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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 8, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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and i learnt more have her on board and i learnt more watching her work than anyone in my career. she is incredible. we look forward to seeing it. and the miseducation of cameron post is out in cinemas now. we'll be back with the headlines in a few moments. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and ben thompson. our headlines today: cutting off cold callers — from today companies who pester people without their permission risk fines of up to half a million pounds. "call off the dogs" — former labour front—bencher chuka umunna urgesjeremy corbyn to stop party infighting and start fighting brexit. alastair cook serves up
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something to remember him by england's record run scorer made 71 in his last test match— but india are on top. it's fast, furious and not for the faint hearted — i'm on the run in an extreme form of tag. the spray tans and sequins are at the ready as strictly cha cha's its way back onto our screens tonight. i cannot wait! and the weather is looking hit and miss today. pretty much everything. cloud, rain, sunshine... the forecast is coming up. good morning. it's saturday the 8th of september. our top story: new powers come into force today designed to stop nuisance calls from personal injury and claim management firms. you'll now need to opt in to allow companies to contact you. businesses that don't comply could face a fine
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of half a million pounds. manuela saragosa has more. for many of us, cold calls are a daily torment. hello? the financial conduct authority says some 2.7 billion nuisance calls texts and e—mails were made over the past year. that works out to be about 50 calls, texts and e—mails sent to every single adult in the country. many are made by companies offering to settle personal injury claims, or to claim back ppi — payment protection insurance. but, from now on, these companies will have to check first that the recipient has explicitly agreed to receive those calls and messages. companies that don't could face a fine of up to £500,000, and people are encouraged to report them to the ico — the information commissioner's office. some companies will see the new change in law and i think they will desist from the activity. when they don't, i'm afraid people are going to have to complain. the ico does need the information from people about these calls, and she will then tackle, use her powers and, slowly but surely, we will get on top of it
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and they will completely cease. campaigners say the new rules do not go far enough. they will not, for example, stop calls from fraudsters and note, too, that firms based overseas are not covered. the issue of consent, they argue, is a red herring and they would prefer to see the authorities rule that unsolicited direct marketing calls are not a legitimate way of doing business. manuela saragosa, bbc news. the former shadow business secretary, chuka umunna, will make a speech today urging jeremy corbyn to ‘call off the dogs' and stop labour mp‘s being targeted for criticising the party leadership. a labour source dismissed the comments as "incoherent and inaccurate". 0ur political correspondent pete saull can tell us more. pete, will this intervention trouble mr corbyn? i think that it reflects a growing
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concern among labour mps. now, moderate labour mps. especially those who have criticised jeremy corbyn in the past. that there is a coordinated effort to target them. hence this rather incendiary language. we have seen two mps this week, they have both lost no—confidence votes in their local labour parties. particularly onjoan ryan, the chair of labour friends of israel. there was a television crew in the meeting, something she says she was horrified by but there could be more of this. but the former shadow chancellor chris leslie has lost a vote of no—confidence in one branch of his local labour party, not the entirety of his constituency in nottingham east. i've been in touch with him this morning and he said that these were obviously motion is now being orchestrated nationally by the leadership‘s machine. these votes are largely
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symbolic but i do think the labour membership are flexing their muscles. a lot ofjeremy corbyn supporters think this is democracy in action and they need to ensure that the party has mps that reflect the views of the now half a million oi’ the views of the now half a million or $0 the views of the now half a million or so members that the labour party have. pete, in westminster, thank you. the first member of president trump's election team to plead guilty to offences during the 2016 campaign has been sentenced to two weeks in jail. george papadopoulos, who was a foreign policy adviser, admitted lying to fbi agents investigating whether the trump campaign colluded with russia — something the president has repeatedly denied. former us president barack 0bama has said his country is living through ‘dangerous times', as he launched an attack on donald trump. in a speech to students in illinois, mr 0bama called for a restoration of ‘honesty‘ and ‘decency‘. he used the claims that white house officials were secretly attempting to stifle the president, to urge people to vote in the upcoming mid—term elections.
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they are not doing us a service by actively promoting 90% of the crazy stuff that's coming out of this white house, and then saying, "don't worry, we're preventing the other 10%." that is not how things are supposed to work. this is not normal. these are extraordinary times. and they are dangerous times. he said, what did you think of president 0bama's speech? and i said, i'm sorry, i watched it, but i fell asleep. laughter. i found he is very good, very good for sleeping. it's emerged that a russian exile who was murdered in britain last march believed that two men from moscow had tried to poison him five years earlier. nikolai glushkov — a former deputy director of the russian airline, aeroflot — was found apparently strangled at his home
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in south—west london, a week after ex—spy, sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, were poisoned in salisbury. the number of people waiting for a lung transplant has risen by nearly 50% over the past five years, according to the nhs. it says it could be down to an ageing population and improvements in trauma care, which mean most organ donors are over the age of 50 and more likely to have existing health problems. the latest figures show there are 354 people on the waiting list, compared with 2a2 five years ago. final campaign rallies will be held in sweden today on the eve of elections that are expected to confirm a surge in support for an anti—immigration party. 0pinion polls suggest that the sweden democrats, who have roots in the neo—nazi movement, will take about 20% of the vote. neither the centre—left governing parties nor their centre—right opponents are expected to win an outright majority. the american rapper mac miller has been found dead at his home in los angeles after an apparent drug overdose.
