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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 1, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, you are watching brea kfast good morning, you are watching breakfast with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. the headlines... the mother and daughter stabbed outside their own home — after a major police appeal, a man is charged with their murder. he'll appear in court today. the fight to free nazanin zahghari—ratcliffe steps up a gear — the fate of the british—iranian charity worker will be discussed at top—level talks in tehran today. no gongs for celebrities linked to tax avoidance schemes — government documents seen by the times shine a light on the honours system. england's women book their place in france for next summer's world cup finals, after breaking welsh hearts in newport. while england celebrated, wales must now hope for the play—offs. good morning. it is the 1st of september and the first day of meteorological autumn. but this weekend we'll see some summery warmth details later. # you make me feel like a natural woman. . . a fitting farewell for the queen of soul —
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music legends, fans and famous faces honour aretha franklin at her seven—hour funeral in detroit. it's saturday the 1st of september. good morning. our top story: a man has been charged with the murders of a mother and daughter in solihull. raneem oudeh and her mother, khaola saleem, were stabbed to death outside their home on monday. janbaz tarin will appear before magistrates this morning. lebo diseko has the latest. raneem oudeh and her mother khaola saleem were found stabbed outside their home in the early hours of monday morning. they were pronounced dead at the scene and a postmortem found they died from multiple stab wounds. police had been looking for the younger woman's ex—partner, janbaz tarin, over a number of days. the 21—year—old was arrested in the spark hill area of birmingham on thursday. in a statement, west midlands police said: the family of the two women
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thanked the public and the police for their continued support. janbaz tarin will appear before magistrates in birmingham today. the case of the jailed british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, will be raised by a foreign office minister today, during a two day visit to tehran. alistair burt says he will push for a resolution of all cases of british dual nationals detained in iran, as tom burridge reports. the moment nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was briefly reunited with her daughter last week. she was released from jail in iran forjust three precious days before the regime there locked her up again. and this is nazanin with gabriella a week before she was arrested in the spring of 2016. they have been separated ever since, with iran accusing nazanin of spying — something she strenuously denies. the foreign office minister
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alistair burt is now in iran. he will meet his counterpart and push for nazanin‘s release. his boss, the foreign secretary, expressed frustration on twitter, calling iran "an incredibly difficult regime to deal with." jeremy hunt said nazanin‘s hopes had been raised and then dashed when she was returned to prison. he promised to redouble efforts to get her home. last week he raised her plight at the united nations. every day that she is in prison is a reminder to the whole world of a gross injustice. nazanin‘s husband, richard ratcliffe, has praised the foreign secretary for his efforts. she suffered panic attacks after being locked up again. who calls the shots in iran is often not straightforward, and nazanin‘s predicament is complicated by tehran‘s deteriorating relationship with our key ally, the united states. government documents obtained by the times newspaper have shown how prominent figures who use tax avoidance schemes
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are apparently being blocked from receiving honours. a document, which was drawn up between hm revenue and customs and the cabinet office, is said to feature a system which rates people's tax affairs. let's speak to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. what more detail can you tell us? good morning. what is the detail on this? good morning. this is a bit of new detail about how the process works when it comes to deciding who gets to be made a sir house a game, or anything else on the honours list. the times has obtained a document which appears to show that the taxman has a significant say. hmrc is given a list of nominated candidates and they then read them using a traffic light system as to how they manage their tax affairs. red is for a high risk nominee. amber is for somebody who has done
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something likely to cause adverse comment. green is low risk. the cabinet office point out this is pa rt cabinet office point out this is part of a long—standing policy to protect the integrity of the system. various different government departments and agencies have an input into how owners are decided. it has been freely available online to see that there is a low, medium and high risk rating given to nominees. what is new is the wording of that. why is it controversial? as the times points out, it may be why high—profile figures have missed out on honours in the past. thank you. less than a third of rail services, provided by the main train operator in northern england, will be running today. a dispute between bosses at northern, and members of the rmt union, has been going on for more than a year. andy gill is at liverpool lime street station. how disruptive are the cancellations likely to be? we were talking to an hour ago.
