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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 7, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today: british airways is hacked as the card details of almost 400,000 customers are stolen. we'll hear from some of those affected, and i'll tell you what to do if you think you're one of them. tributes to a hollywood icon. after an acting career spanning six decades, burt reynolds has died at the age of 82. what a start for ryan giggs in his first competitive match as wales manager. they thrash the republic of ireland in the new uefa nations league, with gareth bale amongst the goals in cardiff. and sally speaks exclusively to zara tindall, as she returns to competitive riding just two months after giving birth. it said chilly start to your friday morning with a little bit of rain in the north—east, but many will be dried today. details of that and
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your weekend forecast coming up on brea kfast your weekend forecast coming up on breakfast —— it's a. it's friday the 7th of september. our top story: british airways has launched an investigation after hundreds of thousands of its customers‘ credit card details were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline has apologised to those affected after the incident which comes at the end of a summer of cancelled flights and incorrect ticket pricing. lebo diseko reports. "a sophisticated attack" is how british airways describes the theft of customer data from its website and mobile app. around 380,000 credit cards were compromised in the two weeks between the 21st of august and the fifth of september. the personal and financial details were stolen as people made bookings online and through the app. when asked why it took so long to detect, the airline said it took action as soon as it realised there was a problem. we found out the extent of the damage and that's why we immediately began to communicate with our customers.
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it is most imperative that we tell our customers to please contact their credit card issuers and their bank, to make sure that they can proceed and follow the recommendations with regards to their credit card details. this is the latest in a series of customer relations issues the airline's had recently. in may last year, 75,000 passengers around the world were left stranded for days after an it failure. the airline was criticised for its handling of the problem, with some people blaming the outsourcing of its it staff. and injuly this year, it issues meant dozens of flights in and out of heathrow airport had to be cancelled. ba has apologised for the latest problems, saying it takes the protection of customers‘ data very seriously, but it might take more than an apology to restore customer confidence. lebo diseko, bbc news. lots of people will have been
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affected. ben, good morning. what do you do if you think you're one of those or youth had an e—mail this morning? -- ukad. the advice from ba is to get in touch with your bank —— you've had. that might be little comfort because if you're anything like me, you might use a couple of different cards to book things, you don't know when you do it. in some cases the bank will cancel the card and give you a new one. you're advised to change passwords if you log into your ba account through the website or the app. they've issued a big apology today in a lot of the papers and it starts with we are set ari, we are investigating this as a matter of urgency —— we are sorry. the breach has been resolved, they say, and our website is working normally. they're very specific in terms of the timing, it affects flights from august the 21st to
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september the fifth. they say as soon as they saw this be let us know. it's pretty vague in terms of what you need to do now, and it comes what you need to do now, and it co m es after what you need to do now, and it comes after a series of bad issues. the timing of the apology is interesting. we're talking to the chief executive later. ba needs to know it needs to deal with this head on straightaway. they've been criticised in the past for not acting quickly enough and not fronting up. in the past we haven't heard from the boss straightaway, it's taken them some weeks, this time it's a immediate. in the business world we keep an eye on the most trusted brands or the superbrands in the uk. last year, ba topped the list of the uk's best brands. this year, not even in the top 20. it shows the effect it's had on the company and the brand, what ba are trying to do is rebuild some of the trust in the brand because people are feeling quite rightly let down. interesting. ben, thank you very much. tributes have been paid to the hollywood actor burt reynolds, who's
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died at the age of 82. over three decades, he appeared in dozens of films, including deliverance and smokey and the bandit. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998. 0ur los angeles correspondent james cook looks back on a long and colourful life. burt reynolds in deliverance, taking on the wilderness and its murderous inhabitants, the embodiment of the macho american. reynolds made his name in westerns, like navajo joe, which reynolds made his name in westerns, like navajojoe, which played on his own reputed... you're a navajo, aren't you? and disputed cherokee roots. what's your name? joe. he became a hollywood heartthrob. what do you do besides drive fast? my
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career high was getting nominated for that film. my career low was when i couldn't get a job. that was not too long before that, i was having a rough time. burt reynolds said he regretted not taking more serious roles, but perhaps it didn't matter. his memoir ended with the line," nobody had more fun than i did". a number of celebrities have tweeted their condolences
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following the actor's death. arnold schwarzenegger said: whoopi goldberg said: dolly parton offered these words: and finally, sylvester stallone said: lots of love for burt reynolds this morning. and we'll be remebering burt's life throughout the show, talking to people who knew
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and worked with him, including the actor peter macnichol. he has an interesting story or two to tell us. more on burt reynolds through the programme. tony blair has used a rare interview to strongly criticise the current labour leader jeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. we knew there was not much love lost between tony blair and jeremy corbyn, but this takes it to a new level? it's a reminder of how much the labour party has changed, for all those years tony blair was prime minister, jeremy corbyn sat on the backbenches. frankly, postman pat was more likely to be invited to the cabinet table than jeremy corbyn
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then. nowjeremy corbyn is in charge and tony blair is reflecting he is solidly in charge, that the labour party has fundamentally changed. he is asked on the podcast, if he was a 21—year—old now, would hejoin? tony blair can't offer a definitive a nswer to blair can't offer a definitive answer to that question. he was particularly critical of the row that's dominated news about the labour party over the summer, the row about anti—semitism. take a look at this. imean, i mean, this anti—semitism thing has been bad because, as i say, it's been, in the end, something ijust can't imagine ever having happened in the labour party that ijoined all the way through to this moment. i can't all the way through to this moment. ican't imagine all the way through to this moment. i can't imagine that we've had 3—4 months debating over something where we have, you know, profoundly insulted the jewish community in our country. he says the labour party has changed
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ina he says the labour party has changed in a profound way and when he's asked about nick robinson about the prospect of another party emerging to try and colonise the centre if you like of politics, he doesn't entirely rule out the prospect of that happening. he says something will fill the vacuum. he says the phrase this can't happen in politics has been disproven quite a lot in recent yea rs. has been disproven quite a lot in recent years. you're right, it has kept you in work, chris. thanks very much indeed! lots to talk about in the sport, victory for wales. not just victory but a record—breaking win for wales over the republic of ireland in the new nations league, which can help teams qualify for the next european championship. a first competitive match under ryan giggs. ryan giggs was this flair player, wales played like him in the epitome of his style. a good start! former players tweeted it was like watching brazil. like watching gareth bale and wales
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absolutely thrashing republican ireland —— republic of ireland. football's nations league is underway. wales got off to a brilliant start with a 4—1 victory over the republic of ireland. it was ryan giggs' first competitive match in charge and the result never looked in doubt. gareth bale with one of the goals in cardiff. serena williams is just a match away from winning herfirst grand slam title since giving birth a year ago. she's into the us open final after beating latvia's anastasija sevastova in just over an hour. it's alastair cook's last match today as england play india in the fifth and final test at the oval. they boast an unbeatable 3—1 series lead. cook will bow out as england's most—capped player, and highest test run—scorer. rory mcilroy and tiger woods both equalled the course record on the first day of the bmw championship in pennsylvania. mcilroy and woods will begin the second day's play, on 8—under par after shooting rounds of 62. a little bit more for you in the papers ina a little bit more for you in the papers in a moment. we will flick through those in a moment. naga is
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doing it already! there's a lot going on. i will leave you to it! time for the weather now, and we have matt here in the studio with us this morning. a treat. full complement. atreat. full complement. inside! it won't last. we will kick you out later. is this because you seen the weather forecast? it's not raining, they will get me out there then. how is it looking? it is looking drive that we should cosy up, looking chilly at the moment. a fine note, this was the scene in penzance, clear skies through the night have led to temperatures taking a tumble. close to freezing in parts of south—west scotland at the moment, but for many it is a morning where we have temperatures into single figures. the exceptions are those areas top and tail of the country where we saw a bit of cloud overnight, and rain as well. on the satellite, rain at the moment spreading across scotland, through the central belt, a wet start here. showers east of northern ireland,
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eastern england, north—west england and parts of north wales. most will be dry. through the morning, rain in central scotland will go south, towards north—east england, cloudy, wet and breezy in the middle of the day and damp in north—west scotland. showers in england will go further east but away from that, most will be dry. a better, brighter afternoon compared to yesterday in wales, central and southern england with temperatures in the teens. further north, lots of cloud in northern england and brighter for some north, lots of cloud in northern england and brighterfor some in the west but north—east england, still outbreaks of rain, the same in south—east scotland, improving on this morning and the middle of the day. largely dry in northern ireland away from eastern coasts and cloudy and risley in the far north of scotland, were temperatures, like yesterday, the mid—teens —— and rosalie. the rain in eastern areas will go away but the cloudy north and scotland will stay damp —— drizzly. 0n the temperature chart you can see the yellows, this will
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stop temperatures falling to much. parts of scotland and eastern england will stay chilly. single figures into the start of the weekend. plans for the weekend? keep a close eye on the forecast, fairly mixed. a lot of dry weather, some rain at times. on saturday the bulk of the rain comes from this weather system pushing across england and wales, bringing morning patchy rain to northern ireland and southern scotland. southern scotland will stay dry, but rain coming and going through the day, most persistent in western hills. the brightest weather will be scotland and northern ireland on saturday with the winds light compared to the fresher a breeze further south. the teens at best. very few will see temperatures above 20. on sunday, reversing the fortu nes above 20. on sunday, reversing the fortunes almost. cloud overnight stopping it from being so chilly. a great start with patchy rain at times. generally brighter in england and wales on sunday, if breezy.
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scotla nd and wales on sunday, if breezy. scotland and northern ireland will see brighter moments, a fair bit of cloud, rain pushing from west to east, especially in the morning, especially around the highlands. temperatures up on today and tomorrow, we could see 22, which is around where we should be for the time of year. not too bad. not bad, but because we have been used to such high temperatures, ifeel a bit shocked i'm only seeing 22. our expectations are here, reality is here, that's where we should be now. how did you find reporting on the heatwave? it was difficult to get the tone right because so many want sunshine, but farmers have struggled, and other health issues. it divides the nation. some people love the sunshine and heat, yourself, for instance, others can't stand it because it went on for so long. it isn't just stand it because it went on for so long. it isn'tjust daytime temperatures causing problems, it's the night—time temperatures. your body doesn't get a chance to recover. we saw very high
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temperatures by day and by night and that led to the problems we saw with health. we're just not used to it, our bodies and our lifestyles. and out our bodies and our lifestyles. and our infrastructure, in hot countries there is a conditioning and people go into malls. and notjust us, the rest of europe as well. the rest of europe had its hottest summer on record. 0ur europe had its hottest summer on record. our last hot spell led to tens of thousands of extra deaths because of the prolonged heat. we will take a look about how the nhs dealt with the summer heatwave and the impact it had. baby leo ba by leo is baby leo is blissfully unaware he has just been born baby leo is blissfully unaware he hasjust been born into baby leo is blissfully unaware he has just been born into the baby leo is blissfully unaware he hasjust been born into thejoint hottest summer on record, but during her pregnancy, his mum, cassie, had to keep her cool. i managed to work earlier and avoid the hottest parts of the day, which was ideal. also avoid public transport and avoid walking too much in the heat of the city. that was really important. bridge control birthing pools have
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been very popular here at the chelsea and westminster hospital. summer is always busy, but this yea r‘s summer is always busy, but this year's extreme heat saw an increase in visits —— temperature controlled. things like swelling can sometimes mask other more serious conditions with pregnancy, so it is difficult to exclude those when women phone in and say they have got swelling of their feet and hands. and say they have got swelling of theirfeet and hands. so and say they have got swelling of their feet and hands. so again we recommend that women come in and be assessed. the government says during july thousands more people were seen within a&e in the same month last year. it was even busier than the winter. usually summer is the time the wards are less busy, it is an opportunity for a time for early winter planning, it is an opportunity for staff to catch up, but we haven't had that respite. so really, since january, it is really been full on. as temperatures soared, the nhs advice website was. heat related enquiries more than doubled, from 730,000 in the summer last year to more than 1.5 million
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over the past three months. the number of deaths related to the summer number of deaths related to the summer has not yet been published, but this climate change expert says higher mortality could become the new norm. we had 900 deaths from heat related conditions a couple of yea rs heat related conditions a couple of years ago. imagine... we didn't hear anything really reported about it, but imagine if we had had a flood event that killed 900 people. there would be understandable outrage, uproar, it would be considered a national crisis. the deaths from heat a public health emergency, and we have got to get better at helping it. and mps are warning a change in climate must mean a major change in our culture. we see in hospital wards overheating, care homes overheating. this is where the frail, elderly people are, and they are the most at risk of overheating ina are the most at risk of overheating in a heat wave. so we really need to plan very carefully to keep the
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older population safe. so if, as is forecast, a summer like this one becomes the rule and not the exception, then our health system, so exception, then our health system, so used to dealing with cold, wet winters, will also need to adapt to frequent, long, hot, somers. —— summers. i remember going to a hospital in milton keynes and they said they we re milton keynes and they said they were busier this summer than they often a re were busier this summer than they often are during the winter. we will not forget the 2018 summer in a hurry. let's take a look at today's papers. the sun claims former foreign secretary boris johnson and his wife, marina wheeler, have separated after 25 years of marriage. the daily mail leads on the british airways hack, reporting that the bank card details of customers who booked flights online over the last 16 days have been taken. ba said it told customers about the breach as soon as it could, and it has now called in police. the guardian reports that the uk's
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allies have lined up to denounce russia at a un meeting over the salisbury novichok attack. the front page also features a photo of hollywood actor burt reynolds, who has died at the age of 82. and the daily mirror features a full—page tribute to burt reynolds. it says the one—time hellraiser had become a recluse. and there has been a huge reaction to burt's death online. a tribute to the actor leads the rolling stone website this morning. it says he was the last of an a—list hollywood breed, and describes him as cary grant crossed with tom jones — funny, sharp, self—aware, and unpretentious. at the height of his fame in the 19705, burt reynolds really was one of hollywood's biggest stars. let's go to los angeles and speak
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to his friend and journalistjeanne wolf. thank you so much forjoining us on bbc breakfast this morning. it must bea bbc breakfast this morning. it must be a really sad day in hollywood, because he was one of the greats, wasn't he? he was one of the greats, andi wasn't he? he was one of the greats, and i must say when i got that phone call, i got frightened, shocked feeling. i knew burt was sick, i had known him for a long time, but i also knew he was scheduled to do seems for quentin tarantino's upcoming movie, and nobody expected him to be near death. we just mentioned that he had become something of a recluse in recent yea rs. something of a recluse in recent years. did people know that he was so years. did people know that he was so unwell? yes, i think people knew he was sick. he had a hard time getting around, and he looked then. but he had just done a couple of movies, had a couple of others lined up movies, had a couple of others lined up —— looked thin. i don't think he was a recluse as much as he didn't like not feeling good or looking his best so he sort of wanted to go out in public in more orchestrated ways.
