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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 8, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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or even appear on the programme, you can callus or emailing newswatch. you can find us on twitter at @newswatchbbc and do have a look at our website: that's all from us. we will hear more about your thoughts of bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning — welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and ben thompson. our headlines today: cutting off cold callers — from today companies who pester people without their permission risk fines of up to half a million pounds. "call off the dogs" — former labour front—bencher chuka umunna urgesjeremy corbyn to stop party infighting and start fighting brexit. grange hill theme and we delve into the grange hill year book
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as a new exhibition celebrates a0 years since it hit our screens. alastair cook, serves up something to remember him by england's record run scorer made 71, in his last test match — but india are on top. it's fast, furious and not for the faint hearted — i'm on the run in an extreme form of tag. the weather is looking hit and this today. pretty much everything. cloud, rain, sunshine. the forecast coming up! it's saturday the 8th of september. our top story: new powers come into force today designed to stop nuisance calls from personal injury and claim management firms. you'll now need to opt in to allow companies to contact you. businesses that don't comply could face a fine of half a million pounds. manuela saragosa has more. for many of us, cold calls are a daily torment. hello? the financial conduct authority says some 2.7 billion nuisance calls texts and e—mails were made over the past year. that works out to be about 50 calls, texts and e—mails sent to every
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single adult in the country. many are made by companies offering to settle personal injury claims, or to claim back ppi — payment protection insurance. but, from now on, these companies will have to check first that the recipient has explicitly agreed to receive those calls and messages. companies that don't could face a fine of up to £500,000, and people are encouraged to report them to the ico — the information commissioner's office. some companies will see the new change in law, and i think they will desist from the activity. when they don't, i'm afraid people are going to have to complain. the ico does need the information from people about these calls, and she will then tackle, use her powers and, slowly but surely, we will get on top of it and they will completely cease. campaigners say the new rules do not go far enough. they will not, for example, stop calls from fraudsters and note, too, that firms based overseas are not covered.
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the issue of consent, they argue, is a red herring and they would prefer to see the authorities rule that unsolicited direct marketing calls are not a legitimate way of doing business. manuela saragosa, bbc news. the former shadow business secretary, chuka umunna, will make a speech today urging jeremy corbyn to ‘call off the dogs‘ and stop labour mp's being targeted for criticising the party leadership. it follows a week in which two labour mp's lost votes of no confidence among their local party members. a party source dismissed the comments as "incoherent and inaccurate". 0ur political correspondent pete saull can tell us more. pete, will this intervention trouble mr corbyn? well, it is interesting. it seems like we are entering another period of intense mudslinging within the labour ranks. chuka umunna, as you say, urgingjeremy labour ranks. chuka umunna, as you say, urging jeremy corbyn to call off the dogs. it paints a picture of
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hounds hunting down labour mps that dared to criticise their leader. i suspect chuka umunna's comments will go down like a bucket of sick among some members. some jeremy go down like a bucket of sick among some members. somejeremy corbyn supporting members feel those folks supporting members feel those folks supporting labour mps are an exercise in democracy. the party has about half a million members. anti—semitism is a large part of this. so is brexit. chuka umunna also making the point today at that jeremy corbyn should be doing more to fight what chuka umunna calls a tory brexit. he wants the labour leader to come out and back a so—called people's boat, a second referendum on the brexit deal. —— a people's vote. pete, thank you very much indeed.
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the first member of president trump's election team to plead guilty to offences during the 2016 campaign has been sentenced to two weeks in jail. george papadopoulos, who was a foreign policy adviser, admitted lying to fbi agents investigating whether the trump campaign colluded with russia — something the president has repeatedly denied. it's emerged that a russian exile who was murdered in britain last march believed that two men from moscow had tried to poison him five years earlier. nikolai glushkov — a former deputy director of the russian airline, aeroflot — was found apparently strangled at his home in south—west london, a week after ex—spy, sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, were poisoned in salisbury. a massive operation to scoop plastic waste from the middle of the pacific ocean is being launched today. a 600—metre long floating device will be towed out from california, as jenny kumah reports. sites like this have shocked people all over the world. the damage to wildlife has inspired a bold project with an ambitious goal —
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to rid the ocean of plastic. and this is the structure that will help to do it. it's been built in san francisco and is launching from there today. it will travel to an area in the eastern pacific known as the great garbage patch, where currents trap plastic. if we don't do it now, all this plastic will start breaking down into smaller and smaller pieces, and the smaller the pieces are, the more harmful and harder to extract from the marine environment. so we feel there is a sense of urgency. so how will it work? a giant tube, 600 metres long, will float on the surface in the shape of a horseshoe. over time, the plastic should gather in a small area and then can be taken out. underwater, a barrier will hang three metres down and trap plastic below the surface. it is meant to allow fish to swim underneath it. but some experts worry
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that the system can harm wildlife. our major concern is for those passive floaters, rather than fish, mammals, plankton, jelly fish, for example. they simply cannot get out of the way of this, they are going to be crammed into this and not be able to escape. the plan is to start with one collection device and eventually deploy 60. the people behind the project estimate a full roll—out will clean up half of the great pacific garbage patch in five years. jenny kumah, bbc news. final campaign rallies will be held in sweden today on the eve of elections that are expected to confirm a surge in support for an anti—immigration party. 0pinion polls suggest that the sweden democrats, who have roots in the neo—nazi movement, will take about 20 % of the vote. neither the centre—left governing parties nor their centre—right opponents are expected to win an outright majority. the wildlife presenter johnny kingdom, who has been
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described as ‘one of the last true characters of rural britain', has died. the film—maker and photographer, who was famous for his documentaries about exmoor, is believed to have been killed in an accident involving a digger. the 79—year—old made several tv series including ‘johnny kingdom's year with the birds‘. his family said ‘a legend had been lost‘. yesterday on breakfast, i spoke exclusively to zara tindall who's back in the saddle just three months after the birth of her second child. it hasn't been an easy road for zara and herfamily — she opened up to me about her two miscarriages and how hard it's been for her husband, mike. after zara's interview, a number of men got in touch with us to share their stories. in a moment, we'll speak to andy clark—coates, who set up a support charity after they experienced a number of miscarriages.