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those protestors weren't there this morning. it is going to be disruptive, isn't it? yes, it certainly is. the rmt union pickets have turned up. this is the 25th strike day in this long—running dispute. the second of six consecutive saturdays by the rmt are taking action because they want to keep cards on trains. they say guards are needed for safety. northern rail say they are trying to keep minimum —— disruption to a minimum. about 30% of services will be running. very few trends before 9am. very few trains after 6pm. —— trains. the rmt have done a deal with merseyrail, the local train operator, to keep guards on trains in principle if they can find the money. they have also done a deal on east anglia trains. there is a dispute continuing here with —— and with south—western. different
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franchise arrangement and different regulations apply in different parts of the country. that is why in some places there is a deal and in some places there is a deal and in some places there is a deal and in some places there isn't. the government says this should not be about safety. it says driver only trains have operated safely for 30 years and part of the country. it says the rail regulator believes that driver only trains are safe. the strike here on the northern rail coincides with some big events. the illuminations and britney spears in blackpool. to give you an example of the disruption, no direct trains, nor replacement buses between here and blackpool at all today. thank you. donald trump is going to visit ireland in november. the white house said the president hoped to "renew the deep and historic ties" between the two countries. his visit will be part of a wider trip to europe, to commemorate 100 years since the end of the first world war. actors rachel weisz and daniel craig have announced the birth of their first child together, a baby girl. the 48—year—old oscar—winning actor, and the 50—year—old star
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ofjames bond, got married in 2011. no name has been announced yet. the couple have reportedly told friends that they are "very happy". congratulations to them. a host of stars, including stevie wonder and bill clinton, were among the many well wishers saying goodbye to aretha franklin at her funeral in detroit yesterday. the memorial service lasted for more than seven hours, and also featured music from ariana grande and chaka khan. our north america correspondent, aleem maqbool, was there. a public that adored her queued for hours to get inside the church to get a chance to say their final goodbyes to the queen of soul. i could not sit at home and watch it on television. being here really brings in the real feel of things. her message and what she represented for people who are of african descent in this country, number one.
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two, beyond that the music is healing, the music is powerful, the music isjoyful. # marvellous # in paying their last respects to her before she's laid to rest, the stars and dignitaries who reflected the reach of aretha franklin's impact and a legacy that goes far beyond the music industry alone. she lived with power, not without weakness, but overcoming her weaknesses. i just loved her. her voice made you feel something. you felt every word, every note, every emotion in the songs she sang. her voice brought peace. there's no doubt the often tough, troubled life of aretha franklin that ultimately yielded such towering achievements, has touched many who came after her, and while goodbyes are being said today, her legacy will continue
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to inspire long into the future. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in detroit. what a marvellous sendoff. amazing voice she had. she will be sorely missed. definitely. artificial intelligence is playing an ever increasing roll in our lives — from self—driving cars to virtual assistants around the house, more and more machines are performing tasks like humans. scientists have now used ai to tackle one of the biggest challenges in treating cancer, predicting how tumours will develop. let's find out more from dr andrea sottoriva, from the institute of cancer research in london. good morning. good morning. it sounds fascinating. using artificial intelligence to predict which way the cancer has spread. how will this work? that's. right in cancer we have a big problem which is the fact that tumours change over time. they
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literally transform from the nine to malignant and they also become resista nt. malignant and they also become resistant. —— be nine. we know the mechanism behind this change is evolution. the same evolution that drives antibiotic resistance or the evolution of species. our research specifically focuses on a fundamental question which is, can we predict the evolution of tumours in individual patients. if we could make this prediction it would be amazing because we could stay one step ahead of the disease, we could intervene early to stop cancer in its tracks. or we can keep the disease under control. normally, to study the evolution of cancer, we use genetic data from patients' tumours. we studied the dna of cancer cells. however, usually these datasets are very large, there are very complex and they are also quite
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noisy. it is very hard to make sense to them and on top of them. so we decided to team up with fellow scientists from the university of edinburgh and queen mary in london. we developed these algorithms. and to our surprise we found that these new tools, it was able to identify hidden particles in this data we couldn't see before. particularly hidden said —— sequences of evolutionary steps that are common to many patients. this is very exciting because if we find, if we identified these hidden sequences of events, that means that if we see a new patient, where we only see a
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portion of that sequence, that means we can make a prediction what we expect to see next. how could that change then the future of cancer treatment? i think that's very exciting because the whole idea is to stay one step ahead of the cancer. so we want doctors to have methods and tools that allow them to intervene very early. or manage the disease, control it. if we are looking to the future, this is an early start, we need more —— more validation etc. but we are looking toa validation etc. but we are looking to a future where doctors will know what is going to happen next. they can design the best treatment for a given patient. is this with cancer thatis given patient. is this with cancer that is already present and has been recognised, or could this be used with precancerous cells? yeah, as well. we're looking at tumours. some
