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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 9, 2018 9:30am-10:01am BST

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air vfnt ‘ur. whether happy then, one air wafting in from the mediterranean, cooler air currents from the north atlantic, look at that, scotland and northern ireland in the cooler air mass, to the south warmer weather. looks as if temperatures could reach the mid—20s in the south of the country, a little bit cooler the following day, but in the north, looks as though we will have a lot more cloud and it will be quite a bit cooler. that's it for now. hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines. boris johnson attacks the prime minister's brexit plans saying she has wrapped the country in a suicide vest and handed the detonator to brussels. in a newspaper article, the former foreign secretary said the chequers deal has opened the uk to "perpetual political blackmail". high drama at the us open as serena williams loses her cool and the final. penalised for a huge row with the umpire, she accuses him of treating her unfairly. rules which prevented some victims of crime from claiming compensation
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if they lived with their attacker are to scrapped. and a record number of runners line up in newcastle at the start of the great north run. before the papers — sport and for a round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's holly hamilton. good morning. it should have been naomi osaka's night after claiming victory in the us open final, but it was serena williams who is grabbing the headlines after she accused the umpire of sexism and treating her unfairly. williams was cited by the official for three code violations, inlcuding for three code violations, including getting coaching signals, breaking her racket and for calling the chair umpire a thief, which cost her a game. i can't sit here and say i wouldn't say he was a thief, because i thought he
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took a game from me. but i've seen other men call other umpires several things, and i'm here fighting for women's rights and women's equality, and for all kinds of stuff. and for me to say "thief" and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark. he has never taken a game from a man because they said thief. i mean, it blows my mind. but i'm going to continue to fight for women and to fight for us to have equal... like, cornet should be able to take her shirt off without getting a fine. this is outrageous. and i just feel like the fact that i have to go through this is just an example for the next person that has emotions and that want to express themselves, that want to be a strong woman, and they are going to be allowed to do that because of today. maybe it didn't work out for me but it will work out for the next person. tears from naomi osaka.
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as she accepted her first grand slam trophy. the ceremony was met with a chorus of boos from williams‘ home us open crowd, who had been unhappy with her treatment during the match. for me it felt like a normal match walking up to the net but it is serena on the other side and she hugged me and it was really awesome. when i step onto the court i feel like a different person. i am not a serena fan, i am just a tennis player. but when i hugged her, i'm sorry... anyways, when i hugged her at the net, i felt... sorry. naomi osaka does become the first japanese woman to win a grand slam. these were the scenes in tokyo as fans gathered to watch her make history. the 20—year—old no doubt hoping it will be the first of many majors. britain's jamie murray won a fourth
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grand slam mixed doubles title alongside partner bethanie mattek—sands. the pair had to fight back from a set down against croatia's nikola mektic and poland's alicja rosolska, before going on to win the championship tie—break 11—9. and congratulations to alfie hewett and gordon reid, who won the wheelchair doubles title. and andy lapthorne, who won the quad wheelchair doubles, with partner david wagner. england were beaten 2—1 by spain at wembley in the nations league, their first match since the world cup. they made the perfect start when marcus rashford, one of three changes to the side that lost against croatia, opened the scoring. spain manged to level just two minutes later. rodrigo moreno then took advantage of poor marking at a free—kick to score the winner from close range after 32 minutes. england were beaten 2—1 by spain at wembley
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in the nations league, their first match since the world cup. they made the perfect start when marcus rashford, one of three changes to the side that lost against croatia, opened the scoring. spain manged to level just two minutes later. rodrigo moreno then took advantage of poor marking at a free—kick to score the winner from close range after 32 minutes. we've got to keep faith in the way we are trying to play, otherwise we go back to what we did historically. there is no way i believe we will ever be a top team if we do that. so we've got to be brave enough to stick to our principles. and, you know, just get better at what we are doing and identify how we improve. but that is not going to be an easy task, because you can see the level of the top teams and i said right across the summer we are under no illusions about that. northern ireland had a disappointing start to their nations league campaign losing 2—1 to bosnia—herzegovina. michael o'neill‘s side had the better of the early chances, but it was the visitors who opened the scoring and then made it two—nil after a defensive mix—up.
