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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 7, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello — it's friday, it's nine o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to the programme. we've travelled to this refugee camp in jordan with former arsenal captain and world cup winner, per mertesacker, where a football programme aims to help some of the 40,000 traumatised children who live there. they want to be, one—day... famous players... like you. and we'll hear more from per mertesacker later in the programme. woeful intelligence is letting down the fight against female genital mutilation in the uk — that's according to a police commander, speaking the uk and us join forces to tackle the crime. and we'll talk about tinder, after a new study suggested one in five people using the dating app are in a relationship, and users are more likely than average to display psychopathic tendancies. have you been on tinder? do get in touch with your stories. hello, welcome to the programme.
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we're live until 11 this morning. also — almost 400,000 british airways customers have had their card details stolen, after booking flights on the airline's website and app. ba has apologised for the data breach. have you been affected? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about — use the hashtag victoria live. if you re emailing and are happy for us to contact you, and maybe want to take part in the programme, please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... tony blair has strongly criticised the current labour leader jeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party, and many within the party believe that it is "lost". jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled
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to his opinion, but that "politics has changed". let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason. tell us more about what tony blair is saying and whether he is offering any alternative? good morning. it is intriguing. let's be honest, dead dogs in the street have probably clocked by now that tony blair and jeremy corbyn are not exactly on the same page when it comes to labour party policy. for all of those years that tony blair was prime minister and jeremy corbyn was perched on his backbenchers, mr blair was more likely to recruit postman pat is a home secretary then bring upjeremy corbyn and offer him a job in the cabinet. but what is striking in this conversation, a 30 minute conversation, where minute by minute tony blair is full of gloom about the future of the party and talking about and ex potential threat to its
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future and also speculating, and we will play you a chunk of this interview, about what might happen in terms of another party emerging. take a look at this. the type of politics that people like me represent, which i would describe as more moderate, progressive politics, if that isn't represented by the labour party, it doesn't matter what i think what these mps think, i don't think the british people will tolerate a situation where, for example, the choice at the next election is borisjohnson against jeremy corbyn. i don't know what will happen and i don't know how it will happen and i don't know how it will happen, but ijust don't believe people will find that, in the country as a whole, and a cce pta ble the country as a whole, and acceptable choice stop he talks about the dastardly row around anti—semitism over the summer in the party and said it fits into a pattern of the current labour party leadership being very sceptical and having a hostility to what he
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describes as traditional western policy. i suspect the reaction we have already had some reaction from those close tojeremy corbyn, we will get reaction from the man himself in the next hour or so, will be one of saying there is a big difference betweenjeremy corbyn and tony blair's attitude to the labour party, that is the whole point. turning to the liberal democrats. speculation that vince cable may be thinking about when he steps down. he is giving a speech in the next half an hour he is giving a speech in the next halfan hourand he is giving a speech in the next half an hour and he is going to flesh out some ideas. these effectively going to acknowledge that within the next year he could bea that within the next year he could be a gone as the leader of the liberal democrats. they won't put a specific timeline on it that that is the conclusion you can easily leap to. he wants to shake up how the pa rty‘s rules to. he wants to shake up how the party's rules work, that's a decision for their membership are not for him. he wants for an non—mp to be allowed to become the leader of the liberal democrats. he wants to look at brexit, pushing for a so—called people's vote and sticking
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around if there was any general election that would come around because of that. but he is very much, and it is not the first time he is doing it, slapping a best before date on his leadership. in politics, when you do that, you go straight into the bargain bin. people will look elsewhere for a premium product, if you like. people will start thinking about the next generation. he has very clearly done that and the nature of the process he is setting out, whilst he is not being explicit about timeline, means it looks pretty likely he could be gone within a year. thank you very much. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. good morning, everyone. the head of the intelligence agency gchq has vowed retaliation against what he called the "real and active threat" posed by russia. jeremy fleming was speaking at a security conference in the united states, a day after the government named two russian agents suspected of carrying out the novichok attack in salisbury. this morning russian officials have called the allegations a ‘frank lie' and have accused the british government of living
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in an information vacuum. lucinda adam reports. releasing the identities of the salisbury suspects, the details of where they went, and how they attempted to murder the skripals was designed to name and shame russia for using a chemical weapon on european soil. in a bid to increase international pressure on moscow, the british government laid out its allegations to its united nations allies. they tried to murder the skripals. they played dice with the lives of the people of salisbury. they work in a parallel universe, where the normal rules of international affairs are inverted. that prompted a furious response from the russian ambassador, rejecting the british accusations as unfounded lies. translation: london needs this story forjust one purpose — to unleash a disgusting anti—russian hysteria. but the us, france, germany and canada all agreed that the russian government almost
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certainly approved the poisoning of ex—spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. today, our british friends and colleagues are providing us with a masterclass on how to stop the spread of chemical weapons. last night, the head of the uk's top secret cyber intelligence agency, gchq, said the threat from russia is reckless, real and active. jeremy fleming said the novichok attack was evidence of the kremlin‘s brazen determination to undermine international rules. he said the threat would be countered with the full range of tools from across our national security. russia denies its military intelligence service, the gru, had anything to do with the attack, but the regime known for its intense secrecy has been dragged under an international spotlight. lucinda adam, bbc news. police in brazil are questioning a man suspected of stabbing the leading candidate in the country's
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presidential election. doctors said the right—wing politician, jair bolsonaro, could have died after being attacked during a campaign rally. he suffered serious internal injuries. almost half the people who bought a leasehold house in the past decade had no idea what they were getting into, according to a new study. research from the national association of estate agents found home—buyers faced high fees and charges, with many feeling they were mis—sold. the study follows controversy which led the government to crackdown on what they called "unjustified" leasehold houses. parents in england are not getting the assurance they need about the quality of education their children are receiving, a committee of mps has warned. the public accounts committee says it is unacceptable that so many schools — previously rated outstanding by education watchdog 0fsted — are exempt from being reinspected. they claim cuts to 0fsted's budget mean families cannot make informed choices. 0fsted says it is confident inspections offer parents the assurance they need. we'll be hearing
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what the chief inspector of schools has to say about this, at around 10:15. a police commander has warned that attempts to stop female genital mutilation have been let down by "woeful" intelligence. commander ivan balhatchet from the national police chiefs' council says the lack of a uk conviction was unacceptable. he's appealing to the public, support groups and those who work with children to pass information to police. we'll be discussing this issue with campaigners against fgm at 9:30am. research has suggested complex operations for conditions such as heart disease and cancer are being cancelled at the last minute. a team from the royal college of anaesthetists and university college london looked at 216 hospitals over a period of seven days last year, to assess the pressures facing the nhs. only a third of the cancellations was down to the patient‘s health. british airways has apologised after the credit card details of hundreds of thousands
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of its customers were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline said the incidents occurred between the august the 21st and september the 5th. the stolen data is not thought to include travel or passport details. ba is advising those affected to contact their credit card providers as soon as possible. hollywood actors have been paying tribute to burt reynolds, who died last night at the age of 82. the screen legend appeared in dozens of films over three decades, including smokey and the bandit and deliverance. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998. arnold schwarzenegger called him a "trailblazer", and former partner sally field said her memories of the star would never fade away. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. thank you very much. we want to hear
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your experiences of using tinder. research suggests one in five on it are already in a relationship and users are more likely to display psychopathic tendencies. stacey says she is an tinder and she met her current partner. she said, my partner and i met current partner. she said, my partnerand i metan current partner. she said, my partner and i met an tinder, we are getting married tomorrow. stacey, we would love to talk to you. we will be talking about it more later, and if you have experiences and want to join in the conversation, don't forget to include your phone number in youre—mail. if forget to include your phone number in your e—mail. if you are sending a text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. john watson is at the bbc sport centre for us this morning. good morning. let's start with football, a good start for ryan giggs for his first match in charge of wales. yes, the nations league, giving european countries a chance to qualify for you wrote 2020, the
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idea it will cnn to meaningless international friendlies. wales were brilliant in their 4—1 over the republic of ireland tom lawrence scored their opener. gareth bale produced a lovely second, we saw him do that many times in the premier league before his move to real madrid. aaron ramsey grabbed a third, before they put the gloss on the win with another. handing manager ryan giggs a win in his first competitive match in charge. it's a good start, and like i said to the players, the bad news for them is that the standard now, they can't drop below it. there's things we could do better obviously. there's things in the game i wasn't happy with. but we can't really moan after a performance like that. you've got to look at the games, see what you can do better and try and do that. they have set the mark high. wales play denmark in their next match in the tournament. and england in the league
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above play spain tomorrow. the us open, serena williams one match away from her first grand slam winner since she gave birth a year ago? yes and a step closer to equalling the record for the most grand slam singles titlesgame as she reached the us open final overnight. and who would have thought that after her the time she's spent away from the game. one set up, she crunhed down this serve before wrapping up the second 6—0 against anaistasjia sevastova. she will face the 20—year—old naomi 0saka in saturday's final, who was just one—year—old when serena won her first grand slam title — now she's got 23 — and she could make that 2a come saturday. fabulous. i got igota i got a little emotional out there because last year i was literally fighting for my life in the hospital. i think i was on my fourth surgery hospital. i think i was on my fourth surgery by now... today is
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thursday... i was on my third surgery, thursday... i was on my third surgery, i still had one more to go. to come from that in a hospital bed and not being able to move and walk and not being able to move and walk and do anything, and now, only a year later, and do anything, and now, only a yearlater, i'm and do anything, and now, only a year later, i'm not training but i'm actually in these finals. incredible, and talking of being one. . . here's serena's daughter alexis 0lympia — wearing a similar tutu dress she wore for her opening match at the tournament last week. it's been a tough return for serena, following the complications that followed her daughter's birth. but she's back and she definitely won. it is great she is talking about what she has been through, because it would be very easy to look at her and see how incredibly she is performing and just think it has been easy, because she is making it look easy, but we know it hasn't been. she is, that is the thing. we saw it, the time she spends away from the game, no one anticipated she would be back contesting grand
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slam singles title so soon after the birth of herfirst slam singles title so soon after the birth of her first child but she is. we know what a fierce competitor she is, we have seen that on the court but it is the challenges she has faced away from the tennis court and the complications following the birth of her daughter that has outlined what a true champion she really is. let's talk about a 17—year—old doing really well at the ladies french open? a little older, 17—year—old golfer julia engstrom who leads after the first round at the ladies french open. she's in herfinal year of high school. so lots on her plate, but she holds a one shot advantage over nearest rival. but she sounds like she's been doing it for years she said — she hit the ball well and made some good putts. that she did. as was rory mcilroy and tiger woods who equalled the course record at the bmw championship in
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pennsylvania. mclroy made six birdies in a row, a career best, to finish with a round of 62 — woods matched him producing his best round in almost two decades. and with the ryder cup around the corner, two guys who'll be playing for europe and america, shooting scores like this is notable, to say the least. it gets us talking head of the ryder cup, which gets under wayjust outside of paris at the end of the month. nice one, see you later, thank you. more than 40,000 children live in the zaatari refugee camp in jordan. many of them are traumatised by war and violence. now arsenal football club has teamed up with save the children psychologists to develop a football programme that works on both their physical and mental health — as well as teaching them about their rights. it's being launched today by former arsenal captain and world cup winner per mertesacker.