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but first here's a reminder of what zara had to say. when things like that happen, normally it's just your family and friends but unfortunately, everyone knew about it. and actually, i had so knew about it. and actually, i had so many letters saying, you know, i'm so sorry, we've been through the same thing. it's incredible. thank you to all those people. but it is... itjust showed how often it does happen. i have a very supportive family. you know, mike is incredible. it's hard for the guys too. it is very different for us because we're carrying a child which, for guys, i guess it is that helpless feeling which must be incredibly hard and horrible for them. but, you know, at the end of them. but, you know, at the end of the day, they've lost a child too. and i guess he's probably used to
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being able to fix things or helping you and supporting you. it's horrible, isn't it, for anyone. za ra zara tindall speaking to me days ago. the response to that interview is huge. she was talking about going back to work, essentially. she did. she was very open and honest, and spokein she was very open and honest, and spoke in a very normal way about losing two babies. and the impact it has had on the whole family. as i said, a lot of people have been in touch. andy clark—coates from the mariposa trust is with us now. can you explain what it is for?m is also widely known as saying cabaye, it was a charity myself and my wife set up after we lost five babies ourselves. it provides services of remembrance and campaigns with the government for
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changes to the care and support of people who go through this. you say it is about helping everybody affected by it but you have also been looking at the response that men have two this. quite rightly the focus is always on women but there isa focus is always on women but there is a forgotten grief that men are facing. they do not really feel like they can vocalise that emotion? when people go through baby loss, i often feel myself, as a man, my first priority is my wife and making sure that she is looked after and her needs are being met. then then go back to work and go back into a normal routine of life. it seems like men have passed the grieving process but that is not the case. for the majority of men, they do not have the opportunity to necessarily speak about the loss and grief they are going through. one of the things that struck me about what zara tindall was saying, she was so open about it. very honest, she spoke about it. very honest, she spoke about it. very honest, she spoke about it in that very sad and very
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natural way. that is not something that people, even women, are always able to do when losing a baby. there is something about it. do they not wa nt to is something about it. do they not want to talk about it, or is it people around them are uncomfortable about talking about losing a child? i think most people want to talk about it, it's a huge part of the grieving process, to discuss and vocalise what they are going through. but society sees it as a taboos subject that people do not talk about. there's been a big change in the last ten years where more people are opening up about it but we need to make it an open subject that people can talk about it. only by doing that do we realise that people are not isolated and they are not alone in going through this. with one in four pregnancies ending in miscarriage, that is a huge amount of people going through this. and what practical steps can a man take in this situation? 0r this. and what practical steps can a man take in this situation? or could a woman take, helping a man who has
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also lost a child? one is talking, communication is key. when we went through loss, we talked about it and made sure that we could express how we we re made sure that we could express how we were feeling. so for a woman helping a man, it allows the opportunity to talk and say how he is feeling. come along to a service of remembrance, have that time to naturally grief. for a man, of remembrance, have that time to naturally grief. fora man, it of remembrance, have that time to naturally grief. for a man, it is making sure that your partner or wife is supported, but it is also about making sure that you do not step back, of not wanting to talk about it. talking is key. and how important are things like the interview that sally did yesterday, hearing from zara tindall and mike tindall about the impact it had on them? you get a sense of what impact it has on the whole family, but also a realisation that you have touched on already. that it is ok to talk about these things can are allowed to be upset? it is massively
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important that people open up. when different celebrities go on air and express how they have gone through loss, it is fantastic for other people. they feel it is something they can talk about and discuss. in a poll that we did last year, 98% of men who had gone through baby loss said they felt more support was needed. it's a huge amount of people, saying that what is currently out there is not currently applicable or suitable and needs improvement. zaha and mike tindall are one couple in many thousands who experienced this. you can see from those pictures, what makes their lives easier is they went on to have a healthy baby. so they now have two lovely girls who are enormous joy to both of them. yes, and that is a wonderful thing for people if they do go on to have the term "rainbow babies, in that way, but they never replace the baby you have lost. he
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a lwa ys replace the baby you have lost. he always remember the children you have lost. they are always part of a family. we lost five in the process of having the two wonderful daughters we have now. we look at ourselves as having seven babies there. they will always be part of it and never forgotten, there. they will always be part of it and neverforgotten, and there. they will always be part of it and never forgotten, and they will always be part of our family and legacy. it is really good to talk to you. thank you for sharing your story with us. there is help out there for those who need it. lot of support, people who come to oui’ lot of support, people who come to our charity website, there is help and advice for anyone going through loss, and advice for men. andy, thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines... new powers come into force today which the government hopes will crackdown on cold calls. firms that don't comply could face a half a million pound fine. labour mp chuka umunna has accused the party's leader jeremy corbyn of driving centre—left