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wigan‘s will grigg did pull a goal back in injury time but it turned out to be just a consolation. england are in control of the fifth and final test against india at the oval. going into the third day india are 174 for 6 in reply to england's first innings of 332. england already have an unassailable 3—1 lead in the series. jos buttler‘s 89 dragged england back into the match. he shared 98 for the ninth wicket with stuart broad, who hung around for an hour and a half for his 38 runs. james anderson then claimed two wickets and is now three away from overtaking australia's glenn mcgrath as the most successful fast bowler in the history of the game. the first time i got recalled at lord's, an unbelievable opportunity to come back in and play. fire was really burning for test cricket. i was very excited. i think that has been the best thing about it, being able to maintain that and feel very privileged to play. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, here's ben brown with the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review.
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with me are james rampton, a features writer at the independent, and henry mance, political correspondent at the ft. dream team! do not laugh! let's take a look at the front pages. the mail on sunday says borisjohnson has triggered a fresh political storm, by accusing theresa may of wrapping a suicide vest around britain 7 and handing the detonator to brussels. typically colourful language. according to the sunday times, the tory party is diving into a bitter civil war over dirty tricks, after it was revealed that theresa may's aides drew up a dossier on borisjohnson‘s sex life in an apparent effort to prevent him from becoming prime minister. and the sun carries a picture of an ex—tory aide
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and a warning that brexit talks could collapse, as a number of cabinet ministers have rejected the only irish border plan acceptable to the eu — that's in the independent. the sunday telegraph has thejustice secretary, david gauke, calling for as many prisoners as possible to be given telephones in their cells in an attempt to help with rehabilitation. and the sunday express carries a full page headline, with claims that a former kgb officer has exposed how russia demanded the murders of dissidents in an identical method to the salisbury attack. so, a varied set of front pages 7 let's see what our reviewers make of it all. dominated by boris johnson dominated by borisjohnson once again. we start with the mail on sunday. and borisjohnson saying the
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suicide jibe, sunday. and borisjohnson saying the suicidejibe, the suicide sunday. and borisjohnson saying the suicide jibe, the suicide vestjibe at theresa may, typically colourful language from boris johnson at theresa may, typically colourful language from borisjohnson and people saying not entirely appropriate. i was interested to read comments on twitter. alan duncan, who worked with boris johnson said it was the most disgusting thing he had heard from a modern politician. there may be history between them but more interesting, the man who served in the army who said it was deeply offensive to talk about that and he had seen a suicide bombing in afghanistan and prayed the people —— praised the people who saved his life. he is saying it was offensive to use it as a colourful phrase to make a point. it seems to me he is going down into the gutter, like what he said about women wearing the burqa, to appeal to a ukip based
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pa rt burqa, to appeal to a ukip based part of the tory party. using offensive language to capture the market which he knows he needs to win the leadership and number 10 downing st. when he uses these phrases, does he plan them, are they off—the—cuff? dashing it out on his laptop, or is it carefully designed as james suggests, to achieve a certain result? these pieces i think written pretty quickly, this is how his mind works. he comes up with metaphors with language. the pieces through with extreme language. you said britain has been feeble, humiliation, we are mad, semi—masochistic, insanity. it is how his brain is working. like a stream of consciousness? there is no adviser to say calm this down and if you are a newspaper editor can you go, great. we have a front page. do you sense it is paving the way for a
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leadership bid? totally. he has a sell—out speech at the tory party conference in birmingham where eve ryo ne conference in birmingham where everyone is saying he will make an attack on mrs may. ever since i first came across him, 35 years ago in the oxford union, i thought he was an entertaining, colourful man. but it is always about him, he is a massive egomaniac. it is not about the country party, it is about him and his bid for power, which my stomach. he would say it is about the party and country. he has those interests at heart? the day before he declared for brexit he wrote an article declaring for remain and made what i think is a cynical judgment that brexit would appeal better to the tory party based and therefore he ditched the article, an articulate article supporting remain
