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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 28, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at ham. on her first trip to africa as prime minister, theresa may calls for a new trade and security partnership between the uk and the continent. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions. the prime minister was greeted by local school children on day one of her four day trip to africa. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. president trump announces flags at the white house and other public buildings will be returned to half mast after criticism of his response to the death ofjohn mccain. also this hour: we'll be looking at a new online map that marks
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the location of plastic waste littering scotland's coastline. it's hoped the new aerial survey will allow scientists to work out where pollution is coming from, and help volunteers clean up. and the stars of this year's strictly come dancing are introduced to fans at a glitzy launch in central london. good morning. it is tuesday the 28th of august. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the prime minister has begun a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk — based on shared prosperity and security. it's her first visit to the the continent since becoming prime minister. after arriving in cape town, she gave a speech pledging
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£4 billion in support for african economies. after a bilateral meeting with south african president, she is expected to visit robben island, where nelson mandela was imprisoned. tomorrow, theresa may will fly to the nigerian capital abuja, before travelling to lagos to meet victims of modern slavery. on thursday, she will visit kenya for talks with president kenyatta. in her speech in cape town this morning she outlined her committment to the relationship between the uk and africa, built on shared prospertity and security. asa as a minister of a trading nation, i wa nt to as a minister of a trading nation, i want to see strong african economies that british businesses can do trade with in a free and fair fashion. whether creating new customers or opportunities for british investors, oui’ opportunities for british investors, our integrated global economy will mean it is good news for british
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people as well as african people. that is why i am delighted that we will today confirm plans to carry over the european union's economic partnership agreement with the southern african... once the eu's deal no longer applies to the uk. the prime minister also announced an ambitious commitment to uk investment in africa. let's go to westminster and get the thoughts of our political correspondent, susana mendonca. tell us more about the investment that theresa may has been talking about. investment that would go into forging those better links between britain and african nations. she wa nts britain and african nations. she wants businesses he had to be able to invest in africa and she talked about how by 2022, she wants britain to be the g—7 nation that has the largest amount of investment in
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africa. post brexit, britain is looking for new partners and to build on trading partners in other parts of the world, so there's no doubt is part of that. but interesting that she said she is going to continue with the current arrangements that the has with six southern african nations with regards to free trade, very much sticking to that. as well as trade, she also talked about the issue of aid. britain currently spends 0.7% of its gdp on international aid. it is quite a controversial issue. theresa may talking that this aid should not just be theresa may talking that this aid should notjust be spent on things like dealing with poverty, but should also be spent on britain's own national... as well as giving a speech today, she also took the opportunity to take a more light—hearted approach. you have
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seen her dancing with children this morning, showing us the lighter side of the prime minister on this trip as well. thank you very much, susannah. let's get the thoughts now of sharon constancon, chair of the south african chamber of commerce here in the uk, to that speech by the prime minister. what did you think? good morning. it is an ambitious plan, a seriously ambitious plan given the way the uk stands with imports and exports to africa. it was interesting that she made no reference of exports from africa. fill in the figure for others in terms of exports and imports. at the moment they are fairly similar. the uk ranks about the seventh for exports at about 3 billion and for imports at about two point something billion ranking eighth. similar rankings with china,
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germany, all the expected usuals which are all g—7 nations, x —— excluding china. i know south africa is only one set of figures that i know well, but i think it will be quite a challenge to beat the us and germany into the race. what areas do you see the investment being most productive in and what are the businesses, products, that are traded between both countries. areas they will probably get involved in are more those they are not trading in as much now, agriculture is probably where africa can provide the greatest value to the world, producing food. it produces employment, utilises the land, using oui’ employment, utilises the land, using our knowledge and technology and expertise, the use of equipment, i think we could change africa quite
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hugely, south africa included. agriculture, ic, a majorarea. showing interest in working in terms of helping businesses run farms rather than only farmers run farms, trying to get them efficient. he said south africa in particular in terms of food production and agriculture, what is the picture across africa? it is mixed, isn't it? it is. what used to be the bread basket of zimbabwe, zimbabwe, it is not, it is a long way to get back to where it was. mining, oil and refined products, that is a big area as well. south africa imports and exports like nigeria does, you end up exports like nigeria does, you end up with both a positive and a negative on the trade account for similar products which sounds interesting. theresa may was talking
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about huge economic growth in africa and you are describing that as well when you look at the figures, though, in terms of trade between africa and the uk and you compare it with the current trade with the eu, it isa with the current trade with the eu, it is a drop in the ocean, isn't it? correct. the total trade between africa and the uk was £28 billion in 2015 and the figure for the eu as a whole was £300 billion. a huge difference. there is no where a africa is going to replace europe. and africa will not fall off the edge of the earth because we do not have the same trade agreements. europe is a major trophy to plan of africa as well. it is a big contributor into africa. —— major trading partner. the knowledge, the law, the transparency of a lot of
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oui’ ways law, the transparency of a lot of our ways of operating, helping educate africa. she alluded to this a few times in her speech, our anti—bribery act, reduction of corruption, the rule of law. she referenced heavily to that and that isn't in the uk can bring, as well as skills, technology and first world education. does the uk have any advantages as a result of leaving the eu 7 any advantages as a result of leaving the eu? i think it is focusing itself in africa and that is the outcome. i would not say that is the outcome. i would not say that isa is the outcome. i would not say that is a natural advantage of than english being something that africa does speak as a second language quite strongly because of the historic influences of the commonwealth. so that helps. the rule of law is more similar, and it has a knowledge of africa that it seems to have not followed as closely as it could happen in the intervening period. ithink closely as it could happen in the intervening period. i think it has advantages, but it is not as a result of europe going. europe has given us a focus on her own economy
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which she unashamedly said this is for us as well. thank you very much. thank you. during theresa may's visit to south africa today, she is set to hand over a world war one relic, which is linked to one of the worst maritime disasters in english waters. the ss mendi was on its way to the western front to support british troops when it sank off the isle of wight in 1917. the ship was rammed by a british merchant ship in thick fog, killing more than 600 south africans. the bell has been on display at southampton‘s seacity museum, but will be handed over south africa's president cyril ramaphosa in cape town. we will have coverage of the ceremony from midday. police in the west midlands have made a direct plea to a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter. detectives want to question janbaz tarin over the stabbing of his ex—partner raneem oudeh and her mother, khaola
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in solihull yesterday. jenny kumar reports. a mother and her daughter stabbed to death. raneem oudeh was 22 years old. her mother, khaola saleem, was 49. their families say they're devastated by their loss. officers are searching for raneem oudeh‘s former partner in connection with the murders. they're appealing to 21—year—old janbaz tarin to hand himself in. the police discovered the women with serious stab wounds here in the early hours of monday morning. they were confirmed dead at the scene near the family's home. lived in solihull for my whole life, never had anything like this happen so close to home. really shocking for me, you know. with the children here and... i don't know what to do. officers have been carrying out forensic tests and house—to—house inquiries, but the main focus is finding mrtarin. west midlands police say if anyone is found to be shielding him,
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they will be prosecuted, but they are warning people not to approach him. jenny kumah, bbc news. kevin reide is in solihull for us. what is the latest? the police say they have been working flat out overnight to try to track down 21—year—old janbaz tarin. we understand they have been searching properties in the birmingham area. we are about seven miles from the centre of birmingham here in solihull. he is wanted in connection the murder of these two women, raneem oudeh and khaola saleem. you can see behind me the forensic operation is still under way outside the property in this residential area of solihull. the police have issued a direct appeal to mr tarin to come forward. it has been issued
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by carolyn caulfield who is leading the investigation here. she said that if there is anyone out there who may be shielding him through a sense of misguided loyalty, then they ought to do the right thing, and they need to be aware that they are committing an offence and will be prosecuted. her message to tarin is that it is vitally important that we get to speak to him as soon as possible, so please do the right thing and let us know where you are. thank you very much. president trump has announced that flags at the white house and public buildings across the united states will be lowered half—mast once more, in honour of senatorjohn mccain, who died on saturday. mr trump, who had clashed repeatedly with mr mccain, faced heavy criticism after flags at some federal buildings were raised yesterday far earlier than would normally be expected. i want to extend our prayers and condolences to the victims of the tragic shooting injacksonville, florida. our hearts and prayers are going to the family of senatorjohn mccain. there's gonna be a lot of activity over the next number of days,
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and we very much appreciate everything that senator mccain has done for our country. an inquest is being held. dexter was 57 and from camden in london. he collapsed in the street and died. his family said that before his death, he was experience stress. what have you been hearing, tom? death, he was experience stress. what have you been hearing, tom7m has been an extraordinary morning here at the coroner ‘s court at this inquest into the death of dexter bristol. what has been argued in court is whether or not the home office policy, tougher immigration laws, contributed to mr bristol's
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death. he collapsed outside his house in march of this year. a previous coroner ‘s court hearing heard he died of natural causes, heart failure. his family argue that heart failure. his family argue that he was caught up in the windrush generation scandal and the fact he couldn't prove he had been here since 1968, he wasjust couldn't prove he had been here since 1968, he was just eight years old, followed his mother over who was working in the nhs. he lost his job last year as a cleaner, his employers sacked him because he didn't have a passport. his family say because he was under stress and pressure because of his immigration status, he therefore had to basically... that it did contribute to his death. it has been an extraordinary morning because there has been a real row in court between the coroner and the council representing the family. the coroner
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got very angry and has since apologised. the family are considering whether they should pull out. we are expecting a statement shortly. thank you. let's go to cape town right now. theresa may is taking part in a ceremony handing over a world war i where rick —— world war i relic. she is giving the bell to the south african president. at the presidential office. the bell was on a ship, ss mendi, it was rammed when it was carrying 600 men, the majority lack south africans. the ship went down and those men
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drowned. 607 lap troops never reached their destination and never served on the western front alongside other allied forces as had been the intention. this bell is being handed back to south africa in the ceremony with the prime minister and the president. band plays they have said it is an important opportunity to... another example of
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the close bonds, historical links and mutual respect that underpins the uk's close relationship with south africa. it is 11:19am. the prime minister begins a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. flags at public building across the united states are to return to half mast after president trump for his response to the death ofjohn mccain. and in sport... jose mourinho says he deserves more respect. the manchester united manager walked out of his news conference after their 3—0 defeat to tottenham. andy murray's through to the second round of the us open after beating james duckworth in four sets. it's his first win in a grand slam match since wimbledon last year as he continues his recovery from injury. and serena williams won her first round match
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against poland's magda linette at flushing meadows. the american will play germany's carina witthoeft next. but world number one simona halep is out. i'll be back with more on those stories later. several people have been injured in further violence in the german city of chemnitz. anti—fascist demonstrators clashed with far—right activists who were protesting after the arrest of a syrian and an iraqi man on suspicion of murder. andrew plant reports. the east german city of chemnitz, in front of its karl marx memorial, several thousand demonstrators chanting anti—immigration slogans. police reported seeing hitler salutes too. tensions here are high after a german man was stabbed on sunday. a syrian and an iraqi man were arrested and a wave of anti—immigration protest took to the streets.