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of them are benign and some of them are malignant. we try to track their whole history from when the ranocchia ‘s to brenda becoming —— when they were innocuous to when they become malignant. this is a specific question we need to examine. i think the key idea here is to beat cancer at its own game, right? there will be lots of people watching now we may have cancer and they are thinking, what could this mean for me? is their any way of knowing that, or is that too far into the future? i think at the moment this is basic research. it will happen in the future. i think this is very exciting. i think it's not going to be too far into the future when we start seeing these kinds of technologies in the clinic. that is that the objective, to bring these from basic research into the clinic. give me an optimistic timeline? an optimistic timeline is
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five to ten years. it would be remarkable. it has been fascinating to listen to the work. vlog. let's it becomes reality. —— good luck. thank you. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. what have we got to look forward to? good morning. it is looking ok this weekend. it will be warming up. the first day of meteorological autumn. it is going to be feeling more like summer, particularly on sunday, for some of us. a cool start this morning. you can see mist erichment. a lot of sunshine. this week will be warmer than in recent days. it will be dry as well. that is because of high pressure. these weatherfronts will try to make inroads. more cloud in scotland, northern ireland, western england and wales. the colder air will be kept at bay as we
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import warm airfrom spain and france. that is starting to push across many western areas. a mild start. a bit more humid. a chilly start. a bit more humid. a chilly start in the south—east. some mist and sunshine through the morning. into the afternoon we will see fairweather cloud. sunny spells. 23 degrees likely from london to hull. further west temperatures 28 to 21. a few sunny spells. some rain for western wales and western scotland. not doing too bad. overnight it looks like it will stay cloudy across much of the country. sumptuous post developing. we are importing this warm air all the while. it will be a warmer start to sunday. a mild night. temperatures not dipping below 12 or 13 degrees. no lower than 15 to 16 across the south. first sunday, more cloud in
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the morning. more sunshine across northern and western areas. no south—east of scotland could do pretty well with sunshine. the best of it in england and wales, and particularly as the south—east. for the rest of scotland and northern ireland, it will turn wetter as the weather from ireland, it will turn wetter as the weatherfrom promotion. another one day across southern and eastern part of the country on monday. a bit more cloud. slightly cooler in the north and west. that cooler air pushes into many areas as we push into the week. high pressure dominated much of the upcoming week. should be fine and settled with sunny spells. not quite as warm as this weekend. that doesn't sound too bad. it's not bad at all, yes. it's not bad at all, yes. it was 18 minutes and 18 seconds
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past eight a moment ago. it's not any more though! no. it is time to look at the papers. former chief prosecutor nazir afzal is here to tell us what's caught his eye. i began to look at the front pages? no, we're not. let's dive straight in. grenfell. i remember reporting when that horrible fire struck. absolutely. a terrible tragedy as we all know. absolutely awful. the trauma for those living in the flats and survived still continues. something you have picked out from the daily telegraph. they carried out an investigation into the other flats around the country that have the same cladding. there are thousands of them. 20,000 plus privately owned. those owned by local authorities etc are likely to
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have their cladding replaced by the local authority and paid for by the local authority and paid for by the local authority. the question here is what happens to those privately owned? is what happens to those privately owned ? many of is what happens to those privately owned? many of them don't have the funds to do the work. what the telegraph have found is that some of these buildings are not insurable, involving debts of £60,000 in some cases to replace the cladding to make their flat saleable. it is a tragedy. it's a tragic —— travesty. how is that legally not the construction compa ny‘s. .. how is that legally not the construction company's. .. you get 10—year insurance for new builds. anything over that is your responsibility. what the daily telegraph have found is there is such a myriad of companies, and i think you will know this, steph, from the other what you do, who on these properties, back shelf companies to companies abroad, it's difficult to find out who the ultimate landlord, the ultimate responsibility really is. it falls
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upon the person who lives there. if they don't have the funds to do it, it would get done. is there no obligation on the government? the government says their responsibility relates to social housing and they are putting money into that. they haven't gone as far as saying they haven't gone as far as saying they have any the response ability. so many ramifications from the tragedy. there are hundreds of people have suffered tremendously, directly, as a result. now we have tens of thousands of others suffering as well. there is a story in all the papers this morning. you have picked out a version in the times. it is to do with one of our colleagues, laura kuenssberg, political editorfor do with one of our colleagues, laura kuenssberg, political editor for the bbc. this is about two blokes who had a fight over which —— whether she's good—looking enough to be on telly. even saying those annoys me. it annoys me as well, which is why i brought a up. these doctors were on holiday in spain. they had a discussion as to whether or not they we re
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discussion as to whether or not they were attractive and offer television. that's not why she is employed fell. exactly. i know that. we all know that. sorry, not having a go at you expect it is not a conversation you have about nick robinson or andrew marr. it ended in violence. drink was involved. they are now appearing before a tribunal in terms of their professional relationships. but the story here is quite simply, why do we treat women this way? why do we feel that men have irresponsibility, a desire to continually have a go whether or not women are fit to go on television. don't you think that is the minority though? we both get grief. look at that lovely face. it's not the majority. most people listen to what we say, i would like to think. i would hope they would see your