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0ur reporter catrin nye joined 0ur reporter catrin nyejoined him when he travelled to the camp to meet syrian refugees. you try to prepare, as much as you can. mentally for, "i'm going to a refugee camp". to imagine the circumstances is impossible. an arsenal star takes on a rather different pitch. per mertesacker is used to the emirates stadium. this pitch, though, is in one of the biggest refugee camps on earth. cheering. the game is itself is a game of the people. no matter where you go in the world, you have that connection. what do you think? i like the shirts. so, you're building relationships here? exactly, yeah, the kids and the coaches here. the pitch was built here and they've taken it upon themselves to make it into something that they're proud of. once you put a ball in front of them, it's no different to anywhere else. same target, yeah.
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good morning. per mertesacker! applause. and the match, well, it's two teams of syrian refugees and arsenal coach drew picks on arsenal player, per. are you going to beat him? i hope so, but i think the odds are stacked against us. why? they've got a big, strong captain in the middle. brilliant, guys, now we need to win this game first. massive captain. very big captain, yeah. about a foot taller than you. we will do what we can. we've got a lot of passion and spirit in our team. arsenal! come on! come on, yellows! in the next pitch along, it's training for the syrian girls. this is zaatari refugee camp in jordan, just 12 kilometres
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from the syrian border. this camp is huge. it's home to 80,000 syrian refugees. it's the size of a small city. it's split into districts, there are schools, a hospital and thousands of shops. this place is well organised, but it has problems. children end up in early marriages, in child labour. kids don't get to be kids here as much. on top of that, they're often traumatised by the war that pushes them here. 2—1, ref. drew tyler is one of the coaches who is moving tojordan for six weeks to train permanent coaches out here. this whole coaching programme has been built over 18 months, in london. arsenal working together with save the children's psychologists. built into it is teaching on teamwork, coping with stress, communication, conflict management
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and, crucially, it gives young players role models. and think about what other emotions you experience on the football pitch and how you might be able to show that, in your movement. it's an expansion of the work arsenal's been doing for years in communities in north london. is this stuff that you'd normally use in the london and uk setting? we've specially developed these programmes to explore the emotions in the camps injordan. it might be one of their friends that is upset or disappointed or nervous about something and they can recognise that in their friends. why do you like doing this kind of work? i think everyone experiences a whole range of emotions when you play football. the common ones to think about are when you score a goal or people don't always think about when you're nervous on the football pitch. or the emotions that you experience, that don't necessarily show on your face. and how you deal with that on the football pitch can relate to how you deal with problems off the pitch, as well.
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i've worked with people who've said that it's literally saved their lives. although the challenges are very different, fleeing conflict from syria and living in a refugee camp with 80,000 people is very different from a young person growing up on an estate here. but some of the approaches and responses are really simple. it's about belonging to something positive. it's about having a sense of purpose, trusted staff, those trusted adults that do have an understanding of what they're going through. are you prepared to deal with real tragedy? we've dealt with tragedy, here. we've had participants that have been murdered. that have murdered other children. we've actually done a few studies over the last few years, showing how toxic stress in conflict zones is affecting children's brain development. the idea of having constant fight—or—flight hormones dumped into the brain, because you're living under constant peril, how that affects natural growth within the brain and receptivity to
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things like empathy and the ability to form relationships. critically important things that can only happen in childhood. if we miss that, we are in danger of children growing up in substantially different manners and effectively having heart problems and hypertension, when they're older. all these sort of health issues. it's critically important we bring all this thinking to bear in this programme, which we have. save the children and arsenal are aiming to coach 4,500 teenage boys and girls in the next few years. in the next three years. here injordan and on pitches built in indonesia. they want to build a programme that can be replicated all around the world. injordan, per meets mohammed, a syrian refugee from daraa who fled the country with his family overnight when he was just nine. he's been living in the camp since. where do you sleep? on this mattress, here.
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mohammed's dad says he watches football here before he goes to sleep at night. the whole family fled, they don't know what's going on at home, they don't know how long they're going to live here. for him, it's just been day by day. enjoying football. so, it gives him just... so much. shukran. when is his son interested in football? since. . ? have you seen your son, like, playing, then? how good he is, skilful? what does football mean to him? for me, if i play on the pitch
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it is the same, i forget everything around me, i just want to have fun. if i play with you, or if i play in the premier league, for me, it's the same. per mertesacker stopped playing for arsenal in may this year. he wasn't sad to stop. he's admitted that he struggled with his mental health while playing. he said he used to get so terrified before games, he'd be choking back sick and suffer constant diarrhoea. you've opened up about your feelings, more recently, right? especially in my last year where i kind of reflected on my career. at some stages, i was struggling, mentally. and i felt a lot of pressure. everyone has a story.
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everyone goes through something. to speak about your feelings is difficult. but opening up... i think you'd be more approachable to these youngsters. and to talk about it helps. and, obviously, these boys need to talk about their feelings more than most. and it's difficult to get that out of them, because theyjust focus on, "no, i'm just happy to have a pitch and play football, everything i've experienced with losing my home..." which i've never experienced. so, we're talking about serious, serious mental struggles, psychological scars, which are difficult to speak about. is this home for them, is that home here, right now or are they prepared to go home? where do you want to be, one day?
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famous player. famous player? football player, like you. like me? no, you are more technical, you are more skilful. he has the dream, you know, to be like me and basically to go to europe, you know. even me probably knowing at one point it's limited and it depends so much on the circumstances. you know, what the future holds for this refugee camp, for their home country. it almost relies on that. but they don't care about that. they're just happy that they found a second home. and they've built kind of something here, which they are proud of. the dad is proud of all his kids. his house, his cabin, his little garden, his son, who plays football.
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and just seeing him happy makes the whole family happy. for me, it's great to be here and just to see how much of an impact we can have on you. thank you. these children have seen things no child ever should and the football coaches know they can't get them their old lives back, their lives befor war. what they can do is try and give them hope, make them stronger and make sure it's not that war that defines their future. we are going to talk more about that a little later. he's been banned from facebook, apple, youtube and spotify, now twitter is the latest platform to permanently suspend american radio host alex jones and his right—wing website, infowars. twitter said it had taken action
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after a number of tweets violated its abusive behaviour policy. alexjones has accused media platforms of unfair censorship of his accounts. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is hear to tell us more. alex jones has alexjones has a long record as a conspiracy theorist and the most wild conspiracies, notably the charge that the sandy hook massacre in which 20 infant schoolchildren and six adults were shot dead, that that was a hoax. he has repeated that was a hoax. he has repeated that a number of times. he's being sued for defamation by the parents of the children who died. that's his most controversial intervention. there have been lots of them. twitter has been under huge pressure over this, because the other companies all together a couple of weeks ago decided enough was enough and got rid of him. twitter has kind of stood out as veering more towards
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free speech than perhaps some of its users would like, so there has been lots of campaign saying you've got to act on this. and equally lots of threat from alex jones to those people trying to get rid of him. so, a big battle over how far free speech goes online. and it's a battle not just being speech goes online. and it's a battle notjust being fought over him but other subjects over social media. does what happened with alex jones change anything in terms of the readiness of social media companies to take action? there is a whole political context. this happened just after a big hearing in washington with the social media companies, with jack dorsey from twitter in particular, which touched on this question of whether they we re on this question of whether they were meeting conservative speakers. alex jones turned were meeting conservative speakers. alexjones turned up —— muting conservative speakers. he made a big noise in the corridors. people are
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now saying, is that what twitter is responding to rather than his actual behaviour. the fact he kind of embarrassed them in washington. they are saying that he has broken their rules too many times and that's the end of it. thank you, rory. we will be speaking about tinder. are you on it, what you think about it? the question today is an fair more psychopaths and cheaters lurking on it? research suggests one in five on it are in a relationship. we will be discussing if the app has a dark side. 0ne we will be discussing if the app has a dark side. one of you have already beenin a dark side. one of you have already been in touch, stacey said she met her partner and tender and they will be getting married tomorrow. hopefully we will speak to them later. do let us know your experiences good or bad. let us know and we can get in touch with you. time for the latest news — here's annita. tony blair has used a rare interview to strongly criticise the current labour leader jeremy corbyn, his supporters
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and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party, and many within the party believe that it is "lost". jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled to his opinion, but that "politics has changed". the type of politics that people like me represent, which i would describe as modern, more moderate, progressive politics, if that isn't represented by the labour party, it doesn't really matter what i think or what these mps think, i don't think the british people will tolerate a situation where, for example, the choice at the next election is borisjohnson versus jeremy corbyn. ijust think... i don't know what will happen, and i don't know how it will happen. but ijust don't believe people will find that, in the country, as a whole, an acceptable choice. the head of the intelligence agency, gchq, has said russia poses a real and active threat. jeremy fleming made the warning
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at a security conference in the united states, a day after the government named two russian agents suspected of conducting the novichok attack in salisbury. he accused the kremlin of having what he called a "brazen determination" to undermine the international rules—based order. this morning russian officials have called the allegations a ‘frank lie' and have accused the british government of living in an information vacuum. parents in england are not getting the assurance they need about the quality of education their children are receiving, a committee of mps has warned. the public accounts committee says it is unacceptable that so many schools — previously rated outstanding by education watchdog 0fsted — are exempt from being reinspected. they claim cuts to 0fsted's budget mean families cannot make informed choices. 0fsted says it is confident inspections offer parents the assurance they need. we'll be hearing what the chief inspector of schools has to say about this, ataround 10:15am. that's a summary of the latest bbc news.