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translation: now is the time to remain calm and level—headed. the police are investigating and the prosecuting authorities are doing theirjobs. chemnitz will not allow the perpetrators of violence and anarchists to run rampant on our streets. flowers have been laid where the 35—year—old man was stabbed to death. in the hours after the killing, far—right groups took to social media to call for public demonstrations against immigration. translation: it does exist, the right—wing extremist scene which rears its head every once in awhile. there is also a certain mixture of different groups. for example, football fans. in chemnitz, counter demonstrators called for calm and tolerance. there are reports that immigrants have suffered abuse in the city in the wake of the stabbing. chancellor angela merkel said germany would not tolerate vigilante justice. local prosecutors said the two suspects were still being questioned.
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andrew plant, bbc news. hospital doctors are calling for the head of the general medical council to stand down over his handling of the case of a paediatrician who was struck off. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter after six—year—old jack adcock died in 2011, but won her bid to be re—instated earlier this month. the actions of the gmc have angered many doctors who said important issues raised by the case, including understaffing, had been ignored. but the gmc said that it was frequently called upon to make difficult decisions to protect patient safety. air pollution can lead to a reduction in intellegence, according to new research. academics in china found that high levels led to significant drops in test scores for language and arithmetic. the average impact was the equivalent of having lost a year of education. testing of the online registration process for eu citizens who want to live and work in the uk after brexit is getting under way.
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up to 4,000 people in the north—west of england are being recruited for the trial, among them, nhs workers, university staff and students. the home office will monitor how smoothly the system works before it is officially launched later this year. what we really need is a lot of outreach work to be done on the part of the home office, as well as a lot of local support, too, indeed, support people through the application process, to ensure that as many applicants as possible get through the process in time and are not left without any paperwork by the time the transition period ends. northern ireland is set to become the nation without a government for the longest period in peacetime. later this month it will pass belgium, which holds the world record of 5111 days without a government. power—sharing between the parties at stormont collapsed in january 2017. now, a social media campaign has
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been started to try to get the country s politicians back into stormont, as emma vardy has been finding out. ..that we have no clue what's going to happen, and nobody properly speaking upfor us... it started with a facebook rant. so i suppose i want to try and do something about it — i want to say to the politicians, "you know something, enough is enogh and we deserve better," and... after dylan quinn vented his frustration at northern ireland's lack of government, he began to get thousands of responses. so, wedeservebetter really grew out of a video that i did, outside my house in fermanagh and it was a call for people to join me in some sort of campaign event to mark the fact that we were going to end up without a government for 589 days and to say this is ludicrous and i asked people tojoin me. he is hoping this will be the wa ke—up call that northern ireland's politicians need. it's about saying, "we need something different here," and they need to resolve that. northern ireland's devolved government in stormont collapsed in january last year, after a bust up over a disastrous
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green energy scheme. since then, talks between the dup and sinn fein to try and restore power—sharing have come to nothing. with no resolution between the main parties, there is currently little expectation of a government returning here any time soon. and for some within the civil service that's leading to frustration, because when it comes to big decisions, their hands are tied. with no ministers to sign things off, there is £1—2 billion worth of projects that have been now put on hold. a major new transport hub for belfast, a new cruise ship quay for the harbour, and the refurbishment of northern ireland's decaying gaelic football stadium are some of the developments that are left in limbo. the economic growth in northern ireland is tracking 0.5% below the rest of the uk as a whole, and we are tracking 3% below the republic of ireland, and something similar across other eu member states.
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if northern ireland is going to succeed as a region, we have to get our economy growing to 2—3% per year, so that's quite a step change from where we are today. and public services are suffering, northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting lists in the uk, with no politicians in place to help them tackle the problem. the waiting lists really extend across every part of the health—care system. there are a significant number of projects that probably need to be acted on, but need a politician in place to sign off on those agreements. northern ireland has now surpassed belgium's world record for being a democratic nation without its own government for the longest. later today, rallies sparked by dylan's campaign will be held across the country to urge politicians to resolve their differences. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. the us city of detroit is remembering aretha franklin before herfuneral there on friday. people will be able to view her coffin
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at the african american museum from today. stevie wonder, chaka khan and jennifer hudson are all expected to perform at an outdoor tribute concert on thursday. now it's time for a look at the weather. here is simon king. thank you. we have got a lot of cloud around across the uk. but there will be some holes, there will be some sunny spells developing through this afternoon, particularly in southern areas. for the time being, at least in suffolk, there is quite cloudy skies. but this skies and rain moving its way into the west of scotland, west of northern ireland as well. to the east of higher ground in scotland, there is good spells of sunshine. sunny spells developing across southern areas. temperatures ranging from 18 to 20 celsius. showers drifting their way
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infor celsius. showers drifting their way in for the early part of wednesday morning. overnight temperatures not particularly low in the south but in northern and western areas turning chilly. wednesday, showers and the south east were clearer way, rain in the north—west moods south east but it will be nothing more than a band of power. many on wednesday it is dry and with sunny spells. similar to today. goodbye. in the hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines. the prime minister is on a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk, based on shared prosperity and security. mrs may delivered her message in a speech in cape town in south africa. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions
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that will see african economies growing by trillions. police in the west midlands are continuing their search for 21—year—old janbaz tarin, who's wanted in connection with the murder of a woman and her daughter in solihull yesterday. president trump has announced flags at the white house and other public buildings will be returned to half mast after critics attacked his response to the death ofjohn mccain. sport now, here's damianjohnson. good morning. pressure is mounting onjose mourinho after his manchester united side lost 3—0 at home to spurs. they could have been in front at half—time but after the break it all changed. hurricane opened the scoring with a great cover. spurs absolutely dominated in the second half. they are one of four
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teams with three wins out of the three in the premier league. jose mourinho clapped the fans for longer than you would have expected given that he lost. he said he was just showing his appreciation, something he felt the lacking in his press conference after the game. just to finish, you know what the result was? 3—0. 3—0. you know what this means? 3—0. but also means, three premierships, and i won more premierships, and i won more premierships alone than the other 19 manager together. three for me, and two for them. respect, manager together. three for me, and two forthem. respect, respect, respect. respect, respect. andy murray is back into the swing of winning at grand slam tournaments. he is through his grand slam clash in the australian open beating australian duckworth in
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three sets. —— forceps. he had surgery on a long—term hip injury at the start of the year. the discomfort i had been feeling in my hip wasa discomfort i had been feeling in my hip was a lot better than was over the grass court season. i've got, you know, a bunch of matches under my belt, a lot more training, and just a better understanding of where my just a better understanding of where d just a better understanding of where my body is out. so that was what helped with the decision. murray is through but kyle edmund is out. the british number one started well, winning the first set but then struggled with the rising temperatures and humidity on court. eventually losing to paolo lorenzi. cameron nori is through after beating jordan johnstone. despite playing well to qualify, heather watson is out in the first round. the aca in a row that watson
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has lost in the first round of the us open. ash micro aca in around. —— the eight year running that she has gone out in the first round of the us open. simona halep has gone out, the first round. there was as much talk about the serena williams outfit as there was against poland's magda linette. she made a straight sets win. she missed last year ‘s challenger because she was expecting her baby. her opponent was expecting her baby. her opponent was ranked 68 in the world and she will lay germany's carina witthoeft which is seeded 17 in the second round. the top and to do was more than just round. the top and to do was more thanjust fashion. round. the top and to do was more than just fashion. the outfit is
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easy to play income aerodynamic with one arm free, so it feels really good. the tutu was easy to play in, i practised it before, so it was fun. more now on our top story, that prime minister theresa may has called for a new partnership between the united kingdom and africa after brexit, during a four—day visit to africa. mrs may told an audience in cape town she wanted the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa by 2022, with britain's private sector companies investing billions. the trip aims to expand trade with africa as britain prepares to leave the eu next year. our africa business editor larry madowo joins us now from nairobi with more on this. how attractive a trade party partner is africa? it is an attractive trade partner for the is africa? it is an attractive trade partnerfor the uk, is africa? it is an attractive trade partner for the uk, certain is africa? it is an attractive trade partnerfor the uk, certain it has been for the eu which is the single largest trading partner, but now the