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mps out of the party. let's find out what's happening with the weather. here's tomasz. it should be warming up in some parts of the country, but the clue is only some? good morning. that's right. some warm weather on the way. it does not arrive until after the weekend. i suppose that is not such great news. in terms of the weather this morning, it is not particularly great across wales and in north—west of england. a lot of cloud on the satellite images. streaming in our direction. i am afraid it's a gloomy one. across the south—west of the uk during today. the rain will miss scotla nd during today. the rain will miss scotland and the south of the country. we are talking about this central swathe of the uk, that will be pretty wet today. it will not be
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raining all the time. it may wax and wane through the morning and afternoon. but in northern scotland, the weather will be really pleasant stay. if you do not mind fresh conditions, 15 or 16 degrees across the highlands and grampians, and belfast, it's about 17 degrees. rain moving through the peak district and into yorkshire, and wales too. much of the midlands, the south and the south—east are dry today. fairly cloudy, but hopefully sunshine will come through. 0n the extreme south coast, probably getting some sun. tonight, even ones that rain clears away. it could come back in the north—west, and here in wales, there is milderaircoming in north—west, and here in wales, there is milder air coming in from the cell. a hint of what ben was referring to, as we head into next week. on monday, temperatures picking up in southern areas of the
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uk and already we see skies clearing across england and wales. temperatures of 20, 201 across england and wales. temperatures of 20, 20 i degrees or so. temperatures of 20, 20 i degrees or so. scotland and northern ireland. showers here, in the second half of the weekend. temperatures are pleasa nt the weekend. temperatures are pleasant there. 20 in hull. 0n monday, what is happening, this weather fronts slices the uk in half so weather fronts slices the uk in half so two areas of weather. in the south, warm wafting in from portugal, spain and france, this patch of orange here is the warmer aircoming infrom patch of orange here is the warmer air coming in from the south. this cooler current of air in scotland and northern ireland, so the uk will be split in two. in the north, temperatures no higher than the mid—teens with rain at times. in the south, temperatures in the mid—20s. this is not an indian summer, that does not happen until october or
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november that technically, we are in summer as november that technically, we are in summer as autumn november that technically, we are in summer as autumn qus november that technically, we are in summer as autumn does not traditionally happen until the equinox, which is towards the end of the month. you said indian summer, does that mean we are expecting one? no, but it is quite often the question put to me, if we get a spell of warm weather at this time of year, is it an indian summer? no, it is normal. an indian summer is october, november. it is lovely to talk to you, we look forward to the possible it is lovely to talk to you, we look forward to the possible indian summer! so forward to the possible indian summer! 50 summer has forward to the possible indian summer! so summer has not yet finished? even though it feels like it may have done! what's it like to be a rookie prison officer at a time of high levels of violence, drug—taking and self—harm ? two years ago, a scheme to get some of britain's brightest university graduates working in jails was unveiled. so would the new recruits go the distance? last year, our home affairs correspondent danny shaw
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met one of the graduates as she started work at coldingley prison in surrey — and now he's returned to find out how she's getting on. i'lljust give you a quick rubdown, mr brown. she's one of the newest prison officers at hmp coldingley, but has the confidence of someone far more experienced. sophie is one of the standout recruits on a programme designed to attract the brightest graduates into prisons. we first met her 12 months ago, when she started work. i've finished my degree. 0k. the new officers were visited by the then justice secretary david lidington. a year on, how has it been? it's been challenging, but it's been rewarding, as well. the best thing is all the interactions that i have with the guys. we make progress all the time. the small wins are the best things — like, getting someone that has been refusing to go to work that is actually finally engaging and going to work. that's the best thing ever. have there been moments when you've doubted whether this was the job for you? when incidents happen and i've been faced with, like, an act of self—harm or someone being under the influence, and that's when i'm like,
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"am i right for this job?" sophie is one of eight graduate prison officers here at coldingley. they are among more than 50 who started the scheme last year. and now it is being expanded and sophie is helping to train the next set of recruits. if they are not in there, you open the flap. these new recruits graduated in subjects including anthropology and social policy. now, they are earning up to £30,000 a year and doing a masters in their spare time. show that you are listening, that you understand. and this is how the graduates learn about techniques they need to do the job. hello, it's q from alpha 1. we have an unconscious officer, officer ralph. it's a training exercise in a classroom at the university of suffolk. i can see there's a rope group going through the window, we have missing keys. in this scenario, a prisoner has escaped after assaulting a member of staff. we have an e—list prisoner escaping out of education! with a set of officer's keys.