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professional —— professionalism and say, you are right for thejob. sadly as a man i hear conversations like this too often. has life changed in the sense that now we are discussing this, when you hear a conversation like this, you don't feel comfortable. i would challenge it day in and day out. some people would stand by and let it happen. maybe evenjoin in. maybe laugh at it. actually, this is very serious. let's light in the mood. we were all getting slightly annoyed. i had a great pleasure of interviewing tim peake. he is so in love with his job. he absolutely loves it. but it does make me laugh when somebody is less enamoured by what perhaps might be the best job less enamoured by what perhaps might be the bestjob in my head in the world. i'm sure we have all been to places like niagara falls, stonehenge and the pyramids and been blown away. this story is about an astronaut on apollo eight back in
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1968. he has been interviewed about his mission. he says that basically after 30 seconds he was just bored of the moon. having seen at he said it was just different shades of grey. he never landed on it. hejust circled it several times. he said he was actually more enamoured by looking back of the earth. i'm sure you would be. thinking about his family, his wife, his parents. that meant more to him than this rocky was circling. i must say tim peake did say one of the most amazing views was looking back. kranjcar would feel the same way but i don't think we would be that bored by the moment. no. we will talk to more in an hour. thank you. people hoping to use northern rail services this weekend face further inconvenience, due to ongoing strike action and continued problems with the timetable. it's a familiar tale. a dispute between bosses and members of the rmt union over the role of guards, has been going on for more than a year. let's speak to daren ireland, north—west regional organiser for the rmt.
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he is at liverpool lime street station where the picket line has been set up. darren, why now? why strike now? there are a lot of events going on, blackpool illuminations, britney spears, all sorts going on and people cannot travel will stop —— cannot travel. the strike is still going on because there has been a failure of the employer to reach agreement with the trade union. we have had negotiations previously. we suspended the industrial action on the 21st ofjuly this year. that was to allow for meaningful as genuine negotiations to take place. u nfortu nately, negotiations to take place. unfortunately, the employer didn't treat those negotiations with the seriousness and genuineness to resolve the current dispute. when we
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had further negotiations this week, because of the actions of the employer in a previous set of negotiations, we had no alternative but to keep the current industrial action on. darren, a dealer has been made between your union admiral —— merseyrail on the same topic. what is different about this? why can't a deal be made here? it a principle agreement that has been agreed between the three parties involved within the merseyrail situation. the political nature obviously is very different in the merseyrail, with the concession agreement is controlled by the combined authority. they have moved their position from initially when we started that dispute, to one where there are no supportive of retaining guards. the employer, merseyrail, have actually been back around the negotiating table to reach a principled agreement with the rmt
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which is being considered by our executive and the membership. the difference between the reeva north franchise is the control of that by the department for transport, led by chris grayling, who has not been to the north of england ever since the dispute started. his department is now preparing to bail out a reeva rail north and bail out south western railway for their failures to resolve the issues over accessibility. on the issue of the guards, why is it such a problem. the department for transport say they are a driver only —— there are a driver only trains operating on other lines for 30 years. trains without guards are safe. why do you think it is such a problem. the issue there is as far as we are concerned as a trade union, it is
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less safe without a second critical person. i'm afraid we have lost the line to darren. we will try to get that back. is it working? no. their areas. let's have another go. i'm sorry darren, we lost your answer. would you give us the answer again on the point of the department for transport saying they are being operated —— there have been operated oliver lines for 30 years and claims that they are safe? over 70% of services in the uk are operated currently with a safety critical guard on board. passengers want to maintain the current levels of safety. our position as a trade union is we believe trains... there we are. i'm afraid we have lost darren. those gremlins, when they get in the system. someone give them a us and we will get them back. someone technical. sorry for that. we will hopefully speak to darren again later. coming up in the next half hour, we're live at the braemar games this morning, the biggest event
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in the highland games calendar. it features many traditional sports such as the tug—o—war and the caber toss, and the queen and prince charles will be among today's spectators. some cracking dancing as well. i'm sure you could do that. i could jump up i'm sure you could do that. i could jump up and down. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and steph mcgovern. coming up before nine we'll get the weather from stav, but first a summary of this morning's main news. a man has been charged with the murders of a mother and daughter in solihull. janbaz tarin, who's 21, will appear before magistrates this morning. he was arrested on thursday, following an extensive search. raneem oudeh and her mother khaola saleem were stabbed to death outside their home on monday. the foreign office minister, alistair burt, will raise the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe directly with iranian ministers today during his visit to tehran. he said he will push for a resolution of all cases of british dual nationals detained in the country. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed two years ago after being accused of spying,
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which she denies. government documents obtained by the times newspaper, have shown how prominent figures who use tax avoidance schemes are apparently being blocked from receiving honours. a document, which was drawn up between hm revenue and customs and the cabinet office, is said to feature a system which rates people's tax affairs. in recent years a number of celebrities who've been involved with lawful schemes, have seemingly been overlooked for honours — including robbie williams and wayne rooney. less than a third of rail services provided by the main train operator in northern england will be running today. a dispute between bosses at northern, and members of the rmt union, has been going on for more than a year. the union says passenger safety will be put at risk by getting rid of guards and extending driver—only services. the united states is ending all funding for the un's palestinian refugee agency. more than five million refugees are supported by the group, but the us state department says the organisation is "irredeemably flawed".