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and went with brexit. it is about the calculation of how he can lead himself into power. how does theresa may stop him? the sunday times highlights what they talk about a dirty dossier, documents they say are on his sex life, 4000 words. do you think it is in existence? some of the revelations apparently in the dossier can be found in the two biographies of boris johnson! dossier can be found in the two biographies of borisjohnson! there isa biographies of borisjohnson! there is a lot of established fact about his affairs and lying on why he was fired from a newspaperjob and the shadow cabinet, under michael howard, all this stuff is established fact and this is something theresa may found to use in 2016just after the something theresa may found to use in 2016 just after the referendum with the tory leadership contest and she thought boris was the person to beat that she did not needed because michael gove knifed him in the back
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and he pulled out. maybe she is dusting it down now to use it again. what we were told by mps, the latest affair and news of the divorce, it probably would not change things. i think there is something different and it is suggested the relationship with someone previously a tory adviser, when boris has had affairs they are people he has met in the arts world. this is someone, even though he has not worked with directly, has been part of the conservative party and had an official role and in the age of me too colleagues might say they feel uncomfortable with this behaviour and not someone they want as prime minister. how popular is he in the country? we know he is popular in the party, despite what might be in the party, despite what might be in the dossier. if he were leader, would he easily win an election?” do not think so. there was booing
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yesterday at the oval when he turned up yesterday at the oval when he turned up in yesterday at the oval when he turned upina yesterday at the oval when he turned up in a hospitality box. the crowd turned on him and started booing, which is telling, given he was popular in london when he was mayor. the brexit stance has made him deeply unpopular in the capital. he is popular in the party, who like his red—blooded, to think law brand of brexit and a percentage of tory party members say they will vote for him. if he got to the final two, which is not a done deal because a lot of mps do not like him and it is down to them, he would probably win, but whether he would win an election, i am but whether he would win an election, iam not but whether he would win an election, i am not sure. you mentioned him at the cricket. i think we have a picture on the front page of the observer. really enjoying the cricket! he also managed to fall asleep! a fascinating day, but not for boris.
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he seems to be on his own which is not the look for a future prime minister, you need to be surrounded by people desperate for your company. in this piece in the observer, andrew mitchell, who previously supported him, said most collea g u es previously supported him, said most colleagues will be sympathetic and he doubts it will have an impact on leadership chances. i would agree with that, sadly. there are similarities with donald trump and revelations made about the 12 women who came out during the presidential campaign, alleging he had assaulted them in some way. the tape where he made gross comments about grabbing women. it made no difference to his election chances and he is now president. i think there is a base in the tory party and this phrases often used, boris is boris. different rules apply and allegations about his private life
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do not affect voters who would vote him in. we have been hearing from the home secretary about these controversial suicide vest remarks from borisjohnson. controversial suicide vest remarks from boris johnson. sajid controversial suicide vest remarks from borisjohnson. sajid javid i think it is fair to say has rebuked the former foreign secretary. we can listen in on the andrew marr programme, what he had to say.” think there are better ways to articulate differences and it is a reminderfor articulate differences and it is a reminder for all of us on public policy, which other party we represent, to use measured language because that is what the public want to see. would you approve of the comparison of the niqab to letterbox ? comparison of the niqab to letterbox? no. is it... is he
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islamophobic? not in the slightest. borisjohnson is someone i have known over a number of years and i think he loves all of britain's communities no matter where they come from. would he be leader of the party? the conservative party is not looking for a leader because we are lucky to have a very good leader and she is also the prime minister of this country and is doing a great job. that was the home secretary speaking earlier. and the next leader of the tory party! possibly. saying there is a need for measured language, i think the chances of borisjohnson using language, i think the chances of boris johnson using measured language are not high. is it fair to say? what is this helping to distract from? from the fact that he does not have thought out, detailed plan, alternative to theresa may's plan, alternative to theresa may's plan for brexit. he may come up with that but at the moment, some of this puree, the hyperbole, is helpful in