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the skills you get from being a prison officer, if you can de—escalate a landing full of prisoners, if you can convince someone who's offended their whole life that they want to change and turn their life around, essentially, the skills that they're going learn with us will set them up for leadership and whatever they go on to do. at the time, we had real problems with recruitment. attracting people to the service, there was a lot of negative press. rising levels of prison violence and concerns over pay have made it hard for governors to find and retain staff. 2,000 front—line officers left the service last year, hundreds of them new recruits. to get some of these bright young people into it, was like a shot in the arm. but sophie isn't at coldingley for long. next year, she'll leave for good, using her experience in another part of the criminaljustice system. danny shaw, bbc news, at coldingley prison. a great story. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers.
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financial analyst margaret doyle is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we'll speak to her in a minute. but first let's take a look at some of the front pages today. the daily express reflects our top story today about a new crackdown on cold callers. the times leads on the proposed changes to the divorce law in england and wales, saying the ‘revolution puts an end to the blame game'. borisjohnson's personal life is on the front pages of a few of the papers. the daily mail claims mrjohnson was cheating on his wife, marina wheeler, ‘at the height of the chequers crisis'. and the guardian claims a russian exile found dead in his london home had previously survived a poisoning attempt by two men from moscow. the paper says detectives are re—investigating the incident. margaret, we said that story about
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borisjohnson is margaret, we said that story about boris johnson is in margaret, we said that story about borisjohnson is in a lot of the newspapers this morning. we picked out a story in the daily mirror. as we know, it has a left—wing tilt, and in this case, they are really looking not just at the and in this case, they are really looking notjust at the personal side of this, as to whether or not he was having an affair, but really, how does this relate to his political ambitions? right at the bottom, they say that actually, what he is doing, that phrase they use is "cleaning the barnacles off the boat and it is advice from lynton crosby, and it is advice from lynton crosby, an australian campaign supremo, the man who helped to win london. a p pa re ntly man who helped to win london. apparently lynton crosby is saying, get the bad news out there first. if you get that divorce news out there, they say they have an affair or whatever, they are less likely to damage them. if a politician of any party admitted to having an affair,
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or the personal life was complicated, it is seen as hugely damaging? the conservative party is seen as damaging? the conservative party is seen as traditional or the party of family values. yes, it would definitely seem to be going against you, against the blue rinse brigade, they tend to be a little bit older. lynton crosby is saying, get it out there first. citing donald trump, who has broken off these rules. donald trump has been caught saying things that are considered to be inappropriate, doing things considered inappropriate. he has highlighted a certain style of politics, it and it seems to have helped him among his base. that is one of the arguments about this approach. we've been talking about this this morning, the story about the no—fault divorce? this this morning, the story about the no-fault divorce? nowl happen
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to think that this is not really that controversial. i think impractical terms it will change a lot. it will make people more intellectually honest but will have few cou ples intellectually honest but will have few couples challenging it, when unreasonable behaviour is cited, you did not put out the pins or whatever it will be. this is where a 68—year—old woman could not get a divorce from her husband. that was unusual. what would be more controversial is if any of these reforms that the times is campaigning for gets accepted. two things will be controversial, what they are like for the benefits of marriage to be shared among non—married couples who have been together a long time. we saw this sad case, her partner died, they had four children together and she said she should get the benefits a widow would get. i think that some people say they give marriage privileges for a reason and the other change thatis for a reason and the other change that is being proposed is prenuptial
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contracts and postnuptial contracts need to be on the same footing. there is the precedent that it did not have before but experts are saying in the law of the land there is a parliament, put it on a sounder footing. and the doctor who objected to be being called miss? she is australian, she is academical doctor. she was complaining because airline staff took a look at this, that her name was on the ticket with doctor but they still called her miss. she wondered whether if she was male they still would have called her doctor. it ignited another controversy, as to whether academic doctors should be called doctors, in other words professors, or whether they should be called doctor outside of the confines of
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the lecture theatre or the academic setting. a lot of controversy there. but apparently, three quarters of british professors are white men. unsurprisingly, airline staff, who look at a woman and see that are surprised. there is such a big gender gap in academia in the uk. and the daily mail has gone to town on these pictures here... one thing they do beautifully, they love celebrity stories and they love pictures stories. celebrity cellulite, bikinis, simon cowell... thank goodness we are out of that! the birth of his son has changed him? he became a dad late in life, he is 5a years old. they show how eric has soft and his dad ‘s image
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and his dad was famously image—conscious, but he has now been spotted pushing a supermarket trolley shaped like a red car. he is not vista cool any more! he has totally ruined his image on so many levels! and baby eric looks so much like an! it is lovely to have you here. thank you. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... we'll find out how mike got on in a game of extreme tag with athletes from all over the world. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thomoson and sally nugent. a summary of this morning's main news. new powers come into force today which the government hopes will stop nuisance cold calls from personal injury and claim management firms. 2.7 billion of these calls were made in the uk over the past year, but you'll now need to opt in to enable companies to contact you. businesses that don't comply could face a fine of half a million pounds.
