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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 21, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a warning of medicine shortages and confusion. nhs trusts criticise a lack of planning for a possible no—deal brexit. calls for tougher regulation of bailiffs, as families fall behind on essential bills. there's a new plan to boost exports. the government says businesses have nothing to lose and everything to gain from brexit. in sport, they're on the attack. sadio mane puts the shine on liverpool's 2—0 win at crystal palace, as they maintain their winning start to the premier league season. and it was a very special delivery, the baby born in a helicopter en route from the isles of scilly. just amazing. every birth is an amazing but this was just a little bit little bit different. light spills of sunshine and i will
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have the full forecast in 50 minutes time. -- 15. good morning. it's tuesday 21st august. our top story: the group representing hospitals and ambulance services in england say they've been left to their own devices to plan for a no—deal brexit. in a letter seen by bbc news, nhs providers say the risk to services is real and warns that drug supplies could run out in the event of a chaotic departure from the eu. nhs england said preparing for every brexit outcome was a priority. our political correspondent iain watson has the details. we will be speaking to liam fox, the international trade secretary later about this, but it is a really fascinating insight from those with no political leanings, if you like. that is right. it is about practicalities rather than politics. nhs providers represents hospitals through england and ambulance services and their letter has been sent to the chief executive of nhs england and to a body called nhs
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improvement, which effectively work in hospitals of. in the letter, they say the risk of a no deal situation is going to —— is becoming likely and has been radio from the nhs on this. in addition, they say it the risk to public services is real and in addition to that, they suggest that without national co—ordination could lead to a situation where we have those stockpiles and shortages of medicines after brexit. they say there are 229 different foundation trusts in england and they have been left to do their own thing, to do their planning in a vacuum without a proper national leadership and because of that effectively they are reinventing the wheel 229 times. they say the lack of communication
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might be, ironically enough, because nhs england light fear that some of this would get into the press. of course, it has leaked to the media today. nhs england say they are working on a contingency plan, working on a contingency plan, working with the department of health. they themselves are not commenting but the cheer of the house of commons health committee is saying that the government must now seek the informed consent of the british people on any final deal that they negotiate with brussels. plenty to think about this morning. we'll be speaking to the international secretary, liam fox, just after 8 o'clock. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is asking the european union to impose extra sanctions on russia in response to the death of dawn sturgess, who was poisoned with a nerve agent in wiltshire. the kremlin has denied any involvement. the foreign secretary is in washington to deliver his first speech since he replaced borisjohnson. speaking to the bbc, he said europe needs to match president trump's actions against russia.
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america has said that within 90 days they will implement sanctions and we have to recognise, that is taking things further, and we have to as europeans make sure that we match that. this happen on european soil. not saying we will do the exact same thing, but we have to make sure that oui’ thing, but we have to make sure that our reaction is to stand shoulder to shoulder with america. there should be tougher regulations for bailiffs in england and wales according to the charity citizens advice. it says it helps someone with bailiff issues every three minutes and that the level of debt for household bills like gas, electricity and council tax has reached £19 billion. 0ur correspondent simon gompertz reports. when bailiffs are called in, charges can escalate and there is the fear that belongings can be taken. with household bills rising, even more people are in danger. in the last five years household debts including
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council tax, energy bills and parking fines have written —— risen by 40%. parking fines have written —— risen by a0%. while problems with bailiffs have tripled to 90,000 a year, and thatis have tripled to 90,000 a year, and that is just complaints to citizens advice of. people are told the charity they are scared to open their doors because of aggressive tactics from bailiffs, even having things removed from their homes while they are ill, which is why citizens advice is calling for an independent regulator for bailiffs. household debt is increasing and referrals to bailiffs is as well. 2017, two .3 million referrals made to bailiffs, the receiving end of that ourfamilies to bailiffs, the receiving end of that our families and households who are intimidated and worried and concerned that they are building up even more debt rather than finding a way out. council say they are protecting vital services like elderly care when they use it bailiffs to retrieve money, even so, the ministry ofjustice is launching a call for evidence on bailiffs and has most to take action if
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necessary. cctv footage has been released of the moment an italian motorway bridge collapsed, killing 43 people. 200 metres of the carriageway in genoa suddenly fell last tuesday. the collapse has led to a fierce debate about the country's infrastructure. the opposition in venezuela is calling for a national strike, in protest at the president's introduction of a new economic plan and a new currency. it comes after he devalued the currency, issuing a new type of bank note. the new notes are not yet available, but all denominations of the previous currency below a thousand bolivars are no longer legal tender. dozens of families from north and south korea have had emotional reunions, as relatives met for the first time in at least 65 years. a group of south koreans, who were chosen by lottery, travelled to a tourist resort in the north for the event which was the first reunion for three years. the brief meeting is likely to be the last and only time many will see each other. it is desperate. you see a father or
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mother haven't seen in a decade and thatis mother haven't seen in a decade and that is it. cases of measles in europe have hit a record high, according to the world health organization, which is calling on countries to take action. 41,000 cases have been reported so far this year, and 37 people have died, compared to 38 people in the whole of last year. more than half of cases have been in ukraine but france, italy and greece have also seen a rise. usain bolt has completed his first football training session with australia's central coast mariners. the olympic sprint champion kicked off his bid to secure a professional football contract at the team's base in gosford in new south wales. 0ur sydney correspondent hywel griffith is there now. it is something. the world ‘s
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fastest man now turning to it and you sport, how did it go? —— turning toa you sport, how did it go? —— turning to a new sport. absolutely. he has nothing to prove to —— as an athlete. but in football, the jury is out. we have seen him play in practice matches and train, but today, his 32nd birthday was the start of his australian and venture. he was told if he can't see he can try to prove himself worthy of that professional contract. he says it is a challenge they are desperate to achieve. he went out, warmed up, sat out of the practice match and at the end of the training he held a press conference in front of the world ‘s media. i asked conference in front of the world ‘s media. iasked him conference in front of the world ‘s media. i asked him whether as a footballer he had anything to offer a part from being very, very quick. beyond being particularly fast, what can you give this team on the pitch? for me, i have said throughout the
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years i am very cool under pressure. that is one thing you have seen from me over the years. i think my ability to understand very quickly and to learn the game is something that i am very good at. i think i see the game very well. i have to work on the basic skills of. i am very good at controlling and stuff like that, there are things that i need to learn and that is why i am here. but i am excited about the opportunity. he says he is very genuine in his desire and bring to bea genuine in his desire and bring to be a footballer. some here saying cynically perhaps this is a pr stunt to put the world ‘s eyes on the a—league and the team that finished bottom last year. the test will be whether he gets that contract and when the season kicks off in 0ctober, whether he is selected to play. certainly exciting. thank you
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very much. a mother has given birth to a baby boy while flying at 1,400 feet inside a coastguard helicopter. emergency crews received a call on saturday night after alicia macdonald went into labour while visiting the isles of scilly. there was no midwife available so she needed to get to the mainland quickly. naomi diamond reports on how the events unfolded. after the drama and excitement of the weekend, a chance for search and rescue paramedic ed griffiths and midwife linda benson to get their breath back and reflect a most memorablejourney. linda breath back and reflect a most memorable journey. linda was drafted in to assist the crew when they were called to a lady in labour on the isle of scilly. she was here and she was puffing on the gas and air and clearly in a lot of pain but she was calm, amazing and i kept asking, you have to communicate through the headsets, it is deafening, communicating and all of a sudden i
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felt like her contractions were coming a lot quicker and then she tapped me and pointed at her water had gone everywhere. so i knew the baby would be shortly behind and sure enough, there was, about three minutes later the baby was delivered. less than two hours after the emergency call was made and at 1400 feet, baby mcdonald arrived. amazing. just amazing. every birth is amazing but this was a little bit different. yes, certainly an unusual shift. i have been in search and rescue for ten years. i have been to all sorts of calls, mountains, out to sea, clips. i have done obstetric emergency, labour type rescues, to sea, clips. i have done obstetric emergency, labourtype rescues, for lack of a better word, but never assisted with the delivery of a baby in the air. the baby and the mother are doing well and the family have thanked everyone involved in his safe delivery. they are heading home to inverness on what they are hoping
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will be a slightly less eventful journey. that is a proper birth picture there. if you have got any stories like that, i am not sure anybody will beat, well actually we have had a classic —— a close in county here. —— encounter. a classic —— a close in county here. -- encounter. i was there when our colleague went into labour unexpectedly. i drove her to the hospital in kind of keystone cops fashion. did you get any towels or hot water? cups of tea, mainly sunnl hot water? cups of tea, mainly sunni. —— mainly for me. hot water? cups of tea, mainly sunni. -- mainly for me. we will have to get some of your stories of. —— stories. dramatic game last night. it was interesting because
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liverpool, even though they beat crystal palace 2—0, they played well. roy hodgson not particularly happy with some refereeing decisions but you have to say liverpool look great. sadio mane scored his third goal of the season deep into injury time to put the shine on a hard fought victory. james milner opened the scoring with a penalty. jose mourinho retains the full backing of manchester united's board, despite their performance in sunday's 3—2 defeat at brighton. mourinho is the bookies favourite to be the next premier league manager to be sacked, but we're told understands that his job is safe. england's cricketers have it all to do if they're to save the third test at trent bridge. virat kohli's hundred has set them a mammoth total of 521 to win, or they'll have to bat for two days just to save the draw. and hollie arnold wins one of two british golds on the opening day of the european para—athletics championships in berlin to complete a clean sweep of major titles. well done wholly.
