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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  August 30, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond one hundred days. ten tweets in one morning. donald trump steps up his attacks on everyone from the press to the supreme court. he's under growing legal pressure and doesn't like what he's seeing in the media. donald trump uses his twitter account to sow division on the same day mourners from both sides of the aisle celebrate the public service ofjohn mccain. my my name is joe my name isjoe biden. my name is joe biden. laughter. i'm a democrat. laughter. and i loved john mccain. in the uk, veteran labour politician frank field quits the party, saying its leadership is becoming a force for anti—semitism. also on the programme... fury in scotland as alex salmond raises £80,000
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on a crowdfunding site to pay his legal expenses that are linked to allegations of sexual harrassment. energy drinks do not give you wings, they make you fat and they rot your teeth, which is why the uk government wants to stop children buying them. get in touch with us using the hashtag — beyond one hundred days. hello and welcome. i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. search donald trump and twitter today and you will get a veritable torrent of hits. in the past few hours, the president has taken on the media, social media, the justice department, james comey and even, most striking of all, perhaps, the chiefjustice of the supreme court. while mr trump was using twitter to rail against his perceived enemies, most of the nation was fixing on another image — this bipartisan scene in arizona, where mourners gathered
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to celebrate the life and public service of former senatorjohn mccain. so is this tweet storm an indication of stress in the white house? joining us is ab stoddard of real clear politics. what do you make of the fact i think we are up what do you make of the fact i think we are up to ii the president has tweeted and many of them about legal issues? not only the number but they we re issues? not only the number but they were more desperate in tone than usual. 15 months after giving an interview to nbc, he fired james comey because of the russian thing. he is now saying maybe they've fudged that, maybe accusing them of i don't know, changing the tape, the transcript. claim that comes without evidence. calling for the head of nbc to lose his job over it. there is panic afoot and it could be legal woes because there are always stress
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going on at the white house. he cloud punctuated by more than the usual political cloud that embraces donald trump. this idea he would not find it such bad form to be doing this on the day when we in this country celebrate a great hero, it is so upsetting. he sees perceived enemies everywhere, even within his own administration. he pre—empted the resignation of the white house counsel if reports are right. the concern it seems reading the washington post, among those in the administration is they do not have the talent and resources within the administration to face up to the legal tidal wave that will come their way. one of the hallmarks of their way. one of the hallmarks of the white house is chaos, that is
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donald trump ‘s comfort zone and was pa rt donald trump ‘s comfort zone and was part of his campaign and live as a businessman. there is not a lot of advance planning, there is a heavy dose of denial, as you have heard him talking about a red wave coming and the fact he cannot accept that democrats have the wind at their back and a very good chance of taking back a majority in the house of representatives and with that would come huge change in the number of investigations from basically none and a new date of oversight over his administration and ethical misdeeds of cabinet members, maybe connections made between family members and himself that are not separated from business dealings with people connected to foreign governments. all of this war rain down on the administration and people around him are concerned they do not have the right team in place, but people are leaving untalented people are not interested in coming. we want to follow up on a story we covered yesterday. the florida governor's race is back
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in the headlines after comments made by the republican nominee ron desantis. speaking on fox news about his african american opponent, andrew gillum, mr desantis made comments which critics say are racist. we've got to work hard to make sure we continue florida going in a good direction. let's build off the success we've had on governor scott. the last thing we need to do is to monkey this up by trying to embrace a socialist agenda with huge tax increases and bankrupting the state. later, andrew gillum was on fox news and he responded to those comments. it's very clear that mr desantis is taking a page directly from the campaign manual of donald trump. but i think he's got another thing coming to him. if he thinks that in today's day and age, florida voters are going to respond to that level of derision and division... they are sick of it. was that dog whistle politics, the
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phrase "monkey up"?|j was that dog whistle politics, the phrase "monkey up"? i believe that when you say about what we saw last summer when you say about what we saw last summer when people were chanting jewish people will not replace us. this is probably a slip of the tongue and not intended to be that way. on one side the supporters of andrew gillum could have said this has been used in the past and people should be sensitive and ron desantis could have said he did not realise the way he used it. let's talk more about the scene in arizona playing out with the service celebrating the life ofjohn mccain and what a juxtaposition to much of the partisan politics in washington. we
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have had two democrats standing up, speaking at this service, joe biden we heard. and the first campaign chairman forjohn mccain when he ran for senate, also a democrat and friend ofjohn mccain, these people chosen byjohn mccain to send a message to the country after his death about the value of bipartisan ship and it is a starkjuxtaposition with what we see in washington, the kind of bitter politics we have here. fascinating. these are live pictures and we can have a quick dip intojoe biden. he is still speaking. classic john. the college, hundreds of people there. the senate was in session and he spoke first. as he walked off the stage and i walked on he said, don't ta ke stage and i walked on he said, don't take it personally, but i don't want to hear what you have to say.
