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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 28, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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good morning, it's tuesday, it's 9am. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. we bring you an exclusive report from the worst refugee camp in the world — that's how aid officials describe moria camp in greece. we've been given rare access and found appalling, overcrowded conditions and deadly violence. aid workers tell us it has has led to children trying to take their own lives. we have children as young as ten years old who have tried suicide, and there are no child psychiatrists or psychologists on this island. the exclusive film at 9.15am. half of nhs england maternity wards turned away expectant mums last year, new figures reveal. one hospital was closed to mums—to—be 33 times, mostly because there weren't enough staff. we will be looking at what is causing the crisis and the risk it presents to pregnant women. and theresa may's on a mission. the prime minister is in africa to woo business leaders and governments. in the wake of brexit, mrs may wants us to become one of africa's
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hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. we want to hear from your this morning if when you were in labour, you were forced to go to a maternity unit or hospital that wasn't local to you because your own was temporarily closed. do get in touch on that, we will be talking more about it after 9:30am. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... it's been described by one charity as the worst refugee camp on earth. this programme has been given exclusive access to the moria camp on the greek island of lesbos where according to aid officials,
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children as young as ten are attempting to take their own lives. the camp is currently home to around 8,000 migrants and refugees despite having only been built as temporary accommodation for 2,000 people. the charity medecins sans frontieres say the camp is plagued with violence, overcrowding, and appalling sanitary conditions. the overcrowding is a result of the eu 5 2016 deal with turkey which banned most from leaving the islands to apply for asylum on the mainland. we'll have a full report from inside the camp later on the programme. that is at 9:15am. also in the news this morning... police in the west midlands have made a direct plea to a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter. detectives want to question janbaz tarin over the stabbing of his ex—partner, raneem 0udeh, and her mother, khaola,
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in solihull yesterday. jenny kumar reports. a mother and her daughter stabbed to death. raneem 0udeh was 22 years old. her mother, khaola saleem, was 49. their families say they're devastated by their loss. officers are searching for raneem 0udeh‘s former partner in connection with the murders. they're appealing to 21—year—old janbaz tarin to hand himself in. the police discovered the women with serious stab wounds here in the early hours of monday morning. they were confirmed dead at the scene near the family's home. lived in solihull for my whole life, never had anything like this happen so close to home. really shocking for me, you know. with the children here and... i don't know what to do. officers have been carrying out forensic tests and house—to—house inquiries, but the main focus is finding mrtarin. west midlands police say if anyone is found to be shielding him, they will be prosecuted,
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but they are warning people not to approach him. jenny kumah, bbc news. joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. theresa may has landed in cape town for her first visit to africa as prime minister. her three—day tour of africa is expected to focus on plans to significantly increase britain's investment in africa after brexit. after south africa, mrs may will travel to nigeria and kenya to discuss trade and security. she will also say she is unashamed about ensuring the money the uk spends on aid in africa benefits britain too. president trump has announced that flags at the white house and public buildings across the united states will be lowered to half—mast once more, in honour of senatorjohn mccain, who died on saturday. mr trump, who had clashed repeatedly with mr mccain, faced heavy criticism after flags at some federal buildings were raised yesterday, far earlier than would
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normally be expected. several people have been injured in violence in the eastern german city of kemnitz. antifascist demonstrators clashed with far—right activists who were protesting after the arrest of a syrian and an iraqi man on suspicion of murder. andrew plant reports. the east german city of chemnitz, in front of its karl marx memorial, several thousand demonstrators chanting anti—immigration slogans. police reported seeing hitler salutes too. tensions here are high after a german man was stabbed on sunday. a syrian and an iraqi man were arrested and a wave of anti—immigration protest took to the streets. translation: now is the time to remain calm and level—headed. the police are investigating and the prosecuting authorities are doing theirjobs. chemnitz will not allow the perpetrators of violence and anarchists to run rampant on our streets. we will enforce the rule of law.
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flowers have been laid where the 35—year—old man was stabbed to death. in the hours after the killing, far—right groups took to social media to call for public demonstrations against immigration. translation: it does exist, the right—wing extremist scene which rears its head every once in awhile. there is also a certain mixture of different groups. for example, football fans. in chemnitz, counter demonstrators called for calm and tolerance. there are reports that immigrants have suffered abuse in the city in the wake of the stabbing. chancellor angela merkel said germany would not tolerate vigilante justice. local prosecutors said the two suspects were still being questioned. andrew plant, bbc news. hospital doctors are calling for the head of the general medical council to stand down over his handling of a paediatrician who was struck off. dr hadiza bawa garba was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter after six—year—old jack adcock died
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in 2011, but she won her bid to be re—instated earlier this month. the gmc said that it was frequently called upon to make difficult decisions to protect patient safety. air pollution can lead to a reduction in intellegence, according to new research. academics in china found that high levels led to significant drops in test scores for language and arithmetic. the average impact was the equivalent of having lost a year of education. testing of the online registration process for eu citizens who want to live and work in the uk after brexit is getting under way. up to 4,000 people in the north—west of england are being recruited for the trial — among them, nhs workers, university staff and students. the home office will monitor how smoothly the system works before it is officially launched later this year. sofia bettiza reports. brexit is only a few months away and the home office is planning ahead. they've asked nhs workers, university staff and students
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in the north—west of england to make real applications for settled status. so today, the very first eu nationals will officially apply to remain in the uk legally. up to 4000 of them. the eu settlement scheme consists of three key steps that can be done online. applicants will have to... prove their identity. show they live in the uk. and declare any criminal convictions. the uk faces the enormous task of registering the more than 3.8 million eu citizens who live in britain over the next three years. and there have been concerns the home office lacks the resources to cope with the task. what we really need is a lot of outreach work to be done on the part of the home office, as well as a lot of local support,
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to indeed support people through the application process to ensure that as many applicants as possible get through the process in time and are not left without any paperwork by the time the transition period ends. so this trial will be closely watched to see how smoothly it handles registrations before it officially launches later this year. sofia bettiza, bbc news. now to cape town were theresa may is with the trade delegation. we were listening. dreaming of a country in which the colour of your skin made no difference to your rights and opportunities. foremost among them was of course nelson mandela. as the world marked the 100th anniversary of his birth earlier this year, a memorial to the great man was unveiled in westminster abbey. it
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sits alongside tributes to the kings and queens, poets and scientists who have shaped my nation's history. a fitting recognition of the lasting impact he made on the world. his walk to freedom and that of south africa was long and arduous but 28 yea rs africa was long and arduous but 28 years ago, barely a mile from here at cape town's city hall, he spoke for the first time following his release from decades behind bars. four years later on grand parade, the newly inaugurated president of south africa spoke of his election not as a victory of party but of people, of the power of democracy and the necessity of unity, equality —— of unity of the quality of universal rights. he spoke of the need to reform south africa's
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economy too, his desire to change south africa from a carpentry in which the majority lived with little hope the one in which they can live and work with dignity —— from the country. with a sense of self—esteem and confidence in the future, building a better life of opportunity, freedom and prosperity. it was a bold vision, one shared not just by millions of south africans but hundreds of billions of people across the world. people including kofi annan. his unlikelyjourney from ghanaian suburbs to global leadership took a very different route to that of mandela. yet like yourformer president, his impact, influence and values spread well beyond the borders of his beloved homeland. and like mandela, the world is a poorer place for his passing but all the richerfor world is a poorer place for his passing but all the richer for his legacy. the life stories of these two creighton encapsulates that ebbs
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and two creighton encapsulates that ebbs a nd flows two creighton encapsulates that ebbs and flows of history. they demonstrate how much can be achieved over the course of a lifetime. but also that progress can never be taken for granted, the fight to secure our games is taken for granted, the fight to secure our games is constant. —— gains. mandela was born in a world on the brink of peace with the war that was meant to end all wars. the dreams of a lasting peace was shattered once again claiming millions of lives including many from this continent. it was in the aftermath of this devastation that the united nations on that the organisation that half a century later kofi annan would go on to lead, was founded. despite mistakes along the way and false starts, global institutions and cooperation established in this period have delivered great games for development. it was at the same time
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that independence movements of a generation of new nations took on a renewed urgency. people won the right to self—determination, constitutions were written and countries were born. the embrace of free markets and free trade which accelerated further with the end of the cold war have acted as the greatest agent of collective human progress the world has ever seen. in those countries that have successfully embraced properly regulated market economies, life expectancy has increased and infant mortality fallen. absolute poverty has shrunk and disposable income grown. access to education has widened. rates of illiteracy plummeted. innovative technologies have transformed lives. the progress we have made over the past century
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is remarkable. the opportunities for the next generation even more so. but to deliver on that promise, we need to recognise new challenges. as warand need to recognise new challenges. as war and state —based conflicts have declined, it has been replaced by new threats. in the past five years, terrorists have killed around 20,000 people in africa. from the 2013th siege in nairobi's shopping centre, the last year's horrific truck bombing in mogadishu, whether in europe or africa, non—state actors are threatening our lives and radicalising our people. maligned state activity is on the rise, from cyber attacks on institutions to chemical weapons on the streets of the uk and syria. while free trade and globalisation have brought huge