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the 26—year—old, whose real name is malcolm mccormick, previously dated pop singer, ariana grande. he had just released a new album and was due to go on tour next month. 0nline, celebrities and fans took to twitter to pay tribute. american rapper snoop dogg posted a memorable scene the duo were in together during scary movie 5. he said "good time we had on set of this movie. god bless your family. pittsburg we lost a real one today". singer—songwriterjason derulo said he was praying for families left behind. he added "a bright star dimmed way too soon". pop artist dua lipa tweeted "such sad news! i can't believe it. rest in peace mac" and rapper missy elliott added "mac miller, such a kind spirit. sending prayers for strength for his family, friends and fans during this difficult time." in recent years, we've covered many stories here on breakfast
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about people collecting plastic litter from beaches. but what if the rubbish could be scooped up from the sea instead? that's the thinking behind a hugely ambitious project which gets under way in the pacific ocean this weekend. to explain how it works, here's our science editor david shukman. there is a plastic waste in every ocean around the world, and this is the first attempt to clean it up. it will take place in the eastern pacific, in a rotating current that traps plastic. what is called the great garbage patch. it is bigger than britain and france combined. so how is this project went to work? a giant tube 600 metres long will float on the surface and bend into a shape mikey hall shoe, drifting naturally with the currents and winds. —— likea winds. —— like a horseshoe. with bits of plastic in the water, it should slowly gather them into plastic in the water, it should slowly gather them into a
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plastic in the water, it should slowly gather them into a smaller area. underwater, a barrier will hang three metres down and trap the plastic below the surface. this design should mean that any fish will pass under it. once that plastic has been drawn into a dense mass, it will then be collected by ship and taken away to be recycled. so that is how it works. not everyone is in favour of this plan. will mccallum is from greenpeace. you suggest that this is a blunt instrument, to sweep all of this out, as other things could get caught in it? completely, plastic, oi’ caught in it? completely, plastic, orany caught in it? completely, plastic, or any thing floating in the ocean, can attract the curiosity of smaller fish which attracts bigger fish and charts. you may find whole ecosystems living under this and when fish are under plastic there's a risk of them eating it be entangled in it. but we saw in that graphic they can get under it? we will see how it goes over the next few months i hope the team are
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monitoring to see what is tangled up in it. more of our criticism around it is when you have an overflowing bath tub, you don't rush for a mop, you turn off the tap first. this is mopping up the floor and not dealing with the problem at the source. but is it better than doing nothing? absolutely, you cannot criticise effo rts absolutely, you cannot criticise efforts to clean up. we have two, every bit of plastic you take off the beach when you go down there will help with the problem but it is not the end solution. it is not the big thing everyone is making it out to be. and i suppose, the need is to do this now. the longer that plastic stays in the ocean, the smaller it brea ks stays in the ocean, the smaller it breaks up into particles. we know about microplastic causing a huge problem. while it is still large enough to be scooped up, that would bea enough to be scooped up, that would be a good way of doing it? yes, but u nfortu nately be a good way of doing it? yes, but unfortunately some plastic sinks quite quickly. plastic is found at all points in the water current. they found an intact plastic bag 11 kilometres beneath the surface of the water and then right up to the
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surface. it's great to skim that stuff off the surface but that is all it is doing. but in practical concerns to one side, ie at least a little inspired by the story behind this? i believe it is a teenager who thought of this, and it has been crowd funded. it has obviously caught the imagination of someone who wants to do something practical? completely, and that is the most inspiring thing, it draws attention to the problem and makes people ask, what can i do to help? there is so much people can do. they can do a two minute beach clean on their local beach, and if you see over packaging in a shop, go to the manager with a picture of it and ask them to stop over packaging. when we look at how much work needs to be done, there is a way of picking off the beaches by hand, it is time—consuming and expensive. there is this proposal. all of these effo rts is this proposal. all of these efforts together have to make a difference, i appreciate the idea of stopping it at the source but that in itself is a huge challenge, if
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you look at all the plastic we consume? yes. and we've heard that theresa may has announced an environment bill that will be coming through next year and we hoping that the government will introduce reduction targets. plastic is set to double in production over the next ten yea rs double in production over the next ten years and it cannot happen if we are to have any hope of cleaning up and stopping it from getting the ocean. we have to see a reduction within that bill. are there any official reduction targets in place now? absolutely none. there are some bands, we are seeing that the government banned microbeads. there isa government banned microbeads. there is a deposit return scheme, you get a bit of money back when you take it back to the shop, but we need to see a much stronger commitment. plastic is cheap, and for manufacturers it protects the items they want to put in these things. there is no incentive to cut it. for a businessmen here, it's about making businesses pay for it, they are not
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paying for the cost of the plastic in ouroceans? paying for the cost of the plastic in our oceans? they haven't been made to. businesses are producing plastic packaging with no thought to the end of its life. it needs to change. any product or business is producing, they need to take responsibility for the lifetime of it so it does not end up at the bottom of the ocean. it needs to be cleaned up in this way. thank you very much for coming in to speak to us. we will keep an eye on how that goes, it has been launched off the coast of california this weekend. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: new powers come into force today which the government hopes will crackdown on cold calls. firms that don't comply could face a half a million pound fine. labour mp chuka umunna has accused the party's leader jeremy corbyn of driving centre—left mps out of the party. some warmer weather. . .