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the former shadow business secretary, chuka umunna, will make a speech today urging jeremy corbyn to ‘call off the dogs' and stop labour mps being targeted for criticising the party leadership. mr umunna will say there is a danger of the centre—left tradition being driven out after two labour mp's lost votes of no confidence among their local party members. a labour source called the comments "incoherent and inaccurate". the first member of president trump's election team to plead guilty to offences during the 2016 campaign has been sentenced to two weeks in jail. george papadopoulos, who was a foreign policy adviser, admitted lying to fbi agents investigating whether the trump campaign colluded with russia — something the president has repeatedly denied. it's emerged that a russian exile who was murdered in britain last march believed that two men from moscow had tried to poison him five years earlier. nikolai glushkov, a former deputy director of the russian airline aeroflot —
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was found apparently strangled at his home in south—west london, a week after ex—spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned in salisbury. the american rapper mac miller has been found dead at his home in los angeles after an apparent drug overdose. the 26—year—old, whose real name is malcolm mccormick, previously dated pop singer, ariana grande. fans and fellow musicians have been paying tribute to him on social media. he had just released a new album and was due to go on tour next month. final campaign rallies will be held in sweden today on the eve of elections that are expected to confirm a surge in support for an anti—immigration party. 0pinion polls suggest that the sweden democrats, who have roots in the neo—nazi movement, will take about 20% of the vote. neither the centre—left governing parties nor their centre—right opponents are expected to win an outright majority. a massive operation to scoop plastic waste from the middle of the pacific ocean
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is being launched today. a 600—metre long collection device will be towed out from california to gather rubbish which will then be shipped back and recycled. critics say the plan tackles the symptom of plastic disposal, not the cause. those are the main stories this morning. 0ne one last thing to tell you about. do not giggle! this image of two birds we are about to show you might at first seem cute, but it doesn't tell the full story. this is a northern wheatear being pursued by the young sparrowhawk across a boat, before it crashed into a window and knocked itself out. to add insult to injury, the wheatear landed for a moment took a smug photo, posing for the camera then flew off.
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the sparrowhawk recovered after about 20 minutes. it reminds me of peace coming with mike. playing tag. something similar happens to you at the end of that. it was just stunned, the sparrowhawk. alastair cook back to his best. it was so emotional. before the 71 he got yesterday, his average was 18 and average career, mr. can he change his mind? that would be nice. it was all about alistair cook, yesterday, and he was satisfied with 71 even if india are in control going into day two at the oval. cook was given a guard of honour by the indian team and passed 50 for the first time this series but he missed out on a century,
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when he was bowled by jasprit bumrah — sparking a batting collapse. england are on 198 for seven. world number one rafael nadal, says he will keep fighting, after he was forced to retire from his us open semifinal, againstjuan martin del potro because of a knee injury. he's now 32, and won the french open earlier this summer. but couldn't continue playing after the end of the second set. it's unclear how long he will be out for. to keep playing at the same time, having too much pain. it was not a tennis match at the end it was one player playing and one standing on the other side of the court. i hate to retire, but stay one more set out there playing like this... it will
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be too much for me. in contrast novak djockovich, looks rejuvenated. he moved closer to equalling pete sampras's tally of 1a grand slams after outclassing kei nishikori to reach the us open final. so he now faces del potro. the final kick of the game earned ulster a win over edinburgh in the pro 1a league. edinburgh thought simon hickey‘s last—minute penalty was enough for them to win in belfast, but ulster then went up the other end and won their own penalty in overtime. john cooney kicked it to steal the victory. glasgow beat last season's runners up munster 25—10. scotland full back stuart hogg scored 13 points in the match. and in the premiership, northampton beat harlequins, with england captain dylan hartley scoring a try in his first match since taking time out to recover from concussion. warrington wolves have sealed their place in the super league play—offs after beating huddersfield giants, but castleford tigers stay ahead of them in third place
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after easing to a comfortable 28—8 victory over hull fc. now with the international football weekend is in full flow, good morning everybody. are you all right? you got stuck on the m6 motorway. south or north? going north in that horrible bit. i had to turn the engine off at one point. by the way, mike, have you had a makeover? a different style of hair. i like it. back to school at this time of year! and a new satchel. let's talk about football. scotland will be happy it was a friendly against belgium. very heavy defeat. we are into the nation ‘s lead, which is complicated to explain, i need ten minutes! the