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benefits, they have not been felt by eve ryo ne benefits, they have not been felt by everyone and to many of our citizens fear they will be left behind. from the great financial crisis of 2008, to the advent of artificial intelligence replacing human labour, people are questioning the model of economic development we seek to defend. the capacity for governments old and new to provide the answers challenged. for some this lies in seeking to resist change, rebuilding the barriers to trade, viewing zero competition —— viewing global competition —— viewing global competition as a zero—sum game and i disagree because these are not challenges faced by a single nation alone. that ideology that inspires vicious terrorist attacks does not respect borders. a chemical weapons attack does not only harm its
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victims but weakens the rules that protect us all from such behaviour. ina more protect us all from such behaviour. in a more connected world, we must all deal with the consequences for good and ill, of increased mobility, not just through people good and ill, of increased mobility, notjust through people and migration flows but also data and ideology. we should recognise that cooperation and competition are not opposites. they can be mutually reinforcing. now is the time for the nations of the world come together. to cooperate, the few international cooperation is a process to which both sides can benefit. the work as partners, sharing our schools, our experience and our resources, to tackle the challenges we face. to contain and forces shaping the world, and to deliver prosperity, security and success for all people. this week, i'm visiting three
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countries, south africa, nigeria and kenya. i regard them as key partners in achieving this goal. with thriving democracies and strong international ties, including through the commonwealth, and fast, changing economies, they are typical of 21st—century africa, and africa very different to the stereotypes that dominated previous centuries, and that some people still believe even today. in 2018, five of the world's fastest growing economies are african. the continent's total gdp could well doubled between 2015 and 2030. by 2050, a quarter of the world's population and a quarter of the world's consumers will live here. from the western cape to the mediterranean, stories of increasing stability, growth, innovation and hope. south africa, for so long blighted by the evils of apartheid,
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is free, democratic and home to one of the continent's largest economies. in cote d'ivoire, united nations peacekeepers have gone home and gdp is growing three times faster than in europe. in ethiopia. for a generation of british people it was often associated only with famine, and it is fast becoming an industrialised nation, creating a huge number of jobs and industrialised nation, creating a huge number ofjobs and establishing itself as a global destination for investment. yet in a situation similarto investment. yet in a situation similar to nations around the world, progress has not been uniform. as well as emergent democracy is growing economies, africa is home to the majority of the world's fragile states, and a quarter of the world's displaced people. extremist groups such as boko haram are killing thousands. africa's ocean economy, three times the size of its land
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mass, is under threat from plastic waste and other pollution. most of the world's boost people —— most of the world's boost people —— most of the world's boost people —— most of the world's poorest the africans and there has been rising inequality within and between nations. much of nigeria is thriving, for example, with people enjoying the fruits of a resurgent economy yet 87 million nigerians live on less than $1 90 per day making at home to more very free sackable than anywhere else in the world. theresa may speaking in cape town as part of a three—day mission to south africa, nigeria and kenya. the aim of the visit is to deepen economic and trade ties with those african economies she was describing there. the nations she was describing as having good strong prospects of next decade or so. that brings an end to the latest bbc news. i will have more later. back to victoria. thank you. i will bring
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you the sport from damian at the bbc sport centre. manchester united got hammered 3—0 last night. you were at the game — how bad were they? well, bizarrely, manchester united could have been in front at half—time. they created a number of clear chances and missed them all but after the break everything went wrong for them. arry kane opening the scoring five minutes into the second half. lucas moura got the second, and then added a third as spurs absolutely dominated in the second half. outpacing the defence. great finish. the travelling fans in ecstasy really. they have done very badly they are traditionally. have a look at this — jose mourinho making a point of standing in front of the united fans and clapping them for longer than you'd expect given that they'd just lost. plenty of immediate speculation as to what he was doing. he says he was just showing his appreciation, something he felt was lacking in his news conference after the game.
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no, just to finish — do you know what was the result? 3-0. reporter: you lost 3—0. 3-0. do you know what this means? 3-0! but it also means three premierships, and i won more premierships alone than the other 19 managers together. three for me, and two for them. respect... respect, respect, respect. respect, man. jose mourinho not a happy man, but he can expect more intense scrutiny when united travel to burnley on sunday. victoria: he has been in a bad mood for quite a long time now, hasn't he? and the us open is under way — how did any murray look in his first round? damian: it's been an agonising year or more for andy murray as he's attempted to battle his way back to fitness from a chronic hip condition. but he's finally getting back into the swing of winning at grand slam tournaments. he's through his first—round clash at the us open, beating australia's james duckworth
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in four sets. it was murray's first best—of—five—set match in 1a months, having had surgery on that long—term hip injury at the start of this year. another brit, cameron norrie, is through, but kyle edmund and heather watson both went out. six—time champion serena williams made her return to the us open with a straight sets win over magda linette from poland. williams missed last year's championship because she was expecting her baby. she returned at the arthur ashe stadium with a 6—4, 6—0 victory over an opponent ranked 68 in the world and will play germany's carina witthoeft, who's seeded 17, in the second round. simona halep became the first top seeded woman ever to lose in the first round of the us open. the world number one from romania lost 6—2, 6—4 to kaia kenepi in the louis armstrong stadium. halep also lost her opening match at flushing meadows last year. that's all the sport for now. more for me later. victoria: thanks very much, damian. it is 23 minutes past nine. you're
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watching victoria derbyshire. children as young as ten attempting suicide, appalling, unsanitary conditions and almost constant horrific violence — that's life inside a refugee camp in europe. this programme has been given rare and exclusive access inside moria camp on the greek island of lesbos — the first stop for many people fleeing violence in syria and beyond. it has a capacity for around 2000 refugees yet houses around 8,000. workers for the medical charity medecins sans frontieres say it is the worst refugee camp on earth. on the day we were given access, two people were stabbed. our reporter catrin nye brings you this exclusive film. the paradise island of lesbos, also home to the refugee camp described as the worst on the planet. we have rare access inside moria camp.
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so we have been given 45 minutes only to go round the camp. it is horrifically overcrowded... please help us, please. for god's sake, help the woman. plagued by constant fighting... ..disease and trauma. children as young as ten attempting suicide. yes. it's not normal, it's not normal, but that's the problem. i've got limited time to look inside moria camp. access to this place is controlled by the greek government. and i have their press representative, george matthaiou, as an escort. but you see the problems. so we have been given 45 minutes only to go around the camp. this is the section
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for the newest arrivals. there's 7,500 people in here — it has capacity for between 2,000 and 3,000. conditions are appalling. there are around 70 people per toilet. the sewage system doesn't work properly. many charities have left this camp in protest at how bad it is. how long is the wait for food? about three hours. three hours? and what do you get? for breakfast, some people come at three o'clock. in the morning? yeah, in the morning. some of them do not get water. this is our 2a hours water. fewer refugees are arriving on the island than previous years but they're not leaving. as part of the deal between the eu and turkey, the greek government is holding people on lesbos rather than moving them to the mainland. they can leave the gates of this camp, but are trapped on the island.
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so george was just telling me that this is a line of tents all with afghans in it, who moved here after all the fights between them and syrian refugees. hi. can i come in? yes. hi. hello. we approach the camps asylum centre, which is closed. it is closed. almost two weeks. they are doing nothing. this is where you apply for asylum? yes. why is it closed? we don't know. everybody is saying different things. we don't know why. she is sick.
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is there anything we can do to help this woman? no, we can't do nothing from first reception. how do you cope with seeing this? we can chelp at first reception to take the papers. after the asylum, we can do nothing for this. do you know when it's going to open again? i don't know. this woman is really, really sick, obviously. everybody here, everybody here... but aren't people supposed to be taken off the island if they're sick? that's why they are here, because it is refugees. inside some shelters, our government representative, george, is confronted about conditions. all the people who came to your country, i believe that they are problem, they are not crazy to come here and waste their time, waste their life. they have problems, and each
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of them have problems. and what they expect from us? to take the papers one day and go in germany and poland on the other? i don't know their expectation, but... you. my expectation, greek people are good, but this situation, our moria situation, is worse. but the moria place for 2,000 people and you are 7,000. we don't make this area to stay, we make to come here for four orfive days and go inside. but now everyone is being kept here. now we can do nothing for this. it's been very clear for a long time that people aren't going to be leaving the island. why haven't conditions been made better? we have not money for this. you could you know the situation of greece,
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economically of greece. i want to help but i can't do nothing because the european union close the borders. moria camp is now spilling out into the surrounding countryside. so this is known as the olive grove and it's basically the overspill from moria. it's where everyone stays that can't fit in there. conditions are even worse, and everyone just wants to tell me how bad it is. please help us, please. for god's sake, help the woman. help the men, help the children, please. if there is a humanity, please help us. for god's sake, help all the people. all the people are in trouble. less than half an hour later, and violence erupts. we have just found out they are evacuating the tent. heard some loud shouting and all the ngos around here have been alerted to some sort of problem inside, some sort of fight. two people have been stabbed and people start evacuating.