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a spokesperson for the agency said it rejected the criticism and was deeply disappointed. all hospital car parks are now free to use in wales, after the last site to charge ditched its fees. the welsh government announced ten years ago that it would end hospital parking charges. a contract with a firm at prince philip hospital in carmarthen ended yesterday, meaning it's free to park there from now on. parking fees at scottish hospitals ended in 2008, except for where the facility is run by a private firm. but you still pay in northern ireland and england. a star—studded array of guests have said a final goodbye to aretha franklin at her funeral in detroit. the service lasted for more than seven hours, with stevie wonder delivering an emotionalfinale. bill clinton gave an address, and there were also performances from ariana grande and chaka khan. competitors from across europe
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have competed in the uk's first ever mermaid olympics. known as the merlympics, contestants take on events such as relay—racing and freestyle. some of those taking part had travelled to the tournament in dorset, from as far away as italy and slovenia. it is something, mike, you particularly enjoyed. it is something we have been looking at since the start of the year. you reminded me this morning, i have still got michelle's tale in the office. do you know who else enjoyed wearing the tale? come on in. you've got your boring trousers on this morning. this isn't nearly as
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impressive as the tail. it's hard to hop in with the tail. it is very cumbersome. i thought that was a gene. it wasn't. this was in january. gene. it wasn't. this was in january. a lot of course drink yesterday. this is why children shouldn't just try this because yesterday. this is why children shouldn'tjust try this because it can be quite difficult. do it as pa rt can be quite difficult. do it as part of a proper mermaid swimming clu b part of a proper mermaid swimming club or session. you are going to talk about football focus in a minute. i am. big talk about football focus in a minute. iam. big games talk about football focus in a minute. i am. big games last night. it was 0—0 between middlesbrough and leeds. the big grudge match. the other huge game was england's women under phil neville reaching the world cup finals. they finally
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conceded a goal in 687 minutes, wales. after a goalless first half, england's strikers came alive midway through the second with all three goals in a space of 12 minutes — toni duggan opening the scoring. jill scott looping header made it two, and nikita parris wrapped up the victory. wales now need to hope they can finish qualifying as one of the four best second—placed teams. to make it to the finals in france injune. do you believe you can go one step further and get to the final?|j believe. further and get to the final?” believe. i don't think the players believe. i don't think the players believe at this moment in time, they have got a little bit to go but each time we meet we have more development and improvement. the truth is in the whole. bringing philosophy in by the medium of football. i was wondering what you
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were talking about. jose mourinho in a spot of bother going to burnley tomorrow. are we going to see a clip? ithink tomorrow. are we going to see a clip? i think were going to hear from dele alli. he's had a troublesome couple of weeks, losing two games out of three. he had a press c0 nfe re nce two games out of three. he had a press conference yesterday where he brought up a bit of philosophy. essentially he is trying to say he is one of the greatest managers in the world. we have got dele alli on football focus. how are you on the celebration? i can't do it. but charlie and i invented a new one.” can do that where you fold fingers over each other. there you go. that's brilliant. you need a full
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close—up to see what we're doing. you need longer to prepare it. no, it's brilliant. i'm going to have to keep my hand like this. what happened to the good old fist in the air celebration. i have been talking to dele alli about the celebration and the fact that spurs have had a decent start of the season. the first thing we need to ask you. the hand challenge. i watched a tutorial, is it right? that's right. we did it better than me. the second one, it's difficult, i don't understand. i don't want to teach people. it's fun watching them trying to do it. i haven't got doublejointed fingers.