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he couldn't be a recluse. he always had friends around him and people that cared for him. lets remember him at his best, shall we? how will you remember him, as a colleague and asa you remember him, as a colleague and as a friend? well, as a colleague and asa as a friend? well, as a colleague and as a friend. i started off in miami, florida, which was about an hour away from his spectacular ranch and his theatre injupiter, florida. soi and his theatre injupiter, florida. so i spent a lot of time with him and interviewing him, and we became friends. he was so much fun. he had sort of a quirky, winking way of looking at the world, and he was very proud of the fact, he would be happy to tell you, that he was number one in the world, box office, five years in a row. but the other thing is that he longed for respect, andi thing is that he longed for respect, and i think there were times he would sayjeanne, i've got the mastercard award, audiences love me, now i want some respect. so when he got nominated for an oscar for
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boogie nights, he said this time i am not going to make wisecracks. this means a lot. do you think he felt he was finally being taken seriously? well, i think he felt he could take himself seriously. he said deliverance was the best movie ever made, and he said it proved i could act, not just ever made, and he said it proved i could act, notjust to the public, but to himself. he knew he was good at being funny guy, and people found out he was funny guy from all the talk shows he did. but you know, he longed to show his experience and his sensitivity, and the other side of him. he was very gracious, and he was quite an old—fashioned gentleman, in a lot of ways. thank you forjoining us and sharing your memories this morning. joining us on the line now is actor peter macnicol, who worked with burt reynolds on the 1986 film heat. thank you so much for talking to us. we have been talking in very affectionate terms about burt reynolds. tell us about your
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experiences with him. well, i first met burt in 1986, on this movie called heat, not the michael mann film called heat, but are less well—known one, and i was driven out to the location to meet everybody. i arrived on the set and i saw only a lot of smirking crew faces. i said i am here to meet burt and the director, and they said burt is in his trailer and the director is... and they looked down to the ground, and there was a chalk outline. it turned out minutes before i arrived, burt had had a disagreement with the director and knocked unconscious. that was day one on heat. how did you deal with that? listen, after hearing burt's side of the story, i understood why he had done it and would probably do the same thing. burt was a kindly soul, he was humane, he was self—deprecating. we
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spent a lot of time together. we hung out in his room, always rehearsing our next day's scenes, andi rehearsing our next day's scenes, and i was anxious to impress him. and over time i realised he was equally anxious to impress me, i think because i had come from the theatre, and that life, that training, seemed, isuppose, more valid to him than being a top ten movie starfor decades. i valid to him than being a top ten movie star for decades. i said valid to him than being a top ten movie starfor decades. i said in a tweet about him, he lived in a state of tension between needing to be taken seriously as an artist, all the while seeing the silliness of it all. you know, he came in at the ragged ending of the old studio system, with its contract players, typecasting. you see them all the 19505 and 19605 television, and all series like gunsmoke and riverboat. you see him feeling his way towards stardom, like another contract player, clint eastwood. he had drama
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and danger, all requisite to the resume, but somewhere along the way he found a quality his competitors did not have. a sense of humour. he could be riotously funny, good—looking, sexy, all at the same time. and indeed, not since carrie grant have we seen these traits in combination —— cary grant. when burt found his funny side of the 19705, we all sat up and took notice, and this love affair between burt in the audience ignited and really never failed away. and his ability to nail comedy, as well. you said he was funny man, you worked with him on a mr bean movie, as well.|j funny man, you worked with him on a mr bean movie, as well. i did, i think that was funny time for him. god bless him, he was having a little issue with the lions on that. it was a harder time for him. i worked with burt, i realise, in a darker era of his life. he worried his best roles were behind him and i
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think he felt stalled. i will leave you with this quick story about him. isaid to you with this quick story about him. i said to him one night as we were about to wrap on heat, i said burt, you have been over every hill and through every valley. do you have any advice for me? and he smiled a sad little smile and said i was about to ask you the same thing. what a lovely man he sounds like he was. thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with us, and it has been a joy talking to you. thank you. i am just looking been a joy talking to you. thank you. i amjust looking at been a joy talking to you. thank you. i am just looking at this quote, wesley snipes paid tribute to him, saying 10—4 bandit, you've got nothing but open road now. a lovely reference. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. traffic could be banned
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from sections of parliament square as a result of the suspected terror attack last month. the pa rt—pedestrianisation of an area outside the houses of parliament is being considered after the ford fiesta ploughed into cyclists and pedestrians, before crashing into a security barrier. the feasibility study into making the area safer has been commissioned by the mayor's office, parliament and westminster city council, with support from the metropolitan police and government security advisers. the majority of met police investigations into things like theft and burglary have closed without a suspect having been identified. figures for the last year published by the home office show there were 30,000 incidents of vehicle theft recorded in london, but a suspect was only identified in 15% of cases. a skate park on the southbank of the river thames is to be awarded £200,000 towards its protection and expansion. the money comes from the the london marathon charitable trust, and is the second—largest contribution towards the project.
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the area in the undercroft of the queen elizabeth hall is not technically a skate park, but has been used as one for decades. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it the travel situation now. is pretty good news if you getting it is pretty good news if you are getting up to use the tube this morning, because currently there is a good service running on all london underground lines. as you can see, traffic is building on the a102 blackwall lane towards the blackwall tunnel. the a501 pentonville road is closed eastbound between a5200 york way and the a5203 caledonian road. that is for gas mains repairs. in kingston, the traffic lights are not working on a307 wood street near fife road. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today is going
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to feel a bit colder than it did yesterday. we are getting off the quite a chilly start. temperatures drop back into single figures last night, and it is going to be a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing as well. but it will stay dry today and there will be some good spells of sunshine around as well. in fact, good spells of sunshine around as well. infact, it good spells of sunshine around as well. in fact, it is a sunny start to the morning. lots of blue sky around for the first half of the day and then a bit more fair weather cloud as we head into the afternoon, but not quite enough to spoil the sunshine. still some decent spells of it around. temperatures are only 1819dc, that is a dip on where we we re 1819dc, that is a dip on where we were yesterday when we got into the low 205 for many places. instead we are looking at the mid to high teens, and we got this noticeable north—westerly wind around as well. now, through this evening and overnight, again it is going to feel quite cool at first. lots of clear skies around for the first half of the night. and it will cloud over, maybe a few areas of rain tomorrow morning. again, temperatures back into single figures, perhaps ten or 11 celsius in central london. now, tomorrow may not be completely dry. back to a westerly wind. quite a lot
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of cloud around, some outbreaks of rain perhaps for central and northern areas in particular, but sunday does look dry at the moment, but also some decent spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we'll be looking back on the life of burt reynolds, who's died at the age of 82. as the raf celebrate their centenary, we meet the men recreating the battle of britain but in miniature. she's best known for her role in the country music tv series nashville, but claire bowen has her own song to sing. she's here after 8:30am. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: british airways has apologised
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after the credit card details of hundreds of thousands of its customers were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline said the incidents occurred between the august the 21st and september the 5th. the stolen data is not thought to include travel or passport details. ba is advising those affected to contact their credit card providers as soon as possible. the head of gchq has said russia poses a real and active threat. jeremy fleming made the warning at a security conference in the united states one day after the government named to russian agents suspected of conducting the novichok attack in salisbury. he accused the kremlin of having what he called a brazen determination to undermine the international rules—based order. in a rare interview, the former prime minister tony blair has strongly criticised the current labour leaderjeremy corbyn,
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his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, mr blair said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party, and many within the party believe that it is lost. jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled to his opinion, but that politics has changed. a number of top us officials, including the vice president, are among those continuing to deny they're the author of an anonymous article attacking donald trump. the new york times piece, believed to be written by a senior white house insider, says mr trump's colleagues are trying to stifle his agenda. the president has described whoever wrote the article as gutless and the newspaper as phony. police are failing to identify suspects in hundreds of thousands of crimes, according to an investigation by the press association. it found three quarters of vehicle thefts, almost half of all shoplifting cases and four out of five burglaries ended with no suspects. it's led to warnings that victims could be put off reporting crimes. the home office says it recognises that demand on police is becoming increasingly complex.
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an 85—year—old flying trapeze artist, a skipping dog and the creator of the world's largest knitting needles are among those to win a place in the latest edition of guinness world records. others to feature include a butcher who has produced 78 sausages in one minute and a dog named feather with a flair forjumping. more than one a second for the sausages. she holds the title after clearing a hurdle almost two metres high. this is the giant knitting needles. that looks like quite arduous, extreme knitting. knit, pear, knit,
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pear. knit, pear, knit, pear. your neck would never be cold doing that! not quite record breakers this morning: wales' record win... is it a record win? of the republic of ireland. ryan giggs's first competitive charge in —— first competitive charge in —— first competitive match in charge, so plenty to celebrate —— over the republic of ireland. wales are off to a flying start in football's inaugral, nations league with a 4—1win over the republic of ireland in cardiff. it was ryan giggs' first competitive match in charge and tom lawrence started the party after five minutes. wales' all—time top scorer gareth bale added a second with a spectacular effort. aaron ramsey added a third before half time, with connor roberts adding a fourth. it's a good start, and like i said to the players, the bad news for them is that the standard now, they
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can't drop below it. there's things we could do better obviously. there's things in the game i wasn't happy with. but we can't really moan after a performance like that. you got to look at the games, see what you can do better and try and do that —— you've got to. scotland begin their nations league campaign at home to albania on monday, but tonight they have a much tougher task. the scots host belgium, who finished third at the world cup, and they'll have to try to contain chelsea forward eden hazard. he's probably in the top five at the minute. i think i've played against him manya minute. i think i've played against him many a times. i know what threats he can do and even if he's having a quiet game, he can pop up at any point and turn a game and that's what we're up against. serena williams is just a match away from winning herfirst grand slam title since giving birth a year ago. she's into the us open final after defeating latvia's anastasija sevastova in straight sets in just over an hour. williams, who's now 36, will face naomi 05aka in tomorrow's final. victory for serena will see her
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equal margaret court's record of 2a grand slam singles titles. rory mcilroy and tiger woods both equalled the course record on the first day of the bmw championship in pennsylvania. mcilroy and woods will begin the second day's play on 8—under par after shooting rounds of 62. mcilroy could have done even better had he not bogeyed two of his last three holes. it's getting to the tight time at the end of the rugby league season. wigan warriors keep up their pressure at the top of super league after victory over wakefield in the super 85. joe greenwood scored in the final minutes to give wigan a 25—10 win. they remain second, just four points behind leaders st helens. next to a crash in the cycling but after riders crossed the line, it's at the vuelta a espana, where britain's simon yates lost the red leader's jersey. this is them crossing the line.
