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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 13, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello. it's thursday. it's nine o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. the brexit secretary says if there's no deal with the eu over brexit, the uk won't be paying 39 billion to them, but he wont tell voters how much britain will have to pay. we will always comply with our strict legal obligations but i think what is very clear is that we would not pay the amount or the schedule in terms of the phased approach that was agreed as part of the negotiated settlement. so how much does this euroscpetic conservative mp think britain shld pay in the event of no deal? nothing. the british voters will not ta ke nothing. the british voters will not take kindly to handing over billions of pounds to the eu as a thank you for having me leaving present. number ten says that no deal is not
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a bluff as the cabinet meets to discuss what would happen if we leave the eu with no deal. the number of cases of domestic abuse where men are the victims has more than doubled in the last five years in england and wales. this man says he was physically and emotionally abused by his ex. my my ex attacked me physically, heard me emotionally, and made my life a living hell. we'll hear more from men who say they were abused by their wives and girlfriends. and almost a third of parents who are professionals know someone who's done something dodgy to get their child into a good school, according to new research. that includes renting a second home oi’ that includes renting a second home or pretending to be religious. this man, who's an athiest, went to church for three years in an attempt to do just that. we'll talk to him in a few minutes‘ time. did it work? hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning.
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we are going to ask you about your daily routine today because of mark wahlberg's daily routine obviously. look at this. he put this on instagram yesterday. he gets up at 2:30am, even earlier than me! i get up 2:30am, even earlier than me! i get up at 3:55am and have a couple of spoonfuls of cottage cheese before heading into work. there is prayer time, breakfast time, loads of workouts, too many! my goodness. quite a few snacks. the chamber recovery thing. what is your daily routine? do let me know in as minute detail as you wish. use the hashtag victoria live. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today: the prime minister will hold
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a special cabinet meeting this morning to discuss preparations for a no—deal brexit. the government is also due to publish guidance on issues such as mobile phone roaming charges, driving licenses and passports in the event of the eu and the uk not reaching an agreement. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. since last summer, you have been able to go anywhere in the eu without paying extra for calls, texts, or data included in your mobile phone tariff. but if britain left the eu without a deal, that could end. the government has said consumers will be protected. we'll also get details on what might happen to driving licences. currently, those issued in the uk are automatically recognised across the eu, but a no—deal brexit could change that, too. it could also affect how eu countries treat british citizens travelling abroad on holiday, with reports that anyone with less than six months left on their passport could be turned away. the brexit secretary, dominic raab, has said that leaving the eu without a deal is highly unlikely, but there are still big sticking points in the negotiations to reach an agreement.
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how to avoid a hard border in northern ireland is one major stumbling block. yesterday, conservative mps opposed to the government's plan set out their alternative solution and called on the prime minister to change her stance. now theresa may is sticking firmly to her plan, but she knows many in her party don't like it, and talk of a leadership challenge this week may continue if she comes back from brussels with a deal her own mps don't like. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. norman is outside number 10 in downing street. how serious is the government about the possibility of ano government about the possibility of a no deal? i think very serious. this isn't some futile bluff that the government is engaged in. there isa the government is engaged in. there is a real view that we could find ourselves on the ist of april quitting without any agreement. that is not what anyone wants, but it
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could happen. why? well, talks may simply break down with the eu, and the timetable now is really tight. there are difficulties, as we know, over northern ireland. but even if mrs may does get a deal, and brings it back to parliament, we know there are whole load of hardline tory brexiteers who may vote it down. in that scenario, it is the government will say we will be leaving without any agreement, so will say we will be leaving without any agreement, so people will have to factor in that this could really happen. the sort of plans that the government will be setting out today about what it will mean for us in terms of whether we can, i don't know, still drive on the continent, with our driving licences, whether we will need new driving licences, the applications were passports, whether we will still have pet passports, can we take the hound on holiday to france? those nitty—gritty details, actually we have got to start thinking about them. it may not be by design. maybe
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nobody wants us to leave without any deal, but it is definitely now a real possibility. thank you, norman. let's bring you the rest of the new so let's bring you the rest of the new so far with annita in the bbc newsroom. good morning, everyone. thousands of people are continuing to leave their homes in north and south carolina, as hurricane florence closes in. the storm has weakened slightly, but heavy rainfall and flooding is still expected in the coming days. our north america correspondent, laura trevelyan, reports. here is the view of hurricane florence from space, as this powerful storm barrels across the atlantic towards america's east coast. as beaches in the storm's path, like this one in north carolina, empty, five states have declared emergencies. if you have been asked to evacuate, don't wait. leave now. you put your life at risk by staying. the waves are beginning
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to pound the beach as hurricane florence bears down on us. she poses a triple threat to life and property. storm surge twice as high as me, hurricane—force winds and catastrophic flooding, after what could be very heavy rainfall. the storm is expected to stall and linger here. bill and charlotte hardison are obeying the order to evacuate. charlotte experienced the devastation of hurricane hazel here in 1954, and she's not hanging around. i just dread it for everybody. i dread it for us. i want my house to be here when i come back. but some plan to ride out the storm, like john and lloyd, who are braced for whatever it may bring. it's our home. we want to stay and make sure everything's 0k and looked after. most have heeded the warnings and fled. the monster storm is fast approaching. laura trevelyan, bbc news, north carolina. the company which runsjohn lewis
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and waitrose has announced that its profits were virtually wiped out in the first half of the year. in the six months to the end of july, pre—tax profits at thejohn lewis partnership plunged by 99%, compared with the same period last year, to £1.2 million. the chairman of the partnership, sir charlie mayfield, said the retail industry was facing challenging times and said the ongoing brexit negotiations were in part to blame for uncertainty in the economy. russia has launched its largest military exercise since the cold war. around 300,000 personnel are involved in the joint training with china and mongolia, along with 80 warships and more than a thousand aircraft. a kremlin spokesman said the drills were justified given aggressive and unfriendly attitudes towards his country. the former prime minister, gordon brown, has told the bbc he fears the world is sleepwalking into another financial crisis.