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—— holly. i've got a brilliant sporting picture coming up injust a second. excellent tea is a head. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. did you say humid? good morning. yes, humid. similarto yesterday. we hold on to warmth and humidity after a missed an murky —— misty and murky start. this front will bring rain to parts of northern ireland and scotla nd parts of northern ireland and scotland later in the day. ahead of it we have moist air flow bringing patchy drizzle, mist and fog and a lot of cloud. through the davis will gradually left. most of us will see some bright or sunny spells. clouding over in northern ireland, western and northern scotland, rain arriving late in the day. the wind
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will pick up for the western isles and northern ireland. elsewhere, light winds. in the best of the sunshine across central and eastern england, temperatures up to 24— 25 degrees. generally 18— 22 and the fresh feel in the north of scotland. 0vernight, outbreaks of rain arrived in western and northern scotland, northern ireland, moving south—east, which could be heavy. a lot of cloud ahead of it and some clear spells for south—east england. another quite muggy and humid night for most with loads of12— quite muggy and humid night for most with loads of 12— 16. —— lows. tomorrow we still have the front working south eastwards. further rainfor working south eastwards. further rain for scotland and northern ireland. that will start to arrive into northern england by the afternoon into north wales as well, maybe the midlands. behind the rain we will see sunny spells and showers. ahead of its on spells of sunshine developing for central, eastern and south—eastern england
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and what we said yesterday, the front is the dividing line between the fresh air to the north and west and the warmth and humidity south and the warmth and humidity south and east. temperatures in south—east england at 26 or 27. behind the cloud and rain, 16 or 17, england at 26 or 27. behind the cloud and rain, 16 or17, so england at 26 or 27. behind the cloud and rain, 16 or 17, so much fresher. that dividing line, the front, works south and eastwards, some outbreaks of rain on that, then by the end of thursday we will all be in the fresh air, really quite cool for northern ireland, scotland and northern ireland, quite a dramatic drop in temperature. 0utbreaks dramatic drop in temperature. outbreaks of rain for east anglia and south—east england thursday morning. it will move south and east with sunshine behind. showers piled into western and northern scotland and northern ireland. let's look into the temperatures. it will be a real difference. 13 for northern scotland, 19— 22 for england and wales, so feeling much more fresh. thank you. see you later. steph hasjoined us. sally is
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knocking about. in the nicest possible way. knocking about! let's look at the front pages. the daily telegraph carries a warning from the conservative peer william hague that if the party changes its leadership election rules, it risks finding boris johnson in charge. a photo of kay longstaff who was rescued from sea after falling off a cruise ship, continues to feature on many front pages. there's also an article about the exam board 0fqual and controversy over results in gcse science. we'll be talking to someone from 0fqual after 8:30am. the sun carries a story about criticism for staff at a hospital in surrey who've been keeping a cat on site. it also has a photo of kay longstaff. so many papers looking into what
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happened to klong —— klong —— kay longstaff. the daily mail is another one to feature kay longstaff on its front page. the main story is about a possible breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment, using a steam therapy. and the guardian carries the measles story which broke yesterday. we'll be interviewing someone from public health england about that in the next half—hour. there's a photo ofjeremy corbyn campaigning in scotland. and the most—read story this morning on the bbc news website, is an article thatjust six percent of us do the traditional working hours of 9 to 5 — flexible working orjob shares are now much more commonplace. i wouldn't have put it at 6%. i would have thought it was higher. i know that we don't do 9—to—5. steph, hello. imagine if your pay went up 300%. that would be nice. at
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the same time everything else in the shops goes up 80,000%. is this venezuela? yes, this is on the front of the ft. they have hyper inflation. this is where prices are going up so sharply they are trying to intervene. they are taking five os off the currency. i have heard a quy os off the currency. i have heard a guy talking about chicken. he went to the shop to buy a chicken and he paid 10 million bolivar and the next day it was 16 million bolivar. paid 10 million bolivar and the next day it was 16 million bolivarlj lived in argentina for a year when they had hyper inflation and it is so they had hyper inflation and it is so destabilising. you go to the supermarket one week and it costs £5. the next week it cost £15. the same shot it will cost £20. it was really destabilising and makes it really destabilising and makes it really difficult. people have to go
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in with bags of money to get a loaf of bread. they are trying to sort this out. they are putting up the minimum wages by 3000%. they are taking five zeros off the currency. but there is lots of... it takes time. if you put up everyone's wages they think they have more money and spend it. it is a complicated situation. very different to the price rises we have seen here it is a couple of% and we go, oh! do you wa nt a couple of% and we go, oh! do you want to see this cracking shot? a little bit of help from dan. the british and irish lions on tour when they had just won against the new zealand barbarians, jones, sam warburton, and look at the veins in their legs. ice packs everywhere. he has a slipped disc. and they won the game. if you feel tired after the
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breakfast shift, spare a thought for these guys. it has been entered for a competitionjust these guys. it has been entered for a competition just to show how tough that game is. they look mentally weary as well. not just physically. have you got something inside? yes, or you asking me or lou? just throwing it out generally. have you seen the story about pockets? no. men have much bigger pockets than women. women have been left out. nothing fits in a woman's pockets. that is because sizes are completely different. what do you have in your pockets? i have a surprisingly large pocket. do you have anything in it? no, i don't like an unsightly bulge. hold on. i have two spare buttons. no, i don't like an unsightly bulge. hold on. i have two spare buttonslj have hold on. i have two spare buttons.” have absolutely nothing in my pockets. they are too small. if you have anything, pass it over, i have whoppers overhear! can you put it in
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your handbag? my wife hates it when i give her my keys, when we go anywhere. yes, yes. quickly, talking about fashion, talk about a mistake, and lexie shen —— alexie sanchez after they were beaten by brighton. the female model was watching him hiding behind a curtain. he has taken it all down and he has deleted it all. has he? yes. only after the victory. thank you very much. the bbc proms has gained a reputation for showcasing new and unique talent, and in another first next week it'll host one of the only disability—led orchestras in the uk. the bournemouth symphony orchestra was formed less than a year ago by musicians who have conditions like blindness, autism and partial deafness. our disability correspondent nikki fox has been to meet them ahead of their debut. rehearsing mozart, an orchestra like no other.
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everyone in this ensemble has a disability and they are about to make their debut at the proms. the group of six musicians were selected from auditions only nine months ago. they all have different disabilities, ranging from hearing loss to autism. james has cerebral palsy and is breaking new ground in the world of classical music by conducting with his head. this is one of ensemble's final
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rehearsals before the proms, where they will be performing this composition, alongside 52 members of the bournemouth symphony orchestra. so everything has to be spot on. one man keeping an eye on rehearsals is alexander campkin. he has used his own experience of living with multiple sclerosis to compose hoping, an intricate six—minute movement. when i was sitting on the audition panel for the group, all of my preconceptions were jsut smashed to the ground, when i realised that we have an absolute wealth of talent and that i could write music as virtuosic and as difficult as i wanted. but one consideration he had to make
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was to incorporate an electronic instrument. you can do a whole octave with very little movement. this is the linnstrument. it has helped charlotte reconnect with music, after she lost the ability to play piano when she was 12. can i have a go? of course. i've been dying. let's hope that within the next 5—10 years that people with disabilities are just the normal part of any orchestra, and people who run them are just happy to adapt. this will be the group's first major performance and will be held in a less formal setting with a relaxed attitude to movement and noise. it is hoped it will notjust encourage concert—goers with a whole range of disabilities but that seeing these role models on stage at the proms, playing world—class music, may untap hidden talent. nikki fox, bbc news. what beautiful music. their
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performance is a week today. love that. thank you already. bright and early people sending in birth stories. a lady gave birth in a helicopter. this is my favourite so far. grant sent one in saying i delivered my first baby when i was stuck in an elevator. we need details. not too many. quite impressive. keep them coming. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. three people have been injured in shooting outside a tube station in north—west london. it happened in brent just
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station in north—west london. it happened in brentjust before 10pm last night. two men, 18 and 24, are still in hospital. their condition is not life—threatening. a 30—year—old woman has been discharged. there have been no arrests. youth violence should be treated like a disease and not like a crime according to one london mp. davies muller says a public health approach has been used successfully in scotland. the home office says it has added to the early intervention fund to help men always from crime. the head of the london fire brigade criticised love island for reinforcing stereotypes about firefighters. he said it was time to end lazy cliches of muscle in and saving women as was shown as part of a task on the show. she says it is putting women offjoining. women have been in the fire service for 33
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yea rs. have been in the fire service for 33 years. i have been in for 16 years. we know that the role has moved on so much. and we want to promote it for all, especially for so much. and we want to promote it forall, especially forwomen so much. and we want to promote it for all, especially for women coming into the service. let's look at the travel situation. the district line is part suspended with no service to richmond and ealing broadway. minor delays on piccadilly line. on the roads, the usual delays northbound after the blackwall tunnel. in colders green, finchley road is closed for a police investigation following a collision. hammersmith bridge will be closed from 7am until 7pm until thursday for urgent repairs. victoria embankment is closed westbound for major gasworks. now for a look at the weather. good morning. we are still in the warm and humid air mass so we have another muggy day. some sunny spells
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developing with the chance of one or two showers. we start the day in some places already around 20 celsius. more cloud this morning. the odd break here and there. sunny spells through the afternoon. just the risk of the odd isolated shower. a lot of dry weather. highs of 25— 26 degrees. through this evening and overnight some late sunshine before the sun sets. overnight it will be dry with clear spells. another muggy and humid night. temperatures not falling far. overnight lows of 13 degrees. tomorrow, another largely dry day, still feeling humid with sunshine and patchy cloud. cabbages up sunshine and patchy cloud. cabbages up at warmer. change on the way into thursday. —— temperatures up warm. sunshine following up behind that. the fresh conditions behind us. i am back with the latest from bbc london in halfan back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on the
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website. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning — we'll speak to international trade secretary liam fox about a leaked government letter from nhs providers who are concerned about a no deal brexit. sprinter usain bolt has kicked off his attempts to become a professional footballer with his first training session at australian side central coast mariners. we'll discuss his chances just after 7:30. singing. and we'll meet the teenager from county durham who's made it to the america's got talent semi—finals. 14—year—old courtney hadwin's fans include the likes of paloma faith and sharon stone. she's amazing!
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here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the group representing hospitals and ambulance services in england say they've been left to their own devices to plan for a no—deal brexit. in a letter seen by bbc news, nhs providers say the risk to services is real and warns that drug supplies could run out in the event of a chaotic departure from the eu. nhs england said preparing for every brexit outcome was a priority. there should be tougher regulations for bailiffs in england and wales according to the charity citizens advice. it says it helps someone with bailiff issues every three minutes and that the level of debt for household bills like gas, electricity and council tax has reached £19 billion. the civil enforcement association says it only collects 18% of the overall debt owed and that bailiffs are trained. a 27—year—old man has been charged with two counts of attempted murder after a woman and her mother were attacked with a hammer in south—east london. the women, who are aged 30 and 64, remain critically ill in hospital. joe xuereb from greenwich, is due to appear before magistrates
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in bromley later. cctv footage has been released of the moment an italian motorway bridge collapsed, killing 43 people. 200 metres of the carriageway in genoa suddenly fell last tuesday. the collapse has led to a fierce debate about the country's infrastructure. dozens of families from north and south korea have had emotional reunions, as relatives met for the first time in at least 65 years. the peninsula was left divided in 1953 after the korean war, with people on the northern side unable to leave. yesterday, a group of south koreans, chosen by a lottery, travelled to a tourist resort in the north for the event. the brief meeting is likely to be the last and only time many will see each other. banks and shops are expected to re—open in venezuela today
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after a public holiday when the government slashed five zeroes off its currency in an attempt to curb hyperinflation. president nicolas maduro has announced a raft of measures to tackle runaway prices. but critics say his plan will do little to repair the economy, and could inflict further hardship on the country. a mother has given birth to a baby boy in a helicopter flying over cornwall. emergency crews received a call on saturday night after alicia macdonald went into labour while visiting the isles of scilly. there was no midwife available so she needed to get to the mainland quickly. torran macdonald was born above penzance in cornwall weighing seven pounds, eight ounces. mrs macdonald has thanked everyone involved in her special delivery. she was clearly in a lot of pain, should she was calm. she was amazing. are kept asking, we had to
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communicate through the headsets, you cannot just talk communicate through the headsets, you cannotjust talk because it is deafening. i was communicating with her and all of a sudden i felt like her and all of a sudden i felt like her contractions were coming quicker and she me and pointed at her waters had gone everywhere. so i knew the baby would be shortly behind and sure enough, there was, about three minutes later the baby was delivered. just amazing. every birth is amazing but this was just a little different. i love that story and i am amazed at how good new mums look. can we see that again? look at the alicia mcdonald, she looks amazing. i have witnessed it on three occasions myself from a distance, i should say. congratulations to her, a lovely story. not everyone looks that good, believe me! they had to communicate via headsets as well. she was
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clearly in a lot of pain. let's start with the premier league and a good win for liverpool at crystal palace, but it wasn't without controversy. their star man mohammed salah was brought down for a penalty for liverpool's first. there is a suggestion by roy hodgson that perhaps he went down a little bit too easily. you can decide for yourself. the penalty was scored by james milner. palace then had aaron wan—bissarka sent off in the second half before sadio mane secured the win in injury time. 2—0 the final score, and liverpool's first clean sheet at selhurt park in nine visits. great three points. i am not sure, it depends
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what you want to see. if you want to see intensity, it was end to end first to last second. we want to see brilliance. a few goalkeeper saves, a few tackles were brilliant. we can play better football. jose's job is safe. that's the message from manchester united this morning. mourinho's under pressure after united's performance in their 3—2 defeat at brighton on sunday. he's now the bookies favourite for the sack, and there have been suggestions he could be replaced by the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane. here's quote from a senior source at the club: "why would we discuss zidane when there is no job available?". that has just come through in the last few hours. for the second time this summer, england's footballers have lost in the semi—finals of a world cup. this time it's the women's under 20s, who were beaten 2—0 by japan in france. it's the furthest england have been in the competiton and they'll play the hosts in the third place play off on friday. england have it all to do
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at trent bridge if they're to avoid a big defeat to india in the third test. they were already well behind, and things got worse when wicket—keeperjonny bairstow broke his finger. he is expected to bat today, but is now a big doubt for the final two tests. england have been set massive 521 to win after india's captain virat kohli scored a century. england will resume this morning on 23 without loss. one of the great things about to get is listening to pest match special. —— test match special. the best bit is when they have to chat amongst themselves. but for some it can mean so much more. have a listen to this email from patrick which was sent to the team at trent bridge. iam going i am going to read out a remarkable e—mail that we have had. from patrick taylor. thank you for writing to us, patrick. he has