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thank you very much. more comments to bring you an tinder. janet said, my daughter met her lovely partner and tinder. they bought a house together and got married in march this year, they could not be happier. steve says it is notjust tinder, i've been divorced 18 years and over that time i've used a number of dating companies. just trying to meet someone of similar age and similar position to me. the membership seems to consist of congenital liars or people with specific needs to fill. i've dated, although i didn't know at the time, serial bigamist, a woman who lied about her age by 20 years, and offers associate at and a con artist. i don't think this is limited to tinder, it's a cultural thing an online dating web ebor use the dating company is the pall of victims to exploit or a fantasyland. there are some genuine people as well, i have met some really nice
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genuine ladies but in my experience, they seem to be in the minority. diane says, i met my husband and plenty of fish and we just separated our second anniversary. we are very happy and much in love. keep your comments coming in, thank you for those. now we can join comments coming in, thank you for those. now we canjoinjohn comments coming in, thank you for those. now we can joinjohn watson for a sports update. hello, many thanks, good morning. what a start for wales in the nations league — the new look tournmament with palces at euro 2020 up for grabs — 4—1 they beat republic ireland. it was ryan giggs's first competitive match in charge. serena williams is one win away from equalling the all time record of most grand slam victories. she's into the final at the us open, after beating ana ijastasa sevastova in straight sets. she will face naomi 0saka of japan on saturday, after she beat madison keys. rory mcilroy showed some real form ahead of teh ryder cup — he made six birdies in a row — a career best — to share the lead
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pennsylvania. with tiger woods at the bmw championship in pennsylvania. they equalled teh course record. expect a stirring reaction from teh crowd when alastair cook walks out for what will be his final test match in a brilliant career, when england take to the field against india in the final match of the series — play gets under way at 11am — we'll be live at the oval at 10am. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. a leading police officer has described intelligence around around female genital mutilation as "woeful" — and said the lack of a conviction for fgm in the uk is unacceptable. commander ivan balhatchet‘s comments come as uk police sign a new agreement with their us counterparts to share intelligence about their operations at airports — where they try to stop families who may be taking their children abroad to undergo fgm. around 170,000 women and girls in the uk are estimated to have undergone fgm. 0ften girls are taken abroad to be "cut", in countries including somalia and egypt.
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the practice has been illegal in the uk since 1985. anyone who performs fgm can face up to 14 years in prison and failing to protect a girl is punishable by seven years imprisonment. but, there has not been a single successful prosecution. we can speak now to — alimatu dimonekene, an fgm survivor and founder of project acei, and founder of the projectacei, nonprofit group which works with government and police forces to eliminate female genital mutilation. and aneeta prem — who is from the freedom charity which works to help victims of fgm. thank you forjoining us. we have this new initiative about the uk government joining this new initiative about the uk governmentjoining forces with the us government, to try and improve the situation, in terms of stopping people going abroad, do you think it will make a difference? it will make a massive difference. given the
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numbers of women who we'd know, through research done by the us authorities, half a million women in the united states are living with fgm or the consequences of fgm. just alone in new york, maryland, virginia, there are 200,000 women who are living with the consequences of fgm. learning from the united kingdom, we know areas where women like myself, survivors of fgm live and reside, there are tendencies for girls to be subjected to fgm. so having the us authority, the united states is a huge country and it is important that the authorities to be aware. so we have shared lots and lots of experiences and approaches they should use. for me, more importantly, supporting survivors. we have seen that challenges in the united kingdom, where survivors find
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it very difficult, or if i can use the word of victims in this context, who find it difficult to report the crime of fgm. fgm is organised crime, so we need all the relevant authorities working on this issue, not just a community led authorities working on this issue, notjust a community led approach, but law enforcement has to play a big part. and because your women and girls are trafficked from one country to another, we need individuals that the immigration, border control having some say in this case. aneeta, in terms of law enforcement, it is not working, is it? know. i agree with the comments, it? know. i agree with the comments, it is awful no one has been prosecuted and we have 170,000 women and girls in the uk. but we have been working with the border agency. you can see the red triangle i'm wearing, the national symbol. border
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for somewhere in the triangle and asking girls if they know what it means. they have helped a lot of girls going out of the country. the veil of secrecy around fgm needs to come to an end. this is child abuse. it needs to be stopped. is it all happening abroad? no, it isn't. there are cutters coming into the uk. 0ne there are cutters coming into the uk. one of the things we need to do is to work on intelligence, operations, and encourage people to come forward and talk about it. sorry to interrupt, just trying to work out how much of it is actually happening here. 170,000 people here are estimated to have had fgm. when you say cutters are coming into the uk, what proportion of it is being done here, can you estimate? we cannot estimate but i would say at least 20% happens in the uk. we were contacted by some that said carter
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gets paid £200 per girl and they can easily cut 20 girls in the day. this is an surgically done properly in a hospital, this is done in the back streets on a table. this is horrendous and girls are dying, girls are suffering lifelong pain and it is completely wrong. we have do seriously start having the conversation, as you are doing today, to make sure this comes to an end. we are working closely with schools and ensuring they know what the signs are. this summer, girls have come back into schools who have gone through fgm. we know that. those people that have subjected them to that need to be prosecuted. alimatu dimonekene, that a shocking if it is true, 20% being done in this country. if that is the case, should it be tackled first? of course. when it comes to fgm, there are still some grey areas, in terms of communities practising fgm. to be
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honest, i could go down to harley street today, if i want to have fgm done to myself. if we look at the clear definition of what fgm is, it simply means any procedure done to the female genitalia for non—medical reasons. i think too often when we talk about fgm, there's lots of emphasis on community such as myself coming from africa, but we do know their white european girls at risk of fgm, if we look at the clear definition of what fgm is. there are four types according to the world 0rganisation. four types according to the world organisation. the first, partial or total removal of the clear choice. type two, excision, not always the case, part partial or total removal of the labia trussed up and that is the clear choice and the lips can be removed, not always the case, and it
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is made into airtight closure, so only the woman can you relate or have menstrual flow. type four, where the grey area comes, means all the other categories. that the who couldn't categorise. people are using the loophole because it is not very clear and they say doing labia plastique, not fgm. there are girls in the united kingdom, if we go according to the national health organisation's statistics, because their estate are now being collected. i think we go back to using this intelligent information to assess who is at risk of fgm. what you are talking about, saying it can be described as legitimate surgery it can be described as legitimate surgery and you could go to harley street and ask for it if you want... going and asking for something to be done is completely different from girls having it done to them with absolutely no choice, isn't it?
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indeed. it is the excuse made too often and we in the community, i work as a community caseworker, going and talking to women. they say, we would want to stop this. i think there is a divide and women are winding to come forward. so many survivors, and not the only one, there are many survivors working ha rd every there are many survivors working hard every day to get our communities to understand what the impactand communities to understand what the impact and severity is on the women, not just our impact and severity is on the women, notjust our physical health but our well—being and psychological health. just briefly as we're almost out of time, described the impact it had an new. lifelong pain and suffering. does the pain never go away? in never goes away, they're are good days and bad days but it is about accessing health services. the physical? hazard the physical you can get over with, it is just cut
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but severity, in terms of the psychological and not believing this has happened to you. the trust in yourfamily. this has happened to you. the trust in your family. this is has happened to you. the trust in yourfamily. this is done in most circumstances buy your loved ones. the level of understanding between the family and child can be confusing because we mix love and hate together. you have a pain someone has objected your body to and then you have to love them at the same time. soap building this safety net, in terms of the law enforcement, the gathering of information, we are attacked all the time on social media for talking about this. for me, i always say, if i save one girl, i have saved a nation. i don't care who attacks me. i think the police need to do a lot more. i understand the challenge because there was no information, people were not talking about what fgm wasn't authorities turned a blind eye because it didn't affect white, blond, blue—eyed girls, mainly african, asian and middle eastern women. 0ur communities are closed but a lot of us are forthcoming and working with the law enforcement and agencies and authorities and we are saying to
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women, there is help out there. families can seek help and we are here to listen. it's not always about the prosecution but we need to prevent about the prosecution but we need to p reve nt fg m about the prosecution but we need to prevent fgm and end it by 2030. thank you so much, alimatu and aneeta, thank you both. coming up — almost 400,000 british airways customers have had their details stolen, after booking flights on the airline's website or app. we'll be asking what to do if it's happened to you. now, dating apps like tinder have completely changed the way many of us get into relationships, offering up seemingly endless options at the swipe of a finger. but do those infinite possibilities come with a dark side? how do you know the person swiping at the other end of the phone is who they say are? well, according to a new study, one in five tinder users are using the app, despite already being in a committed relationship. and that might not be the worst of it. the researchers found that those people using tinder who were already attached we're more likely to exhibit darker personality traits — including psychopathic tendancies. we can talk to michelle thomas.
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she quit online dating after a disturbing encounter with a tinder date. dr becky spelman is a psychologist who's treated women left traumatised by tinder dates. elisabeth timmermans is a tinder expert and the researcher behind the study. alice riley, a tinder user who's using the app to find a husband. stacy hollingworth is also joining us, who got in touch earlier to tell us, who got in touch earlier to tell us she met her soon—to—be husband on tender. are you getting married tomorrow? that's right, tomorrow. congratulations, we will be with you ina congratulations, we will be with you in a moment. elisabeth timmermans, i wa nt to in a moment. elisabeth timmermans, i want to come to you first of force you are behind the research. tell us what you have come up with, because we are specifically looking into the users' motives, and as we say, the dark side of tender. yes, exactly.