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trying to do it. i haven't got double jointed fingers. it's trying to do it. i haven't got doublejointed fingers. it's not that, it's this. i've got it. now, i can't move my hand over again. the whole interview has to be like this. there we are. it's like this. it's like fingerbobs. remember that with the little mice? we will also be talking to rudigerfrom chelsea about his new manager. we'll also be talking about brighton. one of their players who sorted out a shoulder injury with the help of an osteopath. we'll be talking about wales, england and scotland, as well. and it's the old firm this weekend and also the ipswich against
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norwich. ipswich haven't beaten norwich. ipswich haven't beaten norwich for nine years. pressure on ipswich to sort that out. and greg james is doing predictions. have you got any mermaids? not this week. lots of guests going well hours. they don't even question the tail. due remember the outfit in the back of his car? we've got to remember to get on with the cricket. it's all about building a big enough lead for england today in the 11th test at southampton. they'll resume the day 21 runs behind india, with all of their second innings, wickets, in tact. england can wrap up the series with victory on the south coast...they‘re back in the match thanks to moeen ali who took 5 wickets, on the 2nd day.
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i enjoyed going back to county cricket and having a break. it's nice to get a call up when you are in decent nick with the bat and ball. you can have the confidence to come back into the game. it's doing what county cricket should be doing, giving you confidence. to come back into the test side and perform. to the us open, and serena won the battle of the williams sisters to progress through to fourth round. the 23—time grand slam champion, beat sister venus in straight sets, and said it was the best she'd played, since returning to the sport after taking time out to have her daughter, last september. rafael nadal‘s also through to the last 16, but was made to work for it by russia's karen khachanov. nadal was a set and a break down at one point, but fought back to win in four sets. the new rugby union season's underway and newly promoted bristol will be delighted with their start. they took on local rivals bath in their first game back in the premiership. and this late try from alapati leiua ensured they started with a 17—10 win. you can see how that went down at ashton gate.
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in the pro 1a, champions leinster won a cracking match at cardiff. there were only two minutes on the clock when bryan byrne's try, got them to within a point...and another byrne, ross byrne, kicked the conversion to earn a 33—32 victory. george north is playing his club rugby in wales again — and he's not had a bad start. the wales wing scored two tries, on his competitive debut for ospreys, as they beat edinburgh. a huge match in the super league last night. wigan denied local rivals st helens, the chance to secure the league leaders' shield, with a 30—10 win in super league. victory for table—topping saints, would have secured the league title with four games to spare, but the warriors ran in six tries to lead throughout, and secure their place in the semi—finals. elsehwere wakefield trinity beat huddersfield giants. stand—by for a big crash. this is sauber‘s magnus ericsson, in second practice for the italian grand prix,
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thankfully the swede walked away unharmed. sebastian vettel led a one, two for ferrari with mercedes‘ lewis hamilton in third place. and usain bolt‘s foray into the world of football continues. he's on trial with the australian side central coast mariners and he made his first appearance in a pre—season friendly yesterday, coming as a sub in the second half. he had a glimpse of goal late on...but couldn't quite get on the end of this cross. he's quick, but not that quick. if he'd slid in he might have got there. stand up paddle boarding has been one of the biggest growing sports in the uk over the last decade, but what do you do if you don't like water? you could try the new sport of landpaddling. i was told it's easier than skateboarding, so i went to southport this week to join a club session involving all ages. it's the sport that enable us to
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gracefully walk on water. now, stand—up paddle boarding has reached dry land and wales have given it fresh momentum. —— wheels. no longer are they restricted to getting inflata ble are they restricted to getting inflatable boards out and finding calm water, they can keep paddle boarding through the winter even when the sea of southport is rough and dangerous. when it is windy, you can still land paddle. you can get off one board onto another and still have friends and fun and get fit. land paddling followed soon behind just like skateboards and the surfboards. it's much more
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accessible because of the longer and wider wheelbase. you have extra contact with the floor. with the paddle, you no longer have to take your foot off, you are pushing with your foot off, you are pushing with your arms your foot off, you are pushing with yourarms and your foot off, you are pushing with your arms and steering with your feet. if you are one of the many who have tried it on the water, you will find this a doddle. it's also much more stable than skateboarding because you have the stability of the stick. it gives you the same sort of elegance as punting on the river, you can glide along. i'm 70. it's good exercise. i've got a fused ankle and! it's good exercise. i've got a fused ankle and i can use a stick with my arms to push myself along. i don't need to use my feet. it's nice and fun. when you are doing it and it's really hot. it's really good. i don't skateboard but i do this and it's really fun. it's because the paddle makes you feel more secure.