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he says a breakdown in international co—operation has left the global financial system less prepared to withstand threats than it was at the time of the last global crisis 10 years ago. and i feel we are sleepwalking into the next crisis. i feel that this is a leaderless world, and i think when the next crisis comes, and there will be a future crisis, we'll find that we neither have the fiscal and monetary room for manoeuvre that we had in 2008/09, or the willingness to take that action. but perhaps most worrying of all, we will not have the international corporation that was necessary to get us out of this worldwide crisis. the european court of human rights is set to deliver its judgment on a milestone challenge to the uk government's mass surveillance practices, in a case brought by human rights groups from around the world. liberty, amnesty international, privacy international and seven other international rights organisations are challenging the lawfulness of uk mass surveillance laws. the application was lodged after edward snowden,
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a former us national security agency contractor, revealed the existence of surveillance and intelligence sharing programmes operated by the intelligence services of the united states and the united kingdom. people found guilty of assaulting emergency services workers are to face tougher sentences. the new law, which will come into effect from november, will double the amount of time for which offenders can be sent to prison from six months to a year. government figures show an increase in the number of assaults over the past year. public health england has been criticised for working on a new campaign alongside a charity funded by the alcohol industry. in a letter, almost 50 health officials say working with drinkawa re will significantly damage the agency's credibility. it follows a campaign encouraging middle—aged people to have more alcohol—free days. public health england says it hopes this will be the first step in a long—term partnership with the charity. he's one of the greatest
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athletes of all time. usain bolt‘s won gold medals at the olympics and world championships and he's run all over the world. but what about sprinting in space? well, he's not quite managed that yet but he got pretty close, as tim allman explains. there's no denying the fact that usain bolt is the fastest man on earth. the medals and the various world records are proof of that. but what about being the fastest man not on earth? finding the answer to that question will leave you pointing in just one direction. so, to this airport in northern france, and a so—called zero g flight. normally this plane is used for scientific research. this time it was a little bit different. ready, set, go! a 100 metre aircraft not being available, they had to use a somewhat shorter track. the running style wasn't quite as elegant — more of a hop than a sprint —
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but it turns out class is permanent, no matter what the altitude. a kid in a candy store. that's how i felt. for me, it was just fun, do you know what i mean? it's running in a different type of atmosphere, do you know what i mean? it's like you're on the moon. it's not worse, do you know what i mean? it's so different. at first when you get into that first mode, your mind is blown. so, for me, it was outstanding. glasses of celebratory champagne all round, which is easier said than done in a zero gravity environment. and as for usain bolt, he was dancing on the ceiling. quite literally. tim allman, bbc news. it looks like he had fun. there is a summary it looks like he had fun. there is a summary of the latest bbc news
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coming up at 9:30am. deal or no deal? we'll talk to a conservative mp later who says no deal with the eu is preferable to mrs may's own chequers plan. do you agree? lynn on twitter says it isn't a present. it is called paying what you owe. and gavin on email says: i don't understand why we would pay brussels a penny. even while part of the eu, uk citizens have to pay for hospital treatment in spain, for example. the uk traded for hundreds of years around the world successfully well before the eu or the common market and we will do so again. what bugs me is mps and businesses have been trying to link it all to do with finances and the economy. the reason i voted leave was all about immigration. if you'd like to get in touch, you are very welcome.
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use the hashtage victoria live and if you text, you will be charged let's get some sport. steven wyeth is at the bbc sport centre. we have heard in detailfrom the winner of the us open. naomi 0saka was the overshawdowed winner of the women's us open final. the fall—out for saturday night's final at flushing meadows was dominated by serena williams and her reaction to umpiring decisions she branded sexist and unfair. a little lost amongst that was that naomi 0saka had won herfirst major title at the age of 20, becoming the first japanese tennis player to do so, and that she'd beaten her idol in straight sets to claim that title. 0saka, who was brought up in america, has been speaking to the ellen degeneres show about how she dealt with what happened between williams and the umpire during that final. when you're little, you're taught not to look, like, if your opponent gets angry or anything, told to just turn
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around and try to focus. so i tried to do that. but i heard a lot of people in the crowd making noises and i really wanted to turn around. at the time i did kind of think they were booing me. oh, no! i couldn't tell what was going on because it was so loud in there. right. so it was a little bit stressful. receiving the trophy, there was a lot of booing in the crowd and then serena leaned over and said something to you. what did she say to you? that she was proud of me and that i should know that the crowd wasn't booing at me. there were a lot of tears even though she was the champion but naomi 0saka is destined for great things so great to see her smiling again. and the british dominance in cycling looks set to continue? again. and the british dominance in cycling looks set to continue ?m does indeed. we're edging closer to a british clean sweep of cycling's grand tours. chris froome won the giro d'italia, geraint thomas claimed the tour de france yellow jersey, and simon yates continues to lead the vuelta a espana with just four stages remaining. his lead was cut ever so slightly by alejandro valverde on stage eight but a 25—second cushion