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laughter. and he left. you have heard several occasions when the audience has been brought to laughter. maybe a good tonic to some of the division we have seen in america of late. but very interesting who he picked to speak at his funeral. in fact eulogising for him on saturday will be george w bush and barack 0bama so from arizona the coffin will go to washington and lie in state at the rotunda at the senate tomorrow. the former leader of the scottish nationalist party, alex salmond, has sparked fury in scotland after launching a crowdfunding campaign to pay for his legal costs. he is taking the scottish government to court over the way they have handled two allegations of sexual misconduct that were made against him. mr salmond resigned from the party last night. the labour msp rhoda grant
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tweeted this: he's not the first to use the platform. michael cohen — president trump's former lawyer — launched a crowdfunding campaign to cover his legal fees. he has already raised $165,000. and paul manafort — mr trump's former presidential campaign chief. there's a site called the paul manafort defense fund soliciting donations — but it doesn't reveal how much has been raised. and in the wider spectrum of crowdfunding — there's this, a fund to create and fly a baby blimp of london mayor sadiq khan over the capital. it smashed its $75,000 target. so is crowdfunding out of control? let's get the thoughts of david pogue who crowdfunded his own tv show and joins us now from connecticut. congratulations on your crowdfunding
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efforts. that is for a business venture. was it designed more for start—ups all politicians with legal problems? interesting how crowdfunding has moved from i have a great product idea, or i have a great product idea, or i have a great social cause, too i am a disgraced politician and i want the public to vote for me in a public way, in other words, alex salmond, paul manafort, michael cohen, they do not need the money. they are millionaires. it is a way to have an election without an election. millionaires. it is a way to have an election without an electionm millionaires. it is a way to have an election without an election. it is a democratisation of campaign finance? well, yes, although they do not need the money. it is more of a way to say wait a minute, i am a good guy and i will prove it to the
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world by staging this campaign, fundraising campaign and the world will see how much people love me. fundraising campaign and the world will see how much people love melj get these crowdfunding appeals in my inbox every day. some are really good. there was one for an electric wheelchair and did not have the means to get one, others want a critical surgery. some you think it isa critical surgery. some you think it is a good idea but anotherfriend saidi is a good idea but anotherfriend said i would like money to go to sha to bea said i would like money to go to sha to be a shamen. that is not what it was set up for —— to go to peru. to be a shamen. that is not what it was set up for —— to go to perum isa was set up for —— to go to perum is a democracy, people can fund me oi’ is a democracy, people can fund me or not. there is a guy on kick—started who jokingly put up a campaignfor kick—started who jokingly put up a campaign for funds to make potato salad. he raised over $1 million because people thought it was hilarious. he did not need money to
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make potato salad but it is a referendum on whatever idea, cause, principal of you have and some are more worthy than others but it is up to the public to decide. the money he has raised, alex salmond, is a mark of affection he still commands what many snp supporters think but what many snp supporters think but what about the allegation from one of the scottish labour politicians that he was exercising control over victims who had been brave enough to come forward with allegations? yes i hear that. the idea of starting a legal fund for crowd sourcing —— the fire crowd sourcing is open to all people. stormy daniels the pornography star has raised almost $600,000 for her fund. pornography star has raised almost $600,000 for herfund. it pornography star has raised almost $600,000 for her fund. it does not a lwa ys $600,000 for her fund. it does not always work, we should point that out. another donald trump affair
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accuser also started a crowdfunding campaign and did not raise much at all. it was totally a bust. you run all. it was totally a bust. you run a risk when you start these things. 0k. thank you. interestingly it is not so much about the money but showing you how public support, the more money you earn the more the public agrees with you and maybe thatis public agrees with you and maybe that is what alex salmond is doing. i went through the go fund me website today and i will show you the most ludicrous i found, from josh. he had a party and this is what happened to his loo. we had a goal of $150 and he smashed it. $235 raised for a new loo. who are these people? why do they pay this money to these people? we need a new producer and clearly need better graphics. crowds fund
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this! how about crowdfunding you me, frankly? britain has signed a deal with kenya to set up a cybercrime centre in nairobi, to help combat the sexual abuse of children. it's part of a plan by the two countries to tackle organised crime. speaking on the final day of her africa tour, the british prime minister theresa may said the two countries would continue to have a strong relationship. thousands of supporters of an islamist party in pakistan are marching towards islamabad, angry at plans in the netherlands by the far—right politician geert wilders to hold a prophet muhammad cartoon competition. they say the contest is blasphemous. officials in germany's eastern state of saxony sought to avert further unrest in the city of chemnitz before the far right gathers for another anti—immigration protest later tonight. thousands of people took part in two days of protests against asylum seekers in chemnitz this week after police arrested a syrian and an iraqi on suspicion of fatally stabbing a german man on sunday. is banning sugary drinks a sensible