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it was the frenchman alexander geniez claimed the victory in a sprint finish ahead of dylan van baarle, but then an official wasn't paying enough attention and his spectacles went flying and both riders fell off, still going at speed having crossed the line. a pileup! you would be annoyed there, wouldn't you? but it'sjesus herrada who now holds the overall lead. i bet it hurt. the spanish rider started the day over five minutes behind, but now has more than a three minute lead over yates in second. do you know what you are doing on the first of march, 2006? all those yea rs the first of march, 2006? all those years ago? chico time was number one. i remember that. that's bringing happy memories back for you. alastair cook's last match for england begins today, as his side play india in the fifth and final test at the oval. they boast a unassailable 3—1 series lead. cook will bow out as england's most capped player, their highest runscorer in test cricket and with more test centuries than any other england batsman. they boast a unassailable 3—1 series lead. a lot of the focus will be on cook.
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cook will bow out as england's most capped player, their highest runscorer in test cricket and with more test centuries than any other england batsman. he'll be missed. more than anything now it's about us asa more than anything now it's about us as a team giving him an opportunity to celebrate in the best way possible, and that obviously means going out there and making sure we win this game and making sure we play as well as we possibly can. it's an extra incentive for us as a group, and it would be a fitting way to finish what's been a fabulous career. at least cook never had to put up with this, cricket that went over and over and over again, at least cookie never had to put up with this —— cook. this is a parrotjoke, a way of repeating things! a match in leicestershi re way of repeating things! a match in leicestershire was stopped yesterday when a mccaw was this making noise
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in the trees. he landed on flannery‘s shoulder and they had to stop the match for several minutes. he went back to his home so it was safe. dickie bird at the top! that tickled me this morning. it tickled me two! —— too. donald trump has demanded the new york times reveal the name of the author of an anonymous editorial attacking his presidency. there is fierce speculation over who is responsible, with the vice president among those to deny any involvement. mr trump has described the writer as gutless and the newspaper as phony. so, if the flailing new york times has an anonymous editorial, can you believe it, anonymous, meaning gutless, a gutless editorial... we're doing a greatjob. the poll numbers are through the roof, our poll numbers are great. and guess
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what, nobody‘s going to come close to beating me in 2020 because of what we've done. we can talk more about this now with dr brian klaas, who is a professor in global politics at university college london and a columnist for the washington post. the relationship is heating up between mr trump and the media?m is, this is the culmination of a long attack from donald trump on the press. he's called them an enemy of the people, you only see that from people like stalin and mao. he has called them a stain on america. last night he... this is beyond partisan at this point and it is something where we should stand up for basic decency and freedom of the press. how can he come out of this without showing that it seems behind—the—scenes that there's a fairamount of behind—the—scenes that there's a fair amount of chaos in the white house? that's right. this anonymous
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op—ed and also the book by washington post reporter bob woodward, that's coming out early next week, paints a picture of chaos and dysfunction in the white house and dysfunction in the white house and it's not just and dysfunction in the white house and it's notjust around the president, his aides constraining him, which is the big story this week, but two weeks ago the president's own attorney implicated him in directing a federal crime and now we have the lawyer and the deputy campaign chairman, his campaign chairman, national security adviser and foreign security adviser convicted felons. this is ramping up asa convicted felons. this is ramping up as a slow emotion train wreck heading towards a constitutional crisis. what would that look like? it's where we don't really know who is in charge and maybe the president will disregard any advice or advisory policy by his aides trying to constrain him. the op—ed suggests aids are snatching papers away from him before he can sign them because they think he's a dangerous threat
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to international security. tromp is right this op—ed is gutless in a way because if someone in the white house thinks donald trump is a menace to international security and dangerously unfit for office, they should say publicly, not anonymously in the washington times, but in front of congress and hearings. there are still republicans who believe what mr trump stands for. maybe they don't approve of the man, but he has got the office and he's pushing forward their gender, so they're going to put up with him? that's right. a lot of republicans made a double's bargain. privately they don't like donald trump but they don't like donald trump but they like some of his policies on taxes and healthcare —— and devil's. lots of people arrive say things like he is unstable, impulsive and reckless and unfit for office —— lots of people say things. that is an unprecedented view in american history. if you think he is unfit and dangerous, there's not many policies that would justify
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continued support in my mind. they've made a political calculation. we will see with the midterms on november the sixth. thank you very much. thank you. matt is here in the studio this morning. good morning. it has started raining outside. you are going there very soon.|j started raining outside. you are going there very soon. i can hear the boss already. i arranged that for you. i know you did. you like the picture. i love the picture. that is derbyshire. i don't know about you but it looks like a chilly seen. about you but it looks like a chilly seen. that's the truth this morning, very cold for many parts. clear skies for the temperatures have dropped quite widely, down into single figures, lowest in parts of south—west scotland and northern ireland, hovering just above freezing. even as far south as worcester we have temperatures
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around four degrees at present. we saw those clear skies through the night but it is not that chilly everywhere. rain through north—eastern scotland is pushing its way south, starting to ease away the worst of it from the central belt but north—east england will get a lot wetter over the next few hours. some heavy showers north—west england, north midlands, north wales as well, clipping the east of northern ireland. they will shuffle eastwards towards the pennines in the next few hours and then ease a little bit but away from that and patchy rain in northern scotland, many of you get home from work staying dry. a brighter day to come compared with yesterday afternoon across parts of southern england and wales. a few showers close to the channel islands, but most will be dry with sunny spells. down a little bit on yesterday, and certain amounts of cloud across northern england, but they will have eased. much of the day will be dry and compared with this morning, a good pa rt compared with this morning, a good part of scotland will brighten up through this afternoon. it will stay a bit cloudy and damp towards the far north. a bit of a fresh breeze lowing, especially eastern coasts,
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and temperatures struggling into the tea m and temperatures struggling into the team is the most. as we will see, clearer skies for many across central and southern scotland and eastern england. temperatures will drop quite markedly, into single figures. notice the yellow colours out towards the west, this is where cloud spills in outbreaks of rain towards the morning, and temperatures for many holding in double figures. of course, the weekend is on the horizon. the last thing you want to see is rain on that same horizon but it way the england and wales, many parts at least, on saturday. this weather system is inching its way in and targeting england and wales. heaviest and most persistent rain across the hills and coast in the west, with a thick breeze. elsewhere across england, the rain more erratic. some in the south could stay dry all day long. the wind is reasonably light here, breezy across the rest of england and wales. in scotla nd the rest of england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland, temperatures up a little bit on what we are seeing through the day. through saturday night, a lot of cloud means temperatures will not
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drop as much as they have done through the past night or so, but a great start to sunday for many. brightening up quite quickly across england and wales, only isolated showers. a few more showers in scotla nd showers. a few more showers in scotland and northern ireland compared with saturday. sunny spells developing into the afternoon. with winds coming into the south—west on sunday, it will be a slightly warmer day. temperatures around 16 to 20 celsius. it may not sound great considering the summer we have had, but it is about where we should be for the time of year. we have a brolly in the corner. zara tindall has been telling breakfast how pleased she is to be back in the saddle, three months after the birth of her second child. she has been speaking exclusively to sally nugent about her very public highs and lows, and how two difficult miscarriages have helped make her family stronger. you've got your hands full there. bit full. this one, mainly. back to
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work. definitely. so we are back to the serious business of the dayjob now. yes, both. i've got two jobs. a bit of both. a bit of both. we stepped up the day—to—day care routine. well, good for you. we will let you go and get on with that. nice to see you, take care. and this fellow is? this is one of the 90 roll is, that hopefully will be my next good one. or that is the plan, anyway. i'm not sure he knows it yet. now, you went to the olympics, got your silver, you know, in a hugely proud moment for you, i had he been imagining it seems you're a kid? i don't i always thought i would go to the olympic, adding that came later. horses are very much in my life, and my family. being able to kind of have them still in my life and part of my career is great.
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do you ever look at women in the public eye, i'm thinking at the moment of serena williams, particularly, who, you know, have competed at a really high level, had a baby and come back? anime, i can't believe what she has been able do. but at the end of the day, that is her, that is her character. so she can't, you know, immediately switch that off. you can't stop being a sports person, you can't stop being competitive. it really hasn't been an easy couple of years for you privately, has a? you announce your pregnancy in 2016, and then very sadly went on to lose the baby hummerand we sadly went on to lose the baby hummer and we also heard later on that you had lost another child as well, in between your two girls.|j think that is the hardest thing in our situation, is that everyone knew, and very much, you know, when things like that happen, normally it is just your things like that happen, normally it isjust yourfamily things like that happen, normally it is just your family and friends. but u nfortu nately everyone is just your family and friends. but unfortunately everyone knew about it, and... you know, and actually!
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have had so many letters, and... saying, in, i'm so sorry, we have been through the same thing, which is incredible. and thank you to all of people. but it is... itjust showed how often it does happen, and i have a very supportive family. mike is incredible, and he you know, it is hard for the guys too. you are the daughter and granddaughter of two of possibly the most hard—working women in the public eye. do you think that that work ethic is something that you've inherited? probably. i mean, ithink it it's something that i've been around all my life, so you would hope that some of it would rub off. ina good hope that some of it would rub off. in a good way. one of the most famous images of this year, i think, has to have been you, pregnant, at
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the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle. what was that like, having to go and get your gladrags on and your heels? i was so uncomfortable, so uncomfortable, and busy when they build churches they don't think about agut women. busy when they build churches they don't think about agut womenm busy when they build churches they don't think about agut women. it was a hard bench? and really narrow. so you were perched. it was very uncomfortable. thank you very much indeed, it is great to see you looking so well and so happy, and with such big, ambitious plans for the future. we will see what we can do. do it for all the mums. for all the mums, yes! i would love to. i mean, hopefully we can get there, andi mean, hopefully we can get there, and i will see what happens. good luck to zara. we are talking about leasehold properties. do people know what they are buying
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into? it always sounds like a good idea, doesn't it? but it is not a lwa ys idea, doesn't it? but it is not always like that. those estate agents are calling for an investigation into how so many people have ended up only owning the lease on their homes, rather than the freehold. so what is the difference? well, if you buy a leasehold property, you own the building, but crucially not the land it is built on. the land is owned by a freeholder, and once your lease runs out, ownership passes back to them. it also means you have to pay annual ground rent, get permission to make changes to the property, and sometimes pay a fee to a managing agent. there are 1.4 million leasehold houses in england, and that is costing homeowners through rising ground rents and big, unexpected charges — so much so, the government banned leaseholds on nearly all new build houses, and stopped funding them. but the problem is 45% of people didn't know they were buying
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a leasehold property until it was too late. two thirds say they regret the purchase now, and many are struggling to sell their house. joining me now is mark hayward, chief executive of naea propertymark, which represents estate agents and carried out this research. good morning. it is pretty stark, these figures. people regret making these figures. people regret making the decision to buy and are struggling to sell. how did we get to these —— this position? struggling to sell. how did we get to these -- this position? people buy with their heart and not with their head and they need to be advised, and normally a lawyer should advise them and the person selling the property should draw attention to the fact it is leasehold. it is very evident from our survey, and we talked to 1100 people who bought a new home over the last ten years, but that is not the last ten years, but that is not the case. so they were almost blew into the buying of the property, because it was available. —— lured. so housing stock is limited, here is
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a house and i want to buy it. they would assume it was a house or flat which is leasehold and people don't link houses or flats with leaseholds. who is to blame for this? is a builder saying i know a way of making a quick buck, i will get a bit of money and it is consistent income? if you up paying ground rent, you get a consistent income. 0r ground rent, you get a consistent income. or is that the buyer for actually not being aware, not educating themselves that it is a difference? certainly if you look at the statistics we have, over 50% of those buyers were first—time buyers. they turned a vulnerable group. they have never bought before, they don't know any better. so they haven't been alerted to the fact that it is a leasehold property. so far as the housebuilder is concerned, it is an additional source of income. in some insta nces, additional source of income. in some instances, they are selling the freehold the property immediately legal completion takes place. that gives them a capital gain and it is bought by investors, and by the very fa ct bought by investors, and by the very fact that they are investors, they are going to be seeking an income and an increment in the value going
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forward. so aside from the fact you donate to the owner land your house is built on, what else does it stop you doing? well, it doesn't stop you, but if you want to make any alterations to the property, the freeholder will charge you. we have done some research on this, and for instance, if you want to change the blinds in your kitchen, £491 just for consent. if you want to change your carpets, £841. this is a scandal, isn't it? i think it is your carpets, £841. this is a scandal, isn't it? ithink it is a scandal, isn't it? ithink it is a scandal that has been swept under the carpet. it is nowjust coming to light, the other issue we have is that people who have bought these properties in the last ten years directionally trapped. properties in the last ten years directionally trappedlj properties in the last ten years directionally trapped. i was going to say, if you are struggling to sell, is there any way you can get your hands on that freehold? technically yes, and in some cases purchasers were told the freehold would only cost them several 100 thousand. that is not always the case. how do you buy that back? some wa nt case. how do you buy that back? some want a capital gain on that even if they want to sell it. so you are
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trapped. and it really is a scandal, because we got to —— we've got consumers who can't sell their property. thank you so much. we will talk about that a later. also. also more for you on that ba crisis at seven a.m.. and we will have some advice on what to do if you think you are affected. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. traffic could be banned from sections of parliament square as a result of the suspected terror attack last month. the pa rt—pedestrianisation of an area outside the houses of parliament is being considered after the ford fiesta ploughed into cyclists and pedestrians, before crashing into a security barrier. the feasibility study into making the area safer has been commissioned by the mayor's office, parliament and westminster city council, with support from the metropolitan police and government security advisers.