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reminding people he is outraged at the deal, keeping himself in the public mind and establishing himself an alternative to theresa may. he would say he represents the majority in the country who voted to leave the eu. surely he has had two years, he and fellow brexiteers, to come up with a plan. they seem to be saying no chequers, no to the eu plan about the irish border. they might say that theresa may is the one that is the wrecker. they would argue no deal is better than any deal the eu might impose on us and therefore, it seems to me but are that they have had this time and not come up with a cogent and well constructive blanc, because that is all they have been thinking and talking about for two yea rs. thinking and talking about for two years. where is the substance? we know nothing about plans on ireland,
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trade, security, nuclear provision, all of these things are a massive void from the brexiteers and i want to hear from them what they would do if we crash out with no deal. we will end the sequence on boris johnson, which has dominated the papers. and this picture of the boris blonde. they say this is the blonde ex—tory aide link to boris johnson. two blondes together. do not make a right! was previously a special adviser to john whittingdale, worked with zac goldsmith and worked at city hall with boris when he was mayor. a professional person, i have worked with her. she now finds herself on the front pages and has treated something about having the thickest
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skins of all mammals. like eric ca nto na skins of all mammals. like eric ca ntona and he skins of all mammals. like eric cantona and he said the seagulls will follow the trawlers. the sunday telegraph, this is interesting. the idea of giving prisoners phones in their prison cells, the idea to con them down? i thought that is ridiculous when i first heard it. that they would make more and more drug deals but when you read the detail, it is only set preagreed numbers they can phone and also and the justice secretary numbers they can phone and also and thejustice secretary is arguing, which i understand, that keeping in touch with family reduces the risk of reoffending and leads to... they have the scheme in germany and david gauke said it is a success, improving behaviour in prisons and
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reducing the level of recidivism. they can only call certain people? for example, if someone is lying awake, feeling down, at the moment they cannot go to the landing to use they cannot go to the landing to use the communal phone at that time, but they could, using a handset, call a memberof theirfamily, they could, using a handset, call a member of their family, have a chat and feel better about themselves, and feel better about themselves, and it reduces the risk of getting aggravated at a later point. apparently there are fights on the landings with the queues to use communal phones. it might be attacked as softjustice communal phones. it might be attacked as soft justice but the prison system is in a bad way. they have to come up with ideas to reduce the rates of violence inside. and reduce the number of prisoners. they are overcrowded and there do not seem are overcrowded and there do not seem to be coherent plans to lower the number of prisoners. there are too many people in prisons built for smaller numbers so anything that reduces the rate of reoffending has to be good. we have heard reports on
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birminghamjail in to be good. we have heard reports on birmingham jail in particular, the inspector of prisons saying he had to leave a wing because the smell of drugs was overpowering. extraordinary picture he painted. what is going on in prisons is alarming. david gauke, the minister, says it is something they hear time and again from prison governors and office rs and again from prison governors and officers so the message about what is happening in prisons is boiling up, and that has to be a good thing. sorry to go on about brexit, but the prison officers association has said not enough attention has been paid to the issue and a lot of commentators saying because the government is so fixated with brexit, they have not had time to look at important issues like this which is why we have a massive problem in prisons. the daily express, the salisbury nerve agent poisoning update. they have an
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interview with a former soviet, i'm sorry, former russian agent. he says he was instructed on how to apply nerve agents and particularly to door handles. he left the service in the mid—905, he had become a double agent, so his information may be out of date but what he says dovetails with what the british government has said, that we know the russians have experimented with using this. it is pa rt of experimented with using this. it is part of their case in laying out why russia was responsible for the salisbury attack. what the sceptic would say is how does he know? he also says that before the attack in salisbury he was told by russian security saw something bad was about to happen. this guy left over 20 years ago. that could apply on any