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uk will have to do it alone starting next year. that is why the premise thatis next year. that is why the premise that is bringing her brexit road show as it were to south africa, the biggest trading partner with the uk. very rich in minerals, so they will be continuing to access the british market after brexit. she will be heading to nigeria next, the uk buys a lot of nigerian oil and sent it back whence its refined to nigeria, and then to kenya. in the prime minister says she was the uk to be the biggest investor in africa by 2020 in the g-7, the biggest investor in africa by 2020 in the g—7, how much of a climate that? it is quite a claim because now at the moment the uk is at the bottom of the ladder of the g-7. at the bottom of the ladder of the g—7. even though the uk's direct
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investment is slightly lower than germany or the us, the amount of trade and the volumes of trade, the importand trade and the volumes of trade, the import and export from the uk and africa, there is a huge discrepancy. china is at the top of that, the volume of trade that china does in africa is $188 billion, compared to the uk which is $53 billion. you can see the huge discrepancy. is it at pick and choose or can everyone expand in the same way? how does africa make the choices on who the trading partners are going to the? that is the interesting bit to talk about, the prime minister is here before the african leaders are going to beijing to attend a form on chinese african cooperation and coming back with goodies, as it were, new roads, railways and ports, they will have investment into the private sector. the prime minister
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is saying while she's here, she's an advocate for the free market and an advocate for the free market and an advocate for the free market and an advocate for free trade, and africans then have to compare, do we have to do business with the uk and stand—alone stand—alone from the eu, or someone more friendly like china? they will often prefer bigger markets. other specifics coming from is theresa may on what is on offer? not quite specifics, but she has put together 29 business leaders who represent what she calls the best ingenuity of british commerce in technology, hospitality and lots of other industries. she hopes that these will be able to speak to their cou nterpa rts these will be able to speak to their counterparts in south africa, nigeria and kenya and sign specific deals. she does an omnibus offer and then you have to pick and choose as
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then you have to pick and choose as the africans to see what works for the africans to see what works for the specific countries. the trade secretary liam fox has been in singapore for trade meetings where he has been discussing the chances of a brexit deal. earlier this month the trade secretary had said that the odds of a no—deal brexit were 60—40. but he says now there is increasing engagement by european capitals. it is difficult to be scientific about these things. what i think is there is an increased focus on the need to get an agreement with the united kingdom. that doesn't mean that necessarily we would get one, but i think that if you get outside europe and you look at it from the outside, and here we are having talked to investors in singapore, their view is that this is notjust a debate between britain britain and the european union it has a global context. and if there are impediments to trade and investment that appear in europe as a consequence of this process, it will send a signal to the rest of the world's investors about how open europe is for business.
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the us and mexico have agreed to revamp nafta, the north american free trade agreement, in what donald trump called a "really good deal" for both countries. canada — the other member of nafta — is yet to agree to the new terms and will hold more discussions today. david willis reports from washington. it's a big day for trade. big day for our country. a lot of people thought we'd never get here. it is, in his words, an incredible deal and the president wanted his mexican counterpart to share in the celebrations. i believe the president is on the phone. enrique? which he did... once a white house official had worked out how to divert the call to speakerphone. it's an incredible dealfor both parties. most importantly it's an incredible dealfor the workers and for the citizens of both countries. details of the deal remain sketchy, but its intended to replace the existing nafta agreement,
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which donald trump has consistently branded a disaster for american manufacturing. the new deal would keep more car park production within nafta, part production within nafta, something that's good for mexico, and boost the number of parts that are made in factories paying the us minimum wage, something that's good for america. but where does that leave the other signatory to the deal, canada? playing catch—up it would seem. i'll be terminating the existing deal and going into this deal. we'll start negotiating with canada relatively soon, they want to negotiate very badly. mexico wants canada on—board. 80% of its trade is with north america. but at a rally in mexico city, mr pena nieto seemed relieved to have at least reached agreement with one of his countries' principal trading partners just a few months before he is due to leave office. translation: we've reached an agreement regarding the main
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topics of importance for both countries. let's remember that after the arrival, a little over a year ago, of the new us government, quite frankly we were faced with uncertainty and doubt in regards to what would happen, especially the commercial relationship between us. talks with canada are due to get under way later today. mr trump's relationship with his northern neighbours hasn't always been easy, and he's making clear, if canada doesn't come on board, the old north american free trade agreement will go from three members to two. david willis, bbc news, washington. marine conservationists in scotland have created an interactive map to try and combat plastic pollution washing up on the coast. it's hoped it will help guide those of us who want to roll up our sleeves and clean our beaches, as well as scientists and experts who want to work out where the rubbish is coming from. lorna gordon has been
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finding out more. taking to the skies in the war against litter. i am going on a flight with the volunteers pinpointing hotspots where plastic rubbish is washing in from the sea. this is a typical, sort of, patrol height and patrol speed. as you can see, things are moving fast reasonably quickly. you can see in some of these inlets there are bits and pieces. there is a fishing net or something. absolutely, you can see it there. have you found it quite an eye opener? absolutely. from the east coast, the north, the south, the west, the volunteer crews have been methodically crisscrossing scotland's coastline. from the air, flying at the heights ofjust a few hundred feet, you get a unique perspective of the plastic rubbish blighting our shores. from beautiful sandy beaches like this one, to more remote rocky inlets hard to reach by foot, thousands of miles of scotland's coastline are being photographed and surveyed.
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every photo, every bit of footage, shedding more light on the challenges faced. i feel pretty passionate about this problem. the trouble is, i think that people just don't realise the problem exists because nobody has found the stuff before. the reason you haven't found it is because it is almost impossible to see from the sea and it's almost the land, because these sites are so isolated. light aircraft are the only real way of finding this stuff. so we have got everything here. we have plastic fish boxes boxes, footballs... from the air, it looks shocking but on the ground it is even worse. this is where the photos are going to have so many different uses, we can see this litter but we are also going to work with universities, with scientists to figure out where is it coming from? can we stop it at source? is it coming from certain places, is to coming form certain outlets, or do we need to go right to the top of government to say we need laws changes to actually stop
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this entering the oceans in the first place. you need a hand? yeah, please, thanks. some of the areas are tough, sometimes dangerous to reach, but those who know the shoreline well say the map will be a big help. so part of myjob is to visit the most fantastic coast in the world and i suppose i get to those remote places and ifind places that are full of plastic and sometimes i gather it all together and i'm carrying it back and i think am i really going to make a difference? that is where this project will help, it will open it up to a much wider audience. the hope is highlighting where the worst of the waste is washing up will prompt more action to stem the tide of marine litter scarring some parts of scotland's beautiful coastline. lorna gordon, bbc news. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister begins a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk. police in the midlands
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continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. flags at public building across the united states are to return to half mast after president trump is criticised for his response to the death ofjohn mccain. in the business news. it's crunchtime for countrywide. shareholders will today vote on £140 million rescue plan designed to prevent save the stuggling estate agents from collapse. the firm employs nearly 10,700 staff and operates under about 50 brand names including hamptons international and bairstow eves. last week, the take—up of new shares, part of the emergency fund—raise, fell short at 73%. japanese car—maker toyota is to invest £387 million in uber and expand a partnership to develop self—driving cars. the firm said this would involve
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the "mass—production" of autonomous vehicles that would be deployed on uber‘s ride sharing network. home insurance customers are penalised by a so—called loyalty penalty of an extra £75 a year, that's according to consumer group, which? it says people who fail to switch providers are often charged much more than new customers who shop around. estate agency group countrywide has raised £140 million from investors, despite issuing a profit warning as it struggles to deal with a slowing property market. the uk's biggest estate agency group said injune that it wanted to raise £140 million to cut its debt by half. but it also had to abandon its plan pay £20 million to its top three executives, depending on its share price over the next three years, after shareholders made it known that they were less than pleased with the proposed pay—out.