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the majority of met police investigations into things like theft and burglary have closed without a suspect having been identified. figures for the last year published by the home office show there were 30,000 incidents of vehicle theft recorded in london, but a suspect was only identified in 15% of cases. a skate park on the southbank of the river thames is due to be awarded £200,000 towards its protection and expansion. the money comes from the the london marathon charitable trust, and is the second—largest contribution towards the project. the area in the undercroft of the queen elizabeth hall is not technically a skate park, but has been used as one for decades. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. as you can see, traffic is building on the a102 blackwall lane
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towards the blackwall tunnel. the a501 pentonville road is closed eastbound between a5200 york way and the a5203 caledonian road. that is for gas mains repairs. in kingston, the traffic lights are not working on a307 wood street near fife road. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today is going to feel a bit colder than it did yesterday. we're getting off to quite a chilly start. temperatures dropped back into single figures last night, and there's going to be a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing too. but it will stay dry today, and there'll be some good spells of sunshine around, as well. in fact, it's a sunny start to the morning. lots of blue sky around for the first half of the day, and then a bit more fairweather cloud as we head into the afternoon, but not quite enough to spoil the sunshine.
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still some decent spells of it around. top temperatures of only 18 or 19 degrees celsius, that's a dip on where we were yesterday, when we got into the low 205 for many places. but instead, we're looking at the mid to the high teens, and we've got this noticeable north—westerly wind around, as well. now, through this evening and overnight, again it's going to feel quite cool at first. lots of clear skies around for the first part of the night, then it will cloud over, maybe a few areas of rain tomorrow morning. again, temperatures back into single figures, perhaps ten or 11 degrees celsius, though, in central london. now, tomorrow may not be completely dry. back to a westerly wind. quite a bit of cloud around, some outbreaks of rain, perhaps, for central and northern areas in particular. but sunday does look dry at the moment. still some uncerta nty, but also some decent spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today:
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british airways is hacked as the card details of almost 400,000 customers are stolen. we'll hear from some of those affected, and i'll tell you what to do if you think you're one of them. tributes to a hollywood icon. after an acting career spanning six decades, burt reynolds has died at the age of 82. what a start for ryan giggs in his first competitive match as wales manager. they thrash the republic of ireland in the new uefa nations league, with gareth bale amongst the goals in cardiff. and sally speaks exclusively to zara tindall as she returns to competitive riding just three months after giving birth. a bit chilly towards the weekend and. rain to the north—east of england and eastern scotland but for many, a dry day in—store. more
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details on that and your weekend forecast coming up on breakfast. it's friday the 7th of september. our top story: british airways has launched an investigation after hundreds of thousands of its customers' credit card details were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline has apologised to those affected after the incident which comes at the end of a summer of cancelled flights and incorrect ticket pricing. lebo diseko reports. "a sophisticated attack" is how british airways describes the theft of customer data from its website and mobile app. around 380,000 credit cards were compromised in the two weeks between the 21st of august and the fifth of september. the personal and financial details were stolen as people made bookings online and through the app. when asked why it took so long to detect, the airline said it took action as soon as it realised there was a problem.
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we found out the extent of the damage and that's why we immediately began to communicate with our customers. it is most imperative that we tell our customers to please contact their credit card issuers and their bank, to make sure that they can proceed and follow the recommendations with regards to their credit card details. this is the latest in a series of customer relations issues the airline's had recently. in may last year, 75,000 passengers around the world were left stranded for days after an it failure. the airline was criticised for its handling of the problem, with some people blaming the outsourcing of its it staff. and injuly this year, it issues meant dozens of flights in and out of heathrow airport had to be cancelled. ba has apologised for the latest problems, saying it takes the protection of customers' data very seriously, but it might take more than an apology to restore customer confidence. lebo diseko, bbc news. what
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should you do if you've been affected? ben is looking at that this morning. the advice from bae is to get in touch with your bank, because they say your credit card details could be at risk and you could be open to fraud -- ba. it is risk and you could be open to fraud —— ba. it is vague advice and. if you're like me, you might use a couple of different credit cards and you're not sure which one you used cash vague advice. you might call a couple of banks and as a precaution they might cancel the cards —— vague advice. it could cause chaos and. ba has been quite upfront about this —— it could cause chaos. it happened between the 23rd of august and the fifth of september. they want people to be prepared, which is why they're saying this now. in the past, the boss hasn't been forthcoming about problems. it failures, baggage
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problems. it failures, baggage problems and strikes. he has said sorry with full—page apology is in the newspapers. this one says we're sorry, we're investigating this as a matter of urgency. they said the breach has been resolved and the website is working normally. they say to get in touch with your bank and credit card provider and follow their advice. it's interesting, british airways facing so many problems over the last year or so. i think it will damage there be patient. we've talked about branding, we looked at the value of the brand across the business world and they've fallen in the last survey from number 12 out of the top 20 so those problems having an impact —— number one to. 20 so those problems having an impact -- number one to. we will talk to the boss in the next hour. thanks, ben. tributes have been paid to the hollywood actor burt reynolds, who's died at the age of 82. over three decades, he appeared in dozens of films, including deliverance and smokey and the bandit. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998.
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0ur los angeles correspondent james cook looks back on a long and colourful life. lots of messages on social media. arnold schwarzenegger said: many have been paying tribute to burt reynolds, who died at the age of 82. we will remember his life through the show and talk to people who knew and worked with him. and we'll be remebering burt's life throughout the show, talking to people who knew and worked with him, including the actor peter macnichol. they had fantastic memories. what a character he was! but let's turn to politics. former prime minister tony blair has strongly criticised the current labour leader jeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast,
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the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, i suppose in one way we shouldn't be too surprised because mr blairand mrcorbyn shouldn't be too surprised because mr blair and mr corbyn have different views on how labour should proceed, but this takes it to a new level? it does. even the most casual observer of politics will get that there is something of a difference between the politics of tony blair and jeremy corbyn, and supporters of jeremy corbyn hearing and seeing this interview today will say, yeah, of course there's a difference, the party has changed and so long tony blair. they wouldn't be worried at all to politically see the back of him but mr blair is quite striking in saying he fears for the future of the labour party, and if he was a 21—year—old he's not certain he would join. he says it's very
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different from the 19805 were yes, labour had, in michael foot, a leaderfrom the labour had, in michael foot, a leader from the left but he points out that mr foot had served in government and tackled the hard left in the party, butjeremy corbyn, in his view, is unwilling to do that and embraces it. he was particularly critical in this interview about the whole row of anti—semitism that's dominated over the summer. i mean, this anti—semitism thing has been bad because, as i say, it's been, in the end, something ijust can't imagine ever having happened in the labour party that ijoined all the way through to this moment. i can't imagine that we've had 3—4 months debating over something where we have, you know, profoundly insulted the jewish community in our country. he makes the point that this, in his view, sits in a broader context and that context is the current labour party co m es that context is the current labour party comes from a position of quite
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deep hostility to traditional western policy. in addition, he floats the idea of potentially another political party emerging. doesn't say it explicitly, but he reckons if there was a general election in which it was a contest between boris johnson for the conservatives and jeremy corbyn for labour, something, he says, would fill the vacuum. chris mason, thank you very much indeed. chris in westminster for us this morning. a number of top us officials, including the vice president, are among those continuing to deny they're the author of an anonymous article attacking donald trump. the new york times piece, believed to be written by a senior white house insider, says mr trump's colleagues are trying to stifle his agenda. the president has described whoever wrote the article as "gutless" and the newspaper as "phony". an 85—year—old flying trapeze artist, a skipping dog and the creator of the world's largest knitting needles are among those to win a place in the latest edition of guinness world records.
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the latest addition contained those. others to feature include a butcher who has produced 78 sausages in one minute. that's the one i'm impressed with. fast worker! a dog named feather with a flair forjumping. she holds the title after clearing a hurdle almost two metres high. there is the giant knitting needles. how long would it take to make a jumper like that? i have no idea. knit, pearl. knit, pearl. knit, pearl. you could so lose yourself in that pattern. imagine if you made a mistake and you had to go back and change it. imagine how big the whole is if you drop a stitch! —— hole. thanks forjoining us. lots of tributes from across the world of showbiz for the actor burt reynolds, who has died at the age of 82.
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caroline frost joins us who has died at the age of 82. caroline frostjoins us to talk about his life from central london. thanks forjoining us. such sad news, and we've heard some really warm tributes to burt reynolds and his life, across the spectrum of hollywood and actresses and actors? i don't think he made many enemies in his long tenure as one of the world's biggest box office stars. looking back, many people waking up this morning might ask who really is, but for a certain generation, there was no bigger star. at his peak he was the world's biggest box office draw for five running years, that was unprecedented in that age of hollywood, and there were many films he gave his particularly unique charisma and i drink link dimensions to at that time. -- i twinkling. we were talking to peter mccall earlier and he said there
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we re mccall earlier and he said there were two very stark stories —— peter mcnicol. 0ne were two very stark stories —— peter mcnicol. one on the set of heat and burt reynolds punched the director, but the modesty of the man, and his insecurities, especially later, about where he stood as an actor in the whole spectrum. that's very acute. what happened is theirs to groups of actors in this world, one who are given plaudits and other awards and trophies —— there's two groups. 0thers awards and trophies —— there's two groups. others are guilty pleasures. they bring success and escapism and enjoyment to generations. burt reynolds fits into that later camp. he opted for that road. he said he chose the easier of, but he wanted to have a good time on and off the speed and he brought that success to bear. until 1997 it took two decades until he got his 05car bear. until 1997 it took two decades until he got his oscar nomination for boogie nights. how do you think you will be remembered? it fell out.
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caroline, how do you think he will be remembered? we will get your earpiece back in. caroline, how do you think burt reynolds will be remembered? caroline, can you hear me? i can. good. iwas asking, how do you think burt reynolds will be remembered? for being a burly beefcake, for remembered? for being a burly beefca ke, for bringing remembered? for being a burly beefcake, for bringing good humour to the screen and to entertaining a whole generation of audiences and being surprisingly and deceptively talented and versatile. he made it look so easy and many actors, all the people paying tribute to date, they know isn't. thanks carol and thanks for dealing with the technical problems —— today, they know it isn't. a burly beefca ke. know it isn't. a burly beefcake. if you're going to be remembered, be remembered as a
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burly beefcake! be remembered, be remembered as a burly beefca ke! but be remembered, be remembered as a burly beefcake! but maybe not you. talking of burly beefcake stybar but that's not how i'm going to be remembered with the best intentions —— talking of burly beefcake is... this is another view in london downs towards the thames barrier, glorious start for many —— in london down towards. a feel of autumn in the air today. temperatures widely into single figures overnight into the rush—hour. around one in parts of southern scotland, the south—west and northern ireland, even as far as worcester, around four. most start dry, a few showers in the north—west, the north—west midlands, north—west, the north—west midlands, north wales but significant rain has beenin north wales but significant rain has been in eastern scotland. lothian and the borders, into north—east england, turning wet here increasingly in the morning, easing into the afternoon. cloudy and damp into the afternoon. cloudy and damp into the afternoon. cloudy and damp into the far north of scotland but for most, a dry day and bright.