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hello. we are blocked from going back in to film. we try and find out what's going on from luca, who works for the charity msf. it's always the same pattern. it starts with a fight, that was for the food line. people got stabbed and it's always something between different communities. afghan and syrian, something like that. it starts in the afternoon and then explodes in the night—time. moria is the worst place i have ever been in my whole life and i have been working in several countries, warzones, i have been working in refugee camps in central africa republic, in congo, in the biggest ebola
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outbreaks in west africa, 2014, 2015, but i have never seen, ever, the level of suffering we are witnessing here every day. even compared to an ebola outbreak? yes. why? we are in greece. it sounds strange but people, even if affected by ebola, they still have the hope to survive or they have the support of their family, their society, the village, their relative. here, no. here, the hope is taken away by the system. the charity msf refuse to operate inside moria in protest at conditions. this clinic is just outside. the children here have skin conditions caused by poor hygiene inside. respiratory diseases brought on by tear gas fired into the camp
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by police to quell fights. we had a mental health programme for children here and in between our patients, we had a ten—year—old child wanting to suicide inside moria. you are having to deal with children as young as ten attempting suicide? yes, and that maybe sounds real extreme but it is something we are seeing constantly in moria. is that normal? no, it's not. it's not normal, it's not normal, but that's the problem. we are reporting this to the public system, saying, "look, we have children attempting suicide. " children as young as ten years old would try to suicide and there is no child psychologist on this island.
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and despite the fact we push to move these children to athens as soon as possible, it is not happening and those children are still here. some of them are still living inside moria. ali is kurdish, originally from afrin in syria. he and his family are now living in a small, separate refugee camp on the island called pikpa. it's for vulnerable refugees. he fled moria after a now notorious fight there in may. largely between kurdish and arab men. men were attacked with iron bars. no one died but many were injured. hundreds of kurds fled moria after that fight.
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ali says the conflict between rebel groups in syria has also come into the camp. do you think there are dangerous people in moria? what did you expect
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when you came here, for europe? what we can ask now indeed is to improve the living conditions and the greek government should do that, improving conditions. register overcrowdings, provide doctors, access to medical care, access to mental health care. despite the conditions, the boats keep landing from turkey. hello. 51 of the 53 men, women and children on this boat are from afghanistan,
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where dozens have been killed in attacks just this month. they celebrate landing in europe, landing somewhere at least more safe, but unaware of the new trauma that lies ahead. let me read you a couple of messages from you. kathleen, children attempting suicide because it is better living in a camp? what kind of word —— world are we living in? another says, in early 2016, i went to lesbos to help, it left an indelible impression. we will talk more about that after 10am. your m essa g es more about that after 10am. your messages are welcome. the next subject as well, almost half of nhs england maternity wards turned away
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expectant mums last year, new figures show today. one hospital was closed to mums—to—be 33 times, most times because there weren't enough staff — a problem seen across the country. the figures show that 46% of maternity wards couldn't offer their services to patients on a total 282 occasions. and even though this number is a drop on the previous year, in part due to closures of maternity wards, the proportion of trusts turning away patients has increased. campaigners have argued that cuts to maternity services and midwife—led only units are in some cases threatening the safety of mothers and babies alike. we can talk to labour mp and their shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth. labour put in the foi that revealed these figures today. keith strangewood who is the chair of the keep horton general campaign. alice watkin who gave birth three weeks ago and peggy woowdward who is a retired midwife.
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thank you for talking to us. jonathan ashworth, how do you react to the fact almost half of maternity units were forced to temporarily close their doors last year? appalling statistics. the birth of a child is a moment of greatjoy and celebration and love but it is also understandably a moment of anxiety for our mother going into labour and can you imagine being turned away from the maternity unit in the throes of labour being pushed from pillar to post, travelling 20 miles with the fear and anxiety you are going to have your birth in the back of the cab, on the side of the road, not good for the mother's safety and well—being, and certainly not good for the newborn baby and this is because of years of cuts and financial squeeze in on the nhs meaning we have not got enough midwives. we have seen cuts to the number of beds. it is an atrocious
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set of statistics and i hope the minister apologises to every mother turned away, every woman turned away, from a maternity unit. absolutely terrible. i will get back to you with what the government says ina to you with what the government says in a moment. alice, you gave birth three weeks ago, nodding in agreement with some of that, congratulations, but explain to our audience about the 45 minute journey to give birth, why? the local hospital has been downgraded to a midwife in the unit, my first baby, my husband and i were concerned about being at a midwife in the unit, with no doctors. so we had to choose between two hospitals nowhere near our house and it is a good job we did in the end because my son had to be born by emergency caesarean which is not possible at a midwife led unit so we had to choose between oxford, very difficult to get to, or
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warwick, which is a different county and different nhs trust, so it was a very poor choice between the two, because of the downgrade of the local hospital. you are chair of keep the horton general campaign, keith. stories like alice's motivating you to fight to keep maternity services? we have documented cases, horror stories, a mother on the side of the road in a car giving mother on the side of the road in a cargiving birth, mother on the side of the road in a car giving birth, grandmother delivering, we had a child born on the way to oxford in a supermarket car park. listening to jonathan ashworth, we need to throw politics aside and focus on the issue and it is... we are not a third world country, we should not have things like this happen. nothing worse than losing a life, a new life, something that we must not allow to happen and
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that we must not allow to happen and thatis that we must not allow to happen and that is what is happening at the horton because of the transfers. sorry, you're not saying babies have died asa sorry, you're not saying babies have died as a result, are you? the trust are admitting there has been... we have documented evidence of almost never events. i personally was involved in one of these events were we now have a child with life changing disabilities which is going to cost the nhs millions. this was about {2.2 million, the clinical commissioning group wanted to save it. they would reject what you have just sad. i will go back tojonathan as hworth to just sad. i will go back tojonathan ashworth to tell you what the government says. you know they have increased, announced an increase, 2596 increased, announced an increase, 25% increase in midwifery training places. they say, temporary closures in maternity units are well rehearsed safety measures to cope
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with peaks rehearsed safety measures to cope with pea ks in rehearsed safety measures to cope with peaks in admissions. they cannot plan the exact times of birth. they say to use the figures in the way you have is disingenuous. what we are seeing is a greater proportion of trusts shot in maternity units and the reason why is because we have such a chronic shortage of midwives and other trained clinicians working in the units, we are short of 3500 midwives. if the government recruit more midwives, i will congratulate them and celebrate that. i remember david cameron tell us we would have 3000 more midwives and they broke their promise. we are short of 3500 midwives, it could get even worse if we do not get a brexit deal safeguarding that eu staff working in our hospitals. yes, i hear what the government are saying, but the reason they are closing the unit is because they do not have the staff
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and they do not have the capacity, the birds. 14,000 beds cut in hospitals in the last few years. in the circumstances, understand closing them the safety precautions, but the reasons for it is because of yea rs of but the reasons for it is because of years of underfunding and cuts to beds and recruit midwives. they say they are changing, 20 billion a year more by 2023—24. peggy, a retired midwife, i wonder what changes you have seen over the years? good morning. iam having have seen over the years? good morning. i am having difficulty hearing very clearly the links. but my career spanned in the nhs about 48 years and i retired last year and i have seen the changes, they have been particularly started in the 80s when units were closed, or as they
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called it in those days, amalgamated. we lost beds. and also, the underfunding, the fragmentation of the nhs, which accelerated in 2012. in a mag and —— alice, what impact has an add—on new? a massive impact on us. especially when i got home and i had to go into hospital, to be seen by doctors —— what impact has it had on you? when i went to hospital at the horton general i was diagnosed with sepsis but because the maternity unit had been downgraded it couldn't receive the treatment i needed, so i had to be transferred in an ambulance with a life—threatening condition to a different county,
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different hospital, different nhs trust, basically a different part of the country, to receive the treatment i needed to save my life, with a six old baby in tow, and it just had a massive impact on us and it was very scary, that, to me, and if we had been able to go to our local unit like we could before it was downgraded that would have made a huge difference. peggy, how do you react to these figures from this freedom of information request to ten by labour today?” freedom of information request to ten by labour today? i think those figures are the tip of the iceberg. i know from experience over the last few years, that even when the units are not closed the admissions there is a lot of work to stop closure by sending women home as soon as possible, which impacts on their care. john ashworth, it labour win the next general election, what would you do
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about the vacancies when it comes to midwives? —— jon ashworth. about the vacancies when it comes to midwives? ——jon ashworth. for example, would you restore the nurses student bursary? absolutely, because we need to be training midwives. the government sadly got rid of the training bursary and we have seen applications fall as a consequence. we need more midwives. we are short of 3500 midwives, sort of nearly 40,000 nurses as well across the nhs. there are 100,000 vacancies across the nhs. there are 100,000 vacancies across across the nhs. there are 100,000 vacancies across the nhs as a whole but we need to be training midwives and nurses now, so we will bring back that bursary as a first step. of course, we would give the nhs more funding. it has been squeezed so much in these last eight years. hearts have been sold off on privatised as well. we would end that agenda that has been —— at parts of it have been sold off and privatised. that has been accelerated since 2012. we will bring the services back together so rather than this fragmented system, we would bring services back together. are you promising to
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match... sorry to interrupt, what are you promising to match that £20.5 billion? to match it, and they are promising to go beyond that, because that funding is more than it has had under the tories but it is not enough. it is only enough for the nhs to stand still. i want nhs to be the best health care system in the world. i want to give every child the very best start in life. i'm passionate about improving health outcomes for this country's children, and that starts with investment in maternity services.|j investment in maternity services.” wa nt to investment in maternity services.” want to ask you, mr ashworth, if i may, a couple of brief more questions about labour. you are on jeremy corbyn's top team. how close is labour to adopting as official policy offering people a referendum on the final brexit deal mrs may comes back from brussels with? what we've said is that the priority now has to be getting a good deal that puts family prosperity first, puts jobs first, puts the nhs first.