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best thing is to go on the bbc website with an explainer on there. this is scotland losing 4—0 to belgium ina this is scotland losing 4—0 to belgium in a friendly. they play albania on monday. we are talking about this and the home nations on the programme. england had a great world cup. did not win it, but it went well. expectations rising. we have spoken to the boss's boss. technical director of the fa talking about plans for the next few years. do you think i am going to see some major tournament success in the next decade, the euros, the world cup?|j said from when ijoined i believe england can win. it is not without its challenges but we have enough tale nt its challenges but we have enough talent for england to have an opportunity to win and over the past
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years people have faith because junior teams have picked up gold medals. the senior team got to a semifinal in the last tournament and hopefully, with the young team, hopefully, with the young team, hopefully we can build on those experiences and get over the line and pick up a gold medal. northern ireland against bosnia today. what else is coming up? we have a piece onjoey barton. else is coming up? we have a piece on joey barton. manager at fleetwood, unbeaten in five. julian has been to see him talking about deep philosophical stuff. denmark, what they have done this week. now they resolved the issue. i think they resolved the issue. i think they almost called up sandi toksvig! and we have ryan mason and kevin nolan. i am loving the gravel! talking about going back to school
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with my schoolboy haircut, if i did this and ran away, what did you call it at school? it was it. tick. i'm sure they will be playing back at school but now it is an extreme sport. athletes coming to london from all over the world this weekend. with the adrenaline pumping, heart racing, your hopes of survival on the edge. it is the hunter versus the hunted. in this high—speed game of chase. 0n the run from the hand of doom that is out to ta ke from the hand of doom that is out to take you down. it is the old playground game of tag brought into the 21st century. you have 20 seconds to capture the opponent and if you do that, it is your turn to
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be chaste and a chance to score a point. think of it in terms of hunting. you have to get them. fight orflight. hunting. you have to get them. fight or flight. choose to fight and catch a person or flight and or flight. choose to fight and catch a person orflight and get or flight. choose to fight and catch a person or flight and get away. at the top level in the york hall boxing venue, athletes from around the world, often free running specialists, capable of running with agility and explosive speed. specialists, capable of running with agility and explosive speedlj specialists, capable of running with agility and explosive speed. i love childhood games. i still play kickabout against the wall, throwing balls to each other and stuff. when i had the opportunity to become slightly professional in a childhood gamei slightly professional in a childhood game i was in there. yet it started at home with a father and son playing a game orfamilies do. at home with a father and son playing a game or families do. we we re playing a game or families do. we were just playing tag in the garden when he was young. he did not like some of the of the sport so we played a lot of tag and it got more complicated as we went along.
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played a lot of tag and it got more complicated as we went alongm played a lot of tag and it got more complicated as we went along. it is natural movement. it is the first game everyone plays. to make it a sport is good. you always enter the competition as the chaser, the hunter. i have 20 seconds to tag damian and this court is a quarter of the size of the world championship one. we are under way. that was my chance! you survive. sweaty palms. but could i. you survive. sweaty palms. but could i, when! you survive. sweaty palms. but could i, when i became the hunted? he has got me! there we are. it is a
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tea m he has got me! there we are. it is a team sport with five on each team and they come from afar, from germany and japan, to try to take the british on the big court this weekend. brilliant. do not try it at home like those guys, they have the skills and agility. but do try it in the garden. make sure there are cushions around. stay safe. did you jump too far and too high? i was all right on that course. keen to catch and not be caught. tomorrow evening at york hall in london, the world championships. finding a new home can be a complicated business for renters, but it's hoped that new laws in england will cap deposit payments and end unneccessary admin fees by the end of the year. the government hopes the tenant fees bill will make the private rented sector fairer
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and more affordable. radio 4's money box presenter — adam shaw — joins us from our london newsroom to tell us more. we have talked about this a lot, the charges added on, the extras, what are they proposing? they are going to consign them to the dustbin which is good news for a lot of tenants. we have spoken to a lot of tenants. we have spoken to a lot of tenants. we have spoken to a lot of people and on the programme we feature a couple in their 20s who rent in london. they were genuinely shocked, they know what the rent will be and suddenly there are weird sounding extra charges that are added on by the letting agent which amount to hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the individual and it earns the industry a lot of money. it is thought the extra charges amount to something like £2110 million a yearfor the