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was a decent one after a stage was a decent one after a stage 17 won by canada's michael woods. and david silva has been talking candidly about the premature birth of his son. david silva has enjoyed huge success in his career, winning three prmeier legaue titles with manchester city, and a world cup and two european championships with spain. but the premature arrival of a son, mateo, in december had an understandable impact on him as a person and a footballer. silva spent five months travelling between manchester and his family in spain. it was really tough, it was so difficult to him being in hospital for so long. he was in spain. it meant i had to travel a lot and i could hardly train. i didn't sleep
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well and i wasn't eating well. luckily the team was playing well and that really helped me a lot. i've said it before, the only time i could get it out of my mind was when i was playing. i would start thinking that everything once the match was over. but yes, it really was a good escape. football is what we like and enjoy the most. and you can see more of that interview with david silva on the bbc‘s premier league show this evening. david was hugely appreciative to the medical staff in manchester and in spain and his son looks to be doing very well. thank you, steve. 9:17am. welcome to the programme. what lengths have you gone to to try and get your child into the best school? new research by the sutton trust — an organisation working to tackle inequality in education — suggests 30% of professional parents know someone
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who has cheated the system to make sure they got the first school of their choice. top of the list of dodgy tactics is attending church just to get into a faith school. 31% of people knew someone who had done that. 20% knew someone who had rented a second home and said they were living there just so it looked like they lived closer to the school. the sutton trust says we need to level the playing field for local parents and those who can't afford second homes in catchment areas and private tuition to boost their children's chances of success. let's talk now to andrew penman. he was an atheist that went to church for four years just so his son could go to their school. he's also written a book about the issue. he isa he is a columnist for the daily mirror. juliet 0rton is school admissions secretary for coopers school in upminster in essex.
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she investigates parents who claim to live in the area. peter young's son tom didn't get into coopers school, their first choice at first, after the family moved there nine years ago just so he could go there. andrew, tell us about going to church and that even though you are an atheist. the school opposite our house, right opposite, was a state school, but living opposite wasn't enough to send our school there. the church had monopolised the school, and they deliberately discriminated against the children of parents who didn't follow their particular religious beliefs. you could say that would be all right if they were paying for the school, but they were not. the salary of every teacher, the cooks and cleaners, was paid for by all taxpayers. i took the view that all taxpayers have an equal right to try to get their children
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in there. so other places of that, i started going to church, as my wife. we went for about three years or so. are you a hypocrite? yes, i have been accused of that, all sorts of things. 0dious hypocrite comes off quite often. i think that is the wrong word because i have never discourage anyone from doing what i did. quite the opposite. i positively encourage people to undermine the system. if it is your local state school, you are entitled to go there, and if that means faking being religious, do that. what if it is not your local state school and it is actually a bit further away but you decide to go to church to gain the system? that is not what i did. in this case, it was. ijust not what i did. in this case, it was. i just wanted not what i did. in this case, it was. ijust wanted my children to go to the local state primary school. did it work? yes, my son got in there and my daughter then got in there. but it was pretty awful for three years, attending church. i hated every second of it. i didn't
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do it because i thought it would be fun. idid do it because i thought it would be fun. i did it under duress because we have this outrageous system where religions are allowed to discriminate against parents who don't follow their particular beliefs. you haven't undermined the system though. what you did has not achieved ultimately what you would like. you just played the system. you have done nothing to change it. idid you have done nothing to change it. i did what i could to get my children the state education they deserved. we don't allow nhs hospitals to turn people away if they don't follow a particular religion. your councils and paul can't turn people away because of it, so why do this with school? —— council swimming pool. ithink it, so why do this with school? —— council swimming pool. i think this divides society. i am proud for faking religion and i will boast about it. peter, eight or nine years ago, you move from barking in essex to upminster to get your son into a really had school. you lived pretty
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close to the school but after all that time you were told that your son hadn't got a place. tell us what it was like the day you heard that. it was quite frustrating. we had done quite a bit of research on the catchment area. if you looked at the catchment area. if you looked at the catchment area. if you looked at the catchment area for the five years previously, tom wood have got in, if not on the first lot of offers, then definitely the second. it came as a shock, if i am honest with you. we expected on the ist of march to be celebrating tom getting into coopers, and unfortunately we were not. there were lots of sleepless nights and it was not a pleasant time. some might say that it is calmer. you could afford to move and potentially deny someone else already living there a place. well, nine years is quite a long time. he we nt nine years is quite a long time. he went to primary and infants, and daycare there. i think that is an
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invalid point, honestly. your story did have a happy ending as i said in the introduction. you appealed, and that didn't work, but he was on a waiting list and eventually got the place having started at a different secondary school. how did that feel? it was great, amazing. i have told this story many times. at the beginning of the six weeks holiday, one of tom's friends, who actually lives across the road from us, not even 50 yards away, he had got into coopers the day before the six weeks holiday. so we kind of had a guess that he was maybe going to get in. then on monday this week we heard and we were ecstatic. i don't normally drink during the week but we had a nice drink that night. normally drink during the week but we had a nice drink that nightm was good. julia, hello. you are the school admissions secretary for the school admissions secretary for the