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sure, but the question is how close would leader is labour to offering people a second referendum? well, we hope we can get the deal, but we have said all options should remain on the table if the government can't get a deal on parliament cannot agree on what the next step should be, so we are saying keep everything on the table but the priority for the coming days and weeks is absolutely trying to get a deal. it doesn't look like theresa may can get a deal, by the way. think the consensus is she has pretty much mishandled it, but she has until october to convince us she can get that deal. finally, how seriously do you take reports that a number of labour mps you take reports that a number of labourmps are so you take reports that a number of labour mps are so fed up with your leader's approach to brexit and how he has dealt with the many anti—semitism controversies that he billy mayfair planning splitting from labour and forming a new party? —— that they are planning on splitting from labour.” —— that they are planning on splitting from labour. i would say
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if any colleague is planning on setting up some new sdp mark two, like in the 80s, it didn't get anywhere, did it? if you want to radically improve the country to change the conditions for working—class people, people we represent in our constituencies, to improve the nhs, the schools our children will do, to give people well—paid jobs which are not temporary zero—hour contracts, you need eight labour government, united labour government, and the lesson of 1997, when we got eight labour government it was because we were united, because the country together behind a united labour party. in the 80s when that sdp and royjenkins and all that lot went to create an alternative labour party, itjust sustains the tories in power. i have no idea. i know there has been discussed in the newspapers this summer. i have no idea whether it is true or not because i have been spending this august with my family. this is my first day back doing policies, if you like, but the lesson from the 80s if this will only help the tories. you're playing
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the tory game if you go to form an sdp mark two party. thank you for yourtime, sdp mark two party. thank you for your time, jonathan ashworth, labour shadow health secretary, keith strains would, from the keep the horton general campaign, alice watkin, retired midwife, and peggy woodward, thank you so much for your time as well. coming up... protests in the eastern german city of chemnitz end in violence. several people were injured. we will bring you the latest. the great british bake off returns to our screens this evening on channel 4 as a dozen bakers compete to be crowned this year's champion. among those hoping to impress prue leith and paul hollywood are a banker, a blood courier and a dj, as well as a phd research scientist, two full time parents and a mental health specialist. in 2015 the show introduced a ‘sugar—free' week in a bid
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to tackle the criticism about it encouraging people to eat unhealthily, and this year the show will have its first ever ‘vegan week'. we'll talk about that in a minute, with two former contestants. first, here's a clip from the new series, and it's the ‘showstopper challenge', where the constestants have to bake a selfie. oh, my god, i am so running behind on time. finished! 24 biscuits. definitely a last—minute dash. i've not got one decorated biscuit yet. would you like a crisp? i would like nothing that involves taking my eyes off this table. don't want to rush it too much because they're already spreading a bit. i don't want to make them look messy. they're not set. i am making some sancha tea and it works really well with the biscuit. come on...
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come on, release! chocolate, i shouldn't have done it. i am rushing the decoration. do you want me to help you put them on? thank you, yes. right, shall we do this one, yes? one, two, three, four... eight. 18. haven't we done 18 before? this is ridiculous, they don't even look like lambs. they are still melting. bakers, your time is up. please put your biscuits at the end of your benches. all my biscuits are cut out now, but doing my marshmallow fondant is a real messy business. oh, my god. this looks like a horrendous mess. i'm hoping it's going to come together. i'm starting to panic. like i've got some sort of shake on.
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this is like a grassy bit. here's me holding a baby. my hands! that's beautiful. hey, ruby, are you ok? i'm losing it, noel. i know, you look a bit frantic. oh, no, it's cracking. fondant... bakers, your time is up! burst pipe... 0h, rubes! bakers, your time is up! wow!
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the great british bake off, channel 4, 8pm tonight. let's talk now to you. yan tsou ? gbbo contestant from 2017, jane beedle ? gbbo finalist in 2016, melissa morgan ? founder of ms. cupcake, the uk's first vegan—only bakery. watching that clip, does it bring stress back to you? yes, my heart was beating. flashback. so many of the really professional...” was beating. flashback. so many of the really professional... i think whenever the music is played my stomach goes off lottery. that is difficult show stopper task, was not? —— my stomach goes all flattery. i think what people don't appreciate at home, or maybe they do, ithink appreciate at home, or maybe they do, i think the producers think, "what shall we give them, some ice biscuits? shall we give them four
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hours? let's give them two." it makes people not look silly, but i suppose it makes the show... brings in morejeopardy. suppose it makes the show... brings in more jeopardy. ok. suppose it makes the show... brings in morejeopardy. ok. vegan week. is this a good idea? a brilliant idea! finally! we have been pleading for this, going to twitter, you last year, begging for it on bake off, so so exciting for it to finally be happening. just explain what being a feeding means in practical terms, because the number in this country is rising. about 7%, it is reported, the number of the population. what does it mean? remake the whole idea is to not eat, use or consume in any sort of way any animal products —— well, the whole idea is to not eat. just to have a protein free life style. just to have a protein free lifestyle. what do you think of the idea of the idea of eating week?” think it's a brilliant idea. we are now in series nine and i think they have to keep it fresh and make it releva nt have to keep it fresh and make it relevant to what is going on today.
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my son is vegetarian, not feeding, fortunately. trying to get lots of ideas from the list on how the big league in! but i think more people are being aware of what they are putting into their body and cutting out a lot of animal products, and bake off's got to go along with the trends. if they don't, they will just resign themselves to the scrapheap, i think. just resign themselves to the scrapheap, ithink. i just resign themselves to the scrapheap, i think. i think it is great that they are bringing in ten to 20 team. —— bringing it in the 2018. what you think? it is about what people can afford these days as well, obviously. not all they can products, they have their own supermarket shelves, but it is using ideas and actually i find a lot of information you can glean off the internet, because i wasjust chatting to melissa earlier, and something as simple as chickpea water, which i never even contemplated before, but ijust found the idea on the internet, and you can actually use that, from a
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canned tin of chickpeas and use it for meringues. can you? any chickpea water in any of these vegan products? that is pretty new. remit not in any of these particular ones, creating a nice frothy arango. but a lot of this, a lot of what they used to replace eggs are fruits, vegetable periods, different types of seeds that when you mix with water, the growing to acquire duly did mess —— vegetable purees. water, the growing to acquire duly did mess -- vegetable purees. can i try one of these? please! this is our salt, pecan cookie. the ingredients are salt, pecan... traditional things, flour, sugar, and we have a vegetable—based margarine instead of butter. a lot of things you can find as a substitute. you are of the prue and
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paul now of daytime television. crispy on the outside, soft and gooey on the inside, american—style. i haven't had any breakfast today. why not? i can taste the pecans, taste the salt... does it taste good? you wouldn't know this was a leading cookie. norway! you have the game, and people who are not my thing they will not try that —— you wouldn't know that this was a vegan cookie. no way. the problem is the perception of the games as being underfed, malnourished. those are some of the perceptions. this sort of hemp—wearing, hippy style. nowadays the games are an exciting, it is youthful, modern, and it can be about indulgence, decadence and fun. it doesn't have to be about
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wholesomeness and going without. but it is more effort to cook vegan food, let's be honest. you have to be honest with people.” food, let's be honest. you have to be honest with people. i wouldn't say so and it can be a lot cheaper when you take dairy and eggs out of the mixture. using plant -based milks that can be kept in the cupboard, so when you run out you can grab something you already have there. it is about getting a perception. it is new techniques you have not used before, using ingredients you have maybe not thought about before but once you get the hang of it it can be just as easy. you were in the first channel 4 version of paycock. did that impact you? —— bake off. version of paycock. did that impact you? -- bake off. in the tent, we film it earlier, it is not live. our initial reaction was just surviving from week to week and that was the main plan. once they were
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transmitting, channel 4 and all the rest, i did not have any feedback, i preferred it on bbc. they did not show any preference once they started watching it. what about you, in terms of being a finalist a couple of years ago, how much has it changed your life? extremely busy. i was thinking that as i was walking up was thinking that as i was walking up to the bbc this morning, two years ago, no one would have asked me to come and talk about anything! in addition to my dayjob, i am doing food festivals, charity stuff, baking classes, so instead of being five days a week working, i am doing six and a half, seven days. but life is even more interesting? it is huge fun andl is even more interesting? it is huge fun and i am doing things i never dreamt i would do. brilliant. i would recommend it to anybody. if
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you fancy doing something, go and give it a go, you have nothing to lose. challenging, stressful! thank you all for coming on the programme. the latest news and sport in a moment. before that, the weather. we have had a lot of cloud around this morning but it is mostly dry for most parts of the uk. a few photos this morning, this one from the channel islands, some good spells of sunshine here in the afternoon. further north and west, more cloud and this weather front bringing rain in the western isles of scotland and eventually western northern ireland. high—pressure is with most so it will be fairly sunny through the afternoon. the rain spreads its way into western scotland, western northern ireland, let us look at 4pm, rain continuing. eastern
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scotland, remaining dry and spells of sunshine, temperatures up to 19, 20. further west, 15—18. of sunshine, temperatures up to 19, 20. furtherwest, 15—18. england of sunshine, temperatures up to 19, 20. further west, 15—18. england and wales, a lot of cloud, some spells of sunshine, particularly in the south of england and the channel islands and temperatures, 18—21. tonight, area of rain moving south—east, breaking up as it pushes into england and wales. showers developing across the south—east of england in the early hours of wednesday. fairly mild across southern areas overnight, chillier further north and west. the band of rain will continue to weaken and lighter cloud in the south—east. showers in the eastern parts will clear and foremost on wednesday, dry and fairly bright, more sunshine compared to today, and temperatures fairly similar. with lighter winds
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and more sunshine, feeling more pleasant. thursday, and for the next few days, high—pressure building from the south—west and becoming firmly established into thursday. again, plenty of dry and settled weather, lots of sunshine on thursday, barely cloud in the sky in the morning, a bit of cloud in the afternoon. in the range of permit the high teens in northern areas, 21, 22 further south —— the mid—to high teens. outlook into the weekend, remaining largely dry, fair amount of cloud, good spells of sunshine, temperatures coming up if anything by the end of the weekend. bye— bye. hello, it's10am. i'm victoria derbyshire. our top story today... we bring you an exclusive report from the worst refugee camp in the world — that's how aid officials describe moria camp in greece.