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written an e—mail saying, "my dad, john taylor, had, unlike the current england lineup, dug in and battled doggedly to reach 83. he built to his 50s as a pharmacist, father of two boys until unexpected cloud cover descended just as he was looking to break free from the shackles and play with the freedom that retirement would bring. on and ever increasingly sticky wicket, he faced a beamer in the form of leukaemia, parkinson's, the reverse swing of diabetes and was struck down by the vicious bouncer of dementia. but like fellow yorkshireman brian close, he never complained or succumbed to dramatics, he accepted the cards he had been dealt and squeeze every last drop out of life that he could ona last drop out of life that he could on a single by single basis, he is an amazing care team acting as
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runners. on 83, dad finally faced the inevitable, unplayable delivery and left the field of play. i used this critic analogy, says patrick, because tms has been and will continue to be an institution of great importance for our family. as importantly, you managed to allow me to say goodbye to improperlyjust before his passing. and was rushed to hospital on thursday the ninth of august with another bad chest infection. on friday we were told he had 24— infection. on friday we were told he had 24- 48 infection. on friday we were told he had 24— 48 hours to live and in fact he may never regain rig consciousness. on the saturday i visited had in hospital with my wife and after an hour she had eased racial idea of getting test match special on my mobile. afterfive minutes, he opened his eyes and he was completely in the room and a way of our. was able to convey that he was comfortable, he was at peace and i was able to tell him what a wonderful father he is just how much i love wonderful father he is just how much ilove him. wonderful father he is just how much i love him. not one comfortable with
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massive shows of emotion, after 15 minutes he requested that we listen to the cricket. to three hours we listened to chris woakes crashing at lord's listened to chris woakes crashing at lords and make his maiden test century. we got digital radio and in his hospital room to listen to the special the next day and i do think it is any coincident that he passed peacefully just after england it is any coincident that he passed peacefullyjust after england had sealed victory". tough listened. really beautiful and a lovely e—mail to receive. i know the special is important to lots of people. jonathan agnew said he wouldn't have corner through that if he read it beforehand. he had to read it for the first time on air. and so many people who were listening to that yesterday have enjoyed that. that is the benefits of social media, thousands of people can listen to that and cherie. —— share it. thank you. it is 6:41am. the number of measles cases in europe has risen sharply
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according to new figures from the world health organisation, who is calling on countries to take action. more than 41,000 people were infected with the highly contagious disease in the first six months of this year, leading to 37 deaths. in 2017 there were almost 24,000 cases, compared to 5,000 the previous year. more than half of them were in ukraine, but france, italy and greece have also seen a rise. experts blame the surge on a drop in the number of people being vaccinated. dr vanessa saliba from public health england joins us from our london newsroom. argued concerned by this rise? —— argued concerned. we are keeping an eye on it and we have had outbreaks in england. 800 cases at the beginning of the year, compared to 250 cases last year. the outbreaks
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are linked to europe as people travel back and forth and bring the virus with them. tell us a little about measles, we are not accustomed to people suffering from it right now. how dangerous is it? the measles is a very infectious viral illness. it starts off as a bit of a cold, running nose, coughing and sneezing and then you get red, sore eyes, a high—temperature and this rash which starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body. it can be very serious and in some people it can lead to them being in hospital and in very rare cases it can be fatal. there have been 37 deaths in europe this year. it is really important that everyone is aware that it is circulating so that they can protect themselves, all you need do is get the vaccine from your gp and it is never too late to catch up. if somebody is a teenager now and didn't have it in their childhood, they could go and have it? absolutely. about two out of
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three cases we have seen in england are in young people and adults over the age of 15. that is the key message. is notjust a of childhood, anybody who hasn't had the vaccine can get it and it is important that young people in particular call theirgp to find young people in particular call their gp to find out if they are up—to—date. especially if they are travelling to europe or elsewhere or if they are going to summer festivals, where it is easy to spread, or if they are going to start university or college later this year. anyone who has missed out, call your gp, quick and easy and free on the nhs. what would you say to people who had any concerns about vaccines? the vaccine has proven to be highly effective, it works really well to protect you and it is very safe. we know that all we need to do it to stop measles spreading is to achieve very high u pta ke levels spreading is to achieve very high uptake levels of the vaccine. in this country we offer at it to all
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babies when they turn one and the second dose at preschool, so we encourage all parents to take it up at the right time to make sure their children are protected as soon as possible and anybody who has missed out, check with your gp if you are not sure. they will have your records and if you haven't had the doses you can get it for free. records and if you haven't had the doses you can get it for freem records and if you haven't had the doses you can get it for free. it is not just protecting doses you can get it for free. it is notjust protecting against measles, do you think other things will have a resurgence? as you say, vaccine protects against three infections, protections rubella, important for young women before they get pregnant, and also against mum. —— a—league —— mumps. it is important you get the vaccine against those three. rubella is rare because of the high uptake rates and mumps control is good in this country. what we are seeing with measles is a result of the fact that it is
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incredibly infectious. in order to com pletely incredibly infectious. in order to completely control measles and stop it from spreading you need 95% u pta ke it from spreading you need 95% uptake with two doses of the vaccine across the whole population. it is a little bit more difficult to control than the other infections because it is so easy to catch. you say no to 596, is so easy to catch. you say no to 5%, where are we? —— you say 95%. for babies, we are doing very well. we have 95 cents at one days but haven't achieved it with two doses of. we obviously want to do better, encourage pa rents of. we obviously want to do better, encourage parents to get the two doses so that we do achieve the target of 95%. for the young adults, we definitely need to do more to raise awareness to try to get them into gp practices and take the vaccine. vanessa, thank you for your time. thank you for your time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines:
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hospitals and ambulance services in england warn of a lack of contigency planning to cope with a no—deal brexit. the charity citizens advice calls for tougher regulation of bailiffs in england and wales. we are getting loads of fantastic... dramatic birth stories. this is from emma. iwas dramatic birth stories. this is from emma. i was in hospitalfor my c section when i realised i was in labour. it was my fourth child. i was a foreigner for long. i went home. my dad took me to hospital and my water broke. i dropped my daughter off and collected my mum. on my way to hospital i noticed that the head had appeared. my goodness. we were two minutes away so i carried on. then my mother came to my aid. before my father got a maternity team my mum delivered my
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son in the back of the car. thank goodness they picked up her mum. thank you. and not too many details. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. morning. the weather is nowhere near as dramatic as those stories. more of the same. a lot of cloud around for many. still warm and humid. a little more sunshine than yesterday. he is the big picture. we have this front in the atlantic. that will bring rain to scotland and northern ireland later in the day. ahead of it we have this moist air flow bringing patchy drizzle around this morning, misty and murky weather along the western coast, and this will lift. while we will keep cloud through the day, there will be room for bright or sunny spells and maybe one or two showers. cloud is thickening for northern and western scotla nd thickening for northern and western scotland with outbreaks of rain into the evening. the wind will strengthen with the rain across the western isles of scotland, northern ireland. elsewhere, light wind, and
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in the best of the sunshine temperatures reaching 25 or 26 degrees for east anglia and south—east england. widely between 21- 24. in south—east england. widely between 21— 24. in scotland overnight we will see outbreaks of rain sinking south and east, into northern ireland. ahead of it, cloud for england and wales, mainly dry and clear skies for south—east england and east anglia and warm and humid for most of us with lows between 12— 16 degrees. the front is with us tomorrow and it will sink southwards with rain for scotland, northern ireland and eventually through the day the rain arriving into northern england and through the afternoon into wales. behind it we see sunshine developing, one or two showers. ahead of it a lot of cloud. it will thin and break. we will see bright or sunny spells for central, eastern and southern england. as i mentioned yesterday it is a dividing line between the fresh air to the north and the west and the warmth
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and humidity further south and east. in the sunshine temperatures 26— 27 further south and east. behind the rain temperatures in the mid—to—high teens. the front is with us on thursday with outbreaks of rain. most of us will see something. it is a fairly weakening feature. by the end of thursday we are all in these fresher conditions. a noticeable west to north—westerly wind. outbreaks of rain for the midlands, central and eastern england. the rain eventually fizzling out. showers piling into northern ireland, western and northern scotland. elsewhere a good deal of sunshine around. temperatures taking a dip into thursday. widely 13— 15 degrees in scotland and northern ireland. england and wales, 18— 22 degrees and fresh conditions at the end of the week. thank you. see you later. a real divide. the government has launched a new strategy it says will boost the country's exports after brexit. steph's been looking
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into this for us. let's look at exports. what is the situation? we hear politicians talk about exports and that's the way to get the economy growing, sell more goods and services abroad. at the moment, we are the world's sixth largest exporter, which is quite good. if you look at the latest figures on how much it is worth as an economy, it is £620 billion of goods and services that we exported last year and till the end of march. the reason that's a good figure at the moment, it is because the fact that the pound has been low, so it has made products cheaperfor other countries to buy. that has certainly helped. in terms of where things are going, we often talk about how much we trade with the eu, given what's happening with brexit and the impact. if you look at the figures, 60% of services exported outside the eu. so 40% obviously to the eu. if
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you look at goods, it is 52% outside the eu. so 48%. not that far from half when you're talking about goods. that's the situation at the moment. this strategy is aimed at trying to get businesses who could export to exporter of the government have identified 400,000 firms they think could export and that is who they are targeting this out. what else has been announced in this plan? severalthings. else has been announced in this plan? several things. one else has been announced in this plan? severalthings. one is to raise more awareness of the money to help businesses. it is around £50 billion a year which is there to help businesses exporter at —— help businesses exporter. and there is a website to help link people who
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might be in the supply chain of a company that already exporter. so they are the main things. and they will try to create a network of trade commissioners. they will be focused on the politics around this. trying to work with other politicians in other countries to look at how to actually get rid of any barriers there might be with trade, the tariffs, negotiate those things which businesses can't do themselves. so what do businesses make of these suggestions? any help is welcome. there it is a fair amount of cynicism as well. we have heard this before. 2012 i remember announcing george osborne's big plan, the march of the makers, we will get to £1 trillion of exports in 2020, that was abandoned by liam fox trade secretary at cocklebiddy dzeko because they said we just won't get there. —— a couple of
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yea rs won't get there. —— a couple of years ago. i'd speak to people around the country all the time and they say, i don't want to take the risk, i am they say, i don't want to take the risk, iam happy they say, i don't want to take the risk, i am happy with what i have here. i could spend a fortune trying to exploit and it might rule on what i have already. so people are worried about the risk. that is not to say there are not people who want to say there are not people who want to do it. they have just felt that the help hasn't been there for them. the criticism from the federation of small businesses is that there is no new help here. reminding us about the money and creating the new website, that's not really helping. and for small businesses and they need something specific. thank you very much. we will put the points to the trade secretary liam fox on brea kfast the trade secretary liam fox on breakfast at 8:10am. across the country, thousands of young people are nervously awaiting their gcse results due injust 48 hours' time. there are also a few nervous faces here at breakfast hq. that's because,
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earlier this year, naga, tim and jayne agreed to resit their maths gcse as part of our maths challenge series. but what happens to an exam once it's completed and how are grades calculated ? tim muffett has been to follow the journey of his paper to find out. exa m exam over, paper handed in, but what happens to it than? if it was set by the pearson exam board it will end up the pearson exam board it will end up here. all of the exam papers are collected from the 5000 schools around the country and brought here to our processing centre in the north of england. we have a 24—hour
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ata north of england. we have a 24—hour at a seven—day week operation. we have your papers here. let's take them to the processing centre. the scripts have their spines removed. this machine is scanning each page of every single exam paper and digitising it. that's right. we have 12 million scripts that come through every year. then we have approximately 20,000 markers at home around the country. ruth is one of them. this is the online marking screen them. this is the online marking screen where i them. this is the online marking screen where i can see them. this is the online marking screen where i can see the candidates' response. maths gcses like most subjects are no longer mark from start to finish by one examiner. you go in and mark one question at a time. you would go in and mark 50 of that question. you have to work out the size of the angle, which is a good thing generally, and the answer is correct. the answer is correct. 110
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degrees. 320. not correct. and there is no working out. there is nothing we can credit. and why is it a good way to do it? it allows examiners to become familiar with the marking scheme on that question. the evidence shows if examiners focus on one question at a time then marking reliability is better. reactions to the gcse exams were widely posted on social media. many candidates found some papers very hard. people say the gcse has got harder. is that the case? over the last couple of years all of the gcse and a—level qualifications have been reformed. and the qualifications have been made more challenging. what we do when we decide where the grade boundaries are is consider a range of different evidence. our subject experts will look at how they think stu d e nts experts will look at how they think students have found this year's paper competitor last yea r‘s paper. how all of the students have performed. what the average mark has been. what the range of the month
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have been. to make sure if a candidate took last year's paper and achieved a grade for that they would also achieve a grade for this year. it isa also achieve a grade for this year. it is a question then of candidates hoping and waiting. it is probably a bit late now. if you or someone in it is probably a bit late now. if you or someone in your household has taken the gcse is, there are some questions about how things are mark. we'll speak to exam regulators, 0fqual, about how the new grades workjust after 8:30am this morining. if you have questions, send them in and we will try to ask some of them. it can be quite complicated. we will try to get to it later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you with the headlines at 7am. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been injured in a shooting outside a tube station in north west london. it happened on kingsbury road in brentjust
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before 10pm last night. two men, aged 18 and 24 are still in hospital, their conditions are not thought to be life—threatening. a 30—year—old woman has been discharged. so far, there have been no arrests. youth violence should be treated like a disease and not like a crime — that's according to one london mp. labour's chuka umunna, who is a member of the government's serious violence task force, says a ‘public health approach' has been used successfully in scotland. the home office says it's doubled the early intervention fund to help steer young people away from crime. the head of the london fire brigade has criticised the show love island for reinforcing sterotypes about firefighters. commissioner dany cotton said it was time to put an end to lazy cliches of muscle—bound men saving women — as was shown as part of a game on the series. she says it's putting women offjoining. but the brigade wants to see more apply. women have been in the fire service for 33 years.