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russ mould, investment director at aj bell, joins us now nice to see you this morning. talk through this because the news is changing as we have heard this morning. crucially, many people might not have heard of countrywide that they might have heard of some of its brands? yes, it had 850 branches around the knighted kingdom so it's a well established firm, multiple different brands. we have to ask yourself how they got themselves in this position. there are external factors, uk slough themselves in this position. there are externalfactors, uk slough —— housing market slowdown and stamp duty changes, and online competition from people like purple bricks. also internal organisation failing and their digital online offering is wea k their digital online offering is weak and they have got a lot of debts. it's not a problem when you
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have a lot of profit and you can pay the interest easily, but not if you are not making much. it's interesting how the markets change. we're used to talking about things like retailers facing online competition and it is now the same for estate agents? its price transparency, it's easy for book the logon and see what people are offering in terms of fees, and commission, and countrywide was slow to adapt. most of the investors are putting in their pocket again today but those who contributed 30 or £40 million last year to fund its digital roll—out will be a bit miffed because that policy hasn't worked out and they are having to conjure be more cash today. we should not underestimate how important today was because if they had not got the deal, they would
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have gone under? the share price is down 90% over for five years. they we re down 90% over for five years. they were struggling to pay debt, its lenders have been supportive and they have allowed it to take on more debt to give it more reading space. this cash raising today cut the interest bill by £6 million a year and gives the new executive chairman time to turn the business around, cut costs, spring staff and expertise back in and bring back the customers that they have lost. what can they do? with the rise of online estate agent and a slowing housing market that we know about, it's a tough time to be an estate agent. not very easy when you have 850 branches because as soon as your revenue drops a little bit your profits drop an awful lot. you fighting online rivals who do not have a cost basis so they have to cut costs. they need to work on their digital offering and provide fantastic service at competitive prices and that will give them a chance. thank you very much. the
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trials and tribulations of countrywide. let's return now to those findings that insurers are penalising loyal customers according to research released today by the consumer group which? home insurance customers who stick with the same provider can find themselves paying £75 extra per year. the consumer group said those who had held a combined buildings and contents policy for more than a year paid on average £270 annually. however, it said new customers were paying just £195 for the same policy. failing to shop around can cost you dearly as hanahh maundrell, the editor of money.co.uk. loyalty just doesn't pay. insurers will give you a discount in the first year then actually make a loss after that because they know that you're likely to stay with them year after year after year and they can put your premium up and you won't notice. even though the financial regulator now made insurers put the cost of your previous year's policy on your renewal documents, still many people willjust
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renew because, you know, it seems like too much effort. the real issue with home insurance, though, isn't the additional costs that you're paying, it's that if you got a home insurance policy ten years ago, it's probably not going to be fit for purpose any more. so if you came to claim, you wouldn't actually find that the content and buildings that you've got now in your home now would be covered. if you think about the amount of possessions that you have over that time, maybe you get new tvs, maybe you get a new painting or a new piece ofjewellery, or perhaps even a new bike, if your policy doesn't cover those specifically, you could want to go and make a claim but actually it's not going to be covered. certainly the insurance industry has woken up to this and the association of british insurers and the brokers‘ organisation as well have set out guiding principles for their members who are going to look at customers who have been with the insurers for over five years, and take action to review
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whether they're actually, their premiums are being priced fairly. that's going to take a couple of years, though, so the key thing is to look at your policy when it is your renewal, ask whether it's still fit for purpose, whether it does what you need to, and if not, go on a comparison website and to get some quotes and compare your options. you don't have to switch. us stocks had a strong session last night as the us and mexico reached a new trade deal. the announcement sent the s&p 500 and the nasdaq to all—time highs, and the dowjones closed above 26,000 for the first time since early february. and it was a pretty broad based rally with manufacturing, materials and tech stocks all on the up. that has translated to europe as well, so strong session for the
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markets. it's almost that time of year again. strictly come dancing will be back on our sceens in september and last night the line up took to the red carpet to celebrate. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson went down to catch up with the contestants. strictly come dancing back for a 16th series, and familiar faces have returned. i hope 2018 brings about fine and fabulous, gorgeous dancing. very keen... i think we've got a very good bunch. they're fresh and keen, i love that. yes, yes. keen! 15 new contestants ready to compete for the glitterball trophy. i don't want to shave my chest. it's hairy, i don't want to shave it. but i think they're going to get it out. i think there's waxing being talked about and i'm so frightened of that. ijust want to enjoy every single moment because it's just, it's so incredible. it feels like you're at a party the entire time. how much as being an athlete and so competitive helped with something like this? definitely because unless something's perfect, i keep doing it until it is perfect, so i think there's a bit of hunger in there, determination.
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yeah. you're starting to scare me a little bit, lauren. yes. # i know she loves you # i understand #. it has been pointed out that some contestants have more of a dance background than others. well, pussycat dolls was a dance troupe. that was over ten years ago and i'm very excited to learn a new skill and learn latin, learn ballroom and hopefully by the end, feel like i canjust hang with the big guys. while dannyjohn—jules, the cat from red dwarf, once strutted his stuff in a wham video. i've never done any of the genres of dance that they do on this show. # tragedy # when the feeling's gone and you can't go on # it's tragedy #. we've all seen the tragedy video. got the moves. will you bust it out, there? bust a move. do you have an advantage? possibly, in the way that i can pick up routines but can i deliver? it's a different thing, it's
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a totally different way of dancing. what's the most complicated dance routine that blue did? a lean. like that, like that, like that... and like that. that was it? that's it! only one dancer has been in every series. it just gets better and better and better. by the way, i'm delighted dan walker's not doing the show. just so you know. dan, i love you, but i'm thrilled you're not doing the show. he hits the ball too far. he hits a golf ball, like, a quarter of a mile. there are new arrivals, though. meet graziano. i'm so excited! look at this. imean... it's everything incredible, a new world for me. while last year's winner was on hand to give some advice. i know exactly how they're feeling. they're going to be really nervous and thinking, "what have i done? why did i agree to do this?" but they'll soon realise it'll be the best and most intense experience of their lives. the contestants have still to find out who their dance partner will be. the pairings will be
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revealed in two weeks' time. colin paterson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. thank you, we have got some dry weather over the next few days, it's going to turn warm as well particularly into next week. for the here and now, still quite cloudy out there, as you can see from this weather watcher photo from suffolk. some sunshine breaking through the clouds across northern part of england, eastern scotland certainly but further west in scotland, a whole bank card associated with a weather front. during whole bank card associated with a weatherfront. during the rest whole bank card associated with a weather front. during the rest of the afternoon, holds developing in the afternoon, holds developing in the cloud so we will see some sunshine particularly across southern england and south wales through the afternoon. across scotla nd through the afternoon. across scotland the rain is moving in across western scotland, the west of northern ireland, it will stick with you for the rest of the afternoon,
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pushing it to the northern isles as well. eastern scotland will remain largely dry, find with sunny spells, temperatures up to 20 celsius. across england and wales, the cloud will break up the touch to give some bright and sunny spells. especially across the south where temperatures will reach 19 to 21 celsius. for this evening and tonight, the rain in the north—west will move southeast, it will break up as it does, and then we're looking at some showers moving in across central and southern areas, the south—east of england for the early hours of wednesday morning. temperature 12 to 14 degrees, a bit more chilly further north and west with some clearing skies. during wednesday, that rain, showers and the south—east will claye, then we have a band of cloud which will move into the south here and then the rain will fizzle away. sunshine developing as the cloud moves southeast, maximum temperatures up to 17 to 22 degrees. into thursday,
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and the rest of the week, high pressure building from the south—west which will become established through thursday. so plenty of dry and sunny weather through thursday morning. a bit more cloud developing into the afternoon. light winds on thursday, and those temperatures fairly similar to the next couple of days so the average for the time of year, 17 to 20,21 degrees. for friday and into the weekend, as i alluded to, it's going to stay largely dry. some cloud at times but sunny spells developing. temperatures remaining in the high teens or low 20s, but in towards the south—east of england by sunday, temperatures 24 sources, and continuing to rise into next week. this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at midday. on her first trip to africa as prime minister, theresa may calls for a new trade and security partnership between the uk
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and the continent. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions. the prime minister was greeted by local school children on day one of herfour day trip. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. president trump announces flags at the white house and other public buildings will be returned to half mast after criticism of his response to the death ofjohn mccain. also this hour, we'll be looking at a new online map that marks the location of plastic waste littering scotland's coastline. it's hoped the new aerial survey will allow scientists to work out where pollution is coming from, and help volunteers clean up. and the stars of this year's
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strictly come dancing are introduced to fans at a glitzy launch in central london. good afternoon. it is tuesday the 28th of august. i am joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the prime minister has begun a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk, based on shared prosperity and security. in her first visit to africa since becoming prime minister theresa may arrived in cape town this morning where she gave a speech pledging £4 billion in support for african economies. tomorrow, theresa may will fly to the nigerian capital abuja before heading to kenya on thursday for talks with president kenyatta. during her speech this morning, the prime minister
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outlined her committment to a closer relationship between the uk and africa. as prime minister of a trading nation, whose success depends on global markets, i want to see strong african economies that british businesses can do business with in a free and fair fashion. whether through creating new customers for british exporters or opportunities for british investors, how integrated global economy means healthy african economies are good news for british people as well as for african people. that is why i am delighted that we will today confirm plans to carry over the european union's economic partnership agreement with the southern african customs union and mozambique once the eu's deal no longer applies to the uk. the prime minister also announced an ambitious commitment to uk investment in africa. by 2022, i want the uk to be the