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we were mostly interested in, 0k, dark side of tender. yes, exactly. we were mostly interested in, ok, if there is really around 25% of who are using tender that are in a committed relationship, then why are they using tinder? we looked at their motives first and checked if they were different from most single tinder users and found they had higher scores on using tinder because they were curious about what the application is about. tinder has been around since 2014 outside of the us and many people have been in a relationship for longer than that and don't know what the fuss is about and they are curious so they download the app and start swiping to see what it's all about. if we look at other reasons such as using tinderfor an ego look at other reasons such as using tinder for an ego boost because you wa nt to tinder for an ego boost because you want to know how attractive you still are, or arejust as want to know how attractive you still are, or are just as an entertainment tool, as a tool of
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distraction, or as a tool to find new casual sex partners, we did not find a difference for single tinder users so it seems as if they are as likely to use tinder for the motives as single users and less likely to use it for relationship sea king. they seem to be less interested in actually finding a romantic partner —— relationship sea because they already have one. will attack the personality traits of people who are in a committed relationship related to the tinder motives and outcomes. we found that, for instance, people with a higher score on psychopathic are more likely to use tinder to find casual sexual encounters and they are also more likely to report a higher number of one night stands. they are also less agreeable and less
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neurotic than people who have lower scores on psychopathic. 0n the sexual experience tinder motive. interestingly, we also looked at narcissism, and people in a committed relationship who have a higher score on narcissism, they are more likely to use the app for an ego boost, which is also not very surprising, but it seems that they are longing for more social approval from single users to see how attractive they still are. ok. there is loads you have given us to talk about. thank you all stop michelle is in the studio. you have come off tinder after having a particularly bad experience. that's right. what happened? did you come into contact with somebody in a relationship or a psychopath? not as far as i know. i'm fascinated by elisabeth timmermans's research. i worry that online dating is corroding our ability to form real affinities with
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each other and my experience was with somebody who didn't have a lot of empathy. when you build up of view of somebody when you have been chatting online, chatting 24/7 and you may have exchanged a couple of flattering nudes, not that i did. you meet the person and have high expectations and when that person doesn't meet those expectations and empathetic response might be, that isa empathetic response might be, that is a shame. i think a psychopathic ora is a shame. i think a psychopathic or a response that is less empathetic is, this is your problem, you have hurt me by not meeting my expectations. sadly, that was my experience. i went on a date with a quy experience. i went on a date with a guy who i met on tinder. it was just the right side of dole, i would say, a perfectly standard evening, we went for drinks and dinner, there was a little kiss at the end of the night and the next day i got a 400 word text message. 400 words on a text? 400 words on a text after one
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date saying that he could love me and how lovely i was and how beautiful and he would marry me like a shot if i was a slip of a girl. so it was the opposite of its not you, it's not me? it's all eu! let's see what becky, our psychologist thinks of this —— it is all you. what becky, our psychologist thinks of this -- it is all you. i've worked with lots of people, friends and people in my own life, the online world is crazy how people can be andl online world is crazy how people can be and i think michelle has hit the nail on the head about empathy, but if someone lacks empathy, the level of mistreatment can be disastrous because they might not have as much respect for people because they have met them online. did hejust respect for people because they have met them online. did he just not understand the hurt that that causes? if somebody doesn't have high empathy they will not consider that at all and what i say to clients and even friends, speak to someone on the phone before meeting them. and really step back from
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that, do the screening on your emotions after that interaction, how do you feel when interacting with that person? and if any anxiety or any kind of negative responses come up any kind of negative responses come up there is your red flags. i think people don't listen to their emotions enough when dating people online. everyone is vulnerable when they are looking for love, aren't they? inevitably. and happy to potentially ignore the red flies and think, well, maybe this is the one and maybe i should be a bit more open—minded. and maybe i should be a bit more open-minded. people ignore their emotions so much. often clients of mine will say, i felt anxious and i thought i was just mine will say, i felt anxious and i thought i wasjust nervous because i was going on a date when actually their anxiety was trying to tell them something, there is something wrong with this individual. trust your gut. trust your gut instinct, numberone your gut. trust your gut instinct, number one red flag. alice, you are on tinder and number one red flag. alice, you are on tinderand am number one red flag. alice, you are on tinder and am i right in saying you are looking for a husband?” think at least, or at least a
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relationship, not something casual. how have you found it? i've been on dates but haven't found somebody with a romantic spark and it's quite ha rd with a romantic spark and it's quite hard because myjob takes up a lot of my time to sell over the past yearl of my time to sell over the past year i haven't been on that many dates. in general, i think it's hard to find someone you have that connection with. like these guys have been saying, a lot of the time people don't always behave well with the people they meet. i know a lot of people who have been ghosted by people they have been seeing on apps and cut all contact. hasn't happened to you but to people you know?m has happened in situations that i haven't been bothered about but i've known people who have been on three, four, five dates of somebody they really liked and the person just stopped talking to them out of nowhere. as you say, you are time pooras nowhere. as you say, you are time poor as a lot of us are, and i guess thatis poor as a lot of us are, and i guess that is behind the rise of internet
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dating, often the best way to meet people. often i don't have time in the evenings to go on a dating site so the evenings to go on a dating site so that's why things like tinder are useful because you can use it on the commute, orjust useful because you can use it on the commute, or just before useful because you can use it on the commute, orjust before bed and that's what of the appeal, because it fits into a lifestyle. you have to be resilient with it. let's bring in stacey. you have great news, you met the love of your life, i presume, on tinder and you are getting married tomorrow. what happened? i was on and off tinder for about two years. don't get me wrong, there were a couple of not so great experiences and not very great dates but ijust persevered. and thenl dates but ijust persevered. and then i met john dates but ijust persevered. and then i metjohn about dates but ijust persevered. and then i met john about three dates but ijust persevered. and then i metjohn about three and a half years ago on tinder and just really randomly the next day he ended up at my workplace without knowing that i worked there. and so we we re forced knowing that i worked there. and so we were forced to physically meet in person before we had arranged a date. so we kind of knew then that we need to arrange a date. and two
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years later he proposed and three and a half years later we are getting married. obviously you are on tv talking about the fact you have met your future husband on tv talking about the fact you have met yourfuture husband on tinder. have you always felt you could be completely open about that? internet dating has become so common but they would have been a time when people wouldn't have wanted to say when they described how they met that it was on the internet.” when they described how they met that it was on the internet. i think when we first met, i was very coy about it, i said, let's not my family that we met on tinder and was a bit embarrassed but as time has gone on and we have proven this can work and it's not a bad thing to meet somebody online we have been open about how we met. lots of people think it's actually really good and they think it is great that you can meet that way. i know a few other people who have since met that way and got married from meeting on tinder. it has taken a lot of the stigma out of it and i think lots of people are more open and accepting
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about that being away people meet. charlene on the e—mail says she has also married somebody she met on tinder. i'm watching the news and a particular story stood out to me about tinder. my husband and i met on tinder and recently got married and aintree was a great tool to bring us together and we are happy and have a business together. to raise says i had several dates on tinder and my last one has become my partner. after a whirlwind romance another married and they are settled and so happy. anonymous on e—mail says i think tinder is like any app, if one uses it with precaution it can be fun, i meta if one uses it with precaution it can be fun, i met a wonderful man and had a beautiful baby. so many! lisa says, i met on a different website called loopy love 13 years ago and they are celebrating their wedding anniversary. i kissed a few frogs first, she says, but then she had the wedding. my best friend katie got engaged to a lovely man
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she met on tinder. actually, becky, it isa she met on tinder. actually, becky, it is a miracle that these things, what could be brief encounters with very little detail, are leading to such good outcomes in so many cases. it is not all doom and gloom, people can meet people in this way and you just have to be really careful and look after yourself. i think that eagerness and neediness can mean that people just ignore these red flags. but if people can do it with caution they can meet the love of their life, just like they can in everyday life as well. what are the straightforward simple rules for dating online? what do you need to look out for and do? any type of bad behaviour, whether they are too sexual too soon, disrespectful, putting you down rather than lifting you up. but really it comes down to how that behaviour makes you feel, and don't ignore your emotions. if you feel a strong negative emotion, thatis you feel a strong negative emotion, that is not because there has been
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something wrong with you, that's a sign that actually this person is mistreating you in some way. is there a right person for everybody? these people are behaving badly, does that mean they are going to be bad in any relationship?“ does that mean they are going to be bad in any relationship? if somebody lacks empathy they are not ready for a relationship because they cannot treat somebody right and unfortunately michelle has experienced that. i think that person needs to go away and do a bit of work on himself before he's ready to treat somebody respect. we have had e—mails, long e—mailfrom somebody earlier, from a man, who described he had met women like this. does it tend to mainly be men? is that unfair? it can be both. i have learned from michelle's 400 words. it was gas lighting because he was trying to come across as this really nice guy but he was saying horrible things. it was an attempt to make himself feel better about himself. that was short lived. he probably felt better about himself
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for a second. it's not a behaviour thatis for a second. it's not a behaviour that is going to serve him well and it is so unfortunate that you had to experience that. to be honest i'm so glad that happened when i was 30 and not when i was 20 because i was able to read that text and see some of the red flag stop once you have been through a few relationships you know what abusive and coercive behaviour can look like and i recognised it. i was really upset and i was angry and wrote a blog and put it online and forgot about it and now it has 500 million views. wow! you are helping other people to spot the signs. absolutely. great to talk to you all and thank you all very much, and alice, good luck with your quest. thank you. we wish you all the best. good luck tomorrow, stacey. thank you. we tried to contact tinder for a statement but we didn't hear back.