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amount to something like £2110 million a year for the letting agencies. they will lose that which means the tenants will not have to pay it which is big news. good news for te na nts pay it which is big news. good news for tenants because they get more cash in their pocket, but what about the agencies who rely on that money? good question. we have spoken to those agencies and bodies representing them. in some ways, they say, they welcome clarity around this. an important issue we have not mentioned is notjust on charges but the deposit, which has been a problem. saying i have to get my deposit together to get into a home. that has been capped at six weeks, still a lot of money. the letting agencies like it because there had been calls for it to be reduced to four weeks. some are saying what might happen is that we just put the charges onto the landlords. if the landlords have
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them, maybe they will pass them onto them, maybe they will pass them onto the tenants in higher rent, or maybe it will discourage them from entering the market and we could see a fall entering the market and we could see afall in entering the market and we could see a fall in the amount of properties. 0n the face of it good news for te na nts, 0n the face of it good news for tenants, in the long—term it is less clear how it will play out. interesting changes. thank you, adam. more from adam on radio four at midday. an that will affect a lot of people. if you are out and about looking for a flat, or doing nice things in the part, will it be sunshine or raining? you need a number a la. it is raining already in wales, parts of north—west england. it has turned damp across the midlands. a lot of cloud rolling in. look at this extensive area of cloud pushing in
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through the early hours. 0n extensive area of cloud pushing in through the early hours. on top of us if you live in the west, at least. it is looking damp. not much else to say. the rest of the country, the north and south, we will miss the rain because the weather front will sneak in through the middle section of the country. this is the rain heading through wales, the peak district, cumbria, parts of yorkshire and also across the midlands, but nothing too heavy there. in the north in scotland you have sunshine across much of the highlands and down into the grampians and the coast of aberdeenshire. belfast is also fine today with sunshine around but look at that across yorkshire, the cloud and rain. rain across wales. some of it will be heavy but not all the time. in the south, the midlands and into east anglia, not too bad. and
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some sunshine on the south coast. a bit of everything today. this evening the rain should clear and overnight it will come back. this is the rain we would have had today and the rain we would have had today and the rain we would have had today and the rain overnight. but look at the temperatures. maybe no lower than 16 degrees. it means sunday morning, 16 degrees, from dawn, really mild to start the day in england and wales but there will be cloud and rain and on sunday, a different day for is scotla nd on sunday, a different day for is scotland and northern ireland. today you have sunshine, tomorrow showers, a brisk wind. england and wales are doing much better. some sunshine on the way barred the 0rd sprinkled here and there. monday into tuesday, an interesting thing happens. the weather front slices the uk in half which means there are two areas of whether colliding with the summerlike warmth coming from the
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south, and the cold current of air from the north atlantic. we are stuck in between. it means northern parts of the country will get the cool parts of the country will get the cool, rainy weather. manchesterwill probably be in the middle and in the south, back into the mid—20s early next week. how about that? i am liking that. depending where you are in the country. i love his relaxed saturday morning style. just what we need today. we have some reminiscing now. are you old enough? i was never allowed to watch this. it was quite naughty. we should tell people what it is. grange hill. the first script using an ancient typewriter. and an ironing board for a desk.
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but from humble beginnings, the school drama grange hill went on to become a national institution. to celebrate the show‘s 40th anniversary, an exhibition of memorabilia has gone on display in liverpool. andy gill went to take a look. grange hill theme. the music and the titles will be enough to take some people back to 1978, when the first grange hill went out. it ran for 30 years. now its creator has been at the liverpool museum to launch a new display commemorating the series. phil redmond, who grew up on merseyside, wanted a school series based on real life. i think what i really wanted to do when i set out to do it was to create something for kids from my own type of background, which was the classic working—class estate and things. because on television at that time, it was all very much very middle—class, classical adaptations. i wanted something original, realistic and reflected life growing
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realistic and that reflected life growing up in modern britain. the exhibition includes the typewriter on which phil wrote the first episodes and an ironing board like the one he used as a desk in his sparsely furnished flat. there are scripts, costumes and memorabilia. just a minute. you've only had it on ten minutes and already you look a mess. i don't like wearing a tie. at the height of its popularity in the 1980s, 12 million people were watching episodes of grange hill, and it remains a hugely influential programme for an entire generation. it was before i went to school, to secondary school. i was thinking, oh, my god, if that's what secondary school is like, i'm scared! i could connect with it when i was watching it at school. revolutionary, modern. right through to zammo when he was doing the drugs. the just say no campaign.