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school that peter's son has just got into. how do you react to the research today that shows that a third of parents who are professionals know someone who has gained the system? to be honest, that doesn't surprise me, because every year we have a tip—off from one or two parents, that maybe haven't applied to us, to say that we have got applications from pa rents we have got applications from parents who are renting accommodation close to the school, but don't actually live in the accommodation. those statistics to us, that doesn't surprise us at all. so it is yourjob to investigate that, isn't it? if we get a tip-off, we will always investigated. we have 1000 applications for 200 places. if somebody calls us and says there is a certain student coming to your school and they do not live in the address given, then we would always investigate that. we work with the
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council and they would investigate. what do you do? i am fascinated. if somebody is renting a home but not living there, do you go and knock on the door? i did do that last year, yes. we had a tip—off and we checked the poll tax out. the council always check the poll tax first and we were not getting anywhere with that. i went down to the rented accommodation, and there wasn't anybody in. i knocked on a few of the neighbours' doors and they said there was no young boy living in the house and they had never seen a young boy living there. so further investigation led to the property that the mother lived in in rain, who was claiming single parent state benefits. but we could not get anywhere going forward to prove that the boy wasn't living at the upminster address. we did lots more
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research and eventually we found the place. this was right in the school holidays and the parents ended up being cleverer than we were and they wrote to the council and they recovered the place, so we didn't win that one. there have been times we have been able to recoup places which is really good because it that people like mr young get the news that their son can come and they live close to the school. andrew, in your book, there are some incredible things that people have got up to. tell our audience about the mother that hacked into another‘s email. tell our audience about the mother that hacked into another's emailm isa that hacked into another's emailm is a while since i wrote that. that was to assume her identity, if i remember the case correctly? that was pretty awful. it was to try and get the place that should have gone to the genuine mother's email account. that was quite shocking. that is outrageous and extraordinary that it means so much that you would
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commit fraud. that was fraud. yes, there have been court cases. i think there have been court cases. i think the basis of the problem is that even the basis of the problem is that eve n pa re nts the basis of the problem is that even parents who do that, i still have some sympathy for them. there are some really wonderful schools and parents are desperate to get their children into them, but the fa ct their children into them, but the fact also has to be faced that there are dreadful schools that parents are dreadful schools that parents are desperate to avoid. and that is what is driving this problem. are desperate to avoid. and that is what is driving this problemm there were no rubbish schools... exactly. all right. thank you. valerie has just exactly. all right. thank you. valerie hasjust said exactly. all right. thank you. valerie has just said this on twitter: if all schools were good and parents wouldn't have to go to extremes and parents wouldn't have to go to extre m es to and parents wouldn't have to go to extremes to get their children in. thank you for coming on the programme, everyone. you can go if you want, andrew. it is fine. lovely chatting. cheers, andrew. thank you. when social media star and wheelchair user annie segarra saw a tweet saying: "nothing sadder
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than a hot person in a wheelchair" she decided she'd had enough of being pigeon—holed. she started the hashtag #hotpersoninawheelchair to make the point that it is possible, obviosuly, to be attractive and disabled. here's her story. you know, if you just lost some weight, you probably wouldn't need to use that wheelchair. hello, my name is annie segarra and i created #hotpersoninawheelchair. if you think there is nothing sadder than a hot person in a wheelchair, cry about it. still to come: what's more important — your right to privacy or identifying potential terrorists? we'll bring you the latest on a decision by an eu court that the british government's digital surveillance does contravene our human rights. professional footabller marvin sordell is here. he says depression in the sport is more widespread than people think and clubs should provide
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counsellors for players. time for the latest news — here's anita. members of the cabinet are holding an extended three—hour meeting to discuss preparations for what would happen if the uk left the eu without a deal, and will later publish guidance on how that would affect mobile phone roaming charges, passports and driving licences. speaking to the bbc this morning the brexit secretary dominic raab has warned that in the event of negotiations with brussels falling apart, the uk would not pay the money it offered to pay to move the talks to the next stage. we wouldn't pay the amount that's been agreed as part of the financial settlement, but i think we would recognise our strict legal obligations, and i think that would be significantly substantially lower, and of course, it's notjust the issue of quantum, i come back to that,
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it's the rate of payment, and the way in which it's done, and we would be haggling for every penny, and we would be paying effectively the bare minimum. i think you could expect that. so i think we just need to be clear about that, but that's nothing new, the prime minister's said it this week, i said it before, and i think it's well understood, because of course the eu always say there's no deal until we get the whole deal. forecasters in the united states are warning of life—threatening waves and rainfall, even though the powerful hurricane approaching the east coast has weakened to a category two storm. georgia hasjoined north and south carolina, virginia and maryland in declaring a state of emergency over fears that hurricane florence may cause catastrophic floods. officials say that the storm is moving more slowly so may lingerfor longer, causing more damage. more than a million people have been ordered to leave their homes. the european court of human rights has ruled that the uk government's mass surveillance practices breach human rights law.