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some warmer weather... perhaps? what is it like picking up plastic on your local beach? that's what we need to know. which way are we going? we are going that way. it's a good job you've got the expert let's find out what's happening with the weather. here's tomasz. in the short term, in wales, it is turning cloudy and wet. it is not going to be pleasant at all. if you are looking outside the window right now. no excuse, are looking outside the window right now. no excuse, you are looking outside the window right now. no excuse, you have two walk the dog. the cat will manage but you've got to get out there and get your coat and your umbrella. it is not looking pleasant at all. i don't know, maybe you want the rain? but in central areas of the uk, there is a grotty patch of weather. not pouring with rain all day, but in spots of wales and the north—west of england, some heavy spells later on. notice the south and the north on this occasion are missing the
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rainfall altogether. since that central slave in the uk will be pretty damp today. this is a closer look at the weather forecast. at four o'clock on saturday, in the afternoon, sunshine across the scottish mountains, and the southern uplands. not so bad in wales. not wales, northern ireland. sorry, i just stepped on something there. this is where you have cloud and rain and on the south coast, you are backin rain and on the south coast, you are back in the sunshine. the channel islands with beautiful weather today. if you had to the channel islands, head there. nice sunshine on the way. 0nce islands, head there. nice sunshine on the way. once that rain clears from the central swathe of the uk tonight, it comes back in through the early hours of the morning. also a waft of mild air. the beginning of something a little warmer heading oui’ something a little warmer heading our way over the next few days. this sunday, not great weather immediately. low pressure between scotla nd immediately. low pressure between scotland and iceland there. you can see it behind my head. weather
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fronts in our direction. tomorrow, on sunday, showers in scotland and northern ireland, some of those getting into parts of north—western england. in the afternoon, looking fine. temperatures of 22 degrees in london, 20 in hull. monday into tuesday, this weather front, london, 20 in hull. monday into tuesday, this weatherfront, a long weather front, stretching from central atlantic, slicing the weather in half, slicing our atmosphere in half. a cold current in the north atlantic. air is wafting in from the south. the weather will be split across the uk. in the mid teens, rain to the north, backin in the mid teens, rain to the north, back in the mid—20s across the south of the country. back to you. tomasz, thank you. thomas giving a chilled vibe this morning! just like broadchurch or baker street, the shetland islands have captured visitors' imaginations thanks to a popular crime
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thriller based there. they're experiencing a tourist boom because of ‘shetland' — a tv drama based on novels by author anne cleeves. as the final book in the series is released, our reporter jothohnston has been to see the set for himself. shetland. the crime drama has enjoyed worldwide success with its likeable characters, strong storylines, not to mention the bleak windswept scenery. this place looks like a much better place to come to. when you read the news, everything seems terrible and i think people are taking a wee bit of comfort in island murders! but now writer ann cleeves is bidding farewell to the popular detective. she has released a final novel, wild fire. well, i cannot tell you whether the ending is tragic and jimmy dies, or whether it is happy and he goes off
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into the sunset with the love of his life, because you will need to read the book to do that. but i can tell you that the tv series will continue. since the series first aired in 2013, thousands of tourists, many from cruise ships, have been heading to shetland on the trail of the murders. we have visitors from america, australia, and i suppose specifically scandinavia, who like the detective noir. this must be the actual house! i think ithink so... we came to see this lovely scenery which we have been seeing in the tv series and reading about in the books. we enjoy the stories and the mystery of trying to solve the puzzles before the detective does. set. and action! filming is already under way for series five.