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g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions. we have the tools to do so. let's go to westminster and get the thoughts of our political correspondent, susana mendonca. tell us more about the scale of what she's talking about here. the prime minister was talking about, in terms of money, she is putting £4 billion into trying to beef up that relationship in terms of investment between britain and african nations. she is putting £4 billion into investing in building up that relationship. also, she is talking about britain becoming the g—7 nation that invests the most in africa by 2022. all of this very much about trying to build
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relationships with countries outside of the european union after brexit. it was quite notable that within her speech she talked about how the current eu free trade agreement that the eu has with six african nations that britain would stick to that. very much about investment and trade. also she talked about the aid budget. britain currently spends 0.7% of its gdp on international aid. it is quite a controversial issue, people have talked whether the money is spent in the right way. she spoke about a change in the way that money is spent in africa, not just dealing with, —— notjust dealing with poverty, but extremism, migration, putting embassies into places where extremism has been more ofan places where extremism has been more of an issue. also dealing with issues cracking down on illicit finance and organised crime. this trip to africa, she is visiting
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three different countries, she marked it in terms of the visit to south africa by handing over something called the mendi bell which is a bell from a ship on which 600 south africans died jarring world war i. she gave that to the president earlier on today. the president earlier on today. the president also had a light—hearted moment. theresa may met schoolchildren and the prime minister was dancing and joining in, showing her light—hearted side. all of this, the need for more investment, is in part linked to what britain does after brexit. not ina what britain does after brexit. not in a position to do trade deals but it wants to be seen to be looking to other nations and other parts of the world in order to build up those ties. in terms of that issue around brexit, we heard a lot about the idea of a no—deal brexit, what we have heard today from number ten,
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they have been reluctant to say whether they would publish any economic impact assessments of what brexit would mean before mps vote on a deal, but what we understand now is that we will be getting some of that detail before mps vote on the final brexit deal later this autumn. thank you. joining me now from stockholm in sweden is lord boateng — former british high commissioner to south africa between 2005—2009. thank you forjoining us. how important is this visit and how much ofa important is this visit and how much of a difference do you think it will make? i think it is very important. a welcome visit. there haven't been a british prime minister in africa for about five years. compare that to the french, the chinese, and others who are regularly in africa full stop the prime minister's lead is welcome, she has brought a delegation of british as most
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people, is talking herself about investment and jobs, these are desperately needed on the continent, so all of that is welcome. i don't think, however, one should underestimate the scale of the task of the need for britain to catch up, to make the most of its historic advantages and ties in terms of trade with africa. and to see africa asa trade with africa. and to see africa as a market opportunity, not simply as a market opportunity, not simply asa as a market opportunity, not simply as a basket case for philanthropy and oda. and when you describe other countries having been investing and paying more attention to africa before is now, look at what china has been doing, building projects including dams, ports, railways, telecommunications, huge amount of chinese investment. when you look at the statistics, trade between china
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and africa, $188 billion. africa and the uk, $36 billion. is it too late for the uk to try to turn things around? i don't think it is too late, but i don't think one should underestimate the urgency of the task and the extent to which we have fallen behind. if you take south africa as an example, yes, britain is one of south africa's main investors into that country, but if you look at the export balance of trade, south africa exports more to us than we do to south africa. if you take the big infrastructure investments that africa needs, i am here in stockholm at world water week, there is a desperate need to connect the poorest of the board to water and sanitation. in africa. to make a success of urban development in africa. the truth of the matter is that there is a huge
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infrastructure investment gap. if britain is going to now focus more on investment in infrastructure, that will be good. if british companies are going to get more engaged with infrastructure development on the continent, in the way that so many of our competitors are, we need to change the mindset of british business. there are some good examples, the stock exchange recently has been showcasing some of africa's best and fastest growing companies and are creating jobs. sometimes, it has to be said, with the active support of the uk and trademark east africa and other initiatives, connecting the poorest of the poor in farms and rural and urban africa to regional and global markets. all of that does require a greater degree of focus in terms of our development assistance, so it is
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actually linked to creating sustainable jobs and employment opportunities for and within africa. but it also needs british business to step up to the mark. sadly, in the past, they haven't always done that. the more the prime minister and liam fox can do to encourage bad and liam fox can do to encourage bad and engage with africa, to stop seeing it simply for a place of humanitarian assistance, but to see it for what it is, a continent of huge opportunity. there was a lot of pressure on labour tech now call formally for a second referendum. do you think it is time for them to change their policy on a second referendum? my concern is development assistance. the internal
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dynamics of politics around brexit, frankly, i'm not the things that are keeping africans awake at night. what ought to keep all of us awake at night, whether we are in africa britain, is how we make the most of our trading relationships to create jobs in africa, in britain. how we do address these issues, which the prime minister has highlighted, forced migration and terrorism, how we address those by addressing issues around water security on the continent, by addressing issues around youth unemployment. what i find encouraging and heartening about the government's approach is that clearly they are putting africa back where it ought to be, much higher up the agenda than it has been not simply on the part of the government but on the part of
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british business. africa has much to contribute to the prosperity of the world and its own development. thank you very much. my pleasure. police in the west midlands have made a direct plea to a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter. detectives want to question janbaz tarin over the stabbing of his ex—partner raneem owda and her mother, howla of his ex—partner raneem oudeh and her mother in solihull yesterday. jenny kumah reports. a mother and her daughter stabbed to death. raneem oudeh was 22 years old. her mother, khaola saleem, was 49. their families say they're devastated by their loss. officers are searching for raneem oudeh‘s former partner in connection with the murders. they're appealing to 21—year—old janbaz tarin to hand himself in. the police discovered the women with serious stab wounds here in the early hours of monday morning. they were confirmed dead at the scene near the family's home. lived in solihull for my whole life, never had anything like this happen so close to home.
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really shocking for me, you know. with the children here and... i don't know what to do. officers have been carrying out forensic tests and house—to—house inquiries, but the main focus is finding mrtarin. west midlands police say if anyone is found to be shielding him, they will be prosecuted, but they are warning people not to approach him. jenny kumah, bbc news. we have got more information through from west midlands police about the victims. police are saying that the younger woman has a two ewald ———year—old son. the older victim is a mother of six. both were folk born in syria. the suspect is an afghan national. raids were carried out in birmingham last night, and there
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we re birmingham last night, and there were also other raids. no further detail of the outcome of those rates but a little bit more detail about the victims there from west midlands police. a coroner has ruled that the home office did not directly cause the death of a 57—year—old man from the windrush generation, who was worried about being deported from britain. dexter bristol, 57, who was from camden in london, collapsed in the street and died, just one day before he was sent a letter apparently suggesting his case had a favourable result. his family said that before his death he was experiencing considerable stress over the possible threat to his british nationality. our correspondent tom burridge is outside the cornoer‘s court with more on this. it has been a remarkable morning here into the inquest of his death. it has been disputed whether or not the home office should be part of this inquest, whether or not tougher immigration laws and the stress that
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they put onto dexter bristol played a significant role in his death or not. dexter bristol came to britain in1968, not. dexter bristol came to britain in 1968, just eight years old, last year he lost his job because he did not have a passport. his family say those tougher immigration laws brought in by the government did cause him undue stress and should be considered at the inquest here. this morning, as you say, the coroner ruled that the home office did not play a significant part and therefore should not be involved in therefore should not be involved in the inquest. it should be said at a previous hearing, the inquest heard that bristol dexter did die of natural causes. he suffered acute heart failure when he collapsed outside his house. what then happened was that the barrister representing his family intervened and try to argue to the coroner that actually other evidence should be considered more and therefore the home office should play a part. at
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that point, the coroner got incredibly angry with the barrister representing mr bristol's family. he got increasingly i wait —— he got increasingly angry, the court session was adjourned and they came back and he came back as a different band, karma, he apologised to the barrister and the family itself. the family have pulled out of today's proceedings at least as they left, we got some reaction from dexter bristol's mother. i think he was very rude. i know he wasn't speaking direct to me, he was very rude. no sympathy for anyone. he just said his own thing and that is all. how has all of this made you feel?m makes me feel disappointed and i feel the same like i'd just lost my
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son the same moment my son died. the feelings i had at that time, i have it now. that was the mother of dexter bristol who died in march of this year, a victim of the windrush scandal. his family say the stress caused by the wind was scandal contributed to his death. the home office said they had no contact with mr bristol but the family argued that that they were still in the process of trying to collate any documentation that they could to prove that he did come over in 1968 before they made the application which they say is a costly process. an update on our headlines on bbc news. the prime minister begins a four—day trip to africa,
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calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man — wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. flags at public buildings across the united states are to return to half mast — after president trump is criticised for his response to the death ofjohn mccain. let's go for a sports update. jose mourinho have asked all respects after the 3—0 defeat. he applauded remaining fans inside old trafford for much longer then you would expect a given they had just lost the match. speculation as to what he was doing but he says he was just showing his appreciation, something he felt was lacking in his press conference after the game. just to finish, what was the result, 3—0.