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keep your comments coming in. let's catch up with the latest weather. some sunshine around today but outbreaks of rain and child, the perfect recipe for rainbows. not one but two if you look at this weather picture from dorrans. a good deal of sunshine and for much of the uk, a mainly sunny day. as i mentioned at the beginning, some rain, chiefly in south—east scotland this morning, running its way down the north east coast. a few showers in the irish sea, affecting parts of cumbria, cheshire, the midlands. and for the far north of scotland, more in the way of cloud with patchy drizzle. away from the far north of scotland and scottish borders, some dry and bright weather. a similar story in northern ireland, fairly breezy day. watch out for some of those sharp and heavy showers pushing through north—west england, wales and the far south west of england. but for much of england and wales, away from
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the north—east coast, and mainly dry day with some sunshine but a noticeable breeze. temperatures between 14—18. showers will fade overnight. some cloud patchy rain remains in north of scotland. later in the night, some cloud arriving in northern ireland, wales and the south—west. it is a fairly unsettled day tomorrow, particularly across england and wales, as we have this frontal system pushing its weight eastwards. heaviest of the rain in wales, the midlands, southern parts of england. and northern ireland are most in scotland for the morning but clearing through the day. bright sunny spells through the afternoon. quite a wet picture across much of wales on the midlands. the rain eventually arriving into the north—east of england. the far north and maybe the far south of england staying mainly dry with some patchy rain at times. tomorrow, 14 to 19 celsius, feeling cool where you have rain and exposure to the breeze. a fairly messy picture as we go into
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sunday but the front starkly tra nsfers sunday but the front starkly transfers northwards. the chance of seeing rain on sunday will be in northern ireland and scotland. more showery. it should be a dry day in the south. quite breezy, temperatures starting to rise on sunday in england and wales, possibly up to 2122 celsius. a fairly cool feel in scotland and northern ireland. the warmth continues across england and wales through monday and tuesday, where it will be mainly be mainly drivers and sunshine. the greater chance of rain for scotland and northern ireland. hello — it's friday, it's ten o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. almost 400,000 british airways customers have had their card details stolen, after booking flights on the airline's website or app. this was a very sophisticated, criminal attack anna ba.com. over
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the 20 years ba.com have been operating, we have never had a breach of this type. we'll hear from experts on what to do if you think you've been affected. do get in touch with your experiences in the usual ways. we've visited the zaatari refugee camp in jordan, where former arsenal captain per mertesacker is launching a football programme aiming to help some of the 40,000 traumatised children who live there. what do you want to be, one day? famous player. famous player? football player, like you. we'll be hearing more from per mertesacker, who is now head of arsenal's academy, in the next half hour. a committee of mps says education watchdog 0fsted is leaving parents "guessing" about the quality of schools in england. the head of 0fsted has spoken to us this morning — she says they've got it wrong. we are not in control of the amount of money we get. we have a statutory of obligation to inspect. we have to put children first and say, given this amount of money and the obligation to inspect these schools, how can we do the very best that we can,
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to give children the best quality of education and parents the best level of assurance? we'll also be hearing from the mp who put together the report. and if you're a parent: are you getting the assurances you need about the quality of schools in your area? get in touch in the usual ways. now for a round—up of today's news. tony blair has used an interview to strongly criticise the current labour leaderjeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party, and many within the party believe that it is "lost". jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled to his opinion, but that "politics has changed". the type of politics that people like me represent, which i would describe as modern, more moderate, progressive politics, if that isn't represented by the labour party,
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it doesn't really matter what i think or what these mps think, i don't think the british people will tolerate a situation where, for example, the choice at the next election is borisjohnson versus jeremy corbyn. ijust think... i don't know what will happen and i don't know how it will happen. but ijust don't believe people will find that, in the country, as a whole, an acceptable choice. british airways has apologised after the credit card details of hundreds of thousands of its customers were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline said the incidents occurred between the august the 21st and september the 5th. the stolen data is not thought to include travel or passport details. ba is advising those affected to contact their credit card providers as soon as possible. parents in england are not getting the assurance they need about the quality of education their children are receiving, a committee of mps has warned. the public accounts committee says it is unacceptable that so many schools — previously rated outstanding
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by education watchdog 0fsted — are exempt from being reinspected. they claim cuts to 0fsted's budget mean families cannot make informed choices. 0fsted says it is confident inspections offer parents the assurance they need. we'll be hearing what the chief inspector of schools has to say about this, ataround10:15am. hollywood actors have been paying tribute to burt reynolds, who died last night at the age of 82. the screen legend appeared in dozens of films over three decades, including smokey and the bandit and deliverance. he enjoyed a late career revival with an oscar nomination for boogie nights in 1998. arnold schwarzenegger called him a "trailblazer", and former partner sally field said her memories of the star would never fade away. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thank you very much. we have been
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getting so many comments from you and the tinder story, about one in five tinder leaders being already in a relationship and also about people, those people having psychopathic tendencies. we have had an anonymous e—mail, i met my last two partners and tinder, they were train wrecks. one was abusive and won the use me as a free place to live. by using them, you put a lot of trust in to the person you are dating. we have to believe they are who they say they are. they are often not. you can be whoever you wa nt to often not. you can be whoever you want to be online these days. i try to go back to old—fashioned dating. keep your comments coming in. use the hashtag victorialive. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you — and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now... john is at the bbc sport centre. good morning.
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it's farewll to alastair cook, who plays in his last test before retiring from international cricket, after a brilliant career. lots of tributes have been paid after the announcment on monday, the final match in the series with india at the oval will be his last for his country. our sports correspondent joe wilson is there. a beautiful setting in south london. i guess we can expect, or alastair cook can expect, a stirring reception when he walks out in the next hour or so? definitely but he won't cry. remember, he told us that early in the week. here we are above the oval in south london. the way alastair cook is perceived in the england dressing room is sport's most down to earth superstar. that is the wegher brood, the english captain, described yesterday. i asked joe root he thought alastair cook had another century in him. he has been practising, in a series where cook has looked a long way short of that form. it would be the
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33rd ending of his international career. the thing is, take away the romance a little bit... it would be more significant for england if the other opening batsman, keaton jennings, made a significant score because it seems in english cricket and around the world, the art of opening cricket in test matches, which alastair cook perfected in his career, is a dying art. alastair cook aside, a fairy tale ending. you say any number of the top order really need a big score. how likely is that and how fortunate are england to be in this position, having already wrapped up the series against india with one match left to play, in light of the way they have batted in this series? it is a good point. england time and time again have been bailed out, in terms of batting by the almost limitless all—rounders in the team. whenever there is a gap in english cricket, moeen ali fit set and he is batting
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at number three today. whether he does that this test match the whole of the winter, in the ashes here next summer, we have to wait and see. loads of questions to be answered. they need somebody in the batting line—up to make runs as a batsman. from india's point of view, they will be wondering, how come we are in this series having already lost it? they came to england trying to prove they can be their best away from india. the reason they have failed as they haven't shown that resolve or nerve in the run chases where they could have won easily. how much enthusiasm and energy they will have less of this test match remains to be seen. indeed. conditions look set fair. thank you. we will keep you across alastair cook's performance in that final test to come. superb start for wales in the nations league — the new look tournament which gives european countries a route to qualify for euro 2020 — 4—1 they beat the republic of ireland. tom lawrence with their opener.
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gareth bale with a lovely second, we saw him do that many times in the premier league before his move to real madrid. aaron ramsey grabbed a third before they put the gloss on the win with another. handing manager ryan giggs a win in his first competitive match in charge. serena williams edged a step closer to equalling the record for the most grand slam singles titles in the women's game, as she reached the us open final overnight. one set up, she wrapped up the second 6—0 against anaistasjia sevatsova, and will face the 20 year old naomi osaka in saturday's final, who was just one year old when serena won her first grand slam title — now she's got 23 — and she could make that 24 come saturday. the way she has been playing, you wouldn't bet against her. that's all the sport for now. more on around half an hour. thank you, see you later. almost 400,000 british airways
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customers have had their details stolen after booking flights on the airline's website or app. the details include name, address, email address, credit card number and the three—digit security number on the back of the card — that's enough information for it to be used. earlier, ba chief executive alex cruz spoke to the bbc about its response to the hack. this was a very sophisticated, criminal attack on ba.com. over more than 20 years that term, has been operating, we have never had a type of attack like this. the important thing is, as soon as we found that these records may have been compromised, we began the communications process through all channels available directly to the customers, to alert them about this potential problem. colin harbour is one of ba's customers who got that emailfrom them. hejoins me from cyprus now. i'm alsojoined by steve giguerre — he is a cyber security specialist from the technology company
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synopsys. and here with me in the studio is consumer expert megan french. welcome to all of you. colin, what was the first you knew of this? the first i knew of it was getting an e—mail this morning. the e—mail unfortunately, the first thing on the e—mail was a link to book flights. the second thing, as you scroll down, was a pretty picture and at the bottom of the devastating news that my data had been hacked. ba seemed happy to say what hasn't been divulged. then i get to thinking, also in my profile is my passport and travel information. so i'm guessing that could well have been divulged as well, so they will know exactly when to burgle my house. have you had any funny business
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going on with your accounts that you paid for your tickets with? no, i haven't. i spent an hour bringing my credit card company this morning, which ironically is british airways american express. after nearly an hour, they said not to worry, they are on my side and we'll be watching my transactions, but clearly i will be doing that as well. in terms of what information has gone as a result of this hack, ba says it's personal and financial details of customers. as you say, they have sort of said what hasn't gone, but are you clear on what has gone? i have my doubts that the full story hasn't come out yet. i know in other cases where there have been data breaches, there have been further repercussions later on. i strongly suspect that will be the case here. as faras my
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suspect that will be the case here. as far as my credit card is concerned, i wasn't offered the cancellation option, but as you know, i am in cyprus, cancellation option, but as you know, lam in cyprus, so cancellation option, but as you know, i am in cyprus, sol cancellation option, but as you know, i am in cyprus, so i wouldn't have got a replacement sol know, i am in cyprus, so i wouldn't have got a replacement so i will be watching my transactions carefully. megan, what's the best advice to anyone who gets one of these e—mails and knows they have had their information hacked? colin houston exactly the right thing, contact your bank as soon as possible, explained to them what has happened and keep watching your statements —— colin has done exactly the right thing. and also be aware if you get an e—mail, text message or phone call you do not expect to be cautious. scammers jump on this type of bandwagon so never be afraid to go and find the information independently, call—back british airways via the number you have researched yourself and obviously all of your passwords. and are you com pletely protected ? all of your passwords. and are you completely protected? again, you need to monitor these and explain to your bank what has happened. there are protections in place to help you get your money back and british
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airways has said no one will be left out of pocket but it isn't an ideal situation and it is one that you will have to keep monitoring. steve, british airways says this is a very sophisticated hack. what are your thoughts on how sophisticated something like this would have to be? an organisation like british airways would already have very good security measures in place so we have to assume it is somewhat sophisticated, for sure, having seen some earlier reports on other sites about their statements, i've heard that they indicated that they are calling it a data theft as opposed toa calling it a data theft as opposed to a data breach, which might indicate there was some insider threat involved, which adds to the complexity. why do you suspect that? it is simply more down to the fact that the data was between a specific window and not necessarily outside of that. the rewording of data theft implies somebody didn't come from
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outside and take the data, that would then be a hack of sorts. obviously that... you are basing speculation on the information that is out there. absolutely. how often are data breaches an insidejob? there was a report last year that stated that approximately one in four data breaches that we see involve some sort of insider activity. is there any way that people can protect themselves, or are wejust people can protect themselves, or are we just completely reliant on the companies that we give our information to when we go online? the companies that we give our information to when we go online7m isa information to when we go online7m is a bit of both, isn't it? you need to be careful with the obvious things like repeating passwords and allowing organisations to store your credit card information, for example. that's never necessarily and advisable thing to do. in this case with this particular breach its