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way to protect the nation's health or is it the work of an overbearing nanny state? the answer might depend on your politics but it's a live debate in britain right now because the government is proposing a ban on the sale of energy drinks to under 18s. uk children consume more of them than children in any other european country, a quarter of six— to nine—year—olds drink things like red bull and monster energy. but when politicians in the us try to restrict sugary drinks on the grounds they increase obesity, they get panned. in 2013, michael bloomberg, the former mayor of new york, tried to ban super—sized sodas. the ban was never enacted. but it became political. so much so sarah palin showed up at a conservative rally proudly drinking, yes, a super gulp. joining us now is professor at the harvard chan school
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of public health, dr steven gortmake. we will start with the facts in terms of health. does the government have a point that drinking energy drinks for children is a bad idea? all sorts of sugar sweetened beverages have important health effects and excess weight gain is probably the biggest but they definitely contribute excess sugar to our diet, but the major contributor to excess and certainly contributed to the obesity. in the united states, a lot of cities and states have effectively got rid of sugary beverages in school settings, outside of the school lunch, where they used to have stores that would
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sell kid sodas during the day. those have been eliminated all over the states, which is useful. a lot of cities have implemented sugar sweetened beverage excise taxes which are effectively reducing the consumption of sugary beverages, which contribute substantially to obesity and also saving future health care obesity and also saving future health ca re costs, obesity and also saving future health care costs, if you can lower that intake. how do you account for the fact we went through the debate over tobacco and effectively regulating tobacco so people cut down on smoking so we did not have the numbers of people dying from cancer of the country was seeing that it was effective, but when politicians recently like michael bloomberg have tried to reduce the maximum size of sodas sold, they run into huge political problems?”
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think it is a good analogy. it took many years for the tobacco, for the science to grow, to show that consumption of tobacco really was harmful. there were bans on marketing of tobacco and increasing excise taxes and a ban on smoking in the workplace, that contributed to the workplace, that contributed to the decline in smoking. the results and data, the science around sugary beverages is more recent. i think the first study linking these beverages to youth obesity was 2001, we published that in the lancet. it is more recent science showing how harmful consumption of sugary beverages is. it takes a long time to translate that into effective policy action. ok. thank you. we are getting news on this subject
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from south korea that the south korean government is introducing a ban on the sale of coffee in schools across the country, protecting the health of children but also teachers will not be able to have coffee in the school day. there is an issue in the uk with behavioural issues in class that a link to sweet drinks and you saw how many six to nine—year—olds drinking them and plenty of teenagers, particularly through the exam season. if you have such strong evidence which the government suggests it has, why open it up to consultation, why say should be 16, 18? why not ban it? unless you are nervous. maybe that is the conservative party's problem that they think it is a debate about freedom and choice and they do not like introducing bans. and look how long the doctor pointed out it took to get restrictions on
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the tobacco industry. he said the first study was 2001, 70 years ago, and we are still having this debate. a bitter internal row about anti—semitism within the british labour party has been rumbling throughout the summer. today, one of the party's best known mps, veteran frank field, resigned pointing to what he called "the local thuggery" within the party structure. mr field willl now serve as an independent mp, refusing to vote along labour party lines. in a letter to the chief whip he said the labour party has become a force for anti—semitism. i want the labour party to change, i want it to be seen as a clearly anti—racist party and i want the party to be clearly seen that the local thuggery that is going on will not control local mps. louise ellman is a labour mp and is in our westminster studio. this was a scathing comment from
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frank field, calling the party racist, nasty, bullying, is he right? i am sad frank field feels he can no longer sit as a labour mp and his comments about the labour pa rty‘s failure to his comments about the labour party's failure to deal with anti—semitism are correct and they saddened and angered me very much. the deputy leader said it was a wake—up call for the party. the deputy leader said it was a wake-up call for the party. are you confident it will be? it should be. i hope thatjeremy corbyn realises he has not only got to say he will ta ke he has not only got to say he will take action against anti—semitism, he has to do something about it and general talk will not do, he had to deal with anti—semitism that is so strong within the labour party. how would you characterise your relationship with jeremy would you characterise your relationship withjeremy corbyn? would you characterise your relationship with jeremy corbyn? he is the leader of the party, i am
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very critical of his inadequate response to anti—semitism within the party and i have called continually on him to deal with it. party and i have called continually on him to dealwith it. len mccluskey, general secretary of the unite union, said it amounts to mccarthyism and in some way allegations are fabricated to embarrass the leader. could you tell len mccluskey water abuse you have suffered as a jewish member of the party? i have suffered a great deal of personal abuse and outrageous comments made directly or online. i am outraged the many, many allegations of anti—semitism against members of the party asked simply not being dealt with and i find members of the party asked simply not being dealt with and ifind it appalling. ifind not being dealt with and ifind it appalling. i find it not being dealt with and ifind it appalling. ifind it appalling len mccluskey thinks it is proper to smear thejewish mccluskey thinks it is proper to smear the jewish community in mccluskey thinks it is proper to smear thejewish community in the way he has. that is ugly and ominous and he should withdraw his comments.