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it is quite a tough storyline and it gets quite gothic towards the end. so, yeah, buckle up. woman screams: jimmy! fans will have to wait until early next year for yet more shetland noir. jimjohnston, bbc jim johnston, bbc news, jimjohnston, bbc news, lerwick. it looks beautiful, i want to go! so many places do well off the back of great dramas like that. the best advert for tourism that there is. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. financial analyst margaret doyle is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we'll speak to her in a minute. but first let's take a look at some of the front pages today. the daily express reflects our top
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story today about a new crackdown on cold callers. it has a picture of kate silverton on the front as well. strictly sta rts on the front as well. strictly starts tonight, we will be talking about that later. the times leads on the proposed changes to the divorce law in england and wales, saying the ‘revolution puts an end to the blame game'. borisjohnson's personal life is on the front pages of a few of the papers. the daily mail claims mrjohnson was cheating on his wife, marina wheeler, ‘at the height of the chequers crisis'. and the guardian claims a russian exile found dead in his london home had previously survived a poisoning attempt by two men from moscow. the paper says detectives are re—investigating the incident. margaret, let's talk about some of the stories inside. this is from the guardian newspaper, highlighting the trouble that many ministers have. they are given a brief and they've got to read up on it. but not all of them managed to do so? certainly,
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when they are given a brief, they often know very little, if anything, about the brief. in this case, karen bradley, the secretary of state for northern ireland, she admitted in an interview with the parliamentary magazine the house, she did not really know that northern irish politics were tribal. that they will typically vote for nationalists and republicans. the politics does not split in northern ireland on left and right grounds and along left and right lines in the way it does in britain. it's a very different kind of politics and i guess what is surprising is that you would think thatis surprising is that you would think that is the first thing you know about northern ireland, that the politics are tribal and largely based on people's background rather than ideological questions. the question is, do you think that this is disarmingly honest? she is now in
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charge of her brief but it is a surprising admission, and what people in northern ireland have said is they are not surprised people in england don't know much about us but that the secretary of state for northern ireland has admitted that she knew so little about northern ireland. there is an element of being human about this, they need time to get their head around it and will learn about it but how long can that go on? you need to be across what you are doing. she is sort of saying that this, she did not know about this at the time and she knows it now. she is admitting it... but it now. she is admitting it... but it isa it now. she is admitting it... but it is a big admission?” it now. she is admitting it... but it is a big admission? i would say so it is a big admission? i would say so but we have a minority government and a string of —— and james brokenshire is unwell. we have a group of people. and the next story in the financial times is about pensions? penchant is a deeply
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technical subject, hats off for josephine combo in the financial times, she read the fine print in a treasury document and discovered that they are expecting public sector funding, schools and hospitals, to contribute more, employers to contribute more, to pensions. it does not say how much intentions teachers and doctors have to pay, or what they get at the end in their pensions. but what it does mean is that if you are running a hospital or school, suddenly your pay bill will go up. the first year, the treasury will reimburse but after that there is no guarantee. the question then, will there be cutbacks in hospitals and in schools? it looks technical but the financial times is saying they need £4 billion. it is a stealth cut,
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effectively, in public spending, that really know one would have noticed. there was no great announcement but the impact is that public bodies have less money to pay towards their staff pension contributions. the treasury sent us a statement this morning talking about that, saying they will support the department through to 2020 and look at the end of the spending review. but there is no guarantee after that, yes. and speaking of expense, in the guardian this morning, how the high cost of weddings can give guests the jitters. i can't work out if these are tragic or a little bit sad, this is about wedding guests? we used to read about the spiralling cost of being the bride and bridegroom but now apparently a full wedding costs £30,000. you should really pause and think, do you need all of these things? do you need the honeymoon? i
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have several colleagues getting married this year and what a lot of them have done, which is quite smart, is to go on a really short break in england close by, immediately after the wedding but then to say, maybe we will take your pick on a day at another time? not think that you have to do everything all at the same time, and have all of that expense but this article is about the cost of being a guest and not a bride or groom. there is a real trend for farm weddings. destination weddings. the average costis destination weddings. the average cost is over £1000, that's before the hen party, the stag do... they can also be abroad. there is simple advice, just say no. you can do that politely. make sure you respond early and a lot of brides and bridegroom is, they expect a certain proportion of people to say no. it will not be the end of your friendship. let me read out this