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something we needed to rely on the organisation to be able to detect. misreading of data in transit, that is something that is possible. —— miss fruiting. ibook flights via british airways and i could have been caught by this exact breach. you have booked flights in the exact window that is being looked at between 22.58 on the 21st of august and at 5th of september?” between 22.58 on the 21st of august and at 5th of september? i did not but there is every likelihood that i could have and there isn't necessarily something could have done to prevent being a part of it. what do you think about that, colin? the expert saying even the experts find it to protect themselves. well, i'm one of those rare breeds that has unique usernames and passwords on every website and it took me a long time to achieve sol on every website and it took me a long time to achieve so i have a comfortable feeling about that myself. i booked two lots of flights during that period and because of
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the way british airways processes credit card transactions there was actually ten transactions going through in that period so they had ten opportunities to skim off my information. how does that work? why we re information. how does that work? why were they tend transactions for two flights? you book your flights and bend your seats and a venue might book a meal and they are all charged separately. you said you had different passwords for everything else that you do? yes, every website has a different password. —— and then you book a meal. it is a palaver and we are not all good at it. there are things like password managers back and help you but read about them and make sure you know what you're doing. but as we say, better safe than sorry is always the best advice here. keep monitoring your transactions. if you do want a new card you have the right to request it so just keep being savvy is what you need to do after this
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kind of situation. we have had a statement from british airways and it is apologised saying all customers affected by the bridge we re customers affected by the bridge were contacted on thursday night. the breach only affects people who bought tickets during the time frame provided by british airways and not on other occasions. —— affected by the breach. we heard from the chief executive earlier, alex cruz. do what you think about british airways's response? are you confident? i'm not sure what more they at the moment. often in these cases more information becomes apparent as time goes on. i would have preferred to have been advised earlier but i appreciate they have to go through a routine before they can do that. it is essential that people read the e—mail correctly and ta ke people read the e—mail correctly and take whatever action is necessary. thank you forjoining us. on facebook, i have received an e—mail in relation to british airways and the data breach, my credit card company is so busy they are not connecting calls, pot luck when i
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will get through. frustrating considering the clarity on the data breach. thank you for that comment and them coming in. school inspectors are leaving parents "guessing" about the quality of schools in england — that's according to an influential group of mps. pa rliament‘s public accounts committee says there have been clear shortcomings in the performance of 0fsted, the body which inspects schools, which include missing targets for the number and frequency of inspections. in a moment we'll be hearing from the boss of 0fsted, the chief inspector of schools, amanda spielman. but first we can talk to meg hillier mp, the labourchair of the public accounts committee, who pulled together the report. also with us is adrian kneeshaw, headteacher at carlton bolling college — a secondary school in bradford. thank you forjoining us. good morning. can parents rely on what 0fsted a re morning. can parents rely on what 0fsted are saying when it comes to picking a school? one of the concerns we have and it is a requirement of government they don't have to inspect outstanding schools for several years, over 1500 schools have not been inspected over six
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yea rs have not been inspected over six years and that's too big a gap. chief inspector has acknowledged in our committee that a child should expect that is inspected during their time expect that is inspected during theirtime in expect that is inspected during their time in the school and parents have that information so it's not up—to—date and there is a big increase in one—day inspections which don't do much for schools, they are a quick fact checking chat with the head and senior management tea m with the head and senior management team and then they are out again. we are keen to see 0fsted jump up and say they want to be part of school improvement and one—day inspections don't do that. how worried are you? we acknowledge 0fsted has had a big cut to their funding. you get what you cut to their funding. you get what y°u pay cut to their funding. you get what you pay for. and disappointed the chief inspector has been quite defensive about this and i think it's an opportunity for her as the person who should be championing school standards to come out and save this is what we'd like to do. they have only used the data they have collected to do two pieces of research in recent years competitive far much more wider research about the impact of what is happening in schools on pupils' learning and that
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isa schools on pupils' learning and that is a real shame. let's hear from her because i spoke earlier to the chief inspector schools amanda spielman. parents can rely on us to identify schools that are underperforming, making sure that that's brought to everybody‘s attention, so there's a chance to act promptly and make sure that education is protected. the public accounts committee says it is unacceptable that so many schools that have been previously rated outstanding are then exempt from being re—inspected. you're talking about, you said there, that parents can trust that schools would be identified when they are underperforming. but if a school has been rated particularly well, and they're then exempt from exemptions later and things changed, that would not be picked up. the first thing to be clear about is the exemption is a matter of law, it's not something that's a decision that we've made. but we do have sophisticated risk assessment systems, we've embraced data science. where we identify something that looks like a problem in an outstanding school, we do go back in. so parents should get assurance that we do inspect a proportion of outstanding schools, every year.
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but nevertheless, we don't think it's right that any school should go unscrutinised for a decade or more. we know that parents feel the same. so, where you say it's a matter of law, the issues of exemptions, the public accounts committee is criticising those exemptions, should that perhaps be looked at again by mps in terms of potentially changing it? it is a matter for the department for education and parliament. it is not something i can change. the committee also says short inspections don't allow inspectors to make a meaningful assessment of a school's performance. is that a fair criticism? they are short, aren't they, some of them? a short inspection provides a good level of assurance. it is... it is a more constrained inspection than a full inspection, it is more limited in its scope. but it is what we believe is the minimum necessary to give parents assurance that a school remains good. inspectors don't give parents
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enough of an opportunity to contribute their views about the school? we do our best. we make sure that the school informs parents as soon as we notify the school of an inspection. we open up our parent view system and parents are encouraged to contribute anything they have. but, yes, in a short inspection, that is a relatively short window of opportunity. the committee does say there are funding issues for 0fsted. you've had your budget cut by 52%. since 1999. does this all boil down to cash? we have to work to the budget that we are set, we're not in control of the amount of money we get. we have a statutory obligation to inspect. we have to put children first. given this amount of money and the obligation to inspect the schools, how can we do the very best that we can, to give children the best quality of education and parents the best level of assurance? i mean, you are working with constrained budgets, school budgets are difficult.
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what can parents expect, in terms of performance in schools and scrutiny of it, when money is being cut? well, one of the things, so far, our inspection evidence is not showing any significant effect on the quality of education. from the constraints on school budgets. we simply aren't seeing that. if we were picking it up, we would be looking into it and reporting on it. but we are not picking up effects at the moment. schools seem to be doing a remarkably good job of adapting. can we completely trust that that's because they are doing 0k, rather than issues not being picked up because of what the public accounts committee is saying about the constraints on your organisation? what i'm saying is that from the inspection work we do, we don't have evidence at the moment. but if we did, we would look into it. it's like everything else that we do. when we pick up from inspection evidence a wider sector concern,
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as we have done around the curriculum and off rolling, then we look into it and we pull resources together to do some focus work on that area. but what's really important is that i don't become a chief inspector who says things just to grab headlines. it is so important if we are to have a good influence on the system, to encourage good things and accidentally encourage bad things. that we don't say things for which we don't have evidence. thank you very much. the chief inspector of schools amanda spielman talking to me earlier. meg hillier, you heard amanda spielman strongly defending the work 0fsted is doing and pointing out, as you have, they have less money to do the job. she pointing out, as you have, they have less money to do thejob. she is not concerned about what she's seeing in schools. i'm concerned she's being so defensive about this report because we are being very measured in saying without the money and frequency of inspection and with
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these one—day inspections you will not get the richness of information and not helping schools include. there is muddled message between 0fsted and the department about who is responsible for school improvement, where a school needs help to improve and it's important that happens quickly and well because every pupil who has a year or even half a term of problems is going to have a bigger effect on the education. should the focus beyond the government and funding for 0fsted if you are so concerned about thejob 0fsted if you are so concerned about the job 0fsted is doing? 0fsted if you are so concerned about the job ofsted is doing? a lot of our recommendations work to the government including this issue of the frequency of inspections because government sets that agenda. ourjob was to look very clearly and narrowly, to focus on how well 0fsted is doing itsjob and how economic efficiently and effectively it is doing itsjob, that's economic efficiently and effectively it is doing its job, that's the remit of the committee. we're not looking and when 0fsted is a good thing or a bad thing but whether thatis thing or a bad thing but whether that is happening. we are very concerned because partly funding is constraints it is very squeezed in what it can do and these one—day
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inspections, even amanda spielman acknowledged it is an assurance, simplya acknowledged it is an assurance, simply a tick box exercise, it does not really get into looking at school improvement, which is something 0fsted sets itself up to do, is set up partly to do. let's bringing adrian kneeshaw, a headteacher. what has your experience of 0fsted inspections been? could you repeat the question ain? been? could you repeat the question again? what has your experience been of 0fsted inspections?” again? what has your experience been of ofsted inspections? i think 0fsted are an easy target for criticism. i honestly think they are doing a really good job and under an efficient system with constrained finances. i have had 20 inspections at various schools over the last six years. we get criticism of not going to outstanding schools and one—day inspections of good schools, but if they were having equal inspections of those schools rather than focusing on schools really needing support, the recurring inadequate
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schools, the criticism would come in that direction. they are applying the resources where it is needed, in the resources where it is needed, in the schools that need help, the recurring inadequate schools need help and inadequate schools. if they wa nt help and inadequate schools. if they want to look at the results every year for the schools that are outstanding, good schools, if they received complaints, safeguarding issues coming through as well they can inspect again. under difficult circumstances financially they are doing a good job. all headteachers would be hoping their school would get a good rating. but obviously not all schools are doing as well as they should be. as a headteacher when you know there is an 0fsted inspection coming, how are you feeling if you in a school where you know, you said you've been in schools where you haven't had good reports, are you hoping it gets picked up on because it means extra support? do you dread the 0fsted inspection because of what might be uncovered? inspection because of what might be uncovered ? what inspection because of what might be uncovered? what is it? is that question to me? if you are a school in a bad
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situation, you can do something about it. but you only fear 0fsted if you not doing yourjob. for me, i see it as an opportunity to show what you're doing, put your plans into action. if you are in a bad situation, it's not pleasant to be given bad news. i see it a bit like an examination. it's only way, it's an examination. it's only way, it's an opportunity to show what you are doing. if you are doing things correctly day by day and your systems are correct, you have nothing to fear. can you cover something up? a one—day inspection is nothing, is it? if there are things you don't want the 0fsted inspectors to see? inaudible we have lost the line. what do you think about that, do you think schools could cover stuff up? wouldn't say they are covering things up. i think even in that short time, the one day, the information you to give is set out
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by 0fsted. there is a conversation with the school leadership. clearly there isn't a chance to see what's happening with the quality of teaching. i have been through 0fsted inspections as a school governor, and it is a very welcomed thing when you can get the support. but the challenge is 0fsted is supposed to be set up as part of the school improvement regime and this approach, because partly of a lack offunding, means approach, because partly of a lack of funding, means it cannot really fulfil that role. i still challenge 0fsted, that where they see there are challenges and problems in schools, they have their data, they are at the front line of picking that up, they could be advising ministers on the day—to—day realities of schools. saying schools are doing a good job with less money. we hear there are a lot of challenges for our schools. thank you both very much. time for the latest news — here's annita. the bbc news headlines this morning: tony blair has strongly
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criticised the current labour leaderjeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies. speaking to nick robinson's political thinking podcast, the former prime minister said mr corbyn poses an existential threat to the future of the party, and many within the party believe that it is "lost". jeremy corbyn has responded to previous criticism from mr blair by noting that he is entitled to his opinion, but that "politics has changed". the head of the intelligence agency, gchq, has said russia poses a real and active threat. jeremy fleming made the warning at a security conference in the united states, a day after the government named two russian agents suspected of conducting the novichok attack in salisbury. he accused the kremlin of having what he called a "brazen determination" to undermine the international rules—based order. this morning russian officials have called the allegations a ‘frank lie‘ and have accused the british government of living in an information vacuum. british airways has apologised after the credit card details of hundreds of thousands of its customers were stolen following a major data breach on its website and mobile app. the airline said the incidents occurred between the august the 21st and september the 5th.