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sunny spells and southern counties of england, this represents a big improvement on yesterday afternoon. much of southern england, wales and the midlands will be dry, sunny spells and the chance of a shower in the endless channel but a small chance. temperatures down a bit after the fresh start, the high teens. largely cloudy for northern england, with sunny spells, the rain easing off in the north—east. most will be dry and in scotland, skies brightening in eastern areas. can't promise huge amounts of sunshine and the best of the bright skies will be in the west. cloudy and damp in the far north. the same tonight. any showers in eastern areas will fade, clear skies in the morning in the east but in the west, the cloud piles in, more rain and a strengthening breeze. you can see the yellows, an indication of where the yellows, an indication of where the temperatures will rise into the night and into the teens to start the day. in eastern england, down to single figures to start the weekend. into the weekend, the forecast is
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mixed wherever you are rain, sunshine. 0n mixed wherever you are rain, sunshine. on saturday, this will bring the bulk of the weekend rain. in england and wales. wettest in western coasts and hills but fairly erratic elsewhere, drier moments, not a washout hopefully for many. some in the south could stay dry. scotland and northern ireland will stay dry but that good ease away. the afternoon shouldn't feel too bad even with temperatures around the mid—teens. once again, given the cloud in england and wales, temperatures still below 20. then into sunday, a cloudy night with temperatures not dropping away too much. a great start on sunday with splashes of rain and drizzle. england and wales will be brighter than saturday the. a few showers. scotland and northern ireland will start with cloud and early rain, rain continuing on and off. dry and bright moments. on sunday, with winds in the south—west, feeling warmer with temperatures up to 22. back to where they should be for the
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time of year. we will take that, thanks, matt! let's turn our attention to some crime figures which make interesting reading. many police investigations are closing without suspects being identified. that is according to new analysis of recent figures by the press association. it found that, across all 44 police forces in england and wales, 77% of car theft cases had an "incomplete" outcome. in nearly half of all shoplifting cases, investigations ended with no suspect, and 81% of almost 250,000 residential burglary offences were closed without any clue who did it. the revelations have prompted warnings that victims could be put off reporting crimes. the home office says it recognises that crime is changing, and police demand is becoming increasingly complex. let's speak to deputy chief constable amanda bla keman. she is from the national police chiefs council, and joins us from our newsroom in worcester. thank you forjoining us. if someone
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is watching this morning and they go out onto the street and their car has been broken into overnight, you would look at these figures and wonder is there any point in phoning the police? well, i would always urge people to ring the police if they find they have been the victim ofa they find they have been the victim of a crime. it is incredibly important. we utilise that information to understand where we should put our patrols, in order that we can prevent crime have been in the first place. a very —— happening in the first place. in one recent case our officers were able to arrest somebody who was around vehicles, using their stop—and—search powers, identify that the person had items on them, and although they did not get charged with anything in relation to the theft of the vehicles in the area, they were prevented from carrying on their offending. at some of these figures are really
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shocking, aren't they? in the west midlands, 90% of burglaries were closed without a suspect being identified. that will really undermine people's belief and confidence in policing, isn't it? well, i absolutely understand that, but what i would say is, and from the peace that you did just before you came to me, the home office acknowledges that our demand is changing and it is increasing. we also see a situation where our police officer numbers are the lowest they have been since the 19805. we are having to prioritise resources into some of the demand areas which are very complicated and complex, that have safeguarding issues around them, and take our office is a great deal of time and painstaking work in order to solve. that does mean that we haven't been able to put the amount of resources that we would like to into some of the proactive work that we would do, where we would ordinarily be able to link one offender to multiple
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offences. so where we have the opportunity to identify an offender, we do that, but we perhaps don't ta ke we do that, but we perhaps don't take those opportunities that we have simply because of the amount of demand that we have coming in to do that additional work around trying to identify the full scope of their offending, especially when they are unlikely to get... i appreciate you having to do other very compact things like internet crime and fraud and online paedophile activity, that kind of thing, and it takes an awful lot of resources. but things like burglary, shoplifting, car theft, for many of us they are the basics. they are the things we want you to deal with first and foremost. absolutely. we have always prioritised what we have attended. if you are the victim of a residential burglary, across the uk, a response, you will get forensics attendance. but where there are
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no... especially for vehicle crime and shoplifting, where there are no lines of enquiry, where there is no cctv evidence, no evidence together, that does limit our ability to be able to progress that matter. what do you think you as police officers could do to improve these figures? i know it is a matter of getting more resources from the government, but there would surely be things within policing you can do to improve these stats. absolutely, and we do do these things. it is about prevention, stopping it happening in the first place, concentrating on that minority of offender who creates the volume of offences we see, and concentrating our activity around those individuals, which is what we do across uk policing. thank you very much indeed forjoining us on breakfast this morning. let's take a look at today's papers. the sun claims former foreign secretary boris johnson and his wife, marina wheeler, have separated after 25 years of marriage. the daily mail leads
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on the british airways hack, reporting that the bank card details of customers who booked flights online over the last 16 days have been taken. ba said it told customers about the breach as soon as it could, and it has now called in police. the guardian reports that the uk's allies have lined up to denounce russia at a un meeting over the salisbury novichok attack. the front page also features a photo of hollywood actor burt reynolds, who has died at the age of 82. and the daily mirror features a full—page tribute to burt reynolds. it says the one—time hellraiser had become a recluse. and there has been a huge reaction to burt's death online. a tribute to the actor leads the rolling stone website this morning. it says he was the last of an a—list hollywood breed, and describes him as cary grant crossed with tom jones — funny, sharp, self—aware, and unpretentious. it is known as the beautiful game,
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but can football help children traumatised by war and violence? arsenal football club is building pitches across refugee camps in jordan and indonesia, to develop a programme that helps children's physical and mental health. it is being launched today by former arsenal captain and world—cup winner per mertesacker. catrin nyejoined him at a refugee camp injordan. you try to prepare as much as you can, mentally, for i am going to a refugee camp. to imagine these circumstances is impossible. and arsenal star takes on a rather different pitch. per mertesacker is used to the emirates stadium, in london. this pitch is in zaatari
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refugee camp in jordan, london. this pitch is in zaatari refugee camp injordan, just 12 kilometres from the syrian border. the former arsenal captain is here to see a new football training programme designed to help children traumatised by war. this camp is huge. it is home to 80,000 syrian refugees. it is the size of a small city. the place is well organised, but it has problems. children end up in early marriages and child labour. the training programme teaches children about their rights, about teamwork, resilience, and give them vital role models. it is also about letting them just the kids. save the children psychologists work with arsenal, who already do community work in north london. seeing conflict from syria and living in a refugee camp with 80,000 people is very different from a young person growing up on an estate here. very
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different, but some of the approaches to it and responses are really simple. it is about belonging to something positive. it is about having a sense of purpose, trusted staff, those trusted adults, that do have an understanding of what they are going through. in jordan, per mertesacker meets mahmood, assyrian refugee who fled when he was just nine. what does put all mean to him? translation: it is my life. have you seen your son translation: it is my life. have you seen your son playing, and how good he is, and skilful? the whole family fled. they don't know what is going on at home. they don't know how long they are going to live here. so here it is just they are going to live here. so here it isjust being they are going to live here. so here it is just being day by day, enjoying the football. so it gives him just... so much. where do you wa nt to him just... so much. where do you want to be one day? a famous player. like you. save the children and
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arsenal are aiming to coach 4500 teenage boys and girls in the next three years, here injordan and in indonesia. they know they can't get these children their old lives back, but they can try and give them hope, make them stronger, and make sure it is not war that defines their future. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: we are lucky to have the famous poppy display commemorating the first world war here in salford quays this morning, and matt will be heading down to find out more for us. it is still such an amazing sight. we will leave you with that picture as we say could live for a couple of
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minutes. —— goodbye for a couple of minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. traffic could be banned from sections of parliament square as a result of the suspected terror attack last month. the pa rt—pedestrianisation of an area outside the houses of parliament is being considered after the ford fiesta ploughed into cyclists and pedestrians, before crashing into a security barrier. the feasibility study into making the area safer has been commissioned by the mayor's office, parliament and westminster city council, with support from the metropolitan police and government security advisers. met police say a murder investigation is underway after a woman died in a house fire in woolwich yesterday. the fire, which officers are treating as a suspected arson attack, happened in centurion square in the early hours of yesterday morning. two other people were taken to hospital, but their injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. a skate park on the southbank of the river thames is being awarded £200,000 towards its
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protection and expansion. the money comes from the london marathon charitable trust, and is the second—largest contribution towards the project. the area in the undercroft of the queen elizabeth hall is not technically a skate park, but has been used as one for decades. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. on the a40, traffic is building towards london approaching the target roundabout at northolt. the a501 pentonville road is closed eastbound between a5200 york way and the a5203 caledonian road. that is for gas mains repairs. in kingston, the traffic lights are not working on a307 wood street, near fife road. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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today is going to feel a bit colder than it did yesterday. we're getting off to quite a chilly start. temperatures dropped back into single figures last night, and there's going to be a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing, too. but it will stay dry today, and there'll be some good spells of sunshine around, as well. in fact, it's a sunny start to the morning. lots of blue sky around for the first half of the day, and then a bit more fairweather cloud as we head into the afternoon, but not quite enough to spoil the sunshine. still some decent spells of it around. top temperatures of only 18 or 19 degrees celsius, that's a dip on where we were yesterday, when we got into the low 205 for many places. but instead, we're looking at the mid to the high teens, and we've got this noticeable north—westerly wind around, as well. now, through this evening and overnight, again it's going to feel quite cool at first. lots of clear skies around for the first part of the night, then it will cloud over, maybe a few areas of rain tomorrow morning. again, temperatures back into single figures, perhaps ten or 11 degrees celsius, though, in central london. now, tomorrow may not be completely dry.
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back to a westerly wind. quite a bit of cloud around, some outbreaks of rain, perhaps, for central and northern areas in particular. but sunday does look dry at the moment. still some uncerta nty, but also some decent spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. british airways has apologised after the credit card details of hundreds of thousands of its customers were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline said the incidents occurred between the august the 21st and september the 5th. the stolen data is not thought to include travel or passport details. ba is advising those affected to contact their credit card providers as soon as possible. hollywood actors have been paying tribute to burt reynolds,
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who died last night at the age of 82. the screen legend appeared in dozens of films over three decades, including smokey and the bandit and deliverance. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998. arnold schwarzenegger called him a trailblazer, and former partner sally field said her memories of the star would never fade away. the head of intelligence agency gchq has said russia poses a real and active threat. jeremy fleming made the warning at a security conference in the united states, a day after the government named two russian agents suspected of conducting the novichok attack in salisbury. he accused the kremlin of having what he called a brazen determination to undermine the international rules—based order. the former prime minister tony blair has strongly criticised the current labour leader jeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, mr blair said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party,
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and many within the party believe that it is lost. jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled to his opinion, but that politics has changed. a number of top us officials, including the vice president, are among those continuing to deny they're the author of an anonymous article attacking donald trump. the new york times piece, believed to be written by a senior white house insider, says mr trump's colleagues are trying to stifle his agenda. the president has described whoever wrote the article as "gutless" and the newspaper as "phony". police are failing to identify suspects in hundreds of thousands of crimes, according to an investigation by the press association. it found three quarters of vehicle thefts, almost half of all shoplifting cases and four out of five burglaries ended with no suspects. it's led to warnings that victims could be put off reporting crimes. the home office says it recognises that demand on police is becoming increasingly complex.
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coming up, matt will have the weather. quite mild. he's coming to us weather. quite mild. he's coming to us from salford quays. felt a bit chilly. like autumn today. it is meteorological autumn. there you go! mike is going to tell us about the sport. the sunday shining on wales. wonderful night for them, at the start of this new nations league —— the sun is shining. i'm going to get you excited very quickly about it. john was trying to explain this. it replaces meaningless friendlies and is another way to get into the european championship. every match counts.