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quote. chloe was quoted in the piece, she could not afford to go to spain after the wedding as she had just bought a house. she has not spoken to the bride since. just take her out for a meal and say sorry. and if you say no, you do not have to give a reason. you kind of do, you can't just say to give a reason. you kind of do, you can'tjust say no, i'm not coming. ultimately it comes down to the cost. time off work or family... and if you have children, suddenly the logistics are a horrendous nightmare. who looks after the kids on the weekend? but a nice piece of advice is if you say thanks but no thanks, come around after the wedding for dinner, show us your photos and tell us about it, it's a gesture that says, this isn't me rejecting you... weddings are
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becoming longer and longer. instead of having a wedding day, it's now over about six months! especially when it is a destination wedding, when it is a destination wedding, when people are flying and they say they should have something on a friday night, or a barbecue afterwards on the sunday...m friday night, or a barbecue afterwards on the sunday... it takes afterwards on the sunday... it takes a brave person to say, than show me the photos! this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. matt — what's on the menu? a wedding breakfast? not this morning! 0ur a wedding breakfast? not this morning! our special guest today is much more exciting. he plays at all of the glitzy venues, las vegas, the palladium, tonight it is proms in the park. matt goss is here. it is all about food heaven and food health. viewers get to vote as to what you will need. what is your
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food heaven? beef curry, spicy. i should have thought it out knowing it was a morning show... i didn't really think about it! and your hail? -- hell. mushrooms, game. i'm pretty sure you have lined up for me! we have. and what will you be doing? i am going to do a five spice smoky bacon quail scotch egg, with some ginger, kale and pomegranate. the make it sound so easy! i love your red dress as well. and what will you be doing? i will do a chilly fish with some coriander, quite spicy and beautiful. and mint, warners and olives. very nice. we have 0llie smith in charge of the drinks. looking like a lumberjack.” bought my own shrubs with me! don't
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forget you guys are in charge at home as to whether matt goss gets his food heaven or hell. we will see you at ten o'clock! matt goss looking very dapper in the saturday kitchen. which one? they both looked dapper! do stay with us, the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sally nugent. a summary of this morning's main news. new powers come into force today which the government hopes will stop nuisance cold calls from personal injury and claim management firms. 2.7 billion of these calls were made in the uk over the past year, but you'll now need to opt in to enable companies to contact you. businesses that don't comply could face a fine of half a million pounds. earlier, john mitchison from the body that represents telephone marketing companies told us some calls could still get through. it will certainly be significantly reduced. it will allow the ico to issue more fines. i believe that companies will no
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longer think of this as a good way of making money because the individuals themselves will eventually be personally liable. but there is no one single thing that will cut out all nuisance calls entirely. there is nothing bar some very sophisticated technology in networks that will stop illegal calls from just being made to your telephone. the former shadow business secretary, chuka umunna, will make a speech today urging jeremy corbyn to "call off the dogs" and stop labour mps being targeted for criticising the party leadership. mr umunna will say there is a danger of the centre—left tradition being driven out after two labour mps lost votes of no confidence among their local party members. a labour source called the comments "incoherent and inaccurate". the first member of president trump's election team to plead guilty to offences during the 2016 campaign has been sentenced to two weeks in jail. george papadopoulos, who was a foreign policy adviser, admitted lying to fbi agents investigating whether the trump campaign colluded with russia — something the president
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has repeatedly denied. it's emerged that a russian exile who was murdered in britain last march believed that two men from moscow had tried to poison him five years earlier. nikolai glushkov, a former deputy director of the russian airline aeroflot — was found apparently strangled at his home in south—west london, a week after sergei skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned in salisbury. final campaign rallies will be held in sweden today on the eve of elections that are expected to confirm a surge in support for an anti—immigration party. 0pinion polls suggest that the sweden democrats, who have roots in the neo—nazi movement, will take about 20% of the vote. neither the centre—left governing parties nor their centre—right opponents are expected to win an outright majority. a massive operation to scoop plastic waste from the middle of the pacific ocean is being launched today. a 600m—long collection device will be towed out from california
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to gather rubbish which will then be shipped back and recycled. critics say the plan tackles the symptom of plastic disposal, not the cause. the wildlife presenter johnny kingdom, who has been described as wone of the last true characters of rural britain" has died. the filmmaker and photographer, who was famous for his documentaries about exmoor, is believed to have been killed in an accident involving a digger. the 79—year—old made several tv series including johnny kingdom's year with the birds. his family said a legend had been lost. those are the main stories this morning. mike has some emotional scenes from cricket yesterday. emotional only for me, maybe. it is the end of an era that spans back to 2006 and thank goodness he got over half a