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the ruling says that a bulk communications data collection regime is permissible but it lacked sufficient oversight, and did not filter information sufficiently and it was these failures that breached human rights law. the company which runsjohn lewis and waitrose has announced that its profits were virtually wiped out in the first half of the year. in the six months to the end of july, pre—tax profits at thejohn lewis partnership plunged by 99%, compared with the same period last year, to £1.2 million. the chairman of the partnership, sir charlie mayfield, said the retail industry was facing "challenging times" and said the ongoing brexit negotiations were in part to blame for uncertainty in the economy. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now. naomi 0saka has spoken of her attempts to "stay focused" during a controversial us open final win over serena williams — who was penalised for
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rowing with an umpire. britain's simon yates continues to lead the vuelta a espana withjust four stages remaining. he has a 25 second advanatage over alejandro valverde. the former england one—day captain paul collingwood is retiring from cricket — 22 years after making his first—class debut. he played in 68 test matches, and led england to victory at the icc world t20 in 2010. and manchester city's david silva says football was a welcome distraction afollowing the premature birth of his son mateo in december. that's all the sport for now. depression in football is much more widespread than people are aware of — that's according to footballer marvin sordell. sordell played for the england under 21s, team gb at the olympics and in the premier league as a striker for bolton and burnley. the 27—year—old striker is now at league one side, burton albion. but for years during the peak of his career, sordell had depression, attempted to take his life, and kept it a secret from the clubs he played for. in his first tv interview
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on the subject — marvin's here to tell us about the effect it's had on his career, how writing helped him through it and on how clubs can help others to come forward. just to say, the conversation we're about to have will be a frank conversation about mental health issues. marvin, tell us when you began to realise you were struggling with mental health issues. i would say quite a long time agent in 2012 whiched had just moved to bolton and movering away from family and friends, and into a very unique situation, where at the time i wasn't playing, which was very different for me. you had time on your hands? yes, i ha had a lot of
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time to think about things and to think, to reflect on where i was, without actually spending it wisely, i think. so what happened do your mental health? well, it rapidly and quite heavily geer rated and it got toa quite heavily geer rated and it got to a point where my girlfriend at the time, now wife said to me, that, you know you need to see this person, she had given me a choice, she said this is the person i have found and i needed to go and see her. how low did you get? as you know, i, attempted suicide at a point, i thought about it many occasions before that, and several occasions before that, and several occasions after that, and you know, i was occasions after that, and you know, iwas ina occasions after that, and you know, i was in a very deep and dark place. what was going on in your head at that time it was... just a case of
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wanting a release and, from where i was in life, really. ifelt like i was, struggling to have a grip on you know, where my own life and own situation, and it was very difficult to understand why i felt how i did. did you talk to anyone at the club? no, ididn't did you talk to anyone at the club? no, i didn't actually no. why was that? as you're aware and many people know football's an industry where it's not something that is talk about. people don't really talk about feelings and emotions, that is rife among men in general, any way, but, i wasn't really sure how that would affect me playing, in the opportunities i would have, especially in the, you know, the situation i was, i wasn't playing much football any way, as a football player everybody wants to be playing. so you think perhaps if you
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had have said something, then, those who were responsible for selecting the team might have thought, well you weren't just the team might have thought, well you weren'tjust up to it because of the mental health side of things? potentially yes, i think the biggest thing you feel like you are a burden on people, so going to have a conversation i think, everyone having a conversation with my girlfriend at the time, i felt like i was placing a burden on her by talking to her about these things, andi talking to her about these things, and i think that is probably one of the biggest things i needed to realise, at the time, you know, people are there to help me, and i should go to them, and accept their help. you are still playing, burton albion. it is still pretty rare for players to speak openly about depression, when they are still in the game. why do you think that is? i don't think people are sure how you know, the football community be
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it fans and players or staff members will react to it, and how they will ta ke will react to it, and how they will take them personally. i think it may bea take them personally. i think it may be a fear take them personally. i think it may beafearthing, take them personally. i think it may be a fear thing, i mean me, myself having that conversation with don and the interview i had, the day before i was very apprehensive because i wasn't sure what was going to happen, i didn't know... this is a journalist on a national newspaper. yes, i wasn't sure how people would take it, people have been overwhelmingly positive and i am sat here talking about it. when you say positive, tell me about your team—mates, the coaching staff, fans, in terms of... fans have been fantastic, not just fans, in terms of... fans have been fantastic, notjust of the club i play for but of the clubs i have played for, the whole football community, people are very supportive and my team—mates have been supportive, i have had lots of m essa g es off been supportive, i have had lots of messages off my team—mates and former team—mate, and, you know, when i went in, back to training,
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everything was just normal, and joking and everything, as you know, it should be. so what does that tell you then? it tells me that it's actually 0k to have these conversations, and off the back of it, i have had a lot people contacting me, which has been surprising, but, it is quite sad really, that a lot of these people are wanting to have this conversation, but are not having it, you know, in a widerforum, and i think we all want to speak about these issues, but yet, we are all keeping them to ourself, whereas i think if wejust keeping them to ourself, whereas i think if we just start the conversation, you never know where it could lead to, i've just started a conversation. you just proved that, yeah. are you sure that the clu bs you that, yeah. are you sure that the clubs you play for really didn't know? you have said you didn't say anything, but what do o think? know? you have said you didn't say anything, but what do 0 think?|j don't anything, but what do 0 think?” don't know to be honest, i think it is difficult, really, because when you are playing football, and you
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are going to have players that are disappointed and down when they are not playing, and you may automatically link the two, and you know me myself, i did, and it wasn't something that i accepted until i actually went and spoke to the doctor at the time, and i think that's probably one of the hardest things, is to differentiate between a player who is just things, is to differentiate between a player who isjust you know, down and maybe upset because they are not playing or not being picked, you know, individual occurrences of different things as opposed to someone different things as opposed to someone who's actually suffering from depression. but is it interesting to you that clubs look after their players in terms of their diet, and they nutrition and their diet, and they nutrition and their training, their diet, and they nutrition and theirtraining, and their diet, and they nutrition and their training, and there, the physical side of things but not the mental side of things? of course, i think you know, from the age of six when you start playing football you are told what to do, and if you are