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there's a trophy for the top league. wales are in league b, they play denmark and last night, the republic of ireland, and if they win their group they can go to the top tier, as well as getting a place in the european championship. and wales are loving this idea! a record win over the republic of ireland! wales are off to a flying start in football's inaugral, nations league with a 4—1win over the republic of ireland in cardiff. it was ryan giggs' first competitive match in charge and tom lawrence started the party after five minutes. wales' all—time top scorer gareth bale added a second with a spectacular effort. aaron ramsey added a third before half time, with connor roberts adding a fourth. it's a good start, and like i said to the players, the bad news for them is that the standard now, they can't drop below it. there's things we could do better obviously. there's things in the game i wasn't happy with. but we can't really moan after a performance like that. you've got to look at the games, see what you can do better and try and do that. someone else is doing pretty well...
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serena williams is just a match away from winning herfirst grand slam title since giving birth a year ago. she's into the us open final after defeating latvia's anastasija sevastova in straight sets in just over an hour. williams, who's now 36, will face naomi osaka in tomorrow's final. victory for serena will see her equal margaret court's record of 24 grand slam singles titles. i got igota i got a little emotional albert because last year i was literally fighting for my life in the hospital —— out there. i think i was on my first goal mac for the surgery by now. . . first goal mac for the surgery by now... i was on my fourth surgery —— third surgery, i had one more to go. to come from that and being in a hospital bed and not being able to move and walk and do anything, and now only a year later, i'm not training but i'm actually in these
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finals. always a family affair these days. well, after her win, serena posted this picture of her daughter wearing a tutu with the caption "did momma win". you may may remember earlier in the tournament she herself wore a tutu in response to french open organisers saying she couldn't wear a catsuit. rory mcilroy and tiger woods both equalled the course record on the first day of the bmw championship in pennsylvania. mcilroy and woods will begin the second day's play on 8—under par after shooting rounds of 62. mcilroy could have done even better had he not bogeyed two of his last three holes. it's getting to the tight time at the end of the rugby league season. wigan warriors keep up their pressure at the top of super league after victory over wakefield in the super 85. joe greenwood scored in the final minutes to give wigan a 25—10 win.
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they remain second, just four points behind leaders st helens. next to a crash in the cycling but after riders crossed the line, it's at the vuelta a espana, where britain's simon yates lost the red leader's jersey. this is them crossing the line. it was the frenchman alexander geniez claimed the victory in a sprint finish ahead of dylan van baarle, but then an official wasn't paying enough attention and his spectacles went flying and both riders fell off, still going at speed having crossed the line. jesus harreda now holds the lead. he started the day over five minutes behind but now has more than a three—minute lead over yates in second. that shouldn't have happened. you forget when they crossed the line they keep on going. ambling along but then he's behind you! alastair cook's last match for england begins today, as his side play india in the fifth and final test at the oval. they boast a unassailable 3—1 series lead. a lot of the focus will be on cook. cook will bow out as england's most capped player,
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their highest runscorer in test cricket and with more test centuries than any other england batsman. he'll be missed. it all started for him on the first of march, 2006. that's all the sport. i'm feeling peckish. i'm not sure you will want it but we've got some treats for you. sunbird treats. thank you very much indeed! we have got to make this clear —— sunbird treats. —— some bird. this is what you had your eye on? peckish was the reference but it didn't quite work, did it? if you leave food out for the birds in the garden you might think that you are doing good. but in fact you could be making life easier only for the bigger bullying birds. yes, bird feeders seem to benefit pushy larger species, which knock the little ones out of the way, meaning they eat lower quality seeds. so what should we be doing? tim melling from the rspb is here.
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you have got various birdfeeders. is my assumption correct, these are then not good in terms of being fair to all? there's different kinds of bird food attracting different kinds of birds, and this study only looked at peanut and sunflower seed is. it showed what you would expect, big birds, like sparrows and greenfinches, dominate over small birds like loot its. you're talking about this. the food comes out at the bottom, there's a limited amount of space —— like blue tips. the bottom, there's a limited amount of space -- like blue tips. if a small bird comes along then the sparrow small bird comes along then the sparrow will come along and push it off. there. there's various things that attract different birds. the goldfinch was the one that really punched above its weight. it was
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ousting birds that were much bigger than it. this is the thing that a tt ra cts than it. this is the thing that attracts goldfinches, the niger feeder. things like sparrows and greenfinches can't be bothered with it. it has a hole leader for the tiny seeds that are only big enough for the tiniest beaks. if you have one of these you get goldfinches and also siskins and read polls as well. things like that bowls and woodpeckers, which would normally come to your sunflower birdfeeders. i'm going to have to reassign my garden with a different feeder for each species! you get more species if you get more things. if you put apples on your lawn, that helps the thrushes and in the winter, other birds. what i often do is get suet from the butchers, put it in the freezer and then great it and put it along the edge of the wall. then rinse and robins feed on that. in
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the winter they are meat eaters. —— wrens. there's so much food around at the moment. they won't come into the garden —— will come. winter is the garden —— will come. winter is the time they need it when there's snow on the ground. we've been talking about the dry summer when the ground was tough and it's hard to get to the worms, and when we have a cold winter, that's when feeding can be life or death. water, you've just hit feeding can be life or death. water, you'vejust hit on feeding can be life or death. water, you've just hit on that, i put water out through the drought and i've had birds drinking and bathing in my bath is all the time. big ones or little ones? they seem to share it. when the weather is dry, it becomes a problem —— in my barbs.|j when the weather is dry, it becomes a problem -- in my barbs. i would love to have different types of birds in my garden and to see them for my pleasure, but is it natural for my pleasure, but is it natural for these different species to be together in such a small space? yes. does it encourage a bit of friction?
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not really. most birds, the birds we get in gardens, our woodland edge birds. in the countryside you will see the same robins, the durham 0x, the wrens on the edge of woodland. gardens are like a woodland edge. they would be feeding in your garden a nyway eve n they would be feeding in your garden anyway even for people that don't put bird food out, they will still see blackbirds and robins. by putting food out, especially the different kinds of food, you will attract a greater variety. from personal pleasure, you say, i get great pleasure from watching the birds in my garden, site i've put birds in my garden, site i've put bird food out to attract them. attracting the birds because you enjoy watching them but how necessary is it? —— so i put. enjoy watching them but how necessary is it? -- so i put. the water helps them during drought but especially in times of snow cover. with the beast from the east, that was such a late snowfall, that was devastating for the birds because it
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was the time of late winter before nature starts reproducing itself so food stocks are lowest. when i put apples out in my garden, red wings and fieldfares apples out in my garden, red wings and fieldfa res came apples out in my garden, red wings and fieldfares came from nowhere, i had never had them, but they all came in to get the apples. the garden looks great for tim! what a treat for the birds! none of the birds come to my garden! do it in the winter, when they need the calories is important. great to talk to you, tim! let's bring you you up to date with the headlines this hour: british airways is hacked as the card details of almost 400,000 customers are stolen. tributes to a hollywood icon. burt reynolds has died at the age of 82. we said matt was going to leave the building and it's for good reason. we aren't sending him out there
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randomly. just the opposite side of the water to the imperial war museum north and you can see cascading in the middle of the picture is a load of red. it's the famous poppy display commemorating the first world war, it has come here to salford quays and it must be fantastic to be next to that, matt? it is. good morning. it is raining out here, no surprise. a rainbow behind me a short time ago but you mentioned the poppy display. go back to 2014, stunning images of the tower of london. over 880,000 poppies, each one to remember a fallen soldierfrom poppies, each one to remember a fallen soldier from the first world war. the display has since been broken up and split into two, the weeping window and the one you have just seen is with us have been touring. the brains behind it and the director of the arts campaign is jenny. thank you very much for
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joining us, jenny. this display is stunning. most of us have seen it in some shape or form, but tell us about what it is and why it is here now? versus macro wave, one of the two that are touring and they were the central sculptures from the tower of london —— this is wave. there's 5000 poppies behind me and another several more thousand in weeping window, currently in stop —— weeping window. we've gone from orkney, plymouth, southend to other places —— currently in stock. orkney, plymouth, southend to other places -- currently in stock. this is the final one? it is. what do you wa nt is the final one? it is. what do you want people to come to see this sculpture to take away from it? it's a fantastic combination of a beautiful artwork. you can really look at each other poppies and how they've been created by the artist, paul cummins, and the architect and
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they look almost real and organic on this great building. they also presented a life lost in the first world war and that immediately takes you back 100 years to think about those men who went away from these shores to their fate in france and belgium and many other places all around the world. it keeps us talking about the first world war crucially. and thinking about it. exactly. a stunning sculpture, thanks for sharing. it is here until the 25th of november and we will find out later what happens next. thanks very much, a stunning piece of artwork, and it lives long in our minds and will continue to do so, of course. out here it has been raining. a few showers around, and if we take a look at the forecast for today, for many of you are bright and breezy day after a chilly start. we will
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see some rain for some. showers in north—west england, north—west midlands, north wales, but the most significant rain working southwards across eastern scotland. in the coming hours it is north and eastern parts of england who will bear the brunt of that. it means eastern scotla nd brunt of that. it means eastern scotland should brighten up a bit. lots of cloud and northern scotland staying damp and drizzly. a few showers for north—west midlands, north wales, but they are the exception rather than the rule. most places dry with some sunshine at times, and compared with yesterday across wales, the midlands and southern england, a much brighter day. a breeze coming in from the north—west. certainly in the cloudier moments through the day, temperatures staying for most of you in the teams. that is how today is looking. into the evening and overnight, cloud and patchy rain in eastern areas clearing away. this is the lowest of the temperatures, with temperatures dropping into single figures. saturday morning, cloud increasing from the west.
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temperatures around 11 to 13 into the start of the weekend. for the weekend, a fairly mixed one. dry and wet weather as well, england and wales seeing the bulk of the rain, not everywhere. the wettest conditions in the hills in the west, was quite a breeze. parts of southern and eastern england may get away largely dry. the rain spreading away largely dry. the rain spreading away erratically eastwards. some patchy rain and drizzle for scotland and ireland, using. a brighter afternoon with some sunshine, but once again an afternoon of high teens temperatures across the uk, down on what you would expect this time of year. cloudier night to take us time of year. cloudier night to take us into sunday. it will not be quite as chilly on sunday morning, but a great start for the early rises. patchy rain and drizzle almost anywhere. most places will see some sunshine. showers in the afternoon in scotland and northern ireland, england and wales compared with saturday should have a generally drier and brighter day. wind by saturday coming in from the south—west, so it will feel a touch
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warmer than it does today and tomorrow, temperatures peaking around 22 degrees. certainly the weekend, keeper waterproofing hand just in case. by the time we get to sunday, temperatures around where they should be for the time of year. it is back to you. what is the percentage precipitation where you are? it has been 100% over percentage precipitation where you are? it has been 10096 over the past ten minutes. sorry, couldn't resist. the same in my hair. look over your left shoulder. that nice building, we are nice and dry on the inside. really cosy in here. i love you both. demand for vegan products in our supermarkets has soared, as more of us cut the amount of meat we eat. ben is looking at why. a lot of retailers cashing in on
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this, launching their own ranges, and they have seen massive demand. the vegan society, which gives meals and ingredients its stamp of approval, says there has been a 60%jump in the number of products being registered with its trademark. nearly all the big supermarkets have launched their own vegan ranges recently, and demand is growing. that is because more than a quarter of us say we have considered limiting how much meat we consume. dominika piasecka is from the vegan society, and joins me now. why is there such a growing demand for it? people are moving away from meat, but that can't be the only reason. there has been more awareness about how animals are treated for meat, dairy and eggs. so people come to vic and is in for ethical reason, but also because of environmental and health concerns —— veganism. and veganism is a great lifestyle choice for those of us who ca re lifestyle choice for those of us who care about these issues. and some of
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this stuff looks absolutely like meat, sausages, mince and burgers, recreating it but it is vegan, and some stuff is absolutely not looking like meat. where is the distinction? is this for people who don't want to eat meat for ethical reasons, or they just don't want the taste eat meat for ethical reasons, or theyjust don't want the taste or theyjust don't want the taste or the health concerns? so people often wonder why vegans would want to eat something that looks and tastes like real meat, but many of us we grew up eating it and we didn't give it out because it like the taste. so this is for those who want to continue to have fled flavours they grow up eating without continuing with animal suffering, and it is a great choice for those of us who want to cut down on the number of animal products that we eat. so some people might not be a fan of these meat alternatives, but to each their own. a lot of people will imagine something like this when they hear
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the word vegan, but picking up one thing here, and this looks like the most processed thing in the world, recreated and weirdly manufactured and shaped. it is not always healthy, is it? is his processed food. yes, veganism doesn't always equal healthy, and it is important to make a distinction between the two, but the vast majority of vegans eat a healthy diet of nuts, fruits, foods that we are told to eat but we don't always eat enough. we are a lwa ys don't always eat enough. we are always told about five a day but we don't always manage to squeeze it in because we are so many don't always manage to squeeze it in because we are so many animal products. are they cashing in on this trend and sticking the label of vegan this trend and sticking the label of vegan on this trend and sticking the label of vegan on these things? it is a way of selling more staff. yes, it is. we're not fooling ourselves that visitors have suddenly turned compassionate. they are there because there is a prophet to be made, driven notjust by vegans, but those who are concerned with their health or the environment,
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vegetarians, people of different backgrounds and religious beliefs all looking for these products. what defines it as being deagan? —— vegan. all the company has to do is contact us, and we will check the ingredients in the product and verify it is vegan, and if they find something that is not vegan we are happy to assistant in finding the product —— it is a big business, but it comes with certain warnings. after 8a m it comes with certain warnings. after 8am we will talk about that ba problem. we have been talking over the last few days about the impact this summer's heatwave has had, and today we are looking at how the nhs dealt with it. the extreme weather led to more than 1.5 million people visiting the nhs website looking for advice.