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we've been given rare access and found appalling, overcrowded conditions and deadly violence — which aid workers tell us has has led to children trying to take their own lives. i have never seen, ever, the level of suffering we are witnessing here every day. we'll be live in lesbos to speak to a former refugee who made his way to greece by swimming there four years ago. it's already being called the maybot — it's theresa may dancing with school kids in south africa, as she lays out her vision to make post—brexit britain one of the continent's biggest investors. we'll be hearing from entrepreneurs in nigeria and kenya on what kind of investment they need. a new report focussed on how to beat the knife and gun crime surge in london calls for a return
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to increased stop and search, and claims that the public overwhelmingly back a return. but what about the division and anger that stop and search is said to breed? good morning, it's10am. here's joanna gosling in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. it's been described by one charity as the worst refugee camp on earth. this programme has been given exclusive access to the moria camp on the greek island of lesbos where, according to aid workers, children as young as ten are attempting to take their own lives. the camp is currently home to around 8,000 migrants and refugees, despite having only been built as temporary accommodation for 2,000 people. the charity medecins sans frontieres say the camp is plagued with violence, overcrowding, and appalling sanitary conditions. the overcrowding is a result of the eu's 2016 deal with turkey, which banned most from leaving the islands to apply for asylum on the mainland. police in the west midlands have made a direct plea
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to a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter. detectives want to question janbaz tarin over the stabbing of his ex—partner, raneem 0udeh, and her mother, khaola, in solihull yesterday. jenny kumar reports. a mother and her daughter stabbed to death. raneem 0udeh was 22 years old. her mother, khaola saleem, was 49. their families say they're devastated by their loss. officers are searching for raneem oudeh‘s former partner in connection with the murders. they're appealing to 21—year—old janbaz tarin to hand himself in. the police discovered the women with serious stab wounds here in the early hours of monday morning. they were confirmed dead at the scene near the family's home. lived in solihull for my whole life, never had anything like this happen so close to home. really shocking for me, you know. with the children here and... i don't know what to do.
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officers have been carrying out forensic tests and house—to—house inquiries, but the main focus is finding mrtarin. west midlands police say if anyone is found to be shielding him, they will be prosecuted, but they are warning people not to approach him. jenny kumah, bbc news. theresa may is in cape town for her first visit to africa as prime minister. her three—day tour of the continent is focusing on plans to significantly increase britain's investment in africa after brexit. mrs may will also visit nigeria and kenya to discuss trade and security. speaking this morning, the prime minister said she wanted the uk to be the biggest g7 investor in africa by 2022 and set out a variety of plans to maintain trade with the continent after brexit. whether through creating new customers, new british exporters, or opportunities for british investors, our integrated global economy means healthy african economies are good
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news for british people, as well as for african people. that's why i'm delighted we will today confirm plans to carry over the european union's economic partnership agreement with the southern african customs union and mozambique, once the eu's deal no longer applies to the uk. president trump has announced that flags at the white house and public buildings across the united states will be lowered half—mast once more, in honour of senatorjohn mccain, who died on saturday. mr trump, who had clashed repeatedly with mr mccain, faced heavy criticism after flags at some federal buildings were raised yesterday, far earlier than would normally be expected. several people have been injured in violence in the eastern german city of chemnitz. antifascist demonstrators clashed with far—right activists who were protesting after the arrest of a syrian and an iraqi man on suspicion of murder. german chancellor angela merkel has warned that vigilante justice
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would not be tolerated. hospital doctors are calling for the head of the general medical council to stand down over his handling of a paediatrician who was struck off. dr hadiza bawa garba was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter after six—year—old jack adcock died in 2011, but she won her bid to be reinstated earlier this month. the gmc said that it was frequently called upon to make difficult decisions to protect patient safety. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. still to come... we will be getting reaction to the news that the government has announced it will permit women in england to take abortion pills at home. the announcement comes after an exclusive investigation on this programme a month ago revealed that women were illegally buying abortion pills online because they were unable to take the second tablet at home. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victorialive.
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now the sport. pressure is mounting onjose mourinho after his manchester united side lost 3—0 at home to spurs. harry kane opened the scoring early in the second half. lucas moura got the second, and then added a third, as spurs absolutely dominated in the second half. they are one of four teams with three wins out of three at the top of the premier league. a good finish for the third. at the end, jose mourinho made a point of standing in front of the united fans and clapping them for longer than you'd expect, given that they'd just lost. plenty of immediate speculation as to what he was doing. he says he was just showing his appreciation, something he felt was lacking in his press conference after the game. it means three premierships and i
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won more alone than the other 19 together. three for me and two for them. respect. respect, man. respect. andy murray is back into the swing of winning grand slam tournaments. he's through his first—round clash at the us open, beating australia's james duckworth in four sets. it was murray's first best—of—five—set match in 14 months, having had surgery on a long—term hip injury at the start of this year. kyle edmund though is out. the british number one started well, winning the first set. but he then started to struggle with the rising temperatures and humidity on court, and eventually, lost in four sets to italy's paolo lorenzi. better news for british number two cameron norrie. he is through after beating jordan thompson. despite playing well to qualify, heather watson has gone out. she lost in the first round to russia's ekaterina makarova. it's the eighth year in a row that watson has lost in the first round at the us open. simona halep became the first
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top—seeded woman ever to lose in the first round of the us open. the world number one from romania lost 6—2, 6—4 to kaia kenepi in the louis armstrong stadium. halep also lost her opening match at flushing meadows last year. there was as much talk about another serena williams outfit as there was her easy first round win over poland's magda linette. the six—time champion made her return to the us open with a straight sets win. williams missed last year's championship because she was expecting her baby. her 6—4, 6—0 victory over an opponent ranked 68 in the world means she will play germany's carina witthoeft, who's seeded 17, in the second round. and her single—sleeved top and tutu was about more than just fashion. it is easy to play aerodynamic with the one on free so it feels really good. the two to is easy to play in,
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i practised in it before, so that was fun —— tutu. i practised in it before, so that was fun -- tutu. i might try it myself. or perhaps not. thank you. children as young as ten attempting suicide, appalling, unsanitary conditions and almost constant horrific violence — that's life inside a refugee camp in europe. this programme has been given rare and exclusive access inside moria camp on the greek island of lesbos — the first stop for many people fleeing violence in syria and beyond. it has a capacity for around 2,000 refugees, yet houses around 8,000. workers for the medical charity medecins sans frontieres say it is the worst refugee camp on earth. earlier, we showed you catrin nye's full exclusive report from inside the camp. here's a short extract, before we talk about what she found there. the paradise island of lesbos, also home to the refugee camp described as the worst on the planet. so we have been given 45 minutes
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only to go round the camp. this is the section for the newest arrivals. there's 7,500 people in here — it has capacity for between 2,000 and 3,000. food is scarce, conditions are appalling, and violence is almost constant. fewer refugees are arriving on the island than previous years, but they're not leaving. fewer refugees are arriving on the island than previous years, but they're not leaving. as part of the eu turkey deal, they are being held on lesbos rather than moving to the mainland. while we are filming at the camp, two people are stabbed in the queue for food. our
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police block us from getting near the scene. it's always the same pattern. it starts with a fight, that was for the food line. people got stabbed and it's always something between different communities. msf say conditions are leading to deep trauma, that they have children as young as ten attempting suicide. we are reporting this to the public system, to unhcr, saying, "look, we have children as young as ten years old who try to suicide." and there is no child psychiatrist or psychologist on this island. and despite the fact we push to move these children to athens as soon as possible, it is not happening. ali, along with many other kurdish people, fled moria after a huge fight there in may. largely between kurdish and arab men.