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3-0. do finish, what was the result, 3—0. 3—0. do you know what this means? 3-0. but it 3—0. do you know what this means? 3—0. but it also means three premiership ‘s and i wonder more premiership ‘s and i wonder more premiership is a loner than the other 19 managers together. sorry for me and two for them. respect. respect, man. respect. johanna konta plays her first—round match respect, man. respect. johanna konta plays herfirst—round match at respect, man. respect. johanna konta plays her first—round match at the us open later. she takes on garcia of france in new york. she hopes to join andy murray in the second round. he beat duckworth in four sets. it was his first best of five sets. it was his first best of five set match in 14 months having had surgery on his hip at the start of the year. another brit is through but watson went out. full details from the reaction available on the bbc sport website and app. there was
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more talk of serena williams. the six time champion made her return to the us open with straight sets win. she missed last year because she was expecting her first which child. she missed last year because she was expecting herfirst which child. she moves on to play the 17th seed. her outfit was about more than just fashion, apparently. it is easy to play in, aerodynamic with the one arm free and so it feels really good. the tutu is easy to play in i practised in it before. that was fun. that is all the sport for now. we will be back with a full round—up at around we will be back with a full round—up ataround 1:30pm. we will be back with a full round—up at around 1:30pm. thank you very
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much. president trump has announced that flags at the white house and public buildings across the united states will be lowered to half—mast once more, in honour of senatorjohn mccain, who died on saturday. mr trump, who had clashed repeatedly with mr mccain, faced heavy criticism after flags at some federal buildings were raised yesterday, far earlier than would normally be expected. i want to extend our prayers and condolences to the victims of the tragic shooting injacksonville, florida. our hearts and prayers are going to the family of senatorjohn mccain. there's gonna be a lot of activity over the next number of days, and we very much appreciate everything that senator mccain has done for our country. hospital doctors are calling for the head of the general medical council to stand down over his handling of a paediatrician who was struck off. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter after six—year—old jack adcock died in 2011, but won her bid to be re—instated earlier this month. the gmc said that it was frequently
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called upon to make difficult decisions to protect patient safety. air pollution can lead to a reduction in intellegence, according to new research. academics in china found that high levels led to significant drops in test scores for language and arithmetic. the average impact was the equivalent of having lost a year of education. several people have been injured in further violence in the german city. anti—fascist demonstrators clashed with far—right activists who were protesting after the arrest of a syrian and an iraqi man on suspicion of murder. andrew plant reports. the east german city of chemnitz, in front of its karl marx memorial, several thousand demonstrators chanting anti—immigration slogans.
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police reported seeing hitler salutes too. tensions here are high after a german man was stabbed on sunday. a syrian and an iraqi man were arrested and a wave of anti—immigration protest took to the streets. translation: now is the time to remain calm and level—headed. the police are investigating and the prosecuting authorities are doing theirjobs. chemnitz will not allow the perpetrators of violence and anarchists to run rampant on our streets. flowers have been laid where the 35—year—old man was stabbed to death. in the hours after the killing, far—right groups took to social media to call for public demonstrations against immigration. translation: it does exist, the right—wing extremist scene which rears its head every once in awhile. there is also a certain mixture of different groups. for example, football fans. in chemnitz, counter demonstrators called for calm and tolerance. there are reports that immigrants have suffered abuse in the city in the wake of the stabbing. chancellor angela merkel said germany would not tolerate vigilante justice.
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local prosecutors said the two suspects were still being questioned. andrew plant, bbc news. children as young as ten attempting suicide, appalling, unsanitary conditions and almost constant horrific violence — that's life inside a refugee camp in europe. moria camp, on the greek island of lesbos, is the first stop for many people fleeing violence in syria and beyond. it has a capacity for around two thousand refugees yet houses it has a capacity for around 2,000 refugees yet houses around 8,000. catrin nye gained rare access to the camp for the victoria derbyshire programme. the paradise greek holiday island of lesbos. also home to the refugee camp described as the worst on the planet. so, we've been given 45 minutes only to go around the camp. this is the section
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for the newest arrivals. there's 7,500 people in here, and it has capacity for between 2,000 and 3,000. food is scarce, conditions are appalling and violence is almost constant. fewer refugees are arriving on this island than in previous years, but they're not leaving. as part of the eu—turkey deal, they're being held on lesbos rather than moving to the mainland. while we're filming at the camp, two people are stabbed in the queue for food. police block us from getting near the scene. always the same pattern. it starts with a fight, now it was for the food line. but people got stabbed.
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and now it's always something between different communities. msf say conditions are leading to deep trauma. they have children as young as ten attempting suicide. we are reporting this to the public system, to unhcr, to the ministry, to say, look, we have children as young as ten years old who try to suicide. and there is no child psychiatric or psychologist in this island. and despite the fact that we push to move these children to athens as soon as possible, it's not happening. ali, along with many of kurdish people, fled moria after a huge fight there in may. largely between kurdish and arab men. iron bars were used to beat people. do you think there are dangerous people in moria? despite conditions,
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boats keep coming. almost everyone on this one from afghanistan. hello, hello. they celebrate landing somewhere at least warm and safe. ——they celebrate landing somewhere at least more safe. but are unaware of the new trauma that lies ahead. time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. it is not exactly turned into the brightest of mourning. a fairamount of into the brightest of mourning. a fair amount of cloud out there, a few glimmers of brightness as well. through the rest of the hours to
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noon “— through the rest of the hours to noon —— afternoon, not much is going to change. temperatures around 16 to 21 celsius. the best chance for sunshine in the south coast of england and eastern scotland. meanwhile, cloud will bring rain and a strengthening breeze. it will bring this band offering into northern england and wales. tomorrow, some of the shower is run across parts of kent, suffolk and norfolk. weatherford fading away as it sinks south eastwards will stop many places having another dry day tomorrow with bells of sunshine. a bit of humility towards the south—east. most places dry and in the south east it will warm up over the south east it will warm up over the weekend. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the prime minister is on a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership
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between the continent and the uk, based on shared prosperity and security. mrs may delivered her message in a speech in cape town in south africa. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions. the prime minister was greeted by local school children on day one of her four day trip to africa. police in the west midlands are continuing their search for 21—year—old janbaz tarin, who's wanted in connection with the murder of a woman and her daughter in solihull yesterday. president trump has announced flags at the white house and other public buildings will be returned to half mast after critics attacked his response to the death ofjohn mccain. northern ireland is set to become the nation
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without a government for the longest period in peacetime. later this month it will pass belgium, which holds the world record of 541 days without a government. power—sharing between the parties at stormont collapsed in january 2017. now, a social media campaign has been started to try to get the country's politicians back into stormont, as emma vardy has been finding out. ..that we have no clue what's going to happen, and nobody properly speaking upfor us... it started with a facebook rant. so i suppose i want to try and do something about it — i want to say to the politicians, "you know something, enough is enogh and we deserve better," and... after dylan quinn vented his frustration at northern ireland's lack of government, he began to get thousands of responses. so, wedeservebetter really grew out of a video that i did, outside my house in fermanagh and it was a call for people to join me in some sort of campaign event to mark the fact that we were going to end up without a government for 589 days and to say this is ludicrous and i asked people tojoin me.
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he is hoping this will be the wa ke—up call that northern ireland's politicians need. it's about saying, "we need something different here," and they need to resolve that. northern ireland's devolved government in stormont collapsed in january last year, after a bust up over a disastrous green energy scheme. since then, talks between the dup and sinn fein to try and restore power—sharing have come to nothing. with no resolution between the main parties, there is currently little expectation of a government returning here any time soon. and for some within the civil service that's leading to frustration, because when it comes to big decisions, their hands are tied. with no ministers to sign things off, there is £1—2 billion worth of projects that have been now put on hold. a major new transport hub for belfast, a new cruise ship quay for the harbour, and the refurbishment of northern ireland's decaying gaelic football stadium are some of the developments that are left in limbo.
