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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 1, 2018 11:30pm-11:45pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. america joins together to rememberjohn mccain, the former us senator, presidential candidate and vietnam war veteran at a memorial service in washington. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell says he's "worried and saddened" at the prospect of the labour party splitting, and is pleading with mps considering walking away to talk to the leadership. misery for northern rail customers as more than two thirds of services are cancelled, in a dispute over driver—only operated trains. idris elba makes his directorial debut with yardie, the story of a young man's journey from jamaica to the east end. find out what alice smith thought of that and the rest of the week's big releases in the film review. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be
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bringing us tomorrow. with me are martin bentham, home affairs editor for the evening standard, and business journalistjohn crowley. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the mail on sunday reports on an alleged plot led by the prime minister's former election guru to oust her and install borisjohnson in her place. the sunday times also leads on the apparent attempt by sir lynton crosby to destroy the prime minister's brexit plan and boost mrjohnson‘s leadership chances. the paper sasteremy corbyn too is under threat, with mps planning a vote of no confidence in the labour leader. the prime minister herself writes in the sunday telegraph, saying she will not agree to compromises on her brexit plan that are not in the national interest. the sunday express has a pledge from theresa may that there will not be a second brexit referendum. the paper says she believes it would be a "gross betrayal" of democracy. the observer leads on what it says
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is a cash crisis engulfing local councils, pushing children's social care services to tipping point. and the independent reports on remarks from the husband of the british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who is imprisoned in iran. richard ratcliffe says his wife's three day release was part of a "cruel game'." so, lots of optics, surrounding the two major party leaders in particular. theresa may, i will not surrender to brussels, promising to do what is in the uk's interests, whatever that is. exactly, that could mean anything to anybody. ultimately she might argue that things which either side actually do not think our international interest are in the national interest. so it doesn't really take you very far in itself. she then talks in this article, the other more interesting thing is possibly, i suppose, that
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she insists, even if there is no deal, we will survive. it will be a rough ride and so on, but the country is capable of coping with that in the medium term. and also ruling out a second referendum on the grounds of what she says would bea the grounds of what she says would be a gross betrayal of democracy. those are perhaps the more categoric points she is making. in terms of whether she gives in or not and makes more concessions to brussels, well, let's wait and see. it is quite likely we will make more concessions, or she will, quite likely we will make more concessions, orshe will, because she will argue that some of those may be in the national interest, because despite the talk about no deal, ultimately she is probably going to think that no deal isn't a great option and are therefore we should find some way to do it is. therefore, that is where the problem for the brexiteers will come, they will feel to much is being given away. it feels like the attitudes, doesn't it? she has got to say it, thatis doesn't it? she has got to say it, that is herjob. —— feels like platitudes. she is under pressure in
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the mail on sunday. prime minister rumbles boris plot to oust her, with the backing of sir lynton crosby. during the summer holidays, apparently boris was not just walking in the tuscan hills, enjoying the fine wines and food. he was on the phone a bit, do you think? it is whatsapp these days. lynton crosby ran boris johnson's successful mayoral campaign. he also ran theresa may's campaign, rather unsuccessfully, although she is still in power. that was the general election campaign last year. boris wants to reaso's job. election campaign last year. boris wants to reaso'sjob. et cetera. election campaign last year. boris wants to reaso's job. et cetera. -- theresa'sjob. we seem wants to reaso's job. et cetera. -- theresa's job. we seem to wants to reaso's job. et cetera. -- theresa'sjob. we seem to be reading into this a great deal. it is boris' for the taking, if you believe the front pages over the past few months. yes, and i'm not really sure thatis months. yes, and i'm not really sure that is the case. this story in the sunday times is the same story, in
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essence , sunday times is the same story, in essence, that the point is that lynton crosby is allegedly organising a campaign to vote down the chequers deal, and if that happens, theresa may's job the chequers deal, and if that happens, theresa may'sjob comes unsustainable, although we have heard that many times and she is still there. the theory is that she would then have to quit, and of coui’se would then have to quit, and of course the theory is that boris would then come in as the leader of the brexiteer group. now, there are many different obstacles to that happening, and one of them is, first of all, they have to voted down, and secondly, boris himself is not liked bya secondly, boris himself is not liked by a significant chunk of his own party. he is very popular with the grassroots in general, but i think there are people within the party who doubt his ability to do the statesmanlike job of being a prime minister, and point to his record as foreign secretary, with a less favourable light, and think that they cannot risk a leader of that sort. it is one thing simply being
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entertaining and articulating a great exciting vision, and another to be dealing with the details. you mention, martin, that it is the same stories in the sunday times. indeed, it says theresa may and jeremy corbyn face a double coup. let's look at what is being said about jeremy corbyn. rebel mps what record a party, and no—confidence vote. —— plot breakaway party. john mcdonnell talking about how sad he is that mps are going to split away. yes, fears about this schism. the problem with this headline is that people might feel a bit of deja vu. this happened in 2016 when labour mps come in the parliamentary party, they voted by a huge number to get rid ofjeremy corbyn and he didn't budge. so why is he going to budge this time? one interesting thing in that piece is that tony blair is going to break his silence in an interview to be broadcast tomorrow on the handling of anti—semitism, and he says to see
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a situation where thejewish community feels really alienate and anxious, it is a really terrible thing to have done. i think gordon brown in one of the other papers, as well, is going to break his silence as well. that seems to be coming back this week. the other interesting thing in this story, there is another element to it, which is that according to this, jeremy corbyn didn't attend a briefing this week held by the head of mi5, in which she was going to be told about the threat from russian spies, the terrorist threat, the islamist threat, and so on. —— he was. and he didn't attend that because he was attending a meeting about anti—semitism and so on. tony blair also talks about, potentially, his attitude to security being a weak point. i think those two things go together in the sense that although there may well be a perfectly reasonable explanation as to why he didn't turn up to this meeting, it doesjust play into a little bit of this feeling about him