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when you have raised allegations of abuse with the leadership of the party, what is the reaction? in the past i have a lot of abuse within my local labour party and at that stage the national executive produced a critical report about the state of my local labour party and some of thoseissues my local labour party and some of those issues were addressed. but many mps are at the receiving end of co nsta nt many mps are at the receiving end of constant abuse and there are many members of the labour party who make anti—semitic comments, many allegations that are not being considered by the labour party disputes machinery and it is time it was taken more seriously. currently we argue about the labour party's failure to adopt the international definition of anti—semitism. i hope it is resolved but that is one issue dealing with anti—semitism that is equally important. louise ellman, thank you.
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this was scathing comments from frank field. louise ellman sounding cautious about whether she thinks things will change in much for the leadership. shall i show you something quite extraordinary? fishing is one of the worlds biggest sports — and it's particularly this is how they restock the lakes in utah. they are hatchlings and catapulted from plane to an a p pa re ntly catapulted from plane to an apparently this is a better way to restock la kes apparently this is a better way to restock lakes because when they move fish over land, they have a higher mortality rate and because they are small fish, it is effectively like us diving into a swimming pool from a high board and only 5% die. these planes, apparently they can be stopped six, seven lakes in one load and they fly up and down and fish on the lakes. what you think of that? imagine if
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you are one of those fish? first i thought it was cgi, and then i thought it was cgi, and then i thought what of people who support the rights of fish? it looks terrifying. the poor last one, just chucked out of the plane. i have this image of someone saying it was raining fish today going home to the wife in saying this is what i caught today. anyway. this has been 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — joe biden pays a warm tribute to his old rivaljohn mccain. theresa may has done it again, she has found her dancing shoes. we will show you how bad it was. that is all to come.
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it has been on the cool said the past days but the good news is as we end the week and head to the weekend for the first spot of september, it looks like things will warm up. mostly dry with spells of sunshine and the best across the south and east or cloud across the north and west. high pressure will be the dominating factor, bringing settled weather. this weather front will encroach into the south—western could bring more cloud rain to cornwall and devon and cloud and showers in the channel could move further north into kent and south—east england. for mose, dry and largely cleared. colder in north and largely cleared. colder in north and eastern areas but not as much as the previous night. into the afternoon on friday, cloud will
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build. cloud and sunny spells for mess. showers in parts of england. and cloud encroaching further eastwards going into northern ireland. a warm day. temperatures up to 22 degrees in the south and south—east. at the weekend, high pressure in the south and east. weather fronts in the north west will introduce more cloud to scotland, northern ireland and western england and towards wales and there will be rain and drizzle on these weather fronts. breezy across western coasts. the best of the sunshine in the south and east. warm air trying to push further north. into the weekend it looks like we will import warm air from the south thanks to high pressure and these weather fronts moving to the north—west, bringing cloud and the north—west, bringing cloud and the breeze but it will still be on the breeze but it will still be on the warm side on sunday pretty much across the board but more cloud
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across the board but more cloud across the board but more cloud across the north and west thanks to the weather fronts. sunny spells in the weather fronts. sunny spells in the north—east of scotland and did a good portion of england and wales weather wind will be light. fresher further north and west. temperatures not too into sunday. low 20s in central and southern parts of scotla nd central and southern parts of scotland and maybe into the north—east but the highest temperatures in england and wales, 25 in the south—east. this is beyond 100 days. our top stories: the veteran labour mp frank field has quit the party's group in parliament, saying the leadership has become a force for anti—semitism in british politics. the former first minister of scotland alex salmond faces growing criticism of his decision to organise a crowdfunding appeal after he was accused of sexual harrassment, claims he strongly denies. coming up in the next half hour: in phoenix, arizona, family, friends and political leaders are remembering senatorjohn mccain at his memorial service. his democrat rival, the former vice presidentjoe biden, was among those leading the tributes.