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playing for an academy side as a young player you are going to get told what to drink, when to drink it, what to eat, how to recover, when to do you know your gym programmes and conditioning stuff, and even when you're away from the clu b and even when you're away from the club you get told these thing, when it comes to a serious issue like depression and mental health, players are expected to go off a their own bat go and speak to someone, whereas their own bat go and speak to someone, whereas like i said, in the, in the moment you feel like you a burden on people, so you don't wa nt to a burden on people, so you don't want to speak to people about it any way, so it is difficult then, when you already not used to just doing things off your own back, to have to do something like that as well. should professional football clubs employ councillors? i think so, i think it is something that the pfa and the fa need to address and i think even if it is not, even if someone's not directly employed by
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the club, i think if they are a member of club but employed by the fa, or by the pfa for example, i think these people need to be around ona think these people need to be around on a daily basis, to be a part of the staff and the group, and to understand the player, and to know because these are professional people who know the difference between someone who is having a down day and someone's who accuse eventually suffering from a mental health issue, and it can be you know, it can be ground breaking to have that kind of person involved. are you, you have got into writing and we are going to play a clip of one of your poems, before we watch it, explain to our audience what it is about. so, iwrote it, explain to our audience what it is about. so, i wrote the poem denis prose which is an anagram of depression, i named depression denis prose because i wanted to personify depression and how it feels inside
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your mind, you feel like there is yourself and you know, a dark passenger who is trying to take control of your vehicle, which is your body, and the journey kind of goes through the poem talking about the journey goes through the poem talking about thejourney going goes through the poem talking about the journey going through the emotionaljourney of being in a happy and bright sunny place to a sad and dark and you know rainy, crying, place. let us let us have a watch. along the road i started to drive. with denis prose right by my side. he's only small, but i notice him. as i gaze and watch the sun come in. the birds are singing, the flowers bloom. it's all so beautiful, until you give him room. the sky clouds over, he starts to grow. but the car is still in my control. swerving anxiously from lane to lane. while the glorious sunshine turns to grey. this drive's becoming ever so tough and denis prose has had enough. big enough now to master the wheel. says "i'm in control now,
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just trust me, deal? a passenger on my very own journey. reduce the watch and range up so large, it's unearthly. i have no power, but i'm no longer afraid. since denis prose took over, i've just obeyed. he tells me, "close your eyes until i say. on this journey you cannot stay." i'll take you to where there is peace. and above all, a place to sleep." that is not 2 whole poem but has writing helped you it sounds like a cliche but it has? yes, i find it therapeutic to get my emotions out, i have not been someone who has been easily able to talk about my emotions so writing has helped me, you know, to release these and i find it doesn't snowball inside me, and build up that way as well. thank you so much for telling us. thank you so much for telling us. thank you. really appreciate it, it
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is nice to meet you. and if you have been affected by depression, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website — at bbc.co.uk/actionline. coming up. public health england will be on the programme defending its decision to work drinkaware — a charity funded by the alcohol industry. the european court of human rights has ruled that the uk s regime for mass surveillance breaches human rights law, article eight on and article ten on free. our legal eagle clive coleman can give us some more detail on this. this is complicated so new readers start here. this all arises out of the snowed snroefd lacing, he was the snowed snroefd lacing, he was the us intelligence whistle—blower who revealed that bulk mass communications data was being swept up. —— edward snowden this is a huge
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sweep of information, communications data is the when, the where and the, you know, the timing, so it is not the content of our communications, but it is when we communicate it, to whom we communicate it and where we we re whom we communicate it and where we were when we communicated, so it is that information. he also revealed that information. he also revealed that the uk was in receipt of massivement as of that data from other nations, —— massive. as a result of that, groups of journalists and rights organisations have taken a challenge, this is a challenge to what was known as ripper, this was the regulation of investigatory powers act, a 2,000 a cts investigatory powers act, a 2,000 acts of parliament which was the law governing the collection of this sort of data. that took this challenge to the european convention on human rights. since ripa, we have had ipa, the investigatory powers act, dubbed by some the snoopers charity. this was looking at pipa, the preceding act. there have been
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additional safeguards built—in to ipa. this is looking at ripa, the organisations would say the same problems occur in both. what they we re problems occur in both. what they were challenging was the bulk interception, intelligence sharing with foreign governments and the obtaining of communications data from communications service providers, there are legal challenges to those. today the european court of human rights has found that the bulk interception regime under ripa, violated article 8, that is the right we enjoy to a private and family life. and essentially, the issue was with the interception filtering search and selection of communications, and that that was too broad. so what are the implications of this ruling? the implications of the ruling are this isa implications of the ruling are this is a shot across the government's
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bows, the legal challenge to the current regime continues in the uk courts but this is the european court of human rights saying you can have a mass data collection regime but it has to be sufficiently governed and filtered and it has to be more specific then it was under your old act. 0k. be more specific then it was under your old act. ok. i said it was complicated. i understood all of it, which is a first! let's talk now to corey stoughton, from the civil rights group liberty, which along with amnesty international and other organisations has fought to take this case to the european court of human rights, and tom wilson, from the anti—extremism group the henry jackson society. he thinks it's important for national security to monitor terror suspects. thank you for coming on the programme. first of all your reaction to this ruling? this is as clive put it a shot across the bow of the government. it it is a major government for those of us who think there ought to be balance in the