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i myself have been in for 16 years. and, as we know, the role has moved on so much. and we want to promote it for all, especially for women coming into the service. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line is part suspended with no service from earls court to richmond and ealing broadway. it's a good service on all other lines. on the roads — it's the usual delays northbound up to the blackwall tunnel. quite slow there. in golders green: finchley road is closed just north of the tube station for police investigations following a collision. hammersmith bridge will be closed from 7am until 7pm until thursday for urgent repairs. victoria embankment remains closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. good morning.
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we are still in the warm and humid air mass so we have another muggy day. some sunny spells developing with the chance of one or two showers. we start the day in some places already around 20 celsius. there will be a bit more cloud this morning. the odd break here and there. but sunny spells through the afternoon. just the risk of the odd isolated shower. but a lot of dry weather. highs of 25—26 degrees in light winds. through this evening and overnight some late sunshine before the sun sets. overnight will be dry with a good deal of clear spells. another muggy and humid night though. temperatures not falling too far. overnight lows of 13 degrees. tomorrow, then, another largely dry day, still feeling humid with sunshine and patchy cloud. temperatures perhaps a touch warmer. change on the way into thursday. sunshine following up behind that. the fresh conditions behind us. i'm back with the latest from bbc london
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a warning of medicine shortages and confusion, nhs trusts say they've had "radio silence" on how to plan for a no deal brexit. calls for tougher regulation of bailiffs, as families fall behind on essential bills. more fallout from the troubles at house of fraser. hundreds of warehouse jobs
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could be under threat. in sport, they're on the attack. sadio mane puts the shine on liverpool's 2—0 win at crystal palace, as they maintain their winning start to the premier league season. a very special delivery, the baby born in a helicopter en route from the isles of scilly. just amazing. every birth is amazing, but this was just a little bit different. good morning. for many, another warm and humid day. patchy drizzle around, that will lift and spells of sunshine coming through in places. all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. it's tuesday 21st august. our main story — the group representing hospitals and ambulance services in england say they've had "radio silence" and been left to their own devices to plan for a no—deal brexit. in a letter seen by bbc news, nhs providers warns that drug supplies could run out in the event of a chaotic departure from the eu. nhs england said preparing for every
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brexit outcome was a priority. our political correspondent iain watson has the details. it is clear from this letter that they have got some real concerns of. —— real concerns. they have got some real concerns of. -- real concerns. they are the ones that represent nhs trust and ambulance services and they worried about what will happen in a no deal scenario. they say the risk of that is growing and they worried about a lack of national co—ordination. in their letter to nhs england and to nhs improvement, they say that there are has been radio silence from these groups and the risks of a no deal brexit is real. they are also warning in some areas they could see stockpiles of medicines and other areas there could be shortages of
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medicines after brexit. they say thatis medicines after brexit. they say that is because effectively hospital trusts have been left to their own devices and have had to plan things ina vacuum devices and have had to plan things in a vacuum without national leadership, that means they are reinventing the wheel, as they say, 229 times. what they are calling for is an urgent meeting to sort this out. on thursday the government will be giving more detail about how to prepare for a no—deal brexit, advice for individuals and businesses and i am told it is nhs england and nhs improvement, these bodies that they have written to, there will be more details from them on contingency planning in the event of a no—deal brexit. it opens the lid on some of the practical problems that exist beneath the surface when it comes to making these kind of plans and concerns that people have. nhs officials say they are working with government to do the necessary
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planning for every scenario, but the chairs of —— the chair of the commons select committee says she shares these concerns about a lack of planning and she wants to see what she calls the informed consent of the british people to any final brexit deal. that is a thinly veiled code for a referendum. thank you very much. we'll be speaking to the international secretary, liam fox just after 8 o'clock. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is asking the european union to impose extra sanctions on russia in response to the death of dawn sturgess, who was poisoned with the nerve agent, novichok in salisbury. the kremlin has denied any involvement. the foreign secretary is in washington to deliver his first speech since he replaced borisjohnson. speaking to the bbc, he said europe needs to match president trump's actions against russia. america has said that within 90 days they will implement sanctions and we have to recognise, that is taking things further, and we have to, as europeans, make sure that we are matching that. this happened on european soil. not saying we will do the exact same thing,
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but we have to make sure that our reaction is to stand shoulder to shoulder with america. three people have been injured in a shooting in north london. police were called last night after shots were fired in kingsbury road near the kingsbury tube station. two men and a woman were taken to hospital but none of the injuries are life—threatening. police say no arrests have been made. there should be tougher regulations for bailiffs in england and wales according to the charity citizens advice. it says it helps someone with bailiff issues every three minutes and that the level of debt, for household bills like gas, electricity and council tax has reached £19 billion. the civil enforcement association says it only collects 18% of the overall debt owed and that bailiffs are trained. at least ten people have been killed, and others are missing,
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after flash flooding hit a popular tourist spot in south—western italy. the victims had been hiking through a gorge in the pollino national park in calabria. eighteen people were rescued and the search for survivors carried on into the night. officials say the number of those unaccounted for is still unclear. cctv footage has been released of the moment an italian motorway bridge collapsed, killing 43 people. 200 metres of the carriageway, in genoa, suddenly fell last tuesday. the collapse has led to a fierce debate about the country's infrastructure. banks and shops are expected to re—open in venezuela today after a public holiday when the government slashed five zeroes off its currency in an attempt to curb hyperinflation. president nicolas maduro has announced a raft of measures to tackle runaway prices. but critics say his plan will do little to repair the economy, and could inflict further hardship on the country. usain bolt has completed his first football training session
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with australia's central coast mariners. the olympic sprint champion kicked off his bid to secure a professional football contract at the team's base in gosford in new south wales. our sydney correspondent hywel griffith is there now. thank you so much for talking to us about this, whatever happens, if the career doesn't work out we will talk about it because it is a fascinating step in his sporting career. absolutely. a global superstar. whatever happens, whatever comes of this experiment, i think people will still admire him for his athleticism and his achievements on the track. but can he do it on the pitch? we saw him run out this morning, kick a ball, he didn't take part in the practice match so it shows he has a good way to go. afterwards in a press co nfe re nce good way to go. afterwards in a press conference he admitted he is ready to learn and to challenge himself. he has always liked ball ——
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like football and played it, but can he do ina like football and played it, but can he do in a few to win a professional contract? i asked he do in a few to win a professional contract? iasked him he do in a few to win a professional contract? i asked him what as a player he could offer apart from being very, very quick. for me, i do say it throughout the years i am cool under pressure. that is the one thing, if you have seen me over the years. i think my ability to understand very quickly and to learn the game is something that i am very good at. i think i see the game very well. i have two work on the basic skills. i think i am very good at controlling and stuff like that, but there are things that i need to learn and that is why i am here. yeah, i learn and that is why i am here. yeah, lam learn and that is why i am here. yeah, i am excited for the opportunity. we have seen him train with professional teams before, in germany, norway and south africa, some suggest it is a publicity stunt to bring attention to a—league and
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the club, but bolt says he is keen to prove himself in the test will begin in october if he has a contract and it is picked to the team. —— if he is picked for the team. a mother has given birth to a baby boy in a helicopter flying over cornwall. emergency crews received a call on saturday night after alicia macdonald went into labour while visiting the isles of scilly. there was no midwife available so she needed to get to the mainland quickly. torran macdonald was born above penzance in cornwall weighing seven pounds, eight ounces. mrs macdonald has thanked everyone involved in her special delivery. she was laid down here, head down that way and she was puffing on the gas and air and clearly in a lot of pain but she was calm, she was amazing and i kept asking,
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you have to communicate through the headsets, you can't talk because it is deafening, communicating and all of a sudden i felt like her contractions were coming a lot quicker and then she just tapped me and pointed and her waters had gone everywhere. so i knew the baby would be shortly behind and sure enough, there was, about three minutes later the baby was delivered. many of you sharing your story. one saying that my baby was delivered in a 4x4, she even managed to untangle the envelope or court. this from susie. my auntie gave birth to twins in an ambulance, they went over a bump and she said i think i have had one. the ambulance man looked under the collar and there was babyjohn. while they were sorting him out, andrew arrived. all without paying. if only it was like that. "i think i
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have had one! " if only it was like that. "i think i have had one! thank you so much for telling us your stories. it is 12 minutes past seven. taking you back two a another story we have mentioned this morning. —— to another. households in britain that have fallen behind on their essential bills like council tax and energy owe almost £19 billion, which has led to a rise in demands for help from consumers contacted by bailiffs. the charity citizens advice says it helps someone with bailiff issues every three minutes and is calling for tougher regulation, but the local government association says councils have a duty to collect taxes. we'rejoined now byjoe lane from citizen's advice and russell hamblin—boone from the civil enforcement association, who's in our bristol studio. first of all, we mentioned some of the issues, what other problems has research identified? there is a big
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underlying issue of this £19 billion of what we are calling hidden debt, things like council tax, people falling behind on energy bills. one of the big problems is that when we are in that position people faced severe practices of. that one person every three minutes we are helping, when they get to that position, those collection practices push them further into debt they add on cost and make it more difficult for people to get back on track. that is where you mean by severe collection practices? across the range of that there will be different types of collection practices. if it is your rent in might be getting threatened with eviction. one of the things we are concerned about which stands out is this issue of bailiffs getting sent to people ‘s houses to enforce it gets and the big ones are council tax, when that happens, people can have extra fees added to their debt, that means it actually means it ——
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makes it harder to repay and get back to zero. and people face that really stressful experience of having someone on whether it is contacting them all coming to their door, when they are already in severe financial difficulty. lets talk to the chief executive of civil enforcement association. you work with bailiffs, we talk about that stressful situation, what do you put in place, what measures do you had to make sure that you are not intimidating people for example? the object of the exercise is to actually make contact with people, perhaps understand more about their situation, get them into some sort ofa situation, get them into some sort of a re payment situation, get them into some sort of a repayment plan. it is not about making a visit the first resort, the visit is the last stage of the process after we have tried to contact people with letters, telephone calls, e—mails, text. the whole point is, if you are in debt,
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make contact and we can help you thatis make contact and we can help you that is what we are trying to do. there have been a number of reforms but continually become back to reports where there are concerns about the behaviour of some of your bailiffs. you think there is an issue? the process that enforcement agents, as we called them, formerly called bailiffs, go through, is set out in detailed regulations — at process has to be followed. visit only applies to a small number of people and it is a very last report after we've done everything else we can after we make contact with people and if we find someone who is really struggling finds themselves not able to cope with their finances in a vulnerable situation often that's the first contact with made with that person and it's the bailiff or the enforcement agent who can identify that person and refer them to the council to point out to the council that this person has
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problems and isn't going to able to pay the debt. i see that you're having problems with your earpiece. from the council point of view this is money that is owed and he's talking about the negotiation and trying not to worry people. how else would they get the money? absolutely it is right when someone falls behind on their bills the vast majority of people who come to us will say, help me repay my death, not, i don't want to pay my debt. that's crucial. what we see is when the bailiffs have been called, which happened more than 2 million times last year, so it is a frequent occurrence, that activity is making it harderfor them to occurrence, that activity is making it harder for them to do that, it is adding cost and making it more difficult to arrange a way to repay debt. i don't know if you can tell me but how much does it cost someone if your bailiffs have had to visit them? there are a number of costs and they are fixed by the government regardless of the size of your debt
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and there are three stages. the longer you go without making contact to further the stages go and the cost increases. the original cost is £75 on top of whatever it is, if it is unpaid council tax, parking fines, court fines. we don't collect on utilities and the other things citizens advice identified as household debt. bailiffs are only eligible to collect around 18% of the £19 billion figure of household debt thatjoe has been talking about. the number of people that get about. the number of people that get a visit as a result is even smaller. what is the top end, you talked about the bottom end, what is the top and? £310 in fixed fees if you go through to the point where the baylis says i am taking control of some of your property or perhaps your car “— some of your property or perhaps your car —— bailiffs. with review to
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recovering the cost. there is no cost to the taxpayer, only the debtors. is an independent regulator the way forward? citizens advice has been looking at these issues for decades, seeing the problem with bailiffs, and last year 42,000 people had problems relating with bailiffs and one of the problems is, in spite of the rules in 2014, when people feel they have been mistreated the rules themselves are a 0k, and they set out what the bailiffs can do, but if someone feels the bailiff breaks the rules, it is hard to make a complaint, and if they do that they have to go through the court process to make the complaint against the bailiff and when we help clients we see that is an unrealistic expectation on people in severe financial distress, and we think the independent regulator would help people make sure they are treated fairly when they are in that very severe financial difficulties. thank you very much. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather.