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iron bars were used to beat people. do you think there are dangerous people in moria? despite conditions, boats keep coming. almost everyone on this one from afghanistan. hello. they celebrate landing somewhere at least more safe, but are unaware of the new trauma that lies ahead. omar alshakal is 24, a syrian refugee who swam to greece in 2014
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and is now a charity worker. myriam abdel basit, from medicins sans frontiers, she just got back from moria camp injuly. steve valdez—symonds is from amnesty international. he's here to talk about the european community's broader response to the refugee crisis. and in ten years old have tried to ta ke and in ten years old have tried to take their lives in this camp —— i will start by asking you, omar, how do you react to the fact that children as young as ten have tried to ta ke children as young as ten have tried to take their lives in this camp? in terms of moria camp, like, the
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situation, what happened there, you are talking about thousands of young people living there. nobody is taking care of them. the situation... some of them, they came along without their family. for these people it is really hard because they put them in one section and they live alone. when there are young kids are young people, they can young kids are young people, they ca n start young kids are young people, they can start to get drugs and things from people, only because they get tired of living in moria, they get tired of living in moria, they get tired of living in moria, they get tired of the fighting, of the food there, and they get tired because they believe, we believe, they are in prison, because the can't from
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the camp... that is true. omar, let me bring in myriam abdel basit from msf. would you agree with omar that it is effectively a prison? most definitely. as you mentioned earlier, the amount of people at the moment, it is completely overcrowded. a space originally made for around 3100 people and currently more than 8000 are inside, and they are living in absolute squalor. not only that, they are also living in fear. there is a lack of access to basic services, and there are huge obstacles tojust access basic services, and there are huge obstacles to just access basic things like health care, like food. you have to wake up in the morning and you have to wait in a really long line just to get your breakfast and wake up at the crack of dawn in order to avoid the crowds. it is completely inhumane. and, yes, there have been a lot of cases of traumatised nation. people are coming with their own drama from their countries, and that they have experienced throughout their travel
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over to the experienced throughout their travel overto the camp experienced throughout their travel over to the camp and when they arrive they are just being re—traumatised. arrive they are just being re-traumatised. steve, in spite of the fact that omar says it is a prison, they can leave the camp. but they cannot leave the island to apply for asylum on the mainland of greece, which was part of the the deal that you did with turkey. the syste m deal that you did with turkey. the system is breaking down for these people and europe has pretty much turned their back on them completely. they are forgotten by european governments across the board but europe has had years to address the need is to share responsibility for what is, let's face it, compared to other parts of the world, relatively modest movement of people to the richest and most stable place on the planet. but greece has its own financial problems, as we know, in terms of looking after its own people. greece certainly has had difficulties and we can't get away from the fact that greece is responsible directly for
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what is being done to those people in those camps but, yes, this is a european wide responsibility not for european wide responsibility not for european governments to say, "oh, greece, "oh, italy, or, increasingly, "spin", they need to share responsibility and these problems needn't happen. let me read some comments. your report is harrowing and brought tears to my eyes. why is it we have so many people in our world with personal wealth that could house every single person, help with the bills for the refugees, do none of them stand up? another one, "people fleeing cruelty and oppression are refused justice. is this our so—called civilised society should be in a 21st—century?" martin says, "i desperately tragic situation. literally a living hell for these people. what chance do the children have?" jane people. what chance do the children have?"j people. what chance do the children have? " jane says, "this people. what chance do the children have?" jane says, "this is a refugee camp was made up of people fleeing afghanistan and iraq, they get a safe haven after transiting various countries only to recreate the
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mayhem they left their homeland." who exactly are these refugees? is there a point there? the situation they are currently in, with the containment policy, they don't know when they will be able to read, whether they will be able to leave whether they will be able to leave whether they will be able to leave whether they might be deported. these people —— they don't know they will be able to leave. these people are forced in —— forced to wait months, sometimes even years, with their families, months, sometimes even years, with theirfamilies, their months, sometimes even years, with their families, their young children, and they don't not they are coming or going and they are all coming with their own, anyway and this isjust exasperated by the conditions of the camp and by the lack of basic services and basic needs. and e-mail. "the bbc's promotion of immigration is disgusting. you are on the wrong side of this argument and you're fully with the people of the uk are sick and tired of mass immigration."
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omar, what would be your solution to help the people in this camp?” believe you have to do something because i don't believe they do anything... what i am trying to say, these people are trying to do their best, and greece, the amount of refugees they have, this country, they don't have enough money for the people. they are trying to do their best for the refugees, i really believe that. and i saw it. but i don't believe you or germany or any country in europe, i don't believe they are trying to do anything to help greece or help the other countries. at the same time i don't say anything further arab countries, because they are the same, they do nothing. steve, you echoed that,
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that, you know, now this deal has been done, most european nations have forgotten about these people. what should they do, the european governments? with these people in particular who have been here for months and months in awful conditions, they need to get them full—time and as quickly as possible. and europe needs to share responsibility. that means greece is not housing all 20,000 people on the islands at the moment. ultimately, other countries need to step up and say, yes, we will take some of that responsibility. but in the wider course of things, europe has to realise that immigration is a fact of life. there are wars and conflict and persecution across the world. and persecution across the world. and our governments have responsible the in those areas too. we support and sell arms to some of those places. some of the impact of that or what we see with refugee migration. thank you all, thank you very much for coming in. thank you, omar, and thank you. still to come... the extent of violent crime in london — we'll be discussing a new report on how to beat
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the knife and gun crime surge — which is calling for a return of stop and search powers. next, it's the world's second biggest continent, with the world's second biggest population, and theresa may is travelling there for the first time as prime minister, to try to boost trade and investment links. africa is seen a key market the uk will want to trade with after brexit next march. the prime minister — along with nearly 30 business people — will start their tour in cape town in south africa, the uk's largest trading partner on the continent. after that it's stopovers in kenya and nigeria. let's talk now to temie giwa—tubosan, an entrepreneur in nigeria, and hilda moraa, who's an entrepreneur in kenya. and here isjeremy thomson cook, the chief economist at currency firm world first, and also alexander boadi, who is a briton who moved to ghana to help governments
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invest on the continent. welcome to all of you. i will start with you, if i may, is this a good ambition, by 2022, to be the biggest partner of the g7 countries? sure. we have good investment, very good population, that is ready to do the work of transforming africa's future. hilda, how much of an opportunity is there for british companies, for example? so basically everyone in kenyan... it is because of the opportunities, you have young people doing something, that activities, and you see innovation... the opportunities are
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there. temie, you run a company that transport medical products, i understand. it has been very successful. how many more businesses like yours are there across nigeria? there are quite a lot of businesses like that. like imagine, we move essential medical products. a lot of places, you know, you hear in the uk about the problems africa has. what happens nowadays young people are starting countries, —— starting companies, trying to solve these problems. you have companies in education, working around hunger and food, agriculture. so there are quite a lot of companies using the venture model. a new future for africans. hilda, you work in financial technology, a fast—growing market. tell our audience a little more. yes, so i and the ceo of a
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company that connects... right now in kenyan we have more than 90% of the people... in terms of financial services across kenya. and providing national inclusion for people who have been excluded in the kenyan economy. a lot of these people are small smes driving the economy for kenya. what we're trying to do is drive that financial move for these smaller firms who will never access the capital, and because of the high interest rates and it also gives the opportunity to provide. we are seeing these opportunities in that sense. we are seeing a lot of
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companies, so providing notjust financial inclusion but also employment. this is what is driving the economy, notjust for kenya but across sub—saharan the economy, notjust for kenya but across sub—sa ha ran africa. how much could some sort of trade deal with parts of africa help a post brexit britain, jeremy?m depends which, we have trade deals already with many countries in africa, and the terms of which they are under our very africa, and the terms of which they are under our very decent and good towards that african countries, there is a system of trade deal called everything but arms and they can export to the eu with zero ta riffs can export to the eu with zero tariffs and zero quotas. for the uk to beat that, quite difficult. china have got quite a stronghold in certain countries. how much of a
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challenge is that the british investment? it seems to me the first port of call for an african country looking for a big infrastructure project, a runway, railway, new motorways, for example, they go to china. why? it is cheaper to provide the growing of the local workforce but also china is very happy to do it and use it as a soft power mentality within the continent, given how fast it is growing. alex, which markets do you see is most important? currently the market that theresa may is visiting, south africa has one of the biggest gdps in africa, so does nigeria, and so does kenya combined, those three 11, they gdp almost hits 800 billion. —— those three countries alone. what
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are the realities of british companies investing in africa as opposed to the misconceptions? the realities of britain tends to find challenges in regards to, how do things operate on the ground? i think we look at africa from a macro perspective. meaning what? we look at africa as a country as opposed to individual countries. if we focus on specific countries, you tend to realise each country and within the country has its own tribal relationships, tribal ways of conducting business, and that is what we need to focus on, as opposed to looking at africa as one big country. what is the problem of focusing on africa, the continent? in africa, you have francophone countries, great relationship with france. macron still pushing the