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government ability to engage if surveillance, a balance between that need to protect us from terrorist threats and criminal threats and the right for us to live our lives online which so much is increasingly lived online, where we go, what doctors we visit, where we shop, our communications revealing so much about who we are and what we do. 0k, how do you react? i think it is unfortunate this was taken outside of the uk, because our parliament looks at all of these issues and seeks to balance the need for celebrities and privacy with the need for security. they are going to create laws that are tailored to the uk situation, whereas the european courts i think are much more international thinking. what they have said, according to clive is you can have a mass surveillance system as long as it is properly regulated and governed, that seems fair enough? we have strong checks and balances. which means the government wasn't properly regulating it. under
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the new act, there were better regulations put in place, i think it is important to stress that we have to in these situations have a tendai biti of a toss up, trade off between the civil liberties and the security situation, we are facing an unprecedented threat. mi5 has said in the past decade every major terror investigation has used this kind of data, if you want to take away the powers to gather this intelligence you have to accept there is maybe a price.” intelligence you have to accept there is maybe a price. i don't think is saying, are you saying they, is that what liberty is saying, take away the powers to gather that intelligence? absolutely not, that is not the question, the question is where do we draw the line in what the decision today reveals is the government has been drawing that line way too far in the other direction, what we need is a targeted surveillance regime, not a mass indiscriminate one that allows the government to sweep up all of our communications data, and know everything about millions of innocent people when what it really
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needs is... they don't really know, they are not trawling through that, you know, our boring e—mail chain about where we are meeting a friend for coffee. we hope not. we ought to live in security to know that. the law is catching up with the fact we are entitled to know the law protects us from the government being able to do that. a targeted surveillance programme. well well, the intelligence services claim they can only do that by gathering this data and sifting there it. it is important to say without slipping to paranoia we need to ask who are we more scared of the government or the terrorist? the starting point is we do in general trust the government because it is under the oversight of parliament. in this country we have parliamentary sovereignty, as i mentioned our parliament looks at how to balance as it has when it passed the laws how to balance civil liberties needs and the concern is that things like the european court
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of human rights is thinking in terms of human rights is thinking in terms of more abstract principles and not national interests of this country. 0k. national interests of this country. ok. i think it's a false choice. we don't have to choose between trusting terrorist or the government. the point is that we can live with privacy, privacy is an important value too and we need to value that and allow the government to have the powers to fight crime and terrorism. it is not one or the other? i think we agreeing with that, this country is very good at putting checks and balances and the government has put new checks and balances in place. it would be concerning if we outsourced these decisions to foreign overseas courts and there is a move in this country that wants to see much more sovereignty brought back to parliament and decision making here in this country. sure. we will talk about brexit after 10.00. let us not go there now. thank you nearly 50 health experts have written to public health england saying they oppose its decision to work with drinkaware — a charity funded by
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the alcohol industry. in a letter seen by bbc news, they say the partnership will significantly damage the organisation's credibility. on tuesday, the government's alcohol adviser, sir ian gilmore, resigned in protest at the agency's decision to cooperate with the charity on a new campaign. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, is here with me now. michael, fill our audience in with this storiches indeed, this kick off with ourcampaign this storiches indeed, this kick off with our campaign launched earlier this week, in con conjunction with this week, in con conjunction with this charity called drink aware which is funded by the drink industry. the message is you should produce the alcohol you drink to two days a week you shouldn't drink, the problem is this tie in with drink aware, we know that the alcohol adviser was unhappy about it and
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resigned. we have learned that last month nearly 50 experts in public health said you should not get involved with this charity. it will damage public health england's credibility with the public, they say this particular charity and particularly its funders who are the big brewing company, they don't currently, some don't currently promote the safe level of alcohol drinking, in some cases they undermined public health messages in some campaigns they say beyond that public health england's own evidence shows these types of campaigns don't work. there was a study published by public health england in 2016 and it said public private partnerships aimed at behavioural change, these kind of communications messages there is scant evidence they have worked, so they are saying don't get involved with these people, they are
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funded by the brewing company, the alcohol companies and this type of message doesn't really change public behaviour. well, professorjohn newton is director of health improvement at public health england. there is damning stuff, what are you doing? well, good morning. i think the context for this of course is the rising harm from alcohol and obesity that we have reported on on tuesday, we published our health profile so we think that level of harm requires action not inaction. so fine, that is fine, not many would disagree with that, don't work with a charity funded by the alcohol industry. our job is to ensure any messages to the public are fairand job is to ensure any messages to the public are fair and accurate. we know drink aware, they are not the alcohol industry. they are funded by the alcohol industry. they are, among others, there are supermarkets and others but they are regulated and others but they are regulated and we have found working with them very constructive, they are, we believe acting in good faith,
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communicating with the public. we believe they are acting in good faith. that is not good enough is it? what we have found, it is our job, we have a duty to inform the public and to make sure that m essa g es public and to make sure that messages are accurate and according to the evidence. absolutely you don't have to do that with anyone else, you could do—it—yourselves. don't have to do that with anyone else, you could do-it-yourselves. we do, this is in addition. drink aware have nine million hits a yore from people on their website. we see that as an opportunity to get the m essa g es as an opportunity to get the messages out to people who are trying to reduce their drinking. how can anyone believe the messages when so can anyone believe the messages when so many experts say it damages your credibility? the messages if you look at the website, in fact the, it has been welcomed. they are not criticising the campaign, the campaign has been very well received. i would like to make the
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point. there is a difference about the message, but it is the tie up with the drinkaware that people are really really unhappy with. when i was speaking to public health england yesterday, we were saying ourcampaign have england yesterday, we were saying our campaign have messages of support, they named five separate organisation, the british liver trust company 3 when you go to them and say to you support the tie up they say no we don't. the british liver trust say we don't. several other organisations that public health england mentioned support the message but would not comment on the tie in. this is a problem that every public health official i have spoken to has mentioned, they can't understand why the, why public health england would get involved in this organisation, this organisation wants to push this message of drinking less, that is fine for them to do, but by getting involved and working with them, the allegation is that you are giving by extension the