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good morning. another similar deity yesterday. a lot of cloud around. very warm and humid. —— day to yesterday. it is a misty and murky start with moist and humid athletic at. we have a trailing front as we move into northern ireland and scotla nd move into northern ireland and scotland —— humid airflow. it is mainly dry and we lose the misty and murky whether through the morning as the cloud lifts and breaks with bright and sunniest is this afternoon. —— weather. the cloud will build before the rain in the evening and overnight. and the wind will strengthen for the western isles and into northern ireland. elsewhere, fairly light wind and where we see the best of the sunshine temperatures reaching 25 or 26 degrees across parts of east
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anglia and south—east england. quite why the 18— 22 degrees and always cool and fresher in the north of scotla nd cool and fresher in the north of scotland —— quite widely. scotland and northern ireland overnight has the rain as the front moves south and east, some of it on the heavy side. a fair amount of cloud and some clear skies. another humid night with temperatures dropping between 12— 16. the front is still with us tomorrow. it will continue to bring rain across scotland and northern ireland. as it moves south and east we will see some rain arriving into northern england and parts of north wales later in the afternoon. behind the band of rain we will see some sunshine developing and showers. ahead of it still quite and showers. ahead of it still quite a bit of cloud. like today it will break to bring some warm spells of sunshine. we are still in humid air across a good chunk of england and wales. temperatures tomorrow one or two degrees higher. 26 or 27 in
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south—eastern areas and notice the difference behind the band of rain. it is really a dividing line between fresh and humid air. it will bring some outbreaks of rain as we go into thursday. later on thursday the fresh airand thursday. later on thursday the fresh air and really starts to dive down across much of the country. we will all notice the difference in temperature. outbreaks of rain across central and eastern england. some sunny spells behind it. quite frequent in northern ireland and western scotland. notice the difference in temperature on thursday. 13 or 14 in scotland and northern ireland. 18— 22 in england and wales. thank you very much. louise couldn't thank you because she was sipping her breakfast tea. people got cross because occasionally i drink. you know, i am a human. i am not a robot yet. imagine if they knew that there was gin in it. it doesn't smell as bad.
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what is your breakfast of choice? cereal and you get. apologies for being human —— yoghurt.” cereal and you get. apologies for being human -- yoghurt. i have an update on the house of fraser. that is why i have run onto the sofa. it is why i have run onto the sofa. it isa company that has had a fair and not of trouble over the last few months. you will remember injune they announced they we re remember injune they announced they were closing 3159 stores to try to keep the rest of the business going. then it didn't work and you will remember in august, ten august, they announced they were going into administration, and people were worried about theirjobs. a few hours later my —— mike ashley and announced he was buying the house of fraser fonoti million and he said he wanted to turn it into the harrods of the high—street —— house of fraser for £90 million. when it went into administration the company
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owned £1 billion to various people, and now mike ashley bought it for £90 million, which has helped to pay off some of those people, but he isn't obliged to pay off all of the other debt the company has. so the problem is you have loads of suppliers who are owed money. lots of them. you've got liam gallagher's brand, then you've got mulberry as well, and yesterday they announced it would cost them £3 million, so they put out a profit warning. they have concessions in 21 stores employing 80 staff, so the share price fell at one point down 30%, closing at 17%, they saw this fall because of the fallout, and on top
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of this one of the biggest creditors owed money is the company operating two warehouses for house of fraser, they employ 600 people in the warehouse, and they are owed, according to the administrators, £30 million. they are likely to get this money. the unions have said they are worried that the jobs are so under threat. it is the ripple effect. you know, it is good that someone has bought the company. the worry is what happens when the suppliers don't get their money. notjust the big hitters. iwas don't get their money. notjust the big hitters. i was reading that the company that do the dry—cleaning won't get their money. it might be £300,000 but it has to keep them going. thank you for following the journey. it is interesting to see. sometimes we can do the stories and forget about it. it is important that we don't. thank you. see you later. in an increasingly digital age, we often hear aboutjobs that
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are under threat because of technological advances, but there are still staff shortages in some sectors — one of those is the textiles industry, which relies on human skill. our correspondent tomos morgan is at an upholstery company in west yorkshire this morning, which is addressing the skills deficit by training local people to become sewing machinists. good morning. i havejust been watching heather. this is something i wouldn't like to try. i can hardly catch a ball. if i put my hands in a machine they would be chopped off quickly. this place is still thriving. it is a textiles industry thatis thriving. it is a textiles industry that is thriving. a skilled workforce is needed. it is needed to do thejob. cbi said last workforce is needed. it is needed to do the job. cbi said last year there isa do the job. cbi said last year there is a deficit of £45 million. they have to spend the money to train up their own staff. this placejust
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north of bradford are doing something a little bit different. nick soulbury, sorry, forgive me, chris salisbury, your issue is getting young people into the industry, but also getting the skilled workforce you need — how are you getting around it? where finding a lack of interest in machining roles with the young people —— we're. so we are not really getting about it at the moment. we are working with a college who are aligning their courses with industry requirements, which we think is worthwhile, and hopefully it will bring on some young people and train them with some of the skills we are going to need. the main way to get around it is we train people ourselves, so we try and appeal to people that you know you don't need to come in with existing skills. we can help you and train you and bring you on. yes, there is a shortage of interest for young people. the other
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issueis interest for young people. the other issue is you are finding young people don't really want to get into this industry. that is right. there is stigma attached to manufacturing with the images of all victorian workshops and dirty, noisy environments, but we find it is difficult to attract people to machining roles, especially young people. nick, from the british chamber of commerce, there it is an issue with the skilled workforce in manufacturing? they're absolutely is a national issue which businesses are dealing with at a local level —— there. we have introduced radford manufacturing week and the idea is for schools and businesses to work together. as chris has pointed out, keighley college is a college working closely with business to give the courses needed. there is no doubt about it that manufacturing is seen as doubt about it that manufacturing is seen as not so interesting. the reality is there are tremendous jobs
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available in the sector. thank you very much. that is the situation here. time to get the news, sport and the weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been injured in a shooting outside a tube station in north west london. it happened on kingsbury road in brentjust before 10pm last night. two men, aged 18 and 24 are still in hospital, their conditions are not life—threatening. a 30—year—old woman has been discharged. so far, there have been no arrests. youth violence should be treated like a disease and not like a crime — that's according to one london mp. labour's chuka umunna, who is a member of the government's serious violence task force, says a public health approach has been used successfully in scotland. the home office says it's doubled the early intervention fund to help steer young people away from crime. the head of the london fire brigade has criticised the show love island for reinforcing
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sterotypes about firefighters. commissioner dany cotton said it was time to put an end to lazy cliches of muscle—bound men saving women — as was shown as part of a game on the series. she says it's putting women offjoining. but the brigade wants to see more apply. women have been in the fire service now for 33 years. i myself have been in for 16 years. and, actually, we know the role has moved on so much. and we want to promote it for all, especially for women coming into the service. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the district line that's a knock on from overrunning engineering works. it's a good service on all other lines. on the roads, it's the usual delays northbound up to the blackwall tunnel, so quite slow there. in colders green: finchley road is closed just north of the tube station for a police investigation
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following a collision. hammersmith bridge will be closed from 7am to 7pm until thursday for urgent repairs. finally, victoria embankment remains closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. we are still in the warm and humid air mass so we have another muggy, humid day. some sunny spells developing with the chance of seeing one or two showers. we start the day in some places already around 20 celsius. there will be a bit more in the way of cloud this morning. the odd break here and there. but sunny spells on the way through the afternoon. just the risk of the odd isolated shower. but a lot of dry weather. highs of 25—26 degrees in light winds. through this evening and overnight, some late sunshine before the sun sets. overnight will be dry with a good deal of clear spells. another muggy and humid night though. temperatures not falling too far. overnight lows of around 13 degrees.
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tomorrow, then, another largely dry day, still feeling humid with some good spells of sunshine and patchy cloud. temperatures perhaps a touch warmer. but change on the way into thursday. rain clearing through the morning. sunshine following up behind that. the fresh conditions behind us. have a good day. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is just after 7:30am. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the group representing hospitals and ambulance services in england say they've had "radio silence" and been left to their own devices to plan for a no—deal brexit. in a letter seen by bbc news, nhs providers warns that drug supplies could run out in the event of a chaotic departure from the eu. nhs england said preparing for every brexit outcome was a priority. ministers are to reveal more details of their contingency plans
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later this week. so what impact will this really have on the nhs, joining us now mark dayan from the nuffield trust, an independent health think tank. what they seem to be saying in this letter, this is both from hospitals and ambulance services, is there could be a shortage of medicine. is that something, that you recognise? i think there are serious worries in that department. to explain why that is, at the moment you have frictionless trade between the eu and the uk, so you can bring in a medicine from the eu with very few checks at the border. if we have a no—deal brexit, suddenly all of our checks and controls will kick in there and those could be up to 44 different checks on a piece of medicine coming in from the eu. that
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creates delays in its own right and people are worried that it may simply overburden ports, customs services and other niche trying to deal with this, leading to an element of chaos, queues and delays in getting important things in. what sort of important things would be critical? one of the critical things is could be anything, really. even for things manufactured in the uk could require eu components of. ins that concerned me a things with short shelflife is. vital radical supplies which decay into not working after some days, that would apply to radioisotopes that used to detect cancer on imaging scans of. they can decay into the wrong kind of material and are useless. they can decay into the wrong kind of material and are uselessm they can decay into the wrong kind of material and are useless. if this we re of material and are useless. if this were to happen, you could see an effect. the department of health and social care has said we are
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confident of reaching a deal that benefits patients and the nhs but we are preparing for all situations, including in unlikely event of no deals are there is the disruption. are you confident that they are preparing? i think preparations are being done centrally, whether or not that has been communicated, we have heard criticism. i have sympathy for the civil servants trying to do planning because it is hard to plan for a situation of some chaos of. you don't know what might be affected and what won't. you might have heard orders to drug companies about stockpiling and bringing in medicines which are urgently needed. that is drastic action but i think it will be justified. at the end of the day, the only real way to guarantee that the situation remains under control would be to secure that transition agreement with the eu so we can keep going on something like the current basis for another couple of years. what about other
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people who might say that those are scarce stories? —— scare. people who might say that those are scarce stories? -- scare. i would draw distinctions between project fear on the economy and this. these are concrete robins, we know exactly what will have to happen at ports after brexit when medicines have to come in the. i don't understand how you could argue that in the case. there are arguments that we could simply waved all checks on eu imports after brexit, but having imports after brexit, but having imports with no checks is frowned on by international law and raises its own problems. i think these are real issues. thank you very much indeed. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is asking the european union to impose extra sanctions on russia in response to the death of dawn sturgess, who was poisoned with the nerve agent, novichok in salisbury. the kremlin has denied any involvement. the foreign secretary is in washington to deliver his first speech since he replaced borisjohnson. speaking to the bbc, he said europe needs to match president trump's actions against russia.