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french agenda. the western side of africa, very different the eastern africa, very different the eastern africa in terms of cultural norms. southern africa, very different. if the uk is able to understand the intrinsic details of each country, that aspect, able to get involved in business activities at a higher scale. jeremy, you say, crucially, the whole continent, africa, could not provide a fraction of the trade that you can? no, the eu trade with africa to a value of about £55 billion a year, roughly what we do with spain. really? second largest continent, second largest population, you put that against spain, per capita income, how much people are making within these countries, a lot less than any eu?. we will —— any eu customer. services, the services sector in
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these economies, not needed at the moment. how do we re—sculpt our economy to take advantage of african customers as they currently stand? 0k. customers as they currently stand? ok. henke. time forthe customers as they currently stand? ok. henke. time for the latest news —— thank you. time for the latest news — here'sjoanna. the bbc news headlines this morning... it's been described by one charity as the worst refugee camp on earth. this programme has been given exclusive access to the moria camp, on the greek island of lesbos, where, according to aid workers, children as young as ten are attempting to take their own lives. the camp is currently home to around 8,000 migrants and refugees, despite having only been built as temporary accommodation for 2,000 people. the charity medecins sans frontieres say the camp is plagued with violence, overcrowding, and appalling sanitary conditions. the overcrowding is a result of the eu's 2016 deal with turkey, which banned most from leaving the islands to apply for asylum on the mainland. police in the west midlands have made a direct plea to a 21—year—old man wanted
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over the double murder of a mother and daughter. detectives want to question janbaz tarin over the stabbing of his ex—partner, raneem 0udeh, and her mother, khaola, in solihull yesterday. theresa may is in cape town for her first visit to africa as prime minister. her three—day tour of the continent is focusing on plans to significantly increase britain's investment in africa after brexit. mrs may will also visit nigeria and kenya to discuss trade and security. speaking this morning, the prime minister said she wanted the uk to be the biggest g7 investor in africa by 2022 and set out a variety of plans to maintain trade with the continent after brexit. whether through creating new customers for british exporters, or opportunities for british investors, our integrated global economy means healthy african economies are good news for british people, as well as for african people. that's why i'm delighted we will today confirm plans
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to carry over the european union's economic partnership agreement with the southern african customs union and mozambique, once the eu's deal no longer applies to the uk. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with damien. the main headlines... jose mourinho says he deserves more respect. the manchester united manager walked out of his press conference after their 3—0 defeat to tottenham. harry kane put spurs on their way to their third successive win. they are one of four teams who have claimed nine points out of nine at the top of the premier league. andy murray's through to the second round of the us open after beating james duckworth in four sets. it's his first win in a grand slam match since wimbledon last year as he continues his recovery from injury. and serena williams won her first—round match against poland's magda linette at flushing meadows. the american will play germany's carina witthoeft next. but world number one simona halep is out. that's all the sport for now.
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more from me later. thank you. campaigners say there's still work to be done to help the process for women who choose to terminate their pregnancy, after the government announced it will permit women in england to take abortion pills at home. the announcement comes after an exclusive investigation on this programme a month ago revealed that women were illegally buying abortion pills online, because they were unable to take abortion pills at home. the law in england stated that women must take the pill at a hospital or clinic, before travelling home to wait for the abortion process to kick in. but this can start within 30 minutes of taking the drug, meaning women who don't live near a clinic can start to pass their pregnancy in public, before they reach their home. scotland and wales already allow women to take the pills at home. in a moment, we'll hear from campaigners who say it's now vital that abortion services are finally recognised as a health care issue, not a criminal one. but first, here's a clip from our reporterjean mackenzie's
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exclusive film last month. it is a very physical taking over of your body. waves and waves of cramping and pain. sweating. these women are describing something we don't often hear about. what it feels like to have an abortion. hello, nice to meet you. i have come to meet claudia who had an abortion last year. she took a taxi home from hospital after taking the pill, but within minutes of getting in, the symptoms had started. i started to feel really unwell and just extremely nauseous and i was getting the feeling in my chest like i might be about to throw up, and then i started getting cramping at the same time. just didn't want to be sick in the taxi and ijust really, really wanted to get home. in between getting out of the taxi and the symptoms really starting, in that very physical and uncontrollable sense,
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that was like a minute. do you think about what could have happened if you had just been five minutes later? i mean, i know what would have happened. if it had been five minutes later, all of those symptoms would have been happening on the floor of the taxi. i would have been sick in the taxi. i would have started bleeding in the taxi and i would have started losing control of my bowels in the taxi. i lived 15 minutes away from a hospital. not every woman lives 15 minutes away from a hospital. it was so dramatic and so unexpected. 20 minutes into the journey, on the tube, towards home, i started to feel the effects of the pill kicking in. started to feel nauseous, started to sweat, started to get cold, went extremely pale apparently, and then the pain and nausea
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was so extreme i had to get off the tube. i lay down on a bench in the tube and basicallyjust decided that i wasn't going to move any further. how did you feel, knowing that you were starting to pass your pregnancy and you were in this hugely public place? i felt scared, and exposed, and it just felt really unfair. you know, maybe i was very unlucky to be in that small percentage of people that it happens within 30 minutes, but if it happens, then it does. what difference would it have made to you to be able to take the pills at home? i would have been able to have everything that one needs. no movement, a comfortable bed, hot water bottle, painkillers. you know, i didn't have any of that.
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i had to be gawked at by men in suits. so this is the letter that i wrote to the health minister that goes, "one year ago i took the abortion pill..." senior doctors and politicians are nowjoining women like claudia in urging the health secretary to change the law. "..allowing home use of the pill for abortions would save the nhs money and save thousands of women like me from pain and distress. you personally have..." there are women on buses, there are women in taxis and cars and on tubes, going through what i went through right now, and the health minister could change that overnight. yet day by day, more women are being put through that experience, so that makes me angry. very angry. the health secretary has of course
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changed his mind. i've to lesley regan from the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists, and clare murphy who's from the british pregnancy advisory service. they gave us their reaction to the news of the change. we're absolutely delighted by the news. it will make such a difference to girls and women in england and thrilled the secretary of state has taken this decision. absolutely delighted, just like leslie. our only disappointment is it has taken so long to get to this point. the evidence on home use has been clear for many years. it has been endorsed by the world health organization, standard practice around the world, so our only frustration is it has taken ministers this long to make this decision when the evidence has been there. ministers told you it was controversial? that is right. we we re was controversial? that is right. we were told it was too controversial. what has changed?” were told it was too controversial. what has changed? i wonder if there was a growing sense of public opinion is very supportive of women's access to high—quality
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abortion care. i think we have got more female mps who have been standing up for this, asking questions about it. i think there has been more media attention. brilliant to see this programme focusing so much attention on it and producing a great film on it. i think it has been more in the public eye and i think ministers felt more comfortable making this decision. when does this change come into effect and how will it work? we hope it will come into effect before the end of the year and we will do everything we can, we have been asked by the department of health to work with them to develop protocols. we will be working as well to ensure this is rolled out in the smoothest and swiftest way. in the simplest terms, it means women can take their second abortion pill at home? correct. the most important thing about that is they no longer have to make the second unnecessary visit to
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the hospital or clinic which was a barrier to access for many girls and women and it is a really important point to emphasise. in the same way as if you are having a miscarriage, i would say, why don't you take them at home on friday evening when you will have the privacy of your own home and support network? now we can do the same thing for women requesting abortion. there are other issues you are campaigning on, such as the fact abortion is a criminal law issue not a health care issue. explain the difference to the audience. abortion still sits within the criminal law and that is something people are not necessarily familiar with. in 1967 abortion act which was a hugely important landmark piece of legislation did not decriminalise abortion, it did not decriminalise abortion, it did not take out the fundamental criminaland not take out the fundamental criminal and opinion, it remains a criminal and opinion, it remains a criminal offence for any woman at any gestation to cause her own abortion, so if a woman does not get
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the permission of two doctors, orders pills online, for example, she can in principle go to prison for life under the laws passed in 1861. we think that does not pick any sense in the context of the 21st century. — — any sense in the context of the 21st century. —— that does not make any sense. we would like it to be regulated in the same way as we regulated in the same way as we regulate other health services, miscarriage, maternity, it sits with those and it needs to be regulated in the same way. where do you stand on the situation in northern ireland? apart from in very extreme cases, it is still illegal to have an abortion there. it is brilliant to see that and celebrate it as a step forward but there is so much further to go step forward but there is so much furtherto go in step forward but there is so much further to go in terms of abortion rights for women in the uk and northern ireland must be next. it is just intolerable that the situation continues and i think in the absence of stormont, westminster has to act,
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it has a moral and legal duty to ensure women in northern ireland can access abortion care at home. do you have a view? i agree we have to do our best to persuade people. a lot of work to be done with the northern ireland government or politicians i should say, no probable government at the moment, and the citizens. slowly, slowly, we are making a difference and i will work with the eu organisations to continue with that message. it is very important girls and women have access to high—quality, safe and effective and also compassionate care —— with the organisations. that was lesley regan, and you also heard from clare murphy. london should impose an american style of policing to curb a "toxic cycle of serious violence" which has hit the city this year, and ramp up "stop and sea rch" according to a report out today.