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in some parts of the world, there are regular races. i've been given a head start. with more and more clubs in this country, its hope there will soon in this country, its hope there will soon be regular competitions and championships. it's good exercise for your arms, of the body and your call with all the pushing. it's important to find space away from the path users, especially at first when you are certain to turn a view heads. once you have learned to lean and turn, you can keep going. in fa ct, and turn, you can keep going. in fact, stand—up paddle borders even do their own version of circuit training. there is no stopping them in this merseyside seaside town. as winter approaches, it gets to cold in the sea and on the lake but you can keep going with land paddling. a new sport has arrived. great fun and really accessible. i only saw the
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cameraman fall over. but he wasn't even on a paddle board. he's all right? yes, he is. that was a surreal sports bulletin. i hope you kept up with us. people with persistent credit card debt could get more help from their bank from today. new rules mean that if they are paying more money in charges, than they are paying off in debt, then the card provider must step in. let's talk to paul lewis, presenter of moneybox on radio 4. good morning, paul. what does stepping in mean? after18 months, they'll step in. persistent debt is defined as making your monthly payment but paying of interest and not the debt. if that lasts for 18 months, at that point, they will wa nt months, at that point, they will want people about the effects of this. if you pay the minimum, it can ta ke this. if you pay the minimum, it can
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take 20 or 30 years to pay off a credit card debt. they will advise them to pay more. eventually, they may stop the card and moved back to a personal loan and even right of some of the interest. it's quite a major intervention by the regulator. how big a problem is this at the moment in terms of people paying more charges than actual debt? the financial conduct authority estimates that 3.3 million people are in this position. that is quite are in this position. that is quite a lot. i was talking to one man who didn't think he had financial problems but he was paying more in interest, twice as much, than he was paying off in his debt. he paid off eight and paying off in his debt. he paid off eightand a paying off in his debt. he paid off eight and a half thousand pounds. his monthly payments were £200 and mostly paying of interest. people up paying huge amounts, draining their finances and they are the ones that the financial conduct authority is
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targeting. it's about 10% of people on credit cards. there are about 30 million adults with credit cards and about 3.3 million will have persistent debts. that is a staggering number. absolutely staggering. if there are more than 3 million people with difficulties like this, what should they do? they should take advice that the sca is now giving and i have been giving on this programme for many years. if you this programme for many years. if y°u pay this programme for many years. if you pay the minimum, it can take 30 yea rs you pay the minimum, it can take 30 years to you pay the minimum, it can take 30 yea rs to pay you pay the minimum, it can take 30 years to pay off your debt. look at what you are paying this month and freeze that amount. normally the minimum payment goes down if your debt goes down. if you paid a fixed amount, your debt will disappear in just a few years. if you can pay more, it will disappear in one or two years. never in nor a big debt ona two years. never in nor a big debt on a credit card. the sca reckons
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that by taking these measures, customers could save up to £1 billion per year. that is the scale of the profits, the turnover, that the banks are getting from people on credit cards. it makes you think about big profits, big business chasing profits. the banks going to help? do they want to lose this money from the system? they don't have any choice. the rules were announced earlier this year and come into force today. the banks say, this is an important outcome for customers and we will continue to work with the regulator to make sure the market remains responsive to the needs of the customer. the tooth is, they have no choice. after many yea rs, they have no choice. after many years, the regulator has finally passed rules to make them do this. some people in the debt business,
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people who help with debt charities say this doesn't go far enough and they want to do more. they want to see how this works out before any further change can be expected. yes, paul will be giving further good advice on money box on radio four. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. i feel like buddy holly the shop. it has. after that incredible summer, there's been a lot of rain and nights have been chilly. as we head on into this weekend, it's going to warm up quite quite mild further east with the sunshine and a little bit of mist. it's been a bit chilly here. it's
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going to warm up this weekend for england and wales. for most of us, it's going to be dry. it will keep these weather fronts at bay though they will try to get close to the north—west corner particularly on sunday. we will be importing this warm front from spain and france today and into tomorrow. when you get the sunshine, those temperatures will bounce into the mid—20s. after a cool start across the eastern side, we've had some sunshine. it's going to be a nice day from midlands eastwards. we could see 2a celsius. further west, more cloud around. still fairly warm and quite muddy. the north—east of scotland should see some clear spells. the winds are
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a lwa ys see some clear spells. the winds are always a bit breezy across the north and west corner. the south and east coast with light winds. overnight drive for most away from the western hills with a bit more cloud around. it should be a warm night to come so sunday morning temperatures starting at around 14—16d. summer conditions despite being into the start of me to rogic —— meteorological autumn. the best of the sunshine will be across the eastern corner of england where we could see 25 degrees. the weather fronts will bring wet weather fronts will bring wet weather to northern ireland and western scotland later tomorrow. then the cooler air will make inroads across northern areas. temperatures falling away through the week. monday is going to be very