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three people have been injured in a shooting in north london. police were called last night after shots were fired in kingsbury road near the kingsbury tube station. two men and a woman were taken to hospital but none of the injuries are life—threatening. police say no arrests have been made. banks and shops are expected to re—open in venezuela today after a public holiday when the government slashed five zeroes off its currency in an attempt to curb hyperinflation. president nicolas maduro has announced a raft of measures to tackle runaway prices. but critics say his plan will do little to repair the economy, and could inflict further hardship on the country. coming up on the programme, we'll get the weather with alina. more of your dramatic stories. we have been talking about a little baby born in a helicopter over
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cornwall. a baby boy. we were talking that dramatic birth stories. thank you forjoining in and sending some of yours in, they are extraordinary. did you have any drama? i had a few, but we won't talk about that. shall i change the subject with the sports? i will rescue you from that one. what about your birth? what is the even thinking? sometimes i get halfway through a question and think what am i doing? let's change the subject and talk about the football! let's start with the premier league and a good win for liverpool at crystal palace, but it wasn't without controversy. their star man mo salah was brought down for a penalty for liverpool's first. did he dive? lots of people suggesting that he went down very easily. you can decide for yourself.
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the penalty was scored by james milner. palace then had aaron wan—bissarka sent off in the second half before sadio mane secured the win in injury time. 2—0 the final score, and liverpool's first clean sheet at selhurst park in nine visits. great three points, great game, i am not sure, it depends what you want to see. if you want to see intensity, it was end to end first to last second. if you want to see brilliance. a few goalkeeper saves, a few tackles were brilliant. we can play better football. jose's job is safe. that's the message from manchester united this morning. mourinho's under pressure after united's performance in their 3—2 defeat at brighton on sunday. there have been suggestions he could be replaced by the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane, but here's quote from a senior source at the club: "why would we discuss zidane when there is no job available?". there are problems though for united, have a listen to the former premier league striker ian wright who's been speaking to 5 live.
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interesting words from him there. for the second time this summer, england's footballers have lost in the semi—finals of a world cup. this time it's the women's under 20s who were beaten 2—0 by japan in france. it's the furthest england have been in the competiton and they'll play the hosts in the third place play off on friday. england have it all to do at trent bridge if they're to avoid a big defeat to india in the third test. they were already well behind and things got worse when wicket—keeperjonny bairstow broke his finger. he is expected to bat today, but is now a big doubt for the final two tests. england have been set massive 521 to win after india's captain virat kohli scored a century. england will resume this
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morning on 23 without loss. danny cipriani's been given an additional two thousand pound fine by his club side gloucester. it's after he pleaded guilty to assault and resisting arrest following an incident outside a nightclub in jersey. gloucester have also ordered him to do 10 hours community service, and as part of that he'll spend time coaching local children. hollie arnold and harri jenkins won gold as great britain claimed seven medals on the opening day of the para—athletics europeans championships in berlin. reigning world and paralympic champion arnold set a new championship record to win the f46 javelin final. it's her maiden european title after the event was withdrawn from the last european championships. i don't know if anyone was watching, but we had a very special clip that
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we played from test match special. if you want to watch it and find out what we are talking about, you can find it on our twitter feed. reading out a very special e—mail. find it on our twitter feed. reading out a very special e-mail. it is a tribute to somebody‘s dad and also a tribute to somebody‘s dad and also a tribute to somebody‘s dad and also a tribute to test match special. there is nothing quite like radio? a very personal relationship.” is nothing quite like radio? a very personal relationship. i was always taught that when i started in radio that it taught that when i started in radio thatitis taught that when i started in radio that it is the senior service. any time you want to go back, let us know. i am available! you certainly are now. it is 7:41am. ten years ago the fastest man on the planet, usain bolt, blew us all away at the beijing olympics, winning gold in the 200 metres with a record time. today it's a very different story. he's retired from running and he's about to embark on a new career in football. overnight he trained
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with australian team, the central coast mariners, for the first time. will he be successful? sports psychologist, josephine perry is here to tell us more. interesting hearing the journalist talking to him because they asked what he brought to the team. he brings speed, but psychologically it is completely different playing in a large team. completely different. he is an individual sprinter, he is in control of everything and has com plete control of everything and has complete autonomy over who he works with, what time he trains, his coaches, what race as he does. suddenly he is in the midst of another ten people around him and he has to go to training and everybody else goes to training and he has to be part of that team and watch for other people. some athletes really love that because they feel they are sharing the responsibility of little bit. others get really fearful that they will let people down the. it will be fascinating to see how he approaches it. in beijing, he won
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the 100, 200, the relay, much of the focus was on him in that final leg. psychologically, what is it like to drop from the very best and everybody goes to your event and the one name that might be mentioned is usain bolt, here it is cutting down into a sport where he will be nowhere near the best of the world. starting from the bottom, that will be his biggest struggle. it would be going from a body knowing who you are and everybody watching you and looking at you, to having to fit in and get on with those 11 other guys and get on with those 11 other guys and be part of that team and try not to be the special one, not the one thatis to be the special one, not the one that is being watched, to show that he can do it and has the skills to make it. what is the impact of the tea m make it. what is the impact of the team of having the special one? it has got to be a boost and also slightly intimidating? yes, the culture of the team will change overnight as it will with any new
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player coming in. particularly with a player of that stature and the chemistry is important to have everybody safe working together and enjoying playing. a lot of people switched sports. dwain chambers tried nfl, rugby league, rebecca romero. sometimes it is a desire to just remain competitive, to try and find something we can get that adrenaline rush that you have had for so many years. and if you're self identity is as a sports person, stopping that overnight is going to bea stopping that overnight is going to be a huge change to you. some athletes transition well out of sports, if they have children or started education or training before they retire, they can transition well. others might really struggled to do that when sport has been there everything and they are used to that focus and discipline and lots of athletes struggle when suddenly there is no goal. particularly if
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you are analytic athlete, you have been focusing every four years and that goes overnight... your focus is on everyday on what you eat, what time you wake up, so many things in your life has been dominated. so regimented, to see that go is quite difficult to. ijust regimented, to see that go is quite difficult to. i just think it will be interesting to see how he does. it could either he is terrible. —— it could be that he is. he has had dreams of playing for manchester united, he has played in charity matches but he is not at the level to bea matches but he is not at the level to be a fully fledged football professional. the scrutiny of the world will be up on him. it is a big risk. tell us about psychology, you deal with athletes, how do you prepare them for a big change? it is really learning the sport and learning themselves. if they can see what the sport requires and this is what the sport requires and this is what you have to give it, where are
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the gaps, where can you spend the time focusing and working and what can you use to take into it? really looking at your weaknesses and what you can give to it and where are your strengths. if it is a 50 metre sprint down the line i am not sure anyone can beat him. it will be exciting to watch him. thank you very much. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. as you can see it is misty and murky in places. this is the north yorkshire coast and allah are go and we have bright and sunniest is coming through. this is further south on the east coast —— about an hour ago. we start with mist and about an hour ago. we start with mistand murk about an hour ago. we start with mist and murk m—local out and drizzle. it is warm and humid for many. drizzle. it is warm and humid for n drizzle. it is warm and humid for many. many of us will see some bright or sunny spells. we have this trailing front in the atlantic bringing rain into scotland and northern ireland later in the day.
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ahead of it we are in the warm and humid airflow, bringing cloud through the day. the mist and low cloud will go. we should all see some bright or sunny spells in the afternoon although it will be cloudy for northern ireland and the north and west scotland with rain later on this evening, and some strong wind at the end of the afternoon particularly for the western isles of scotla nd particularly for the western isles of scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, light winds and in the best of sunshine temperatures up to 25 or 26 degrees. quite widely18— 22. fresher feeling in 25 or 26 degrees. quite widely18— 22. fresherfeeling in the north of scotla nd 22. fresherfeeling in the north of scotland with outbreaks of rain sinking south and east through the evening and overnight, into northern ireland as well, then some cloud, but mainly dry. for most it is another quiet muggy and humid night with lows between 12— 16 degrees. so the front is with us tomorrow with outbreaks of rain for scotland and northern ireland and then eventually
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getting into northern england, wales, maybe the midlands in the afternoon. behind it we will see sunshine developing and also some showers. then we have the cloud, so it will thin and break with warm spells of sunshine. very warm in parts of central eastern and south—eastern england but behind the cloud and outbreaks of rain it is a fresh and cool feel with temperatures in the mid—to—high teens. the real noticeable contrast between north—west and south—east on wednesday. as we go into thursday the fresh air starts to dive down south and east so that by the end of thursday afternoon most of us will feel noticeably fresher. still rain across east anglia and south—east england. some sunshine behind it. then the showers piling into northern and western scotland and northern ireland. on thursday it will be feeling quite fresh. thank you very much. we are going back in
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time. it all went a bit low tech at gatwick aiport yesterday after a technical problem. steph's been looking into this. digging out the breakfast whiteboard. someone has been busy. imagine turning up at the airport looking for the fancy display and you see someone looking for the fancy display and you see someone writing on the departure times and the gate number and everything else on this. that is basically what happened yesterday. good morning. instead of the usual display they had people feeling a whiteboard and display they had people feeling a whiteboa rd and shouting display they had people feeling a whiteboard and shouting the departure gates to thousands of people who were there. and of course it is the busiest time to travel at the moment, so to tell us what happened, let speak with a travel expert. let's find out what happened with travel expert simon calder who joins us from plymouth. what went wrong? early hours yesterday morning, a fibre—optic cable belonging to vodafone was
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severed and all of the screens went blank, everything was on the blink, including the airport's app, so, yes, talk about whiteboard and gate numbers, they called it a manual contingency plan that went on through one of the busiest days of the summer until 5pm when they got things working. so how did this affect passengers? did they get this manual operation plan into action quickly? they knew early in the day that things were going to be going a little bit pear shaped. as a result of that, they put this contingency plan into effect, but the crucial thing is that the airlines have to get theirfirst thing is that the airlines have to get their first wave of flight out of gatwick and indeed other big airports between 6am and 8am in the morning and if they don't go on time then things unravel later and so you have the terrible scenes of people being unable to tell where the gate was, whether it was boarding, if it
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is on the last call, and 200 people at least who missed their holiday flights are sadly. easyjet is the biggest airline at gatwick and they said anyone who missed the flight got a free transfer, but terribly upsetting for people, and a reminder of the fact that we rely so much on digital stuff and there is a lot to be said for analogue things. certainly, simon. what about the people you mentioned, easyjet letting people on flights, what about everyone else, will they get compensation, could they get away? we had some delays building up. some flights were delayed because of the problems. of course it is much more frequent that this happens now because in the olden days you might remember we would go to the desk and checkin remember we would go to the desk and check in the luggage. these days you have the boarding pass printed out and maybe on your mobile phone, i hope your battery doesn't run out,
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and so than people have to get on with going straight through security. you look at the screen and if there isn't a screen you are in trouble. so i hope that given this is one of the busiest weeks of the year, probably in their history in fa ct, year, probably in their history in fact, friday will be particularly bad, that everybody has their contingency plan. and wherever you are going as always hope for the best and be prepared for delays and disruptions, and if yourflight is more than two or three hours late then at the very least the airline has to provide you with meals and accommodation if necessary. simon, thank you for talking through that. iimagine thank you for talking through that. i imagine there are probably a lot of airports... inaudible. what happens if your mobile phone ru ns what happens if your mobile phone runs out, you are in trouble?” what happens if your mobile phone runs out, you are in trouble? i have seen runs out, you are in trouble? i have seen that happen to someone. they
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did manage to get something printed out. i could not go without. me neither. i can't handle it. thank you. across the country, thousands of young people are nervously awaiting their gcse results due injust 48 hours' time. yes, good luck to everybody who is waiting. there are also a few nervous faces here at breakfast hq. that's because earlier this year, naga, tim and jayne agreed to resit their maths gcse as part of our maths challenge series. but what happens to an exam once it's completed and how are grades calculated ? tim muffett has been to follow the journey of his paper to find out. exam over, paper handed in, but what happens to it then? if it was set by the pearson exam board, it will end up here. all of the exam papers are collected from the 5000 schools around the country and brought here to our processing centre in the north of england.