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breakfast‘s john maguire reports. baby leo is blissfully unaware he hasjust been born into the joint—hottest summer on record. but during her pregnancy, his mum, cassie, had to keep her cool. i managed to work earlier, and avoid the hottest parts of the day, which was ideal. also avoid public transport, and avoid walking too much in the heat of the city. that was really important. temperature—controlled birthing pools have been very popular here at the chelsea and westminster hospital. summer is always busy, but this year's extreme heat saw an increase in visits. things like swelling can sometimes mask other, more serious conditions with pregnancy, so it's difficult to exclude those when women phone in and say they've got swelling of their feet and hands. so, again, we recommend that women come in and be assessed. the government says, during july, thousands more people were seen
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within a&e than the same month last year. it was even busier than the winter. usually summer is the time the wards are less busy. it's an opportunity for a time for early winter planning. it's an opportunity for staff to catch up. but we haven't had that respite. so really, since january, it's really been full on. as temperatures soared, the nhs advice website was red—hot. heat—related enquiries more than doubled, from 730,000 in the summer last year to more than 1.5 million over the past three months. the number of deaths related to the summer has not yet been published, but this climate change expert says higher mortality could become the new norm. we had 900 deaths from heat—related conditions a couple of years ago. imagine — we didn't hear anything really reported about it, but imagine if we'd had a flood event that killed 900 people. there would be understandable outrage, uproar. it would be considered a national crisis. the deaths from heat
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are a public health emergency, and we've got to get better at helping it. and mps are warning a change in climate must mean a major change in our culture. we're seeing hospital wards overheating, care homes overheating. this is where the frail, elderly people are, and they're the most at risk of overheating in a heatwave. so we really need to plan very carefully to keep the older population safe. so if, as is forecast, a summer like this one becomes the rule and not the exception, then our health system, so used to dealing with cold, wet winters, will also need to adapt to frequent long, hot summers. all those questions we are now
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asking ourselves, whether these summers will become regular. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. traffic could be banned from sections of parliament square as a result of the suspected terror attack last month. the pa rt—pedestrianisation of an area outside the houses of parliament is being considered after the ford fiesta ploughed into cyclists and pedestrians, before crashing into a security barrier. the feasibility study into making the area safer has been commissioned by the mayor's office, parliament and westminster city council, with support from the metropolitan police and government security advisers. the met police say a murder investigation is underway after a woman died in a house fire in woolwich yesterday. the fire, which officers are treating as a suspected arson attack, happened in centurion square in the early hours of yesterday
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morning. two other people were taken to hospital, but their injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. a skate park on the southbank of the river thames is being awarded £200,000 towards its protection and expansion. the money comes from the london marathon charitable trust, and is the second—largest contribution towards the project. the area in the undercroft of the queen elizabeth hall is not technically a skate park, but has been used as one for decades. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. very slow northbound on the a102 blackwall tunnel approach, after an earlier accident. the a501 pentonville road is closed eastbound between a5200 york way and the a5203 caledonian road. that is for gas mains repairs. in kingston, the traffic lights
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are not working on a307 wood street near fife road. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today is going to feel a bit colder than it did yesterday. we're getting off to quite a chilly start. temperatures dropped back into single figures last night, and there's going to be a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing, too. but it will stay dry today, and there'll be some good spells of sunshine around, as well. in fact, it's a sunny start to the morning. lots of blue sky around for the first half of the day, and then a bit more fairweather cloud as we head into the afternoon, but not quite enough to spoil the sunshine. still some decent spells of it around. top temperatures of only 18 or 19 degrees celsius, that's a dip on where we were yesterday, when we got into the low 205 for many places. but instead, we're looking at the mid to the high teens, and we've got this noticeable north—westerly wind around, as well. now, through this evening and overnight, again it's going to feel quite cool at first. lots of clear skies around for the first part of the night, then it will cloud over, maybe a few outbreaks of rain tomorrow morning. again, temperatures back into single figures,
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perhaps ten or 11 degrees celsius, though, in central london. now, tomorrow may not be completely dry. back to a westerly wind. quite a bit of cloud around, some outbreaks of rain, perhaps, for central and for northern areas in particular. but sunday does look dry at the moment. still some uncerta nty, but also some decent spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today: british airways is hacked as the card details of almost 400,000 customers are stolen. we'll hear from some of those affected, and i'll tell you what to do if you think you're one of them. tributes to a hollywood icon. after an acting career spanning six decades, burt reynolds has died at the age of 82. a wonderful night for wales... they thrash the republic of ireland in the new uefa nations league, with gareth bale amongst
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the goals in cardiff. three months after giving birth zara tindall returns to competitive riding. she speaks exclusively to sally and reveals how the heartbreak of two miscarriages have helped make her family stronger. i had so many letters saying, you know, "i'm so sorry, we've been through these same thing", which is incredible — thank you to all those people. and astley we can do towards weekend, corrado cool start to friday, rain in northern england, scotla nd friday, rain in northern england, scotland and northern ireland. details from the imperial war museum north on breakfast. it's friday 7th september. our top story: british airways has launched an investigation after hundreds of thousands of its customers'
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credit card details were stolen, following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline has apologised to those affected after the incident which comes at the end of a summer of cancelled flights and incorrect ticket pricing. lebo diseko reports. a sophisticated attack, is how british airways describes the theft of customer data from its website and mobile app. around 380,000 credit cards were compromised in the two weeks between 21st august and 5th september. the personal and financial details were stolen as people make bookings online and through the app. when asked why it took so long to detect the airline said it took action soon as it there was a problem. we found out the extent of the damage and that's why we immediately began to communicate with our customers. it is most imperative that we tell our customers to please contact their credit card issuers
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and banks to make sure that they can proceed and follow the regulations with regard to their credit card details. this is the latest in a series of customer relations issues the airline's had recently. in may last year, 75,000 passengers around the world were left stranded for days after an it failure. the airline was criticised for its handling of the problem, with some people blaming the outsourcing of its it staff. and injuly this year, it issues met dozens —— meant dozens of flights in and out of heathrow airport had to be cancelled. ba has apologised for the latest problems, saying it takes the protection of customers' data very seriously. but it might take more than an apology to restore customer confidence. lebo diseko, bbc news. so, what should you do if you've been affected? ben is with us now. b hay are pretty clear if you think
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you may be affected, if you are logging into your account using the app on the dates it's talking about, you should get in touch with your bank because potentially your bank details are at risk. they set happen between the 21st of august and the 5th of september. if you have used your card details, it might mean you are now subject to fraud. get in touch with your bank. they may cancel your card if they think you are at risk. in that respect, it is quite difficult because people might have one card stored on the system and had with another card, it's not a lwa ys and had with another card, it's not always clear cut which one you used and which one you might need to cancel. it will cause problems. we have heard from a lot of people this morning facing those problems. ba are trying to draw a line under this and say they are sorry. they have taken full—page adverts are in many papers this morning saying they are sorry and are investigating as a matter of urgency. they have contacted all affected customers and eight if you think you have been affected, get in touch with your
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bank. as you touched on earlier, this is the latest in a long line of problems for ba which will hit its reputation. ba had been at number one spot in most trusted brands in the uk until last year and now has fallen out of the top 20. from number one do not even the top 20? yes. all sorts of reasons might be behind that but not least many are the problems they have had with cancelled flights, baggage problems, it failures. the bass very keen to come out on dates, we are sorry about this, we are trying to put it right but i know you will be speaking to him. yes, alex cruise will bejoining us. in other news this morning... hollywood actors have been paying tribute to burt reynolds, who died last night at the age of 82. the screen legend appeared in dozens of films over three decades, including smokey and the bandit and deliverance. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998. we look back at a long and colourful
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eye. burt reynolds in deliverance, taking on murderous inhabitants, the embodiment of the match are american. burt reynolds made his name in westerns. what's your name? joe. he became a hollywood heart—throb. what do you do besides drive fast? smokey and the was classic burt reynolds, one long car chase. but drinking, womanising and spending took a toll on his reputation and by and by 1986 he was bankrupt. you come into my into my house, my party, to tell me about the future. his reputation was revived by boogie
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nights, although he hated making the movie. i got nominated for that film was my career high, and the career low was when i couldn't get a job. that... not too long before that, i was having a tough time. burt reynolds said he regretted not taking more serious roles but perhaps it didn't matter. his memoir ended with the line "nobody had more fun than! ended with the line "nobody had more fun than i did". the family and friends of burt reynolds have been reacting to his death. his niece, nancy lee hess, released this statement on behalf of his family. that just one
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thatjust one of many tributes. his former partner, the actress sally field, said... sally field remembering burt reynolds, who died last night. some political news for you here. former prime minister tony blair has strongly criticised the current labour leaderjeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's "political thinking" podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster — he has been talking to our former
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political editor. the timing of this, it is all rather interesting, isn't it? how he's talking about the labour party and specificallyjeremy corbyn? yes, good morning. it is. it is worth remembering probably even the dogs in the street now have clocked that the labour party under tony blair and underjeremy corbyn are rather different beasts but when are rather different beasts but when a former prime minister and former party leader gives a half an hour interview, which minute by minute is a dissection of the current leader's approach and is very, very critical, thenit approach and is very, very critical, then it is inevitably quite striking. so, tony blair talks about how people like him within the labour party feel lost. they wonder if they will ever get is what they feared their party back. they wonder if there might be space for another party to re—merge. that was something that tony blair entirely shut down. picking up on the row this summer, this whole swirling row
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about alleged anti—semitism, tony blair very strong, take a look at this. imean, this. i mean, this anti—semitism thing has been bad, because, as i say, it's been bad, because, as i say, it's beenin been bad, because, as i say, it's been in the end something i can't imagine ever having happened in the labour party that ijoined, all the way through to this moment. i can't imagine that we've had 3—4 months debating over something where we have profoundly insulted the jewish community in our country. tony blair askedif community in our country. tony blair asked if he was 21 years old all over again, would hejoin the labour party? there is a bit of a pause and he says probably. so he can't definitively answer that question. he said if the general election was a contest between borisjohnson for the conservatives onjeremy corbyn of labour, something would fill the vacuum. it is his view is kind of brand of centre—left politics still might have a future, but not
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necessarily under the fold of the labour party. chris, very interesting at the moment, what's going on. thank you very much. a number of top us officials, including the vice president, are among those continuing to deny they're the author of an anonymous article attacking donald trump. the new york times piece, believed to be written by a senior white house insider, says mr trump's colleagues are trying to stifle his agenda. the president has described whoever wrote the article as "gutless" and the newspaper as "phony". an 85—year—old flying trapeze artist, a skipping dog and the creator of the world's largest knitting needles are among those to win a place in the latest edition of guinness world records. as if you needed telling! others to feature include a butcher who has produced 78 sausages in one minute, and a dog named feather with a flairforjumping — she holds the title after clearing
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a hurdle almost two metres high. and this is biggest knitting needles in the world. these are. these are. the biggest scarf. that was the biggest grammatical error of the morning! i made the same error. but i did point it out! it is 8:12. after a summer involving cancellations and pricing issues, british airways must feel frustrated to be facing more problems — this time an online data breach. a major data breach. the airline says it's investigating after hundreds of thousands of its customers' credit card details were compromised. we can speak now to the airlines chief executive alex cruise who joins us from our london newsroom. good morning. to start with, when did you find out there had been this major data breach? we got an