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day. the russian security services seem day. the russian security services seem active. i think the language, it is quite chilling, this agent was handed this material when he worked asa handed this material when he worked as a double agent in latvia and he was told it was an effective substance and in fact he decided not to carry out the attack because he was worried about the effect it would have on him, because it is so powerful. we have seen sadly with the two passers—by affected by this nerve agent, it shows the potency but also the complete inhumanity of the russian agent and state, who are backing these operations. we will conclude with a look at the sunday telegraph, which features kate silverton on strictly, which is coming back to our screens. are you a fan? i'm not a massive fan but theresa may has done a brilliantjob to prepare us with her efforts in
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africa and she tweeted yesterday to the contestants, let me know if you need any tips! her attempt at dancing has whetted the appetite. she danced twice on the africa tour. i felt terrible, as someone who does not like getting up and dancing, the thought of doing it with the nation's press in front of you, awful. she was criticised for being too rigid and stiff and when she relaxes and dances... i said to my daughters, she looks awkward, and they said she is not employed as a dancer but prime minister and this has shown her in a good light, the funny has shown her in a good light, the fu n ny tweet has shown her in a good light, the funny tweet you quoted and also peter crouch, who does the funny dances, he said theresa may has stolen my moves! i think it is good that it shows a lighter side and i think the popularity of strictly is a su ccess think the popularity of strictly is a success for the bbc because the x
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factor is struggling. it seems to be on death's door, even though it has brought in robbie williams and louis tomlinson, it is struggling for viewers. commentators say this line—up of strictly, kate silverton apart, were a z list. my children watch a person on you called zoella, but they have not got her, but her brother. it is a juggernaut, whoever is on it, strictly. you are the a list! thank you very much for reviewing the papers today. you can see the front pages of the papers on the website. and it is also on the bbc iplayer. after the grey and damp weather this
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morning it looks like it will improve for some later today, but it has been a great start with rain around, breezy also and if anything it will get more windy across scotla nd it will get more windy across scotland later today and into tonight. low pressure between the uk and iceland is moving in, just to the north—west, sending stronger winds and frequent showers, but to the south the weather is quieter and on the south coast today it is looking beautiful. breezy around the coasts and quite breezy inland but plenty of sunshine on the way. then we will see showers almost anywhere from the midlands northwards, more frequent in the north of northern ireland, across scotland. gusty winds later in the western isles and
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throughout scotland, they could be exceeding 50 mph in places. the closer to the low pressure, the stronger the winds. a blustery night with frequent showers rattling through and rattling our windows, i guess. tonight that moves to the north and to the south we have clear skies. the winds drop by the end of the night. tomorrow starts pretty bright across england and wales. there will be showers across scotla nd there will be showers across scotland but generally, a good start to the day. from lunchtime onwards it clouds over the north—west with rain in belfast in glasgow. the sound should stay dry and brighter the very least. temperatures could get up to 22 degrees. tuesday, the weather front slicing the ocean and atmosphere. two areas of whether happening. we have warm airfrom
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southern climes, cooler air currents from the north atlantic and scotland and northern ireland in the cooler air mass, whereas to the south, we have the warmer weather so it looks on tuesday temperatures could get up to the mid—20s across the south of the country. cooler the following day, whereas in the north, it looks as though we will have more cloud and it will be quite a bit cooler. this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 10am... boris johnson attacks the prime minister's brexit plans saying she has wrapped the country in a suicide vest and handed the detonator to brussels. high drama at the us open as serena williams loses her cool and the final. you owe me an apology. i have never cheated in my life. i have a daughter and i stand up for what is right for her. you owe me an apology. (sot) rules which prevented some victims of crime from claiming compensation if they lived with their attacker are to scrapped.
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north korea stages a huge military display to celebrate its 70th anniversary. but the country's long range missiles weren't part

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