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the stolen data is not thought to include travel or passport details. ba is advising those affected to contact their credit card providers as soon as possible. the former foreign secretary boris johnson and his wife marina wheeler have announced they are seeking a divorce. the pair have been married for 25 years and have four children together. in a joint statement, they said they had been separated for some time. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. let‘s join john thank you. let‘s joinjohn for sports update. alistair cook recieved a commeorative cap on the field ahead of his final test for england before retiring. 12 years since he played his first test, the final match of the series against india at the oval will be his last for his country. what a start for wales in the nations league — the new look tournmament with palces at euro 2020 up for grabs. 4—1 they beat republic ireland.
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gareth bale with a superb second in what was ryan gigg‘s first match in charge. serena williams is one win away from equalling the all time record of most grand slam victories. she‘s into the final at the us open, after beating anastasija sevastova in straight sets. she will face naomi osaka of japan on saturday after she beat madison keys. rory mcilroy showed some real form ahead of the ryder cup. he made six birdies in a row — a career best — to share the lead with tiger woods at the bmw championship in pennsylvania. they equalled the course record. so, both players playing in the ryder cup at the end of the month and both putting in some impressive rounds. thank you very much. the liberal democrats will hold a leadership election "once brexit is resolves or stopped", current leader sir vince cable has said. the lib dems have 12 mps, down from the 57 they had in 2010. sir vince took over last
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year, without a contest. let‘s get more from our political correspondent chris mason. tell us more. good morning. the intriguing thing politically this morning if you have two people, vince cable and tony blair, former big beasts of what they would see as the centre ground of british politics. men who are used to sitting in the back of ministerial jaguars and clutching red boxes, trying to work out where they and their politics sits in the modern landscape. frankly, both of them kind of struggling and articulating a thought about how politics might change, revved whether via a new party or as vince cable said, shaking up the current leadership roles within his party, the liberal democrats, to allow a non—mp to be the next leader. effectively, sir vince cable is putting the sell by
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date on his own leadership. it does mean he could be gone as the lib dem leader by next year. let‘s take a quick watch of what he has been saying. the fact is that our current parliamentary system is severely damaged, if not actually broken. a forward—looking party has to look outside, as well as inside. so, my intention, therefore, is to ensure that the next leader is chosen from the widest possible pool of talent, to put him or her at the helm of a far bigger, more open movement than any previous leader has been. crucially, sir vince cable says the liberal democrats and others should be willing to step beyond the tribal is to labour element of politics, to consider the best vehicles for their brand of politics i have a successful future. there is a definite overlap there with what we heard in the news bulletin, this interview nick robinson has done for his pod cast political thinking with
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tony blair. a man who describes himself as a man of the political centre, speculating about the potential of a new party emerging. mr blair saying if there was an election between borisjohnson of the conservatives onjeremy corbyn of labour, something, in his view, would fill the vacuum. thank you very much, chris. can football help children traumatised by war and violence? arsenal football club is building pitches and training coaches in jordan and indonesia to try to do just that. they‘ve teamed up with save the children psychologists to develop a football programme that works on children‘s mental — as well as physical — health, and teaches them their rights. it‘s being launched today by former arsenal captain and world cup winner per mertesacker. we brought you catrin nye‘s full film earlier. here‘s an extract. you try to prepare, as much as you can, mentally, for, "i‘m going to a refugee camp". to imagine these circumstances, it‘s impossible.
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an arsenal star takes on a rather different pitch. per mertesacker is used to the emirates stadium. this pitch is in zaatari refugee camp in jordan, just 12 kilometres from the syrian border. applause. arsenal! the former arsenal captain is here to see a new football training programme, designed to help children traumatised by war. this camp is huge. it‘s home to 80,000 syrian refugees. it‘s the size of a small city. this place is well organised, but it has problems. children end up in early marriages, in child labour. the training programme teaches children about their rights, teamwork, resilience and gives them a vital role models. it‘s also about letting them just be kids. save the children‘s psychologists work with arsenal, who already do community work in north london. fleeing conflict from syria and living in a refugee camp with 80,000 people is very different
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from a young person growing up on an estate here. very different, but some of the approaches and responses are really simple. it's about belonging to something positive. it's about having a sense of purpose, trusted staff, those trusted adults that do have an understanding of what they're going through. in jordan, per mertesacker meets mohammed, a syrian refugee who fled when he was just nine. what does football mean to him? yeah? have you seen your son, like, playing and how good he is and skilful? the whole family fled, they don‘t know what‘s going on at home, they don‘t know how long they‘re going to live here. so, for him, it‘sjust been day by day, enjoying the football. so, it gives him just... so much.