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the economic growth in northern ireland is tracking 0.5% below the rest of the uk as a whole, and we are tracking 3% below the republic of ireland, and something similar across other eu member states. if northern ireland is going to succeed as a region, we have to get our economy growing to 2—3% per year, so that's quite a step change from where we are today. and public services are suffering, northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting lists in the uk, with no politicians in place to help them tackle the problem. the waiting lists really extend across every part of the health—care system. there are a significant number of projects that probably need to be acted on, but need a politician in place to sign off on those agreements. northern ireland has now surpassed belgium's world record for being a democratic nation without its own government for the longest. later today, rallies sparked by dylan's campaign will be held across the country to urge politicians to resolve
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their differences. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster has been speaking this morning accusing sinn fein of being unwilling to break the political deadlock. our ireland correspondent chris page is in stormont. what has she been saying, and what of the hopes of the deadlock being broken? the hopes of the deadlock being broken are still pretty slim to say the least. this morning the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster and members of the stormont family held a news conference and unveiled a banner calling on sinn fein to end its boycott. that is how the dup seen things, sinn fein boycotting the situation, they lay all the blame on the fact that northern ireland is without a cupboard at sinn fein's feat. arlene foster repeated the
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view she had laid out for some months for the way to break this deadlock is for everyone to go back into the power—sharing executive together and then have a parallel process to resolve the issues which continue to divide them, there are significant of which is where there should be legal recognition of the irish language, new recognition to protect and promote the language. sinn fein see things very differently from the dup, they say the dup is standing in the way of people's writes in refusing to bring in legislation on the irish language, something which is very important culturally, they would say, two members of the irish nationalist community in northern ireland, and they have have differences with the dup on the things like same—sex marriage, they cannot get married in northern ireland, the any part of the uk and ireland, the any part of the uk and ireland where that is the case, and sinn fein say that his denying people's writes. when asked about
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any discussion on the resumption of negotiations, arlene foster said that that had not happened over the summer. the chasm between the two parties had not narrowed at all and as northern ireland passes this unenviable landmark of belgium of not having a government for so long, more than 500 days, there is no end in sight to the impasse. this all in the report the social media campaign to try and get the politicians to sort this out, how much public pressure is building in northern ireland to get it resolved? certainly there has been a great deal of frustration over the last 18 months while stormont has not be operating. there have not been big demonstrations on the street, we will see if that changes tonight when these rallies being held tonight across the country under the banner of we deserve better. this landmark today, northern ireland going beyond belgium in terms of the
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length of time it has had without government in peace time, it will not be in the guinness book of records because the writers have said in the book that northern ireland is not a sovereign nation state, its still under the control of westminster so it does not qualify for a world record. but people have seen this as a landmark in terms of the seriousness of the situation we're in, particularly people in working in this public sector, schools and universities, who say, when is this going to go on till, when will we know what our budget is? there are all of these positions that have not been made stacking up, when will they be made? it will be very interesting to see the turnout at the rallies tonight. the body of singer aretha franklin, known as the queen of soul, is being held in state at the african american museum in detroit so allow the public to pay their respects to the star. she is to be kept on view in the museum until herfuneral on friday. stevie wonder, chaka khan and jennifer hudson are all expected to perform at an outdoor tribute concert on thursday.
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our north america correspondent rajini vaidya nathan is at detroit's african american museum. where the singer is lying in state. this week kicks off a week of remembrance for the queen of soul, aretha franklin, who was born here in the trite and kept her links to this city throughout her life. —— born here in detroit. we show you the queue often museum where she is lying in state today and tomorrow, we got here before 7am and there we re we got here before 7am and there were already people here who had camped out to make sure they could pay their respects. not too long ago, aretha franklin's casket, a gold casket, arrived in a fleet of ca rs gold casket, arrived in a fleet of cars and has now been taken into the museum and in about an hour and a half from now people will be able to go and pay their respects in person.
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a group of ladies here who have been queueing since the early morning. what's your name? wash—out. queueing since the early morning. what's your name? wash-out. you are from detroit's? yes, originally, i am from michigan. the many faces of aretha franklin there. what does she mean to detroit? , my god, that's not even the right even words can say what she means. just a phenomenal natural. useful, queen of soul. you will saying earlier how significant to this place she was because she never gave up her ties. no, she always came back, internationally, she always mentioned us, she loved us. we were at the church yesterday where she grew up and her father was the preacher, they were saying that she a lwa ys preacher, they were saying that she always donated the community and came back and gave. how much did that mean to you? it meant a lot to make it shows how apparent she was asa make it shows how apparent she was as a woman and how thoughtful and
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loving she was of people and of all people, natalie came from. what was it like to see the —— no matter where she came from. what was it like to see the golden casket, she a lwa ys like to see the golden casket, she always travel in style, same today? 0h, always travel in style, same today? oh, my god, it was amazing, they did it out for a recess. when she came m, it out for a recess. when she came in, it was like, wow! why do they mean so much for you all to be his you could pay respects in person?m my life, every song she made broad miata somethings, she made songs, you might have been in a situation, you might have been in a situation, you played her songs, whichever one which was for your situation, she bought yard. you are greedy would singer aretha song. —— you greedy would think and aretha song. berwick macro before # every morning i wake up
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# every morning i wake up # before at a time make up # before at a time make up # combing my hair now # combing my hair now # wondering what just # combing my hair now # wondering whatjust to wear now # wondering whatjust to wear now # i # wondering whatjust to wear now #isaya # wondering whatjust to wear now # i say a little prayerfor you. rest in peace, queen of soul. we will talk to you when you came out of the museum. there you have it from some of the fans in the queue. there will be a private funeral on friday, there will be performers like stevie wonder and jennifer hudson, and will clinton is one of the speakers. we also —— bill clinton. we also understand that former president barack obama have been invited, and george w bush, we do not know if they will attend in person. marine conservationists in scotland have created an interactive map to try and combat plastic pollution washing up on the coast. its hoped it will help guide those of us who want to roll up our sleeves and clean our beaches,
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as well as scientists and experts who want to work out where the rubbish is coming from. lorna gordon has been finding out more. taking to the skies in the war against litter. i am going on a flight with the volunteers pinpointing hotspots where plastic rubbish is washing in from the sea. this is a typical, sort of, patrol height and patrol speed. as you can see, things are moving fast reasonably quickly. you can see in some of these inlets there are bits and pieces. there is a fishing net or something. absolutely, you can see it there. have you found it quite an eye opener? absolutely. from the east coast, the north, the south, the west, the volunteer crews have been methodically crisscrossing scotland's coastline. from the air, flying at the heights ofjust a few hundred feet, you get a unique perspective of the plastic rubbish blighting our shores. from beautiful sandy beaches like this one, to more remote rocky inlets hard to reach by foot, thousands of miles of
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scotland's coastline are being photographed and surveyed. every photo, every bit of footage, shedding more light on the challenges faced. i feel pretty passionate about this problem. the trouble is, i think that people just don't realise the problem exists because nobody has found the stuff before. the reason you haven't found it is because it is almost impossible to see from the sea and it's almost the land, because these sites are so isolated. light aircraft are the only real way of finding this stuff. so we have got everything here. we have plastic fish boxes boxes, footballs... from the air, it looks shocking but on the ground it is even worse. this is where the photos are going to have so many different uses, we can see this litter but we are also going to work with universities, with scientists to figure out where is it coming from? can we stop it at source? is it coming from certain places, is it coming from certain outlets, or do we need to go right to the top of government to say we need law changes to actually stop
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this entering the oceans in the first place. you need a hand? yeah, please, thanks. some of the areas are tough, sometimes dangerous to reach, but those who know the shoreline well say the map will be a big help. so part of myjob is to visit the most fantastic coast in the world and i suppose i get to those remote places and ifind places that are full of plastic and sometimes i gather it all together and i'm carrying it back and i think am i really going to make a difference? that is where this project will help, it will open it up to a much wider audience. the hope is highlighting where the worst of the waste is washing up will prompt more action to stem the tide of marine litter scarring some parts of scotland's beautiful coastline. lorna gordon, bbc news. a majorfire has broken out at primark‘s flagship store in belfast, causing the evacuation of shoppers and staff from the building. thick smoke and flames could be seen billowing
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from the top floor of the store, which was recently refurbished. more than 10 fire engines were deployed to the scene, and members of the public as well as motorists are advised to stay away from the area. the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister begins a four—day trip to africa, calling for a new partnership between the continent and the uk. police in the midlands continue their search for a 21—year—old man wanted over the double murder of a mother and daughter in solihull. flags at public buildings across the united states are to return to half mast after president trump is criticised for his response to the death ofjohn mccain. more now on our top story, that prime minister theresa may has called for a new partnership between the united kingdom and africa after brexit, during a four—day visit to africa. mrs may told an audience in cape town she wanted the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa by 2022, with britain's private sector companies
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investing billions. the trip aims to expand trade with africa as britain prepares to leave the eu next year, as our africa business editor larry madowo explains. it is an attractive trade partner for the uk, certain it has been for the eu which is the single largest trading partner, but now the uk will have to do it alone starting march 2019. that is why the prime minister is bringing her brexit road show as it were to south africa, the biggest trading partner with the uk. very rich in minerals, so they will be trying to make sure that they can continue to access the uk market after brexit. she will be heading to nigeria next, which does not refine oil, the uk buys a lot of nigerian oil and sends it back when it's refined to nigeria, and then to kenya where a lot of agricultural products end up in the uk. when the prime minister says she wants the uk to be the biggest investor in africa by 2020
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in the g7, how much of a climb is that? it is quite a climb because now at the moment the uk is at the bottom of the ladder of the g7 investment in africa. even though the uk's direct investment is slightly lower than germany or the us, the amount of trade and the volumes of trade, the import and export from the uk and africa, there is a huge discrepancy. china is at the top of that, the volume of trade that china does in africa is $188 billion, compared to the uk which is $53 billion. you can see the huge discrepancy. is it a pick and choose or can everyone expand in the same way? how does africa make the choices on who the trading partners are going to be the?