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and as a new film about the moon landing premieres, we ask, have we taken all that neil armstrong achieved for granted ? let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag #beyond100days. is senatorjohn mccain died with his boots on, fighting until the end. it is reflected in the way he planned his funeral. the arizona senator asked the former presidents george w bush and barack 0bama to speak for him this saturday at his funeral, and they will. but it's the snub to the current president who had mocked and condemned the senator for years that is unmistakable. today, they are holding a memorial service in arizona, celebrating his life. then mr mccain's body will be moved to washington, where it will lie in state tomorrow in the capitol rotunda. a short while ago, former vice presidentjoe biden, a democrat, took the stage
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to remember his long time adversary, and dear friend. a great friendship that transcended whatever political differences we had or later developed. because above all, we understood the same thing, that all politics is personal. it's all about trust. i trustjohn my life. joe biden who ran againstjohn mccain in 2008. joining us now from austin is mica mosbacher, a personalfriend of senator mccain. when you look at what's happening in arizona and you democrats standing up arizona and you democrats standing up there arizona and you democrats standing 'ng arizona and you democrats standing up there paying tributejohn mccain, doesn't it make you hanker for those days when perhaps america could be a little more civil? absolutely. those
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we re little more civil? absolutely. those were the days, back in the 805, when people reached acr055 were the days, back in the 805, when people reached across the aisle and worked together. we're 5tronger together than with our differences. it is an emotional day for me, i had a great privilege of knowing john mccain as a great privilege of knowing john mccain a5a a great privilege of knowing john mccain as a friend and i was supposed to be at the funeral today, and due to travel problems i was unable to get there. butjohn mccain spoke at my husband's funeral, he was secretary of finance on the mccain campaign in 2008. george w bush spoke at his funeral as well, so bush spoke at his funeral as well, so those are some parallels that make my heart go out to cindy, meghan and the mccain family, because i've bought that path and know only too well what it is like to lose the light of your life. i thinkjoe biden's tribute was beautiful, heartfelt and really embodied those qualities ofjohn
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mccain, not only a patriot but a man who had courage of conviction, who could be tough in the rain, tough and his adverse areas, but thenjoke with them a few hours later. he has left a marvellous legacy for those, andl left a marvellous legacy for those, and i think he's really a part of the greatest generation. go ahead, christian. i was going to say, it strikes me watching this and watching joe biden bringing the audience to laughter that the president could have diffused some of this. if he'd put out a statement that had been prepared for him, speaking one of someone he had his differences with, yes, some people would have said that was hypocritical, but could've taken some of the fire out of it?” hypocritical, but could've taken some of the fire out of it? i see your points, and it's unfortunate to have this relationship between these two great men, both of whom i admire
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greatly. but today it's time to honourjohn mccain by setting aside our political differences and coming together and celebrating the core values of what makes america great. 0ne values of what makes america great. one of my favourite john mccain quotes is americans never quit, we never surrender, we never hide from history, we make history. and i think senatorjohn mccain will go down in history as a workable patriot antihero, who in bodies our —— and hero, who in bodies our country. where did john mccain get his strength from? i know he has said in the past he got it from his mum? he got it from roberta mccain, who in her905 mum? he got it from roberta mccain, who in her 905 took us sailing. my husband was worried she maybe didn't have proceed legs, and he kept trying to help her, and cheaper as
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tim off, saying, i'm not a helpless old woman! she had this spirit of independence. she looked it to tijuana at an early age and she helped children all over the country. roberto really is the key to that mccain spirit of which meghan mccain really bodies as well. thank you forjoining us and for those stories. the services ended now in arizona, john mccain's casket being carried out that big charge the families of the members of four decades and will now be moved to washington. it will lie in state in the senate rotunda and then there will be services here in washington and at annapolis at the naval academy. i was tell you the other day, the chairman of the foreign affa i rs day, the chairman of the foreign affairs committee here in the uk has written to nato asking for the new
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nato headquarters to be named after john mccain. today, three former nato secretary general is, they've written to the current secretary general of nato saying the same thing. in their letter, they say a few things better symbolise the transatlantic alliance and injuring benefits of american global leadership than senator mccain and his work. what i thought was most notable about the latter is what it left unsaid. it does not mention donald trump by name. and senator mccain i'm sure would be thrilled at the thought of a nato building being named after him. president trump is in permanent campaign mode. last week, he was at a rally in west virginia, tonight it is indiana. and he will be buoyed by the primaries result this week. in florida, arizona, georgia, trump candidates are winning big, which again underlines the president's influence with the republican base. and on the economy, he has a good story to tell. second—quarter growth was bigger than expected at 4.2%, consumer confidence soaring, the nasdaq is through the 8000 mark for the first time. and that's where his interests
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and those of the voter align. 15.9% say the economy is the key issue. 13.5% say health care is what matters most. and 11.3% say immigration is their priority. tom roten is a talk show host with iheartradio in huntington, west virginia. here's a taster of his on—air style. i take calls from folks just like you who are sick, whether it's potholes or politics. i tell you, i know what i'm talking about, i'm the straight shooter. they get it in, they get it all out, they get off the phone and they get well. it's a free wellness clinic and i want to help people feel better, i really do. it's time to wake up, friend. it's ridiculous. and i'm sick of it. the straight shooter, me, drtom. i haven't forgotten about it, i'm still sick about it. it's time that the taxpayer stands up to the bully and says, no! i'm sick of the occupation tax.