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century. he can hold his hat high. he got a decent total of 71. he was satisfied with that score even if india are in control going in today two but england have already won the series. it was all about alistair cook, yesterday. cook was given a guard of honour, by the indian team and passed 50 for the first time this series, but he missed out on a century when he was bowled by jasprit bumrah sparking a batting collapse. england are on 198 for seven. in football, scotland suffered their heaviest defeat at home for 45 years against belgium in a friendly ahead of their nations league opener against albania on monday. romalu lukaku opened the scoring in the first half and then three goals after the break did the damage. chelsea's eden hazard with one of them, batshuaye pounced on a mistake, to make it 4—0. england start in the nations league tonight at home to spain and captain harry kane will receive his golden boot award prior to the match for scoring the most goals
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at the world cup. he'll wear specially commissioned golden boots in the match but is keen to keep those feet on the ground and avoid comparisons with the likes of messi or ronaldo. to do that in the world cup and to finish top goal—scorer is something i was extremely proud of. i don't think i can be up there with them two yet, but that is my aim. my aim is to improve. yeah, like you say, the summer was great but now it's on to more things and i'm going to do them better. northern ireland are also in action today — they are up against bosnia—herzegovina at windsor park. it's the first ever meeting between the two sides and they are in one of the b groups along with austria. and manager michael 0'neill feels the new format of qualifying for the euros is a postive step. the fact we are in the competition that has the reward of a promotion —
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relegation situation but has the route to euro 2020 potentially is a good thing and we are happy with the format and look forward to the games. the games will prepare us for what lies ahead when the draw is made for euro 2020. the final kick of the game earned ulster a win over edinburgh in the pro 1a league. edinburgh thought simon hickey‘s last—minute penalty was enough for them to win in belfast, but ulster then went up the other end and won their own penalty in overtime. john cooney kicked it to steal the victory. meanwhile glasgow beat last season's runners up munster 25—10. scotland full back stuart hogg scored 13 points in the match. and in the premiership, northampton beat harlequins, with england captain dylan hartley scoring a try in his first match since taking time out to recover from concussion. warrington wolves have sealed their place in the super league play—offs, after beating huddersfield giants, but castleford tigers stay ahead of them in third place, after easing to a comfortable 28—8 victory over hull fc. world number one rafael nadal,
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says he "will keep fighting", after he was forced to retire from his us open semifinal againstjuan martin del potro, because of a knee injury. he's now 32, and won the french open earlier this summer. but couldn't continue playing after the end of the second set. it's unclear how long he will be out for. to keep playing, at the same time that way, you know, having too much pain. it was not a tennis match at the end. it was one player playing and one standing on the other side of the court. i hate to retire, but to stay one more set out there playing like this... it will be too much for me. in contrast, novak djockovich looks re—juvenated.
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he moved closer to equalling pete sampras's tally of 1a grand slams after outclassing kei nishikori to reach the us open final. so he now faces del potro. and a huge match today for serena williams, if she wins today, equalling margaret court's 2a grand slam titles. she does have that in her sights. herjapanese opponent has beaten her early this year but she said at the time she was breast—feeding and is more back to fitness now, only a year after giving birth and having health problems associated with the delivery. it is well documented. she suffered massive complications following the delivery of her daughter. she had blood clots and emergency caesarean. today she hopes to win her 24th grand slam title at the us open. it's an extraordinary recovery — here's a look back at some of the key moments on herjourney. # i'm a keep running
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# cos a winner don't quit on themselves... so we're leaving the hospital after a long time. we had a lot of complications, but look who we got. we got a baby girl. # i'm a wade, i'm a wade through the water. # tell the tide, "don't move" # i'm a riot, i'm a riot through your borders # call me bulletproof # lord forgive me, i've been runnin' # runnin' blind in truth # i'm a wade, i'm a wave through your shallow love # tell the deep i'm new # i'm telling these tears, "go and fall away, fall away" # may the last one burn into flames... umpire: game, miss williams.
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# freedom, freedom! # i can't move! # freedom, cut me loose! # freedom, freedom! # where are you? # cos i need freedom, too! don't call it a comeback. i'm going to knock you out. mama said knock you out. # i'm a keep running. # cos a winner don't quit on themselves.# so how has she done it? we're joined now by paralympic athlete dame sarah storey and sports medicine consultant drjohn rogers. good morning. sarah, iwas going good morning. sarah, i was going to call you dame sarah storey i know you too well to do that! watching what serena williams has done and what serena williams has done and what she has been through, you have been through that twice, you have two children. how much of the challenge is it going back to the dayjob physically? challenge is it going back to the day job physically? the first few weeks you wonder if you will return
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to the size you were, whether you will get out of the cycle of never being able to leave the house because as soon as being able to leave the house because as soon as you being able to leave the house because as soon as you try to there isa because as soon as you try to there is a nappy explosion! you have one crawling around, trying to walk, and it goes so quickly. she has done an incredible job, it goes so quickly. she has done an incrediblejob, especially it goes so quickly. she has done an incredible job, especially after having an emergency caesarean. she described being on the brink of death. clearly very serious. what has she been through? she has had an emergency caesarean section and she had a life—threatening condition and she had a bleed following that. life—threatening and incredible she has come back to this level of competition in that period of time. the training of fact, after pregnancy, regardless of the complications she has had, means it