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where do you want to be, one day? famous player. famous player? football player, like you. save the children and arsenal are aiming to coach 4,500 teenage boys and girls in the next three years, here injordan and in indonesia. they know they can‘t get these children their old lives back, but they can try and give them hope, make them stronger and make sure it‘s not war that defines their future. earlier we spoke to per mertesacker himself — who joined us in the studio along with mairead king, head of partnerships at save the children, and ahmad al—rashid, a syrian refugee from aleppo, who arrived in the uk two years ago. for me, it was a totally new experience, to be part of a project, and obviously we have been with save the children for seven years, and as arsenal players we always try and raise as much as we can, but where
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does it actually go? and to see it and to be there was as well my duty and to be there was as well my duty and my responsibility, as a player and my responsibility, as a player and now being with arsenal for so long. i want to know where the money goes and what impact it can have. how did you feel about being there and helping these kids who have such different lives from the ones we know and understand ? different lives from the ones we know and understand? would you feel you could bring to them and did you talk to them about their experiences or was it more about the practical business of playing football? we started with practising football but off the pitch, to listen to them and learn from them and learn from their experiences... how they see arsenal, how they see football, what are their dreams and how can we help them to shape that? because as i was there, it looked, to me, pretty limited. refugee camp, dry, hot. a
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good infrastructure, but then they have no limits, and on the football pitch, they don‘t think as much about the circumstances. we are all the same on the pitch and even for me, playing with them, it was amazing. iforgot me, playing with them, it was amazing. i forgot about the circumstances, so they do as well. it was amazing just to learn and listen to them. . that is presumably what this is about, making these kids forget for a moment that they are constrained so dramatically by the circumstances they are in? absolutely. save the children has been protecting children in conflict and from viole nt been protecting children in conflict and from violent for almost 100 years. what we really wanted to do with this programme was to bring all the expertise that arsenal have and their coaching expertise, and combine that with our expertise of helping these children who have been traumatised and have seen a lot. our expertise of working with children who have been through that. if we can combine all of that, we can
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really come up with a programme that is impactful and can have real impact on children's lives, notjust of the short term and for a short moment of relief, but actually coaching skills. we were talking about building children's communication skills, resilience skills, giving them confidence and courage. the whole aspect of being pa rt of courage. the whole aspect of being part of the team, feeling they belong and discussing their feelings. and conflict resolution. there is so much more to it. when we combine both the organisation skills and expertise, we have something very powerful. you have lived in a refugee camp in iraq. how vulnerable do you feel in that situation, when you are stuck somewhere and you don‘t know what the future holds? i lived and worked in refugee camps in the region and for the majority of these people, especially for the parents, this is not what you expect for your children. you want your
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children to go to education, to be normal, and being stuck in this limbo situation for now almost seven years, this is their life. what difference can football make for these kids? i think it makes a massive impact. especially, it gives the children the opportunity to go and play. simple things like playing that many people all over the world, especially children all over the world, take for granted, many of these children don't have it. they don't have this. i think it's great for them to have this opportunity. per, do you think the kids realise it is about more than kicking a ball around the pitch? i think they get an idea because we are doing so much more, notjust building the pictures, sending coaches, sending coaches longer—term to coach the coaches longer—term to coach the coaches there. we build a real relationship and they feel it is not
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only about the pitches, it is more coming from this connection and save the children. we‘re not leaving them alone. that gives the connection they need and the care they need to not only think that they may be forgotten. we really care about them and that means long—term and not only build pitches for the short—term and that we have done something. how did the children react to you being there? for me it was very, react to you being there? for me it was very, very special to be there. i think they were quite happy. we obviously took some photos and they we re obviously took some photos and they were just obviously took some photos and they werejust happy obviously took some photos and they were just happy to play with one another. i actually felt like a kid myself. i think there was not a big difference for them in training and focusing on their skills and on the coach who has a massive impact on them. i had the feeling they could
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felt quite normal, even with myself in the team. i know you are an arsenalfan. for in the team. i know you are an arsenal fan. for people in the team. i know you are an arsenalfan. for people in the camps when they have guys coming over from arsenal, how will they see that? is arsenal, how will they see that? is arsenal a big thing over there?” think it's a very big thing. i remember my time in iraq and the region, when it comes to football it isa very region, when it comes to football it is a very big thing for many, many children. when you are talking about a football player, football star, it is like a dream coming true. i think it means a lot for many, many of these children. in terms of it being a dream come true, i guess some of them might be harbouring the thought that maybe they have a special skill that maybe they have a special skill that would be spotted. what would happen if there are kids with a strong talent? could they be brought over? what might happen?m strong talent? could they be brought over? what might happen? it might happen for surviving the better the connection is, with the coaches at arsenal and getting their skills
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here, bringing that to a refugee camp, even when you thought that wasn‘t going to happen. that is theirdream. wasn‘t going to happen. that is their dream. their wasn‘t going to happen. that is theirdream. theirdream wasn‘t going to happen. that is their dream. their dream is to be a footballer one—day and we‘re not going to take that away from them. we actually breed that idea for them and that is not only a dream that we can make things happen with our great partnership. we can all obviously imagine what that will be doing to children, to have their dreams fired up. in the end they are ina very dreams fired up. in the end they are in a very difficult situation, and you obviously spoke about the long—term impact hopefully of this building resilience and their courage. how will you be able to measure whether it has had that long—term impact on these kids? measure whether it has had that long-term impact on these kids? for us and for the partnership, one of the key elements is that we gather evidence to really show this is having an impact. because we want to be able to, with arsenal, we want to get others to replicate this, we wa nt get others to replicate this, we want to be able to do this in other
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countries. we really want to kind of beat leaders in the way and say this really works, so the evidence piece is really crucial and important. we will be doing that throughout the programme, at the different stages when the coaches go out, to see has it improved all of those elements i spoke about in relation to the children, has it improved their self—esteem, as it improves their confidence? self—esteem, as it improves their confidence ? loss self—esteem, as it improves their confidence? loss of traumatised children are very withdrawn. have they come out? have they realised that belonging and being part of the team really gives them something? we are talking about life skills for the future, not kind of, you know, tale nt the future, not kind of, you know, talent spotting for the next star. really what you are giving them is that hope for the future and those skills the future and that resilience and being able to deal with their emotions way beyond the time of the programme. that's the real impact, i think. per, time of the programme. that's the real impact, ithink. per, you time of the programme. that's the real impact, i think. per, you said you feel like a kid again. how does
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this compare to playing in a winning team. it‘s obviously a very different type of fulfilment. yes, i was really keen and i wanted to make that experience, where the money goes and the impact it has on children is so huge and on myself as well. that is as well how we grow our partnership, obviously with ambassadors and with people who play ona ambassadors and with people who play on a regular basis for arsenal. that is powerful. but we want the skills for our coaches to have that they spot what they see on the pitch, not only football wise but how are the children actually, and how we can improve that. there is a lot to it but we are very proud that we have built a partnership and it is still growing. the vast majority of home owners who bought a leasehold house now regret it, with many feeling they were mis—sold and some are now struggling to sell up — that‘s according to a new report from the national association of estate agents. the research follows controversy which led the government
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to crackdown on what it called unjustified leaseholds, banning the agreements on nearly all new—build houses. but the study says 45% of people didn‘t know they were buying a leasehold property until it was too late and some 94% now say they wish they hadn‘t bought their home at all. here with me is louie burns, managing director of leasehold solutions, a group which aims to help leaseholders to take greater control of the value of their properties and which works closely with the report authors. and joining me via webcam from london is mumshad afruz, a former leaseholder who was forced to sell his east london flat because of mounting costs he hadn‘t bargained for. thank you forjoining us. louie burns you have been working with some of the researchers. tell us about the horror stories you have encountered. as the report points out, there are lots of cases of real human misery caused by the unnecessary selling of properties, houses, as leasehold and owner is
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ground rents which have huge implications on people trying to buy the freehold of their homes, but also these licenses and omissions people get charged and there is no way of knowing what they will be beforehand. we have seen people being charged many thousands of pounds just for permission to fit a conservatory in their own garden. i spoke to a gentleman who had been charged £200 per room for permission to change the carpets in the room. it goes on and on. we have hundreds of cases of these unnecessary licenses. these are things people are not aware that when they are buying the property, necessarily? no because the leases have a clause that says the freeholder can charge a fee but that the must be reasonable but unfortunately there is no legal definition of what reasonable is, and so they are allowed to charge and if the leaseholders wanted challenge that
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they would have to take their freeholders to the first—tier tribunal but obviously there is a cost to that. mumshad afruz, i said you are forced to sell your flat because mounting costs were more than you bargained for. what were the costs you are coming across? the costs were simply quite exorbitant and they were over and above the service charge as well as ground re nt service charge as well as ground rent and they were coming in the form of various maintenance, as well as section 20. when i personally challenged the managing agent to quantify and rationalise some of the costs they were threatening me with legal actions. costs they were threatening me with legalactions. initially the interaction was with the managing agent and once they realised some of my impressions work right forensic andl my impressions work right forensic and i was asking specifically
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details, they decided to involve their legal counsel. as you can imagine, asa their legal counsel. as you can imagine, as a leaseholder i raised this inquiry on my own and i felt quite intimidated. at the time i felt quite unsupported, didn't really know where to turn to, other than to rely on my own resources and ta ke than to rely on my own resources and take on the managing agent as much asi take on the managing agent as much as i possibly could. but i think, you know, the existing arrangement and the legal relationship that we have at the moment is heavily skewed towards the freeholder. we really do need to revisit and completely overhaul the system. the system, you know, is archaic and it is very feudal in its nature. sorry to interrupt. did you know when you
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bought the flat what you are letting yourself in for in terms of potential liabilities as a leaseholder? no, no, i didn't and that's one of the drawbacks and perhaps one of the areas that could be looked at. when you buy your first property, you know, you are very excited to get onto the property ladder. the conveyancer will do the very minimum. i don't think the process is... sorry, i said, have you sold your flat or are you in the process of selling it?” have sold my flat. i had no option but to sell up. the seven years that i owned that flat, on average i
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actually paid over £3000 which equated to half of my mortgage payment so i could no longerjustify holding onto the flat. it was very much a family home. we had our first born there. it was in a very picturesque place overlooking regents canal. mumshad, sorry to interrupt but we are short on time andi interrupt but we are short on time and i want to bring in louie to come and. people often find themselves unable to sell, obviously mumshad managed to sell his, but because of the costs associated with these people find they cannot sell their properties. the cost and a general awareness to it, people are trapped and the report says 60% and that figure is growing more and more as people are struggling and feel trapped with growing families, not
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able to move. people are being offered jobs and need to relocate and they can‘t. the human cost of this is not considered very often but it is huge, as the gentleman said. thank you both very much. i have a few more comments on tinder, so many of you getting in touch on that. anonymous text, i discovered my husband of 21 years was using dating sites claiming he was separated. two years online divorce and more settled contemplating dating but the thought of someone like my ex—husband out that terrifies me. another e—mail says, i will never use them again. i was contacted will never use them again. i was co nta cted by will never use them again. i was contacted by somebody messed up my head for a long time and i will never trust men on those sites again. thank you for those and for your company today. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. i will see you soon, have lovely weekend. bye— bye. hello, foremost it is mainly dry day
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with spells of sunshine but some rain around particularly in the morning across eastern and north—eastern counties of england and also light rain and drizzle in the final scotland and showers feeding in on a brisk north—westerly wind, parts of north—westerly wind, parts of north—west england, wales and midlands. elsewhere most will have a dry day, spells of sunshine and noticeable north—westerly breeze and highs between 14—19dc, perhaps higher in the south—east of england. receiving any showers will fade, overnight we will keep affirmative power, patchy rain, light drizzle in the far north of scotland and elsewhere cloud increasing of northern ireland, wales and north—west england with outbreaks of rain by dawn and lows overnight between 7—13dc. fairly unsettled day tomorrow, the rain across midlands, wales and north—west england slowly working eastwards, clearing from northern ireland to leave a dry afternoon with spells of sunshine, driver much of scotland with sunny spells and driest along southern
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counties, temperatures up to 17 and 19 celsius. this is bbc news, i‘m annita mcveigh. these are the top stories developing at 11: sir vince cable announces he will step down as liberal democrat leader once the question of brexit is resolved or stopped. my my intention therefore is to ensure that the next leader is chosen from the widest possible pool of talent and to put him or her at the helm of and to put him or her at the helm of afar and to put him or her at the helm of a far bigger, more open than any previous leader has been. tony blair criticisesjeremy corbyn, his supporters and his policies saying says he is "not sure it is possible" for labour
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"moderates" to take the party back from the left. the head of the intelligence agency — gchq — says the uk and its allies will use all tools available to fight back against the ‘real and active threat‘ from russia. what future for syria?

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