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folks, get rid of your sickness with me, dr tom. the straight talk go, dr tom, is in west virginia for us. i might roll all ears, dr tom! talk west virginia for us. i might roll all ears, drtom! talk to west virginia for us. i might roll all ears, dr tom! talk to us about how donald trump went down last week in west virginia. he isn't permanent campaign mode, do they like what they're hearing? absolutely, i appreciate being on with you guys. it was a knowledge of fine event la st it was a knowledge of fine event last week, what people attended the event told me, and they were excited to see and hear president trump. he's been here half a dozen times in we st he's been here half a dozen times in west virginia, and his message resonating well and the polls show he has a 63%job resonating well and the polls show
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he has a 63% job approval rating. we st he has a 63% job approval rating. west virginia's love donald trump. this is why it's important for people like us to talk to people like you. and ties will get an up on headlines from the coasts and we're not really touching with the base. related to primary result in florida on tuesday, a red wave, record is coming out for donald trump, his level is solid in florida. his influence on the election here was evident too backing may in the primary, he put out a tweet saying who to vote for and it made a difference. that was in the senate race. was here last week stopping patrick morrisey, who is running against joe patrick morrisey, who is running againstjoe mansion, patrick morrisey, who is running against joe mansion, who patrick morrisey, who is running againstjoe mansion, who used to be very popular, and trott can have a very popular, and trott can have a very important influence in that race. also in the congressional race between karen miller and the
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democrat in that race.” between karen miller and the democrat in that race. i am interested to see in that list of things voters think are important and whether they tally up with what you're hearing in west virginia? i think you had the margin for president trump of any state in the union. what is not on that list is russia and russian interference in the american elections. is that something people are at all concerned about, that investigation, in west virginia? no, i think you we st in west virginia? no, i think you west virginia people leave most of that stuff would just come out in the wash and when all the facts are presented, then they'll pay attention to it. right now, they are not paying attention to manor ford, cowa n, not paying attention to manor ford, cowan, miller, any of that investigation. their concerns about three things, cold, god and guns. faith and family are very important in west virginia, we'd sooner not ta ke
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in west virginia, we'd sooner not take in coal jobs in west virginia, we'd sooner not take in coaljobs and production since trump took office and that's what's important here. and are concerned about the opioid crisis“ that something people talk about? absolutely, and this area right here is right at the presenter of that crisis with a record number of bodies last year. that is something a lot of politicians try to tackle, and it's very tough issue to tackle, but i think even alignment with trump on that issue seems to be winning votes. thank you forjoining us. tom with a whole new style of broadcasting with living christian andi broadcasting with living christian and i will try and adults in. with a bit of practice. us citizens are being denied their passports as authorities question the authenticity of their birth certificates. the washington post reports that in south texas, immigration enforcement agencies are targeting citizens of hispanic origin by asking them to prove that they were really born in the united states.