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grange hill was set in london, but one of the most popular characters was the lovable scouse rogue ziggy greaves. liverpool, is that where you are from? eeh by gum, you wouldn't think so, would you? i'm not from yorkshire, divvy. it is always going to be in me. i'm not going to ever... it's like riding a bike. acting, i'm never going to stop knowing how to act. the actor who played him now works in hospitality at liverpool football club. i brought a little bit of myself in it, as well. i put a little bit of my own personality, as well as the script. i did add lines and ad lib a lot. sometimes i would drive them mad, but, we all did it, notjust me. the grange hill exhibition is on at the museum of liverpool until february. a proper blast from the past. and that music will be in power is all day. and we will speak to phil redmond later, the creator of that, writing on a typewriter perched on
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the ironing board. it was ground—breaking. it really was. even though i was not allowed to watch it. we are talking about something else ground—breaking. she's been described as the ambassador of cool by maxine peake and she won the grand jury prize at this years sundance film festival. now desiree akhavan is getting people talking about bisexuality and controversial gay conversion therapy in her latest tv and film productions. we'll meet her in a moment but first here a preview of her latest project — the miseducation of cameron post. so it's worked for you, then? like you've changed? yes. i changed. how? it was a process. it's funny, actually. the moment things began to turn around was in a bar. a bar? yeah. a gay bar of all places. two men from my church came in. they saw my car parked outside
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and they knew i'd been struggling, so they came in looking for me. 0h. it was god, cameron. i asked for his help and he gave it to me in the form of those allies. i was so deeply unhappy. but i didn't think i was worth saving. and i wonder if you have asked that of yourself. are you worth saving? desiree, thanks forjoining us. welcome. we saw a clip of the film. it is in the headlines a lot at the moment but maybe not enough because we hear the horrors of conversion therapy, especially young children being sent to be cured of being gay. this is one of the first times we have heard about girls being sent. why now? i fell in love with the
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book, the film is based on the book of the same title and it was the most honest depiction of teenage life i had seen sincejohn hughes movies. it made me laugh and cry and it took me on a journey of a female sexual coming—of—age and interesting you say we do not see young women's stories, it is not as though women are stories, it is not as though women a re less stories, it is not as though women are less prone to this kind of gay conversion therapy it is no one ca res conversion therapy it is no one cares about winning's stories and the film industry leans toward stories of men and we have women's stories of men and we have women's stories from a male perspective. stories of men and we have women's stories from a male perspectivelj stories from a male perspective.” wa nted stories from a male perspective.” wanted to change that. surely it must be changing, because this has been commissioned and made. there is money behind it. are the winds of change around the subject?” money behind it. are the winds of change around the subject? i hope so. change around the subject? i hope so. there was not that much money
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behind this. i am grateful we won the grand jury prize because it shows there is an audience and people want to make it but it was difficult to make this, every step of the way my producing partner and i put ourselves out on a limb and said trust us, we can do this made it for a fourth of the budget we wa nted it for a fourth of the budget we wanted to. the uk government pledged to ban it. but it is still widespread. in the state 700,000 people have undergone gay conversion therapy and places i opening in places like la, seemingly liberal places. it exists, like white supremacy, this has exploded since donald trump got into office. mike pence is a supporter. is this a way to get the story out. this is a way to get the story out. this is a way
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to get the story out. this is a way to get it in the headlines as we talk about it now and others talk about it. is it a medium talk about it now and others talk about it. is ita medium in talk about it now and others talk about it. is it a medium in which it is the way to get people to acknowledge it is a huge problem? cinema is powerful. it has the power to give you a gay friend when you do not have one, it brings it into your home. i did not make the film with an agenda of promoting anti—gay conversion therapy legislation although i am happy that is happening. i wanted to tell a good story and a story that mattered. happening. i wanted to tell a good story and a story that matteredm had something to say. you also have another project out. coming up soon. 0n channel 4 next month. another project out. coming up soon. on channel 4 next month. the bisexual is a sexual coming—of—age comedy, about a woman in her 30s who has identified as lesbian and comes out as bisexual and dates men for
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the first time. that is an unusual way to tell a story. it was a reversed taboo. i wanted to make a series about a bisexual character andi series about a bisexual character and i thought what is the best way to handle that i thought dealing with a reverse coming out and dealing with the prejudices they would have against themselves and people around them, what would that look like? some great names the cast. maxine pea ke look like? some great names the cast. maxine peake among them. a regular here. how did that come about? how do you look at potential actors? maxine was interesting. i moved to the uk four years ago because my writing and producing partner lives here and we started writing the miseducation of cameron post. we took her couch and lives there are many months at her husband allowed it very kindly! we also co—wrote the the bisexual. the entire time i was pitching it around
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the uk, i do not know the actors here, i was born and raised in new york city and when i mention the plot, a girl in her 30s, and york city and when i mention the plot, a girl in her30s, and her partner is someone who is lovable and intelligent and beautiful and charismatic, but strong and stead fast. and they go, a maxine peake type. 0k. fast. and they go, a maxine peake type. ok. that kept happening, that conversation with an executive. a maxine peake type. so i checked out the maxine pea ke maxine peake type. so i checked out the maxine peake type work and it was phenomenal. was it a moment when that is...? yes. was phenomenal. was it a moment when that is. . . ? yes. i felt lucky was phenomenal. was it a moment when that is...? yes. i felt lucky to have her on board and i learnt more watching her work than anyone in my career. she is incredible. we look forward to seeing it. and the miseducation of cameron post is out in cinemas now. we'll be back with the headlines in a few moments. good morning, welcome to breakfast
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with sally nugent and ben thompson. 0ur headlines today: cutting off cold callers — from today companies who pester people without their permission risk fines of up to half a million pounds. "call off the dogs" — former labour front—bencher chuka umunna urgesjeremy corbyn to stop party infighting and start fighting brexit.
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