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somehow or other being on the wrong side in all these national security debates. they had a file on him for many years, of course, so he is no friend of the security services. but he isa friend of the security services. but he is a friend, for example, he has appeared on russia today and all for what. the observer have another story about this. labour to shake up rules to deselect mps. this is going to be discussed at the party conference in the next few, well, this forthcoming party conference. who is going to benefit from that? who is going to benefit from that? who is going to be selected or deselected? well, it is too fast track the return of expelled members and accept supporters of hard left groups. it is momentum, jeremy corbyn‘s powerbase, people who have been expelled already, possible anti—semites who have in expelled. i think this is the slightly better story, because it doesn't quite say that this must have come from the national executive, but it puts moderate mps under pressure, if they are facing deselection. pity more
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powers into the hands of the membership? it does, but it might also drive some of the moderate mps, those whojohn mcdonnell also drive some of the moderate mps, those who john mcdonnell is worried about splitting away, if they think they are going to be shot down and deselected then obviously, and even if they are not, if they see some of the people they side with in the political vision of where labour should be going, being taken out, then of course that might well push them into the potential split. it also talks about frank field trying to take legal advice to resist the attempt, saying that if he resigns as the party whip he has to resign from the party completely. you can see from the party completely. you can see this whole thing, those who are not on the jeremy corbyn narrative increasingly being alienate it and pushed aside, so where will that leave? staying with the observer, revealed, cash crisis pushing child services to to pinpoint. an £800 million shortfall in funding needed. yes, and basically what is happening
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here is that more children are being referred into the care system for various reasons, lack of willingness of local authorities to take any risks with them after they have been repeat cases and others, and lack of services that sometimes make people get into a crisis situation a bit earlier, so two things there. and of coui’se earlier, so two things there. and of course the ability for councils to deal with those children is diminished because they haven't got as much fesoui’ces diminished because they haven't got as much i’esoui’ces as diminished because they haven't got as much resources as they once had. that is the gist of the story. this isa that is the gist of the story. this is a massive story. we have the sound and fury over brexit, and this isa sound and fury over brexit, and this is a big story in this country. the local government association estimates there is going to be a £6 billion shortfall in funding for local councils, and this isjust manifesting itself in this sector. so, you know, what are the politicians doing to try and solve these problems? yeah, the argument is that brexit is taking up all the
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bandwidth. for such a long time. the other thing, of course, bandwidth. for such a long time. the otherthing, of course, is bandwidth. for such a long time. the other thing, of course, is that ultimately it has a big impact, obviously on the instant —— individual children at all so on society as a whole, because these are often, unfortunately, the children who end up in all sorts of difficulty, whether it be getting involved in crime or having problems, mental health problems, all those different things, they tend to be disproportionately represented in these issues. so it is not a short—term thing thatjust goes is not a short—term thing thatjust goes away. is not a short—term thing thatjust goes away. it is a long—term problem and it ends up being a massive problem for the individuals and for wider society as well. let's go back to the sunday times. unisex changing rooms put women in danger. harassment, voyeurism? yes, so, this is really... and awkward subject, to talk about, when you are in changing rooms anyway. i was in there with my young family recently and it is a horrendous experience anyway. 30
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celsius, sweaty towels. having to watch out, whether you are exposing yourself to somebody, inadvertently of course, is another headache. how do you feel about this? it is like, i would much prefer, i would feel very much more comfortable having, you know, men can go to the men's and women's can go to the women's, but of course the problem is people who self identified in more fluid ways, and how do you deal with that? —— self identify. ways, and how do you deal with that? -- self identify. yes, trying to create spaces everybody can use equally and feel comfortable with doing so. yes. it is, i suppose. that doesn't have to be achieved in that particular way, does it? it is a statement, actually, the obvious. if you unfortunately have those of my sex you are prone to doing the wrong thing, in amongst women, in a changing room environment, it is going to give them more opportunity to do it, whereas if they are amongst other blokes they cannot do it in quite the same way quite so
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easily. individual cubicles gets you around all of this, and that is my preference as well. i have no need to strip off in front of anybody. you will not be doing a mixed one? no. let's go back to the sunday telegraph. 999... no. let's go back to the sunday telegraph. 999. .. i no. let's go back to the sunday telegraph. 999... i can't believe i just said that on national television. i can't believe i say a lot of things on national television, actually. 999, a massive rise in drug problems in prisons. the prisons minister, rory stewart, really wa nts the prisons minister, rory stewart, really wants to the prisons minister, rory stewart, really wa nts to cla m p the prisons minister, rory stewart, really wants to clamp down on that in the next 12 months. here we see the crisis, the impact it is having on inmates. yes, this is the growing abuse of drugs like spice which has led to a huge rise in 999 callouts. steve bu rt led to a huge rise in 999 callouts. steve burt on a very good reporter, says there is one every a0 minutes into an english jail. says there is one every a0 minutes into an englishjail. so lags says there is one every a0 minutes into an english jail. so lags are looking for more ingenious ways to get out ofjail. here is one of them, they are being taken out in an ambulance, really. again, it kind of
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relates back to the story in the observer, where there are problems in society. this is a big problem in society. again, on the outside, but ironically, on the inside as well. and rehabilitation schemes are in p i’essu i’e and rehabilitation schemes are in pressure short supply? it is another example of a knock—on effect because the prisons are not being adequately resourced and run and so you get a knock—on effect on to the health service and so the cost gets worse, actually. yes. and the human cost as well. indeed. that was the papers, don't forget, you can watch the front pages our website. if you missed the
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