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the government alleges that between the 1950s and the 1990s, some midwives provided us birth certificates to babies who were actually born in mexico. in 2009, the state department agreed to stop denying passports to us citizens, but now the trump administration has restarted the practice and cases are multiplying. for more on this, we speak to kevin sieff of the washington post, who broke this story today. some legs a detail, and the characters you've come across, one of the characters you've found had served in the military, he was border patrol, considers himself american since his earliest days, but even though he has a precedent, he can't get a passport? —— has a birth certificate. he walks in texas
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and had a previous us passports. he sent a tweet to be renewed and instead received a letter from the state department saying it didn't believe he was a us citizen, it wasn't convinced. it as tim to send ina wasn't convinced. it as tim to send in a whole array of obscure documents, a is mother's prenatal records, his baptismal certificate. and he did, actually, practice, find some of these documents and sent another letter to the state department to say, here you go. and received yet another denial. this is a guy who has served his country for the better part of his career. he still can't convince the government that he is a citizen. president of the hard line the state department is taking. but it is worth pointing out that because of these reports of midwives giving out birth certificates, the bush and 0bama governments did stop issuing
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passports, so this is not unique to this governments? what has changed is that in 2009 there was a settlement after the aclu filed a lawsuit. at 29, it was easier for these people living in south texas to prove to the government they were born in the us and us citizens and they ultimately got their passports. under the they ultimately got their passports. underthe trump they ultimately got their passports. under the trump administration, a few things are happening. the number of people being denied passport is going up. it's also becoming a lot more difficult for those people to follow u p more difficult for those people to follow up and prove to the government that they were born in the us. jump medley the only way for them to get their passports and prove their citizenship is to sue the state apartments, spent thousands of dollars on legal fees and ultimately not know at the end of the day whether they will win the lawsuit. what is so scary at this
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moment for all these people, and we're talking about thousands of people affected by this policy, is that you get a letter in the mail that you get a letter in the mail that doesn'tjust that you get a letter in the mail that doesn't just deny your passport, but also that the government doesn't believe you are a citizen. so what comes next? in at least 20 cases i know about, people ended up being detained in immigration detention centres. these are people with official us bath certificate. in other cases, people are coming back from mexico for visiting family or visiting the doctor, there was stopped bridge, their existing passports taken away from them by border patrol agents and they were sent directly to detention centres. basically, you have a huge number of people rendered stateless, and it's unclear what the next step is. this is a fascinating story and we hope we can carry on covering this one, it will be interesting to know what happens to these people after less back
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thank you forjoining us. what is so interesting about this story is that the government is saying it doesn't have a new policy in place, which is exactly the same tide of language in the white house use of the family separation issue as well, it's just enforcing an existing statute, albeit far moriya rigorously. argentina? has hiked interest rates to sixty per cent as it takes dramatic steps to restore confidence in its plunging currency in the latest sign of turmoil among emerging market economies this year. the peso dropped amid intense speculation from traders on foreign exchanges, falling by more than 10% in the most severe drop for the currency since it was floated in 2015. this is beyond 100 days. still to come: as first man from universal pictures blasts off awards season at the venice film festival with a three—minute ovation, we'll be finding out the impact made by early astronauts on generations of people around the world. the uk's biggest payday lender wonga has gone
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into administration tonight. it had already stopped accepting new loan applications as it teetered on the brink of collapse. wonga — which at its height had over a million customers — has had to deal with a surge of compensation claims against them after a government clamp—down on payday lenders. 0ur personal finance correspondent simon gompertz reports. wonga rode to number one among payday lenders on a wave of humorous adverts which glossed over the harm being done to some borrowers. borrowers whose compensation claims have now crippled the lender. stacey in south london saw a £600 loan turn into £5,000 when she missed some payments. they're still chasing me for the money, which i'm trying to get cancelled out now. they completely screwed me over. i was very vulnerable at the time. i don't know if you've heard, but they are in financial trouble. yes, i have heard, i read about it. what do you think about that?
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i think good on them, it's what they deserve. because of the way they treated you? yep, yeah, i do. i think they deserve it. i think they deserve to go bust, because they preyed on people who were vulnerable. wonga's fall began in 2014, when it had a big financial penalty for sending threatening letters to borrowers from fake lawyers' addresses. then it was forced to compensate 330,000 customers it hadn't checked could pay the money back. in a backlash, charges for payday loans were capped. and as more compensation claims came in, £10 million from wonga's backers turned out not to be enough to cover them. so what are the options for wonga customers who've seen the message that they're not lending any more and heard the company has failed? well, if you've got a loan, you'll still have to pay that back. if you're pursuing compensation, the danger is that you'lljust have to join a long queue of creditors tried to get their money back from wonga. wonga's rates were 1500%, but its business model backfired, and this lender's time has run out.