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the centre for socialjustice research group has called for a zero—tolerance approach similar to a model used in glasgow, which the csj's chair, iain duncan smith, has described as a "proven blueprint" that could save thousands of lives. injanuary we reported on the success of the glasgow project. it comes as police in london opened their 100th homicide investigation last week — that's since the start of 2018. here with me is andy cook, chief executive of the centre for socialjustice. how would you describe your organisation? in the middle, independent. everybody always says that! well we are a research group and that is why we have gone to glasgow... we're also joined by will linden, deputy director of the scottish violence reduction unit. scotla nd scotland was once labelled the most violent country in the developed
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world in the last few years they have massively reduce the number of stabbings. world in the last few years they have massively reduced the number of stabbings. and joining us via webcam from turkey is ken hinds, chair of haringey‘s independent stop and search monitoring group, which monitors the police carrying out stop and seach in the borough. we are also joined via webcam from london by dal babu, a former chief superintendent with the metropolitan police. welcome, all of you. firstly, what are you recommending? we are recommending the group violence intervention programme which worked so well in america and in glasgow, as you cited. we are recommending that that is brought into london and england. in fact, the centre for socialjustice produced a report ten yea rs socialjustice produced a report ten years ago saying the same things and it wasn't enacted upon and we are rehashing the same things, saying listen to this. in other areas it has worked so well and we just haven't done it, hook, line and sinker. what does it mean? their three parts to it. the first part focuses on the major areas that have
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big issues. focusing and on picking those rather than a blanket approach across the whole city. second is drawing in the group leaders and community leaders from that whole borough together to look at what intervention, programmes, early intervention, programmes, early intervention is needed. and the final part we call visible leadership. things like stop and search and more community policing drawn on, criticalfor search and more community policing drawn on, critical for those three parts. -- policing going on. the police have stop and search powers. yes, but it has been reduced and how much it has been used over the last 5-10 much it has been used over the last 5—10 years. much it has been used over the last 5-10 years. they would see because it is intelligence led? they would say that, and of course you can keep that intelligence led, but there has almost been a reluctance to use it forfear almost been a reluctance to use it for fear of retribution in different ways, and lots of things have been said about whether it is kind of
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racist in how it is used, etc, but... when theresa may was home secretary, as you know, she acknowledged it cost a lot of division within communities. absolutely, but when we went back out to these communities —— it caused a lot of division. when we went out to these communities the bigger there was everything going on with the murders and everything happening and they would much prefer a proactive approach. how much have cuts the police officer numbers got to do with the rise in violent crime, in the capital? lots of people, particularly the mayor, is particularly citing that is the reason. i always think, you know, people who say, nothing can be done u nless people who say, nothing can be done unless huge money is invested, because in effect they are saying nothing can be done...” because in effect they are saying nothing can be done... i am not sure anybody is saying that, but they are pointing out a reduction of 20,000 in police numbers since 2010, it is likely to have an impact on crime.” think what this is about is focused resource in. in lots of other areas they have focused their resources. we sought something fantastic going
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on 6000 officers deployed in camden, that kind of sensible, intelligent policing in that way, focused in the area. to be clear, do you think a reduction of 20,000 police officers across the country has any link with across the country has any link with a rise in crime, or not? i think it definitely plays a part but i don't think it is the major part. thank you. let me bring in will linden. thank you for talking to us. in january we did a film with your collea g u es january we did a film with your colleagues and other co—workers in the area, about how you have managed to reduce drastically the number of stabbings, and it is because you ta ke stabbings, and it is because you take a different approach, you take a health led approach to the victims of stabbings. just explain to our audience again what that means. of stabbings. just explain to our audience again what that meansm is quite simple. this is about understanding what the drivers of the violence or the behaviour is. understanding what is causing it and tackling a root cause rather than dealing with a symptom. if you look
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at mason crane, for example, violence with a knife, a weapon, a behaviour. why did a young man or women choose to get involved with gangs? if you get to the root of that, you can act to start to engender some form of behavioural change, and that is what the public health approach is about, behavioural change, about a community focused approach where we are all coming together rather than just dealing with the end point, the violence, the symptoms that come with it. in practicalterms, it can meana with it. in practicalterms, it can mean a victim of a horrific stabbing being spoken to in hospital, by workers, to say, "look, do you need some help getting off the drugs? you need some help finding a job? the needs help finding somewhere to live?" yeah, it is about certainty of action. and they mentioned the focus of the model before that we tried out in 2008 on our youth gang issue, and the kind of consistency
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in the approach from policing whereby if you do something where you are going to do something bad, you are going to do something bad, you know, it is the same way you do interventions. if you want someone to come off drugs, to find work, get back into education, you have to look for those teachable moments. you have to look for those points they want to change, and when they do you have to react, you have to provide services, you have to provide services, you have to provide support, because that is how you can then get work done. let me bring in ken hinds and dal babu, ken hinds joining bring in ken hinds and dal babu, ken hindsjoining us from his holiday so we are grateful for that. the mayor of london says he has seen an increase in weapons and intelligence led stop and search as well as funding the new violent crime task force, taking knives and weapons off london's streets particularly in high crime boroughs. he is also investing in a new young londonerlondoners‘ fund contributing ina new londonerlondoners‘ fund contributing in a new approach towards violent crime prevention. is it working? no,
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it is not. i believe it is also adding to the escalation in the violence we are experiencing. it is quite clear that, you know, these things have been tried over the last 40 years and haven't worked. what it has resulted in is two writes, 1981, the bricks and try it, and in 2011 —— two riots, in brixton in 1981, and in 2011 in tottenham. and the no suspicion law, the stop and outlaw, it is being used. when the centre for socialjustice suggests there should be an increase in stop and search, what you say to that?” would say there is an increase, in harrogate, for example, in april, you know, in march there were 400 stop and searchs and in april it was close to 900, but what has happened is quite clearly not an increase in detection or stopping people, stopping weapons or knives, it is an increase under the misuse of drugs
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act, specifically marijuana... let me bring in dal babu, then, a former superintendent with the net. what you think of some other recommendations, the suggestions from this report today? nothing new. the police have already doing this. they have an al capone take principle where they target gang members, they have intervention, they work with other agencies. they work with voluntary organisations. there is nothing new that has been said in that report and nothing the police are not doing. i think the key element here and i think i am not entirely sure the gentleman from the centre actor answered your question, it is about resources. we had 820,000 reduction —— we have had a 20,000 reduction in police officers, and support workers, support staff reduced, so officers are not there to do this often search. the rushing around doing the 999 calls and we need to look at the
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london based solution. —— they are rushing around. it is great to see the success we have in glasgow but it is by and large monoculture, and needs of the size of london. london has 8.5 million people. all sorts of people from an arty backgrounds, so we need to look at something specific to london, but it will only work if you have resources my not onlyjust in the police but also in the support services. —— people from minority backgrounds. it is notjust about community response but also about community response but also about having stop and search which is intelligence led. i think in 1981 when we had a huge increase in stop and search it led to the brixton disorders. how do you respond to that, andy cook? as i said it is not the be all and end all, which i totally acknowledge, the stop and search, and it has to work with the community, where the intelligence ultimately comes from, as the community sits down together and it is done together, what we are
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advocating for. the line about london being so different that it has to have its own unique thing, we just don't buy that. this approach is used by 77 cities across the world and it has seen huge success across those 77 cities including places like boston, cincinnati and all that, so i think thatis cincinnati and all that, so i think that is a bit of a get out phrase. thank you all very much. i wish we could have devoted more time but thank you for coming on the programme. andy cook, will linden, dal babu and ken hinds, thank you for your time. just a couple of m essa g es to for your time. just a couple of messages to end on regarding our exclusive report from the refugee camp on the island of lesbos. one e—mail. "i am shocked and virtually in tears, watching a man from kurdistan with the little girl crying. no one can violate human rights like this. it seems a blatant violation of people's human rights within the eu." thank you for your company today. thanks for getting in touch as well. bbc newsroom live is
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next. have a good day. hello, good morning. nota hello, good morning. not a great deal of rain in the forecast over the next few days. it will stay dry for many of us, some spells of sunshine. still quite cloudy at the moment as you can see from our weather watcher in leeds, but the global break—up from time to time especially across the south of england during the afternoon —— the cloud will break up. not sold towards the west of northern ireland and the west of scotland, rain around location and sticking around for much of the afternoon. eastern scotla nd for much of the afternoon. eastern scotland having sunnier spells and the maximum temperature this afternoon of about 17—21. this band of rain will south—eastward and break—up as it does so. there may be some showers developing in the south—east of england on the early
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pa rt south—east of england on the early part of wednesday morning. overnight temperatures down to about 14, relatively mild in the south—east, and a little more chilly further north and west. during wednesday, those showers in the south—east will clear away. the rain in the north—west will also fizzle away. a band of cloud moving into the south—east. for many, then, a dry day, and increasing amounts of sunshine. bye— bye. this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at 11am. on her first trip to africa as prime minister, theresa may calls for a new trade and security partnership between the uk and the continent. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa,
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with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions. the prime minister was greeted by local school children on day one of her four day trip to africa. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. president trump announces flags at the white house and other public
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