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warm in the eastern corner but temperatures moving back towards the average later in the week. time to get the winter duvet back off again. maybe. the braemar gathering is the biggest event in the calendar of the highland games, and has attracted royal spectators since queen victoria in 18118. this year's event also sees the opening of a new centre, where tourists can find out more about the games' history. catriona renton is there this morning. you've come outside and i can see some highland dancers behind you. good morning. i know it's right up your street. good morning from the braemar gathering. the events get under way in the next half an hour or so. under way in the next half an hour or so. all the things you would expect to see at the highland games including tossing the caber, tug of war, the hammer, highland dancers, of course. we wanted to give you a
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flavour of all the things that are going to happen. the pavilion over there is going to open with the queen and the duke of rothesay coming. i thought it'd be good to give you an idea of the events you can see today. we went to the crieff highland games to look at them. the unique sound of the bagpipes as pipers andrew marr ‘s parade through the town centre. the chieftain of the town centre. the chieftain of the games this year ‘s from ohio. one of the highlights of my life. it's fantastic. really honoured to be here. just reading the chieftain is an honour itself. i feel i a celebrity. it was fantastic. what better way to what down the street than to have everybody cheering for you. it was fantastic. the highland
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games date back over 1000 years in scotland. in the cumberland style wrestling the current champion held sway. today's gathering attended by the queen and prince charles has long been a favourite of the royal family, especially a young charles. like crieff, there will be traditional heavy athletic events like the tug of war and caber toss as well as highland dance competitions, track and field and piping. the games are a spectacle like no other. countries all over the world celebrate celtic heritage by hosting their own games. finland and norway host the most northerly games with the most southerly being in new zealand. great to see the kids walking about in kilts. it's fantastic. if you're scottish, it's the thing you do. i love that things
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like this still carry on in such a small place like crieff. it's fantastic for scotland. we've been here for several weeks practising and being part of the ban.” here for several weeks practising and being part of the ban. i think the games are one of the strongest in the world. we've been coming here with the games in sterling and the highlands and it's going well. it's absolutely magic. the pull of the games brings tourists to scotland and keeps the unique nature of the game is alive. i'mjoined now and keeps the unique nature of the game is alive. i'm joined now by james dawkins who is taking part in eight heavy events. talk us through what you're going to be throwing today? first this morning is a heavy hammer. £23. there is also a £16 hammer. £23. there is also a £16 hammer. we have a 28 lb wait for
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distance. this goes over the bar. here we have the 22 lb stone which isa here we have the 22 lb stone which is a standing shot put. the last event would be the caber. the braemar k bahia is over 19 feet and around a in weight. which of these events is the most difficult? the caber is the most difficult. each is different in weight and length. the hammer is my favourite event to throw. the caber is a crowd pleaser. quickly i'm going to take you to michelle who is the world junior champion highland dancer. is this the highlight of your year? in august there is the world championship and we work up to this
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doing training and lots of dance classes for the world's which is our main highlight. you must be pretty good? i've won 16 championships so far in the year. and very quickly, how do you remember? it looks if a cult. you go to dancing to three times a week. that's how you get better. richard anderson is going to quickly piped up to do the highland fling. girls, quicklyjoin him. a quick demonstration of how the highland fling is done. not something i would be able to do at all. quickly, guys. bagpipes. though they look fabulous? i loved
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her saying, we go to dance lessons. practice makes perfect. that beautiful moment when their feet went up all at the same time. stunning. have fun, everyone there. coming up on breakfast... we'll be talking about these in the next hour, school lunchboxes. all the sweet stuff in front of me, you've got the healthy one. a survey says the majority of parents feel guilty that their child's packed lunch isn't healthy enough. we'll be looking at the pressure parents are under, and getting some top tips for packing a healthy lunch. we'll see you soon. yeah and good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and steph mcgovern. our headlines today: the fight to free nazanin zahghari—ratcliffe steps up a gear — the fate
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of the british—iranian charity worker will be discussed at top—level talks in tehran today. the mother and daughter stabbed outside their own home — after a major police appeal, a man is charged with their murder. he'll appear in court today. no gongs for celebrities linked to tax avoidance schemes — government documents seen by the times shine a light on the honours system. england's women book their place in france for next summer's world cup finals, after breaking welsh hearts in newport. england celebreated, wales must now hope for the play—offs. a fitting farewell for the queen of soul —
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