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takes time to improve fitness and conditioning. and the technical aspects of tennis, to get back to this level is impressive. we are not just talking about getting back to regular life but a level of fitness most of us would only aspire to. getting there and staying there is an achievement. and such a competitive sport environment. having a young child to deal with and the challenges, sleepless nights that go with that, the mental resilience it takes to overcome the trauma of childbirth and the medical risks she has dealt with. you mentioned trauma, actually, never mind the physical stuff, it is amazingly she managed to recover from that, to go through that, she described, talking to her husband and having a conversation where she
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was prepared she might not survive surgery. how would you mentally come back from that because that is a trauma. you must be left with worry about your physical ability going into such a physical environment. about your physical ability going into such a physical environmentlj into such a physical environment.” had two emergency caesareans but not as life—threatening as serena's. somebody is cutting you open and it is major surgery so you have six weeks when you must rest. you can only pick up your baby, you cannot drive. for serena she had the added complication of blood clots. mentally you have to focus on your baby and making sure the baby is happy and then you think about returning to competition and exercise, first of all for your own mental health, you return to make yourself feel good, get some fresh air. and when you start to return to what you think is more like yourself, you stop to think about yourself, you stop to think about your career and this is why we have
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maternity leave in any career. should sport be more forgiving to returning parents? mothers and fathers, because sometimes the structure is not there. maternity leave, does that exist? we cannot physically take maternity leave because your body is your tool and you have a different way round of working and you do not have the flexibility as an athlete because you are effectively self—employed. as an athlete you have to be able to keep exercising during pregnancy to maintain health because your heart rate is low and suddenly you have an extra blood volume to pump around the body and exercise protects you from complications and afterwards helps you to return to more normal life before you work out if you will be in fit state to return to pre—pregnancy condition. most of us feel no pressure to come back and i became a mother the first time after
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the olympics in london where i did not feel pressure. sarah touched on the idea of wanting to get back. you must find elite sports people saying they are desperate to get back and there is a temptation to do it too quickly? one of the people back from doing too much too soon. it is a gradual return to sporting activity, initially physical activity, something as simple as walking and pushing the pram and then return to sporting activity and then think about returning to high—level performance. it is gradual with increasing fitness and people like sarah and serena, there is a team of people in terms of zoology, strength and conditioning, who will support that process back to elite level.m is fascinating. it is nice to see you both. thank you. let's find out what's happening with the weather. good morning. good morning to you at
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home. the weather this morning is all over the place, and it is difficult to summarise it in any clear way. for most, a lot of cloud today and already we have had rain in wales, north—west england, but also we have sunshine. let's see what is happening through today. a weather front is moving through central parts stop it is bringing cloud. the rain is mostly affecting wales, north—west england, up to cumbria, throughout yorkshire, just dribs and drabs there. across the midlands. to the north of this, across northern ireland and scotland, the weather is looking fine. apm, temperatures may be up to 17. that is not bad. the same goes
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for wales. then we have rain and some of it could be heavy where you see the darker colours. this is moving through. this isjust a snapshot. the midlands, not too much. the south coast, hazy. the rain clears away this evening, towards denmark. then we have another area of rain moving in of the atlantic. the rain all clear and come back with it mild air. mid—teens for many across the southern two thirds of the country. i think it will be a warm night. tomorrow, low—pressure close by. that is sending strong winds and a weather front of showers to scotland, north—west england, maybe wales, northern ireland white cat showers, but across the south, central and many eastern areas,
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sunday is looking good so if you wa nt sunday is looking good so if you want sunshine this weekend, the best bet is sunday. monday into tuesday, a long weather front stretches out into the central north atlantic. we have warm aircoming into the central north atlantic. we have warm air coming in from the south and cooler air from the north atla ntic south and cooler air from the north atlantic so scotland, northern ireland, in fresher conditions, where it is the south, temperatures picking up perhaps to 25 on tuesday in the south, which is what we get in the south, which is what we get in the middle of summer, whereas in the north, mid—teens and outbreaks of rain. have a great time whatever you are doing. and still technically summer? we have to get to the equinox, i can never remember, between the 21st and 23rd. it can be any time, this year. we still have some left, i guess. good news. thanks. back to school.