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that is the interesting bit to talk about, the prime minister is here before the african leaders are going to beijing to attend a forum on chinese african cooperation and coming back with goodies, as it were, new roads, railways and ports, they will have investment into the private sector. the prime minister is saying while she's here, she's an advocate for the free market and an advocate for free trade, and africans then have to compare, do we have to do business with the uk and stand alone from the eu, or someone more aggressive but friendly like china? they will often prefer bigger markets like china and the eu. are there specifics coming from is theresa may on what is on offer? not quite specifics, but she has put together 29 business leaders who represent what she calls the best ingenuity of british
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commerce in technology, hospitality and lots of other industries. she hopes that these will be able to speak to their counterparts in south africa, nigeria and kenya and sign specific deals. she does an omnibus offer and then you have to pick and choose as the africans to see what works for the specific countries. it's almost that time of year again. strictly come dancing will be back on our sceens in september and last night the line up took to the red carpet to celebrate. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson went down to catch up with the contestants. strictly come dancing back for a 16th series.
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i hope 2018 brings about fine and fabulous gorgeous dancing. very keen. i hear we have got a very good bunch. they are fresh and keen. i love that. keen. 15 new contestants ready to compete for the glitterball trophy. howjealous were the rest of steps that you were the one that got the call? well, i think they are really proud of me. i've had lots of encouraging text messages and hopefully, we will have thm in the audience. i don't want to show my chest. it's hairy, i don't want to shave it. but i think they are going to get it out. i think there is waxing being talked of and i am so frightened of that. how much does being an athlete and so competitive help with something like this? definitely, because unless something is perfect, i keep doing it until it is perfect, so i think there's a bit of hunger in there, determination in there. it has been pointed out, though, that some contestants have more of a dance background than others. dannyjohn—jules once strutted his stuff in a wham! video. i've never done any of the genres of dance that they do on this show. what is the most complicated dance routine blue did?
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a lean. like that, like that, like that... and like that. that was it?! that's it! only one dancer has been in every series. it just gets better and better and better. by the way, i'm delighted dan walker's not doing the show. just so you know. dan, i love you, but i'm thrilled you're not doing the show. he hits the ball too far. he hits a golf ball, like, a quarter of a mile. there are new arrivals, though. while last year's winner was on hand to give some advice. i know exactly how they're feeling. they're going to be really nervous and thinking, "what have i done? why did i agree to do this?" but they'll soon realise it'll be the best and most intense experience of their lives. the great british bake off returns to our screens this evening on channel 4 as a dozen bakers compete to be crowned this year's champion and this year the show will have its first ever vegan week.
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earlier my colleague victoria derbyshire spoke to yan tsou a bake off contestant from 2017, jane beedle, who reached the final in 2016 and melissa morgan, founder of miss cupcake, the uk s first vegan—only bakery — nowadays veganism is modern, it's exciting, it's useful. and it can be about indulgence and decadence and fun. it doesn't have to be about wholesomeness and going without. it is more effort, though, to cook vegan food, you've got to be honest with me. i wouldn't say so. it actually can turn out to be a lot cheaper as well then you take dairy and eggs out of the mixture. instead using shelf stable plant —based milk back can be kept in your cupboard so when you run out, great, i can grab something i've already got there. it is just about getting a perception, its' new technique that maybe you've not used before. using ingredients maybe you've not thought about before. but when you get the hang of it, it can be just as easy. 0k. i want to ask you both, you were in the first channel 4 version of bake off, obviously there was a huge furore. as a contestant, did that in fact you, were you really aware of that
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or once you get in the tent, you've just got to cook for your life? in the tent, because we were actually obviously filming earlier, because it's not live, and i think our initial reaction wasjust going into the tent and surviving week to week. and that was our main plan. and actually, once they were transmitting, like transmission was channel 4 and all the rest of it, i don't think, i didn't have any feedback whether i would have preferred it would have been in bbc one. they naturally didn't show any preference either way. once they started watching it. sure, and what about you, in terms of being a finalist, just a couple of years ago, how much has it changed your life? it's made it extremely busy, actually. i was thinking as i was walking up to the front of the bbc this morning, thinking, two years ago, nobody would have asked me to come up and talk about anything. so in addition to what i normally do, the dayjob, i'm doing food festivals, i'm doing charity staff, i'm doing baking classes, so instead of being a five—day week
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worker, now i'm doing six and a half, seven days a week. well, life is even more interesting, would you say? it's fun, it is huge fun and i'm getting to do things that i never dreamt that i would do. it's brilliant. i would recommend it to anybody. if you fancy doing something, go give it a go. because you've got nothing to lose. can animals really bring us art? well if you're yang yang, you have put up a pretty good case. tim allman explains. meet the artist in residence. 18 years old, with the deftest of brushstrokes. yang yang is a mistress of the canvas. just as long as she's not feeling too peckish. translation: well, at first,
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she found paint brush very exciting. she pulled it towards her, sniffed it and took a bite, tasted it. it's important that only natural materials were used. the paintbrushes are made from bamboo. then she learned what the paintbrush is for, that pictures can be made with it. and it works really well. clearly, her work is a little on the abstract side, impressionistic, you may say. but there does seem to be some emotional connection to her work. translation: we decided to have the pictures painted in black because pandas are black and white, so she paints black on white. the paintings vary a lot. if she feels more expressive, then her paintings are a bit wilder. sometimes they have relatively little paint on the canvas, it all depends on the mood of the day. her paintings are now on sale, 100 of them up for grabs, each one selling for more than $500. the zoo says it will use the money to raise awareness about pandas. and each picture will come with a certificate of authenticity, although this artist never signs her work. in a moment it's time for the one
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o'clock news with kate silverton and we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two but first it's time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. for many of us, it hasn't exactly turned into the brightest of days. the favoured few getting a few glimmers of sunshine, for many more, remaining quite cloudy. the best chance of spanish spells this afternoon, close to the south of england, also part of high ground in the north—east and eastern scotland. sunshine to aberdeen. for northern and western scotland, a strengthening breeze and a weather front sliding in without bikes of rain. asimilar front sliding in without bikes of rain. a similar story for northern ireland and as we move across england and wales, big errors of cloud, some sunny spells, for east wales, close to the west coast, cloudy. as we move into the evening,
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southern areas particularly the channel islands but also the south and south—east of england are likely to see some isolated showers developing. at the same time the weather front moves rain out of northern ireland and scotland in the northern england and wales. that fight continues to make progress south—east during tomorrow, but the rain most allowed so not much more than a band of cloud. —— the grain will fizzle out. some showers clipping into kent and coastal parts of east anglia but a dry day for most of us. sunshine spreading from the north—west. cool and fresh for many, humid in the south—east. we move those were the thugs away to the east as we get into thursday and that allows —— those weather fronts, and that allows high pressure into the british isles. mostly dry to the end of the week with sunshine although the nights for a time will be quite chilly. this is how we're going to be looking for the first
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pa rt going to be looking for the first part of thursday, green and blue colours of the temperature chart, towns and cities into single digits. into the countryside it will be a chilly start of the day with the odd mist touch as well. once we clear any mist, a fine day, spells of sunshine, fairly large areas of cloud likely to develop, small chance of a shower and temperatures 16 to 20 degrees. western areas could see the odd spot of cloud at times, further east, bit more sunshine and was the south—east, it will start to warm up. theresa may announces plans to boost britain's investment in africa post—brexit. in her first trip to the continent as prime minister she's promised £4 billion in support for african economies — creating jobs for the young. i want the uk to be the g7‘s number one investor in africa, with britain's private sector companies taking the lead in investing the billions that will see african economies growing by trillions.
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as she's critiqued for her dance floor diplomacy, the prime minister played down warnings from the chancellor here about the economic damage a no—deal brexit could cause. we'll have the latest from herfirst stop, south africa, shortly. also this lunchtime:
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