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indication something may have gone wrong and the evening of two days ago, the 5th of september. we began to work and find out exactly what happened. as soon as we found out that data was compromised, we began an all—out exercise to try and reach out to each and every customer that may have been compromised. out to each and every customer that may have been compromisedm out to each and every customer that may have been compromised. it took almost two weeks for you to even realised this had happened, this started potentially on the 21st of august? this was a very sophisticated, criminal attack on ba .com. over more than 20 years that term, has been operating, we have never had a type of attack like this. the important thing is, as soon as we this. the important thing is, as soon as we found that these records may have been compromised, we began the communications process through all channels available directly to the customers, to alert them about this potential problem. the fact it took so long to realise will only add to the anxiety of customers who
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have been affected. they will wonder, is it going to happen again, could it be happening right now? we don't believe, we are convinced this particular breach has been neutralised and the website is operating as normal. we are addressing the needs and the concerns of those customers that made any sort of booking transaction on our website from approximately 11 o'clock at night on the 21st of august until approximately ten o'clock on september the 5th. those are the customers that may have been affected, those are the ones we want to spend some time with. the trouble is, although you say this is a very sophisticated and unprecedented attack, is not unprecedented for british airways. you've had a long list of problems, pricing scandal, baggage issues, people are going to be looking at this and saying, what on earth is happening at your company? british way ways -- airways is we're not just caring
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we're notjust caring about the safety of our passengers in the air, but also on the ground. this is particular event has been an attack on our ba.com website and app, very specific and very sophisticated. again, ourfocus right now with our customers. the trouble is people can see this and say, if you go look after our credit ca rd say, if you go look after our credit card details, can you look after us when we are flying, in the air? it's a confidence thing, isn't it?|j when we are flying, in the air? it's a confidence thing, isn't it? i feel co mforta ble a confidence thing, isn't it? i feel comfortable in saying they are two different things. managing data in one particular case and flying passengers. you have been in charge two and a half years. in that time, this is just the latest in that series of incidents. have you ever at any point thought, maybe i should 90, at any point thought, maybe i should go, stand down, review my position? is not something i'm particularly concerned with right now. what i am concerned with right now. what i am concerned with right now. what i am concerned with is to make sure any concerned with is to make sure any concerned or upset that our customers may have had as a
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consequence of this event is immediately addressed. we can talk about what has happened over the last two years or five years at a later stage. right now, last two years or five years at a laterstage. right now, priority number one, our customers. talking about what has happened few years, in the last 12 months you have gone from number one most trusted brand in britain to disappearing out of the top 20. how do you recover from that? british airways is the most punctual airline, continues adding products. it continues to deliver more in new destinations on a yearly basis. we will not stop doing that. we have a formidable team, that is absolutely committed to celebrate the 100th anniversary next year and to address these issues and to go beyond. we are now focused on today. todayis beyond. we are now focused on today. today is our customers. we must make sure we are in touch with them. we must make sure we address any concerns they may have. and if they are confirmed on an information point of view, what should they did if they think they are affected by this? we have already contacted them
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up, they can call us. if any customer has suffered a financial loss as a result of this theft of data we will compensate them. we wa nt data we will compensate them. we want them to know we are close to them and will address any concerns they may have. alex cruise, chief executive of british airways, thank you forjoining us. 8:17am is the time. matt has left the building, we didn't upset him too much, i think. there is a gorgeous poppy display commemorating the war in salford quays and that is where matt is this morning. the beauty of that does balance out the fa ct beauty of that does balance out the fact it is drizzling a bit, good morning. it certainly does and it's a better view than up there. welcome to the imperial war museum north in salford quays. you cannot forget those iconic images four years ago into bars and 14 as the poppies were
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displayed around the tower of london. an iconic design byjohn cummings and tom pike. that design has since been broken up and two portions of it have been travelling around the country, and its final destination is here at the imperial war museum north. director—general of imperial war museum is is here to tell us more. thank you forjoining us. in the rain! we have this stunning image behind us. what does this mean to the imperial war museum is to have this in front of the museum? as you said, everybody remembers that poppies at the tower of london and millions of people have been able to share them around the country. for the museum, of course, the two donors who bought the original sculptures they have donated them to the imperial war museum north. the great thing is they will permanently be part of the legacy for the nation after the first world war centenary. they are here and officially unveiled
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tomorrow until the 25th of november. what happens afterwards? the two sculptures are in the collection and at the moment we are deciding whether or not we can do a permanent installation of them but we haven't decided quite yet where. there is quite a lot of demand for the poppies in some form to continue to tour but our slight problem is it is absolutely massive and beautiful but we cannot tour it completely at the same scale but we will look at how we make it available around the world. wonderful, so in one shape or form there will always be there to keep us remembering? the iconic first world war centenary. thank you for joining first world war centenary. thank you forjoining us this morning. lovely scene forjoining us this morning. lovely scene behind me. the weather is not so scene behind me. the weather is not so great at the moment. let's look at the details, because whilst we have rain in parts of northern england, north woodlands and north wales and north—eastern england and eastern scotland —— north midlands. for the rest of us not bad, dry and breezy, cooler than we have been used to, temperatures in the night
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down to single figures but for many of you there will be sunny spells after a blue skies start. northern england, particularly on the western side of the pennines the showers continue, more persistent rain eased the pennines this morning, easing offa the pennines this morning, easing off a little into the afternoon. patchy rain continues over north and eastern parts of scotland but there will be lots of dry weather here in the afternoon and it should brighten up. the afternoon and it should brighten away the afternoon and it should brighten up. away from that one or two isolated showers, the vast majority of the population will have a dry day with sunshine. after a court star temperatures lift into the teens down a little on what we normally expect this time of year. —— after a cool start. any rain across eastern areas will play tonight and we will see clear skies and dry weather into tomorrow morning. patchy in scotland and later on the cloud will thicken up and outbreaks of rain start pushing in. temperatures will hold in double figures into the night into the start of the weekend. clear skies, central and southern scotland and eastern england in physicalfigures once more. a cool start across
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eastern areas for the weekend, a bright start but across england and wales it will not last too much, next weekend. england and well is will have the cloudy day, outbreaks of rain coming and going, more persistent in the hills in the west, but dry moments in the south and east. scotland and northern ireland on saturday, early rain will ease off, a few showers in the afternoon but lots of dry and bright weather. like today temperatures stick in the teens even if the winds eased down a bit. into sunday after a cloudy night it won't be as cold to start with but we will see a brightening up with but we will see a brightening up day, early morning rain, patchy drizzle here and there, it will clear through, england and wales will have more sunshine on sunday. scotla nd will have more sunshine on sunday. scotland and northern ireland, a few more showers around on sunday but some sunshine too and with south—westerly winds and will feel that bit milder. that is how you weather is looking and i will hand you back to the warmth of the studio with naga and john. you're not at
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all jealous that with naga and john. you're not at alljealous that it is a warmer in here? that beats that sofa, i will give you that. we're both going to go and have a look at that. absolutely. the time now is 8:21am. zara tindall has been telling breakfast how pleased she is to be back in the saddle three months after the birth of her second child. she's been speaking exclusively to sally nugent about her very public highs and lows, and how two difficult miscarriages have helped make herfamily with rugby—player mike tindall even stronger. you've got your hands full there. what? with this one or that one? a bit full. this one, mainly. back to work. yeah, i know. definitely. so we're back to the serious business of the dayjob now. yeah, both — i've got twojobs. yes, a bit of both. a bit of both. we've stepped up the daddy daycare routine. well, good for you. we'll let you go and get on with that. thank you, i will leave you to it.
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nice to see you, take care. do you know what you're doing? i'm going to get some food now. laughter does he know what he's doing? he does! he's pretty good, actually. he's pretty good. so this is your newish stables? newish, yeah, we moved in about three years ago, i think, now. so, yeah, it's our own little yard. and this fellow is? this is class i, this is my nice nine—year—old that hopefully will be my next good one or that's the plan anyway. i'm not sure he knows it yet. you went to the olympics, got your silver, you know, hugely proud moment, i imagine, for you, something you have been imagining since you were a kid? i don't know that i always thought i want go to the olympics. i think that came later.
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horses are very much in my life, in my family. being able to kind of have them still in my life and part of my career is great. how important is it that your horse has the type of character that on the big days they can cope and raise it a bit, raise their game? raise the bar, raise the game. really important. you know, it's as mental for them as it is for us. at the end of the day they are a character that you've got to try and work with and figure out, you know, which side of the bed they got out of in the morning and how well they are going to work with you. you sound like a horse whisperer now. dol? they chuckle do you ever look at women in the public eye, i'm thinking at the moment of serena williams, particularly, who, you know, have competed at a really high level, had a baby, and come back? i mean, i can't believe, you know, what she's been able to do. but at the end of the day, that is her, that's her character. so she can't, you know, immediately switch that off.
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you can't stop being a sportsperson, you can't stop being competitive. it's pushing yourself and that's what you do in your career anyway. it really hasn't been an easy couple of years for you privately, has it? you announced your pregnancy in 2016, and then very sadly went on to lose the baby, and we also heard later on that you had lost another child, as well, in between your two girls. yeah. i think that's the hardest thing, in our situation, is that everyone knew. and very much, you know, when things like that happen, normally it'sjust your family and friends. but unfortunately everyone knew about it, and... you know, and actually i had so many letters, and — saying, i'm so sorry, we've been through the same thing. which is incredible, and thank you to all of those people. but it's — itjust showed how often it does happen. and i have a very supportive family. mike is incredible, and he —
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you know, it's hard for the guys too. it's very different for us because we are carrying the child but for guys it is kind of that helpless feeling which must be incredibly high and horrible for them. but, you know, at the end of the day they have still lost a child too. i guess he's probably used to being able to fix things or to try and help you or support you. yeah, and being helpless is horrible, isn't it, for anyone. you know, it's been a horrible road that actually now we you know, it's been a horrible road but actually now we have come out of the end of it and hopefully it makes
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you a stronger family. you are the daughter and granddaughter of two of possibly the most ha rd—working women in the public eye. do you think that that work ethic is something that you've inherited? erm, probably. i mean, i think it's something that i've been around all my life, so you would hope that some of it would rub off. in a good way. one of the most famous images of this year, i think, has to have been you, pregnant, at the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle. what was that like, having to go and get your gladrags on and your heels? i was so uncomfortable, so uncomfortable. and obviously when they build churches, they don't think about pregnant women. it was a really hard bench? and really narrow. so you were perched? perched and trying to get comfy. it was very uncomfortable. she was quite active, let me say, through the whole service. is that what was happening, she was kicking? she was kicking a lot. well, thank you very much indeed.
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it's great to see you looking so well and so happy, and with such big, ambitious plans for the future. we'll see what we can do. do it for all the mums. for all the mums, yeah! i would love to. i mean, hopefully we can get there, and i'll see what happens. lovely to see her back on the road, back competing and looking happy. and speaking so openly and honestly about all sorts of things. zara tindall speaking to sally. the time is 8:28am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. much of the uk a dry day but some rain around, particularly across south—east scotland, north—east england, making its way down the north sea coast. showers feeding into the north sea, parts of england, wales and the midlands. the
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cloud that the north—east of scotla nd cloud that the north—east of scotland with patchy rain. elsewhere, mainly dry, spells of sunshine. ties between 14—19 but noticeable north—westerly breeze. most of the showers were tend to fade away through this evening. we will keep quite a lot of cloud with patchy rain and drizzle the far north of scotland. as the niguez on, cloud increasing across northern ireland, wales and north west england. some rain arriving by morning, temperature 7—13dc. tamara, outbreaks of rain clearing for northern ireland but coming into wales, north—east england and the midlands. not so much rain for southern counties, mainly dry and scotla nd southern counties, mainly dry and scotland and northern ireland. ties between 15—19. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with victoria fritz and maryam moshiri. turbulence for british airways after a huge data breach affects hundreds of thousands of customers. live from london, that's our top story on friday 7th september. the airline says it's
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investigating the breach as a matter of urgency. customer data from 380,000 transactions has been stolen from the website and the mobile app. also in the programme, we'll be getting reaction from asia, as the world waits to see whether he'll reall do it.
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