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we have a 24—hour, seven—days—a—week operation. we have your papers here. let's take them to the processing centre. the scripts have their spines removed. this machine is scanning each page of every single exam paper and digitising it? that's right. we have 12 million scripts that come through every year. then we have approximately 20,000 markers at home around the country. ruth is one of them. this is the online marking screen where i can see the candidate's response. maths gcses, like most subjects, are no longer marked from start to finish by one examiner. you go in and mark one question at a time. you would go in and mark 50 of that question. you have to work out the size of the angle,
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which is a good thing generally, and the answer is correct. the answer is correct. 110 degrees. 320. not correct. and there is no working out. there is nothing we can credit. and why is it a good way to do it? it allows examiners to become familiar with the marking scheme on that question. the evidence shows if examiners focus on one question at a time then marking reliability is better. reactions to the gcse exams were widely posted on social media. many candidates found some papers very hard. people say the gcse has got harder. is that the case? over the last couple of years all of the gcse and a—level qualifications have been reformed. and the qualifications have been made more challenging. what we do when we decide where the grade boundaries are is consider a range of different evidence. our subject experts will look at how they think students have found this yea r‘s paper compared
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to last year's paper. how all of the students have performed. what the average mark has been. what the range of the month have been. to make sure if a candidate took last year's paper and achieved a grade four, that they would also achieve a grade four this year. it is a question then of candidates hoping and waiting. remember of candidates hoping and waiting. this time last ye. quite remember this time last year was quite tense. good luck to the pa rents quite tense. good luck to the parents and teenagers. we'll speak to exam regulators, 0fqual, about how the new grades workjust after 8:30am this morining. if you have any questions, send them in. while you think about that, let's get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. couple of tea and some toast. weather wherever you are watching. couple of tea and some toastm weather wherever you are watching. couple of tea and some toast. it is a busy time. we will see you for the
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headlines at 8am. it is home-made as well. very nice. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been injured in a shooting outside a tube station in north west london. it happened on kingsbury road in brentjust before 10pm last night. two men, aged 18 and 24 are still in hospital, their conditions are not life—threatening. a 30—year—old woman has been discharged. so far, there have been no arrests. youth violence should be treated like a disease and not like a crime — that's according to one london mp. labour's chuka umunna, who is a member of the government's serious violence task force, says a public health approach has been used successfully in scotland. the home office says it's doubled the early intervention fund to help steer young people away from crime. the head of the london fire brigade has criticised the show love island for reinforcing sterotypes about firefighters. commissioner dany cotton said it was time to put an end to lazy cliches of muscle—bound
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men saving women — as was shown as part of a game on the series. she says it's putting women offjoining. but the brigade wants to see more apply. women have been in the fire service now for 33 years. i myself have been in for 16 years. and, actually, we know the role has moved on so much. and we want to promote it for all, especially for women coming into the service. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the district line that's a knock on from overrunning engineering works. it's a good service on all other lines. in colders green: finchley road is closed just north of the tube station for a police investigation following a collision. hammersmith bridge will be closed from 7am to 7pm until thursday for urgent repairs. finally, victoria
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embankment remains closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge for major gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. we are still in the warm and humid air mass so we have another muggy, humid day. some sunny spells developing with the chance of seeing one or two showers. we start the day in some places already around 20 celsius. there will be a bit more in the way of cloud this morning. the odd break here and there. but sunny spells on the way through the afternoon. just the risk of the odd isolated shower. but a lot of dry weather. highs of 25—26 degrees in light winds. through this evening and overnight, some late sunshine before the sun sets. overnight will be dry with a good deal of clear spells. another muggy and humid night though. temperatures not falling too far. overnight lows of around 13 degrees. tomorrow, then, another largely dry day, still feeling humid with some good spells of sunshine and patchy cloud. temperatures perhaps a touch warmer. but change on the way into thursday. rain clearing through the morning. sunshine following up behind that.
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the fresh conditions behind us. have a good day. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a warning of medicine shortages and confusion — nhs trusts say they've had "radio silence" on how to plan for a no deal brexit. drug shortages and confusion, nhs trusts criticise preparations for a no—deal brexit. calls for tougher regulation of bailiffs as families fall behind on essential bills. more fallout from the troubles at house of fraser. hundreds of warehouse jobs could be under threat.
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in sport, they're on the attack, sadio mane puts the shine on liverpool's 2—0 win at crystal palace, as they maintain their winning start to the premier league season. wow! and we'll meet the british teenager who's the favourite to win america's got talent. another warm and humid today, drizzle around should lift, many of us drizzle around should lift, many of us will see spells of sunshine and we will have the details in 15 minutes. good morning, it's tuesday 21st august. our top story. the group representing hospitals and ambulance services in england say they've had "radio silence" and been left to their own devices to plan for a no—deal brexit. in a letter seen by bbc news, nhs providers warns that drug supplies could run out in the event of a chaotic departure from the eu. nhs england said preparing for every brexit outcome was a priority. our political correspondent iain watson has the details.
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lots of people reacting, some saying legitimate and real concerns, others dismissing it as a scare story, where is the truth? that's right, what is interesting, this comes from the group that represents hospital trusts, that represents ambulance groups, and in effect they say they have not had enough national leadership when it comes to planning for brexit. what they say in their letter to nhs england and nhs improvement, the body which monitors hospital trusts, is the risk to public services is realfrom hospital trusts, is the risk to public services is real from a no—deal brexit, and so far, inadequate communication, radio silence. the warning that there could be bizarrely enough shortages and stockpiles of medicines after brexit. the reason for that is because there has not been active national leadership doing contingency planning for a no—deal
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brexit. these trusts have been left to their own devices, making plans ina vacuum, to their own devices, making plans in a vacuum, which means that some are stockpiling, some areas have shortages, and they have been forced to reinvent the wheel. hard to take stock, but the government says, we are planning for a no—deal brexit, more detail about what that will mean for individuals on thursday when that is released, but the department of health are saying they will be confident there is a deal, they are simply making sure and planning for every eventuality. may seem planning for every eventuality. may seem like scaremongering but what we have here in this letter, lifting the lid on an internal debate about the lid on an internal debate about the practicalities of the planning process and the feeling there has been a lack of communication when it comes to sorting out this issue. the chair of the health committee, the cross— party chair of the health committee, the cross—party committee of mps looking at these issues, dr sarah wollaston, who voted to remain, says there needs to be informed consent of the
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british people on a final "brexit" deal, she is calling for referendum. she too shares concerns about what could happen to the nhs if there is a hard brexit or a no deal "brexit", in her own words. we'll be speaking to the international secretary, liam fox just after in a few minutes' time. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is asking the european union to impose extra sanctions on russia in response to the death of dawn sturgess, who was poisoned with the nerve agent, novichok in salisbury. the kremlin has denied any involvement. the foreign secretary is in washington to deliver his first speech since he replaced borisjohnson. speaking to the bbc, he said europe needs to match president trump's actions against russia. three people have been injured in a shooting in north london. police were called last night after shots were fired in kingsbury road near the kingsbury tube station.
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two men and a woman were taken to hospital but none of the injuries are life—threatening. police say no arrests have been made. there should be tougher regulations for bailiffs in england and wales according to the charity citizens advice. it says it helps someone with bailiff issues every three minutes and that the level of debt, for household bills like gas, electricity and council tax has reached £19 billion. the civil enforcement association says it only collects 18% of the overall debt owed and that bailiffs are trained. cctv footage has been released of the moment an italian motorway bridge collapsed, killing 43 people. two hundred metres of the carriageway in genoa suddenly fell last tuesday. the collapse has led to a fierce debate about the country's infrastructure. banks and shops are expected to re—open in venezuela today after a public holiday when the government slashed five zeroes off its currency in an attempt to curb hyperinflation. president nicolas maduro has announced a raft of measures to tackle runaway prices.