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an update now on one of our main stories this week. no, not the second paul manafort trial, nor the latest in the brexit negotiations. but theresa may dancing. again. the british prime minister was keen to show off the latest round of her fanciful footwork as she wrapped up her trip to africa. i'm lost for words. that's slightly better. do you think she got such good mother's day from ourfirst round of dancing? the first round of glowing tributes have gone to her
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head. i think we should put the prime minister out of paramilitary. that's overconfidence. first man, the movie from universal pictures, has opened the venice film festival and surprisingly, it's the first time that hollywood has really focused on neil armstrong. and it got me thinking, perhaps we don't really consider anymore the inspirational effect those early astronauts had on generations of people around the world? here's a clip. we've chosen a job so difficult, requiring so many technological developments. we're going to have to start from scratch. only after we've mastered these tasks, can we consider trying to land on the moon. neil, if this flight is successful, you'll go down in history. for more on this we can speak to monica grady, who's professor
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of planetary and space sciences at the open university. is very good to have you with us. do we ta ke is very good to have you with us. do we take what is the lump sum and his tea m we take what is the lump sum and his team did for granted?” we take what is the lump sum and his team did for granted? i hope we don't. and i don't think we do. we have a lot of interest in what is going on in the national space station and without neil armstrong and all use colleagues and the enormous team behind them, that wouldn't be happening. i think it's gone a bit quiet at the moment, the cashier i'm sure up with next year being the 50th anniversary of the apollo landings there will be a huge boost of interest with the public. i don't think we take it for granted, i think it's always there in the background as something that has such an enormous influence on us and
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gives silver and astronauts at school. shall i give you gives silver and astronauts at school. shalli give you my gives silver and astronauts at school. shall i give you my fact of the day? i was learning how powerful the day? i was learning how powerful the computer on apollo 11 was, and read today an iphone 5 had 1000 times more processing speed then the computer that took them to the moon. yeah, it's scary. the film that was ata yeah, it's scary. the film that was at a couple of years ago, thai state hidden figures, showing how they we re hidden figures, showing how they were doing the calculation is on a blackboard with a slide rule to get the astronauts into orbit, it's unbelievable that they were doing it without a computer. and the hardware was so clunky, as well as the lack of software, so it's amazing it was as successful as it was. and given
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the advances in technology we'd had since then, kimi negations and all that sort of stuff, going back to the main, it's given, it's going to happen. who's going to do that, he was at the forefront of moon exploration and what do they want to do there? there'll two parallel strands. there are the space agencies like the european space agency, nasa, the japanese, chinese, indian, by many space agencies and the russians as well who are working very closely with the european space agency. and they all have various lunar missions in planning. but there is something cold the global space exploration strategy, which has been signed up to buy all the major space—faring nations with an aim of making sure that... to put it
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simply, if the russians build something up there, russian bolts will fit in chinese nuts. you're not going to have an imperial and metric mix—up, everything will fit together. the different space agencies are going with a single aim, more or less, of exploration using the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration to mars and beyond. and it has to be global, because it's too expensive for one nation to do it by yourself. thank you forjoining us. christian, that was part of the reason this was such a big deal when we watched neil armstrong launching out there, it was all wrapped up in the cold war and american supremacy and he was going to dominate and be the world superpower. but if it becomes a multilateral endeavour, then who
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knows, sky is the limit? you and i will be broadcasting from the moon as an outside broadcast before you know it. yeah, you're going first, apparently. i'm too scared! i don't trust this acolyte links, you can go fast. we'll be back centre next week, see you then. 0n the hillside the past few days, but the good news is as we head into the weekend for the first art of september, things will warm up for many of us. good spells of sunshine, sunset across the south east and clouds in the north west thanks to atla ntic clouds in the north west thanks to atlantic weather fronts. high—pressure dominating for the next few days, bringing settled weather. this dinky front coming into night, however, bringing rain
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possibly to cornwall. showers in the channel going into kent overnight. but and largely dry overnight. chilly in northern areas, but not as bad as the previous night. moving into tomorrow, dry and bright to start with, allows building through the day. summer show is affecting the day. summer show is affecting the south east of england, this weather front bringing clouds into the west. a warm day, temperatures reaching 22 degrees across the south and southeast. into the weekend, these weather fronts spoiling things in the north, bringing more cloud to scotland, northern ireland, western parts of england and wales. there will be like train or drizzle on these fronts. breezy on the western coast, sunshine in the east and
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south, up to 22 degrees. up to 20 degrees in belfast. into the weekends, warm airfrom degrees in belfast. into the weekends, warm air from the south coming up, these weather france moving up to the northeast, bringing an increasing cloud and breeze. into sunday, more cloud across the north and west thanks to these weather fronts. sunny spells in the northeast of scotland, sunny spells across a good portion of england and wales, winds generally light and windy in the outer hebrides. temperatures not too bad on sunday, lows of 20 oh across central and southern parts of scotland, perhaps even the northeast of scotland. at the warmest temperatures across england and wales, up to 25 in the southeast. this is bbc news i'm ben brown. the headlines at 8:00.
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the veteran mp frank field resigns the labour whip saying the party's leadership has become a "force for anti—semitism in british politics". i want labour party to change. i wa nt i want labour party to change. i want it to be seen as a clearly anti—racist party and i want the party to be clearly seen that the locals agree that going on will not control local mps. —— local thuggery thatis control local mps. —— local thuggery that is going on. the payday lender wonga is going into administration putting 500 hundred jobs at risk. a landmark court ruling that could affect thousands of unmarried parents around the country — a mother who's partner died is told she can claim bereavement benefits. also this hour — scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon says it's important allegations of sexual misconduct against alex salmond are properly investigated and not just swept aside.
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