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it feels autumnal. but still technically summer. it reminds me of going back to school, this. it began as a script knocked out using an ancient typewriter and an ironing board for a desk. but from its first broadcast a0 years ago, the school drama grange hill went on to do rather well, pulling in 12 million viewers per episode at its height. in a moment we'll speak to the man behind the ironing board — phil redmond. first let's take a look at some memorable moments. you down there, are you smoking? i'm talking to you! flipping heck, who wants a babyjust to get rid of period pains. anyway, i'm not getting married. the top
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lip, there is something on it. laughter. it isa laughter. it is a moustache. brave attempt, but you would be advised to get rid of it. it's up to me, isn't it? are you all right, zammo? applause screaming. what on earth is going on here? my goodness, many people's childhood on the television. did you know when you started with the ironing board and typewriter, that is where you are heading? it was weird that my family have found the linked with an
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ironing board. the only time you used it! i have said many times before, when you set out to create something, you hope it will be a success and at the time i was an aspiring writer and hoped it would go on three, four series and give me a bit of reputation and help me go somewhere else but it went on and on. and now at this grand age, i can look back and see why, because it was relevant to the kids, about their life and times of the issues they wanted. when you talk about the early days, what happened in the meetings? how did they go when you said some of this will be hard—hitting. said some of this will be ha rd—hitting. put it said some of this will be hard—hitting. put it on the bbc. said some of this will be hard-hitting. put it on the bbc. the bbc said let's get on with it. there we re bbc said let's get on with it. there were difficulties at times. in the first series, i did not think we we re first series, i did not think we were doing anything controversial. but when the furore broke and what i
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realised people were getting upset about working—class accidents. it was about kids speaking in real dialects. is that what people complained about? that is what it boiled down to. there was an episode with a joke when a kid was doing a story about school animals. and saying you have to include miss clarke, because she is a cow. when we recorded it, lines were added saying you cannot say that about children. and they said it is the bbc, we cannot end the programme with the word cow. we went on a journey and when it became the biggest ever launch and 12 million people at 5pm, imagine that, any programme getting 12 million people any time now. people complaining realised it was reaching the audience, the social campaigners wa nted audience, the social campaigners wanted to reach it. there were
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tensions every now and again, but gradually we went on the journey and realised how far we could go and eventually went to the zammo storyline. which was ground—breaking. when i kept on saying we should be looking at the sex, drugs, rock and rollside saying we should be looking at the sex, drugs, rock and roll side of school, let's do something about drugs. there was a huge push at the time which was trunks is bad, you did. isaid time which was trunks is bad, you did. i said that is ridiculous because within our industry there we re because within our industry there were functioning addicts. so i said let's show how anybody can drop into it through social problems and issues. and we showed how to get out of it which means we have to do it in two years, we have to show zammo's decline and show how he can find help. and offer people a way out. it was ground—breaking. find help. and offer people a way out. it was ground-breaking. we looked at some of the moments and
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this is significant. when you look back, the ones that stand out for you? there are lots. it wasjust showing real kids in real schools. things like student democracy, school councils, things like that. but it has to be the zammo thing, thatis but it has to be the zammo thing, that is where we reached everything television should be about. is there anything that matches up to it today for kids? i do not think so, i think it isa for kids? i do not think so, i think it is a genre that is missed and we could go on two hours talking about that, but that is another day! lovely to see you. now, it's that time of year again. are you going to sing? strictly come dancing is back on our screens. tonight it's the launch show of the 16th series. the celebrity contestants have all been revealed and at 7.30
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tonight we'll find out which of the professional dancers they'll each be paired up with. we'rejoined by someone who'll know exactly how they're feeling — it's two—time finalist kristina rihanoff. good morning. well done, you made it. yes, it was like operationjames bond. congratulations. what is today like for everybody? you have to remember it is pre—recorded so the dancers and celebrities know who they have got. we don't know but they have got. we don't know but they know. the actual launch show is exciting. there is no dancing tonight? there will be dancing, group numbers and a group number with celebrities, but at that point they do not know who is dancing with who, so it is exciting. talk to me
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about the pairings. that is the point of contention. as a professional, do you look for someone professional, do you look for someone who will be a great dancer, or great entertainment? both but the main thing is someone who will be professional and is ready to take instructions, have fun and work hard because as a professional you work all year round towards the show and wa nt to all year round towards the show and want to do well and go far. you want someone want to do well and go far. you want someone with a good attitude and open mind. i am putting pressure on you now. we can look at this year. is there anybody you have seen on the list and you think, i would really definitely want them? dias. i —— yes. i think charles venn is really exciting. i think he will have great rhythm. he is an actor. very well—known. as a great personality. he will be charming, i
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think, and also have quite good rhythm. that is my prediction, but i do not know. quite a lot of youngsters this time. yes, the show is always evolving and trying to bring ina is always evolving and trying to bring in a younger audience, like dancing with the stars in america, new dances, couples's choices. and same sex couples in some of the dancing. i think it will only be with professionals. it has been embraced in other countries and there are some group numbers where professionals of the same—sex dance with each other and it is a great step forward and hopefully we will see a same—sex couple competing on strictly. how many layers of spray tan will have been applied this morning? i usually had two. i love it. i don't know. wendy you start putting on the sparkles? you
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have a very long day because you have a very long day because you have a very long day because you have a lot of rehearsals, dress romps, so have a lot of rehearsals, dress romps, so it is a long day. thanks. lovely to see you. thank you, thanks for having me. and you can watch the first episode in the new series of strictly come dancing at 7:35 tonight on bbc one. that's all from us for today — rogerjohnson and rachel burden this is bbc news. the headlines at 10: people being harassed by cold callers will be given powers to stop them, in new measures introduced by the government today. companies will see the new change in law, and i think they will desist from the activity. when they do not, i'm afraid people will have to complain. the labour mp chuka umunna has accused jeremy corbyn of driving centre—left mps like himself out of the party, ahead of a speech later this morning. also coming up this hour... for the first time ever, there's going to be an attempt
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to get into the middle of the pacific ocean to try to clean it up. thousands of top university graduates are competing forjobs as prison officers in a scheme aiming to transform the uk's toughest prisons. and at 10.30 — the travel show is injohannesburg taking a lesson
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