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but critics say his plan will do little to repair the economy, and could inflict further hardship on the country. usain bolt has completed his first football training session with australia's central coast mariners. the olympic sprint champion kicked off his bid to secure a professional football contract at the team's base in gosford in new south wales. our sydney correspondent hywel griffith is there now. we have seen him out and about, looking good. yes, he was relaxed, enjoying himself, he says he likes being part of a team, after so many years as an individual athlete but will he win a place in the first 11, he is here for an indefinite period, training initially with the team in their preseason, hoping to get a place in the squad and a professional contract. we have seen
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this before with usain bolt, training in germany, norway, south africa, professional contract has not come his way, he says it is his boyhood dream and he has something to offer, after the training session, he spoke to us in the media and we asked what he had to offer apart from of course been very quick. throughout the years, i have seen quick. throughout the years, i have seen that i am cool under pressure. that is one thing. if you have seen me over the years, i think my ability to understand very quickly and learn the game is something i am very good at. i think i see the game very good at. i think i see the game very well. i have to work on the basic skills, i am very good at controlling, stuff like that, but there are things i need to learn, and that is why i am here. i'm excited for the opportunity. some see this as a bit of a pr stunt, not just for central coast mariners but for the a league in australia, they
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finished bottom last year, they need a lot of help, could usain bolt be the man? —— a—league. he says is reason for coming here are genuine, he wants to have a life after sprinting and his reputation will probably be untarnished, he has played with a relax look on his face, he wants to stay, enjoying himself and prove that he can be a professional footballer. lots of people will be wanting to watch, thank you very much. a mother has given birth to a baby boy in a helicopter flying over cornwall. emergency crews received a call on saturday night after alicia macdonald went into labour while visiting the isles of scilly. there was no midwife available so she needed to get to the mainland quickly. torran macdonald was born above penzance in cornwall weighing seven pounds, eight ounces. mrs macdonald has thanked everyone involved in her special delivery. she was clearly in a lot of pain, but she was as calm as. she was amazing and i kept asking... we had to communicate through headsets. you can't just talk
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because it is deafening in here. so i was just communicating with her and saying and then all of a sudden, i felt like her contractions were coming a lot quicker and then she just sort of tapped me and pointed and her waters had gone everywhere, so i knew the baby would be shortly behind. and sure enough, there it was. about three minutes later, the baby was delivered. just amazing. every birth is amazing, but this was just a little bit different. thank you so much for all of you who have been in touch about dramatic birth stories. we opted for a homebirth for our third, the baby was late, i missed muse at wembley and my friend phoned from the gig with newborn playing in the background! i practice self hypnosis, says another lady, i ran out of time to get to the hospital because i was so relaxed. we had to run to the hospital. my late sister was born in nash point lighthouse,
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wales, only one car in the village, my mum had been taken to hospital to prepare for the above, my sister was born in the lighthouse, because we did not have time to get the rest of the family to the hospital at the same time! basset! thank you very much for getting in touch, goodness me. “— much for getting in touch, goodness me. —— classic. last year, exports from the uk rose to a record high of £620 billion. the international trade secretary liam fox says he wants those numbers to rise. launching his new export strategy later, he will say britain could be a 21st—century exporting superpower. but small businesses are calling for more financial incentives like grants and export vouchers. let's discuss this with dr fox, who joins us from westminster. thank you for coming on the programme, will be lovely to get more detail on this, we mentioned there, exports to the uk —— from the uk are at a record high, how will things be improved? the global
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economy is growing quite quickly at the present time, notwithstanding the present time, notwithstanding the global financial crisis, global trade has doubled between 1997 and 2017. the imf say that 90% of global growth in ten to 15 years will be outside continental europe. clearly britain must prepare itself to be where the markets are, we have been having this discussion with business, and what we need to do as governments to help his misses take that leap of faith to get into that exporting market. a lot of them have already done so, we have identified around 400,000 businesses who could bea around 400,000 businesses who could be a exporting but are not doing so. we have been having this decision over re ce nt we have been having this decision over recent months, what can we do to the system in this process. we talked to a lot of those businesses, lots of them say, you say they could be exporting, a lot of them say there is a huge risk involved in that and we are happy with what we are doing with our business model and don't want to get involved in
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that huge risk, that the costs would bring about, how do you convince those tojoin bring about, how do you convince those to join the export brigade? very many more than the number you mention say they would like to export, but they have concerns, anxieties about doing that, and what they told us was for things, they wanted us to inform them better, about what the export opportunities were, and how we can help them getting into specific markets and understanding those markets, updating our great website, today it has 1700 —— updating our great website, today it has 1700 -- 1750 updating our great website, today it has 1700 —— 1750 export opportunities, we want that to be in the tens of thousands. secondly, how can we better connect? what businesses want to do, i am going to china later today, one of the things we will be discussing is opening up the dairy market to uk products, thatis the dairy market to uk products, that is a great advantage to uk farmers. the next thing, how can we be insured that we get the finance, the finance last year made 78% of
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its agreements with small businesses, rather than big businesses, rather than big businesses, encouraging them. perhaps the most important thing was, they said we don't necessarily wa nt was, they said we don't necessarily want to be told by government how to do things, we would like to be able to talk to companies like ourselves. products like bar selling into the same market, setting up through the department mechanisms to do that, including an online community. so businesses can talk to peers about businesses, experiences, successes, problems they have had. this is from the federation of small businesses, with regard to brexit they say, the clock is ticking, if financial in the centres are not introduced, there is a risk that the current uncertainty will have a serious detrimental impact on the growth of small businesses. —— financial incentives. this seems to be an issue, the lack of specific detail, the lack of clarity when it comes to the lack of clarity when it comes to the effects of brexit and this is the effects of brexit and this is the federation of small businesses making the point. we understand we
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need to get an agreement, it will remain an important market, but, there is a world beyond europe, and there is a world beyond europe, and there is a time beyond brexit, and competitors do not plan in a two or three year cycle, they planned for 20, 30 years, three year cycle, they planned for 20,30 years, in terms of global markets, the growth in the global economy, if 90% will be beyond europe, we need to look to the world beyond europe. that does not mean europe will not continue to be an important market for the united kingdom, it is, it is around 43, 40 496 kingdom, it is, it is around 43, 40 4% of exports, so we want to get an open and comprehends the, but we need to understand that the big growth in the global economy will be in asia, africa, south america. you say there is life beyond brexit but these businesses, people are going through this at the moment, these are genuine concerns about what will happen in the future, turning attention to the letter we have been talking about: you say there is life after brexit,
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iam you say there is life after brexit, i am talking about the concern is happening now and genuine worries and this is in the public sphere, not a political statement, concerns about the day—to—day running of something as important as the health service. how do we get medicines? what happens if there is no deal and we have to pay extra paris on medicines? —— extra tariffs. we have to pay extra paris on medicines? -- extra tariffs. the government will be setting out technical notices covering areas like that but we do not want no deal, we want a deal with the eu and thatis deal, we want a deal with the eu and that is also being seen in a global context. i have not long comeback from japan. if as a result of any brexit agreement we introduce new impediments to trade across europe, there are lots of other places where international investors can take their money. this is a question for their money. this is a question for the whole of europe and the real
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choice here is, is it going to be a people's grexit about prosperity or bureaucrat's brexit? —— people's brexit. we want it to be about people and trade in a global context so we people and trade in a global context so we maintain the prosperity into the longer term, but if the bureaucrats decide it is about political ideology, that is to everyone's disadvantage. you mentioned no deal, last month he said it would be better to leave the eu with no deal than to extend talks past the march deadline, do you still believe that? i still think we should leave the eu, as we promised, that we will do what we promised not to stay in the customs union and single market, and that we will ensure we get a full and comprehensive agreement with the eu giving us maximum advantage in terms of access to the european economy but not tying our hands in terms of
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future opportunities as the country, that still remains the government policy. good to talk to you international trade secretary, liam fox, more detail on the nhs letter we have been talking about this morning and brexit more generally as well. iam well. i am conscious well. i am conscious some well. i am conscious some of you are still on holiday, is there going to be sunshine? this is west sussex, but not eve ryo ne this is west sussex, but not everyone seeing this is west sussex, but not everyone seeing sunshine this morning. this is south—east wales in the last hour. a real mixture. the mist and low cloud and drizzle will gradually lift. warm and humid for most. the bigger picture, trailing front out in the atlantic bringing outbreaks of rain in parts of scotla nd outbreaks of rain in parts of scotland and northern ireland later and ahead of it, moist and humid air
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flow, but that will slowly lift, so through the day, the cloud trying to thin and break, warm spells of sunshine for many, but the cloud will build in northern ireland and scotla nd will build in northern ireland and scotland later, outbreaks of rain here in the evening. the wind strengthening as well particular for the western islands and northern ireland. most places having a mini dry day and in the sunshine, up to 24, 20 six. —— dry day and in the sunshine, up to 24,20 six. —— mainly dry day. overnight, scotland and northern ireland outbreaks of rain pushing him from the north—west, some could turn heavy for a time. ahead of it, mainly dry, a lot of cloud. maybe clearer skies for south—east england and east anglia. for many, and a vision muggy and humid night. the front is still with us tomorrow morning —— a mainly muggy and humid
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night. rain arriving in parts of northern england and wales and the midlands in the afternoon. behind the rain, spousal sunshine coming through, showers. ahead of it, cloud, but sending and breaking, warm spousal sunshine, warm and humid air. behind it, coolerand fresher. we will all see the fresher air by thursday. 26, 27 potentially in the south—east on wednesday afternoon. slowly the fresher air diving down south and east through thursday. still outbreaks of rain on thursday. still outbreaks of rain on thursday over south—east england, the midlands, east anglia. behind it, sunshine. showers are western scotla nd it, sunshine. showers are western scotland and northern ireland in the afternoon. everywhere much fresher by thursday afternoon. thank you very much indeed. enjoy the sunshine, if you have it. we have been talking a lot about
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house of fraser. staff was saying, covering a big story, then there is the fallout from the big story, that is what we are doing. —— steph was saying. i have talked about it a lot. injune, we talked about 31 stores being closed out of 59, because of the fact that they had been struggling, as a lot of retailers have, so they were the stores they identified as being the ones not making the money. this did not help them so in august, the company went into administration. a few hours later, mike ashley, the owner of sports direct, he bought house of fraser for £90 million. owner of sports direct, he bought house of fraserfor £90 million. he has since said he wants to try to keep the majority of the stores open and we have found out in the last ten minutes the flagship oxford street store is definitely going to
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stay open, handshakes being done outside, the idea being they want to make it the harrods of the high street. the problem you have this one mike ashley bought the company, it was in a lot of debt. that is debt he is not obliged to pay. the effect very much is all of the companies who supply house of fraser and there are lots of them, more than 1000 suppliers. it is everything from, as you mentioned, the small companies who have done the small companies who have done the laundry, right up to the company operating the warehouses. there are concerns now because they are owed £30 million according to the administrators by house of fraser and this is money they are probably not going to get back and now the unions say, what about the 600 people working there? huge amount of money for them. other companies as well, well brands like mulberry,
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posh designer handbags, and they say they have lost about £3 million because of this and they have filed a profit warning yesterday causing the share price to fall. it is the ripple effect of the fact they do not have to pay the debt, mike ashley. the money he paid to buy the company has contributed to some of the debt but that has gone to other banks and the bondholders, not the suppliers. that is where the story continues, and i will follow it. the serious impact on so many different people. thank you, steph. the bbc proms has gained a reputation for showcasing new and unique talent, and in another first, next week, it'll host one of the only disability—led orchestras in the uk. the bournemouth symphony orchestra resound ensemble was formed less than a year ago by musicians who have conditions like blindness, autism and partial deafness. our disability correspondent, nikki fox, has been to meet them ahead of their debut. rehearsing mozart, an orchestra like no other.
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everyone in this ensemble has a disability and they are about to make their debut at the proms. the group of six musicians were selected from auditions only nine months ago. they all have different disabilities, ranging from hearing loss to autism. james has cerebral palsy and is breaking new ground in the world of classical music by conducting with his head. this is one of ensemble's final
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rehearsals before the proms, where they will be performing this composition, alongside 52 members of the bournemouth symphony orchestra. so everything has to be spot on. one man keeping an eye on rehearsals is alexander campkin. he has used his own experience of living with multiple sclerosis to compose hoping, an intricate six—minute movement. when i was sitting on the audition panel for the group, all of my preconceptions were just smashed to the ground, when i realised that we have an absolute wealth of talent and that i could write music as virtuosic and as difficult as i wanted.
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but one consideration he had to make was to incorporate an electronic instrument. you can do a whole octave with very little movement. this is the linnstrument. it has helped charlotte reconnect with music, after she lost the ability to play piano when she was 12. can i have a go? of course. i've been dying. let's hope that within the next 5—10 years that people with disabilities are just the normal part of any orchestra, and people who run them are just happy to adapt. this will be the group's first major performance and will be held in a less formal setting with a relaxed attitude to movement and noise. it is hoped it will notjust encourage concert—goers with a whole range of disabilities but that seeing these role models on stage at the proms, playing world—class music, may untap hidden talent. nikki fox, bbc news. beautiful music. they will be
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performing next week, the bournemouth symphony orchestra, they make their debut on monday at the proms. you can listen live on bbc radio 3. talking about amazing birth stories inspired by the woman who has given birth ina inspired by the woman who has given birth in a helicopter over penzance, a lovely baby. so many questions about house of fraser as well, many topics we are talking about, and something else on your minds, gcses, how does the branding work. i know some of you will be having results, pa rents some of you will be having results, parents awaiting the results as well, but time now to get another mile and maggie started the
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day across many parts of england and wales, like yesterday, a lot of cloud, drizzly outbreaks. it will get brighter throughout the day, especially for england and wales. —— mild and muggy. good spells of sunshine, it will feel pretty warm, further north and west, cloud more stubborn across scotland, to northern ireland, a few showers moving in and cloud thickening as we head into the evening hours and the far north—west. largely dry and fairly bright this afternoon, for most, temperatures up to 21 to 26 degrees. across south—east of england. tonight, rain will move into scotland, through northern ireland, heavy pulses of rain for a time, staying dry, quite mild, quite muddy for england and wales, temperatures 14 to 17 degrees. a bit fresher further north and west.
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during wednesday, this band of rain will move south and east, as it clears scotland and northern ireland it will be drier and brighter into the afternoon, that when will push into wales, northern england, the south of that, staying warm and muqqy' south of that, staying warm and muggy, temperatures once again into the mid—20s. fresher feel. muggy, temperatures once again into the mid—20s. fresherfeel. that weather front will continue to spread into the south—west of england as we get into thursday, another weather system behind that introducing much cooler conditions. notice the orange turn to blue, as we go through thursday, by the end of the day, all of us under those fresher conditions. there is the rain initially in the south—east, could last for a little part of the day, then the other band of rain moving into the far north—west. temperatures 15, 16 degrees, temperatures still up into the 20s, just about, mostly, temperatures dropping down quite considerably, 18
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to 22 degrees. that is all from me. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and sally bundock. the world's biggest miner, bhp billiton, sees a 37% drop in net profit. we dig into the numbers to find out what drove earnings lower. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday, 21st august. fears over trade wars and a slow down in the biggest users of raw materials. china are fanning fears that the industry could see more rocky times ahead. also in the programme: president trump accuses beijing of currency manipulation to combat us tariffs on some chinese products,
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