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alcohol industry some degree of respectability in terms of, instead of focussing on the harm they are doing. fr i would stress that drinkaware is not the alcohol industry. they can make that point themselves, the reason we are working with them is because this is an opportunity they have ten million, nine to ten million hits, probably gone up since we have done this coverage, that is an opportunity to guess messages through, we want to make sure that the messages are as effective as they can be. don't you wonder why they can be. don't you wonder why the alcohol industry is funding drinkaware? what we are aware of is drinkaware? what we are aware of is drinkaware are active in this area, they are a charity, that are an educational charity. have you asked that question? about why the, they are funding when, i mean you would have to ask them. surely it has occurred to you to ask that question? we have a duty to make sure that messages to the public are
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accurate and evidence based. drinkaware are for whatever reason putting out messages to the public about alcohol, we are, our primary responsibility is to do what we can to improve the health of the population, public health is controversial, we have beens criticised in the past and we will be in the future. you have absolutely defended your work with drinkaware, despite they are funded by the alcohol industry, you would work with them again? we are working with them. we work i can assure your our independence has not been diminished by this partnership, our objective is to run a good campaign with drinkaware. it is not the only thing we do. it is a small step but we think it is a step in the right direction. beyond this particular campaign and this particular link, the other point made to me, is in their initial statement public health england say this was the first step in resetting the relationship with a wider alcohol industry and the concern is this is just the first step and there will
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be other messages and other campaigns further down the road funded by brewery, alcohol industry, who public health officials would argue have no interest in reducing alcohol consumption in this country. that is speculation, we have no intention of taking any money from the industry, there is, this is not, this... you could be stronger than that, you say you have no intention. there is no suggestion we are going to do something funded by the alcohol industry. you have said you are going to vet the relationship. we think there needs to be an honest conversation with the public, we have had good experience working with the food industry on sugar, we have taken out vast amounts of sugar, have taken out vast amounts of sugar, we have taken out vast amounts of sugar, we don't think you can effect that change if you don't talk to people who are on the street doing the work and that is what is behind that we are doing it carefully and we have very carefully safeguarding our independence. thank you, professorjohn newton
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from public health england and michael buchanan. all the sport on the way but first the weather. good morning. not a the way but first the weather. good morning. nota bad the way but first the weather. good morning. not a bad start to the day across england and wales has lots of sunshine around but pretty chilly. temperatures last night close to freezing in some areas and frost on the grass in parts of central and eastern england as well as parts of southern wales. a different story further north with temperatures held up further north with temperatures held up by further north with temperatures held up by showers. they have been working across scotland and northern ireland this morning, heading towards northern england, pushing in through late morning and into the afternoon. increasing amounts of cloud later. sunshine in northern england. after that chilly start, a bright day with mist and fog clearing and temperatures up a degree or so on yesterday and nice enough where you have got the
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sunshine but down on where it should be for this time of year. tonight, clear skies towards the south and cool tonight but not quite as chilly as last night. after clear start, rain spreads into western scotland and northern ireland and temperatures will hold up here as the breeze picks up. goodbye for now. thanks, matt. hello. it's thursday. it's ten o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. theresa may's cabinet are meeting right now to discuss preparations for a no—deal brexit. the brexit sec says if there's no deal with the eu over brexit, the uk won't be paying 39 billion to the eu but he won't tell voters how much britain will have to pay. we will always comply with our strict legal obligations but i think what is very clear is that we would not pay the amount or the schedule in terms of the phased approach that was agreed as part of the negotiated settlement. so how much does this eurosceptic conservative mp think britian shld pay in the event of no deal? nothing.
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the british voters will not take kindly to handing over billions of pounds to the eu as a thank you for having me leaving present. no deal is not a bluff, say number 10, as ministers are told they need to get a shift on with plans for quitting the eu without any agreement. the number of cases of domestic abuse where men are the victims has more than doubled in the last five years in england and wales. we will hear from this man who said he was the victim of abuse by his ex—girlfriend and found it extremely difficult to get the help he needed. and a warning that mums who post graphic and terrifying accounts of birthing stories online like these are contributing to a growing phobia of childbirth. we'll hear from one researcher who says sharing such personal experiences may be therapeutic for the mother but pregnant women could be traumatised.
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good morning. it's ten o'clock. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the latest news. members of the cabinet are holding an extended 3—hour meeting to discuss preparations for what would happen if the uk left the eu without a deal and will later publish guidance on how that would affect mobile phone roaming charges, passports and driving licences. speaking to the bbc this morning, the brexit secretary dominic raab has warned that in the event of negotiations with brussels falling apart, the uk would not pay the money it offered to pay to move the talks to the next stage. we wouldn't pay the amount that has been agreed as part of the financial settle m e nt been agreed as part of the financial settlement but i think we would recognise our strict legal obligations, and i think that would be significantly, substantially lower. and it is notjust the issue of quantum. i will come back to that. it is the rate of payment and the way in which it is done. we will
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be haggling for every penny and paying effectively the bare minimum. i think you can expect that. i think we just need to be clear about that, but that is nothing new. the prime ministers edit this week and i have said it before. it is well understood, because the eu has a lwa ys understood, because the eu has always said there is no deal until we get the whole deal. the european court of human rights has ruled that the uk government's mass surveillance practices breach human rights law and violated the right to privacy of those targeted. the ruling says that a bulk communications data collection regime is permissible but that the uk system lacked sufficient oversight, and did not filter information sufficiently and it was these failures that breached human rights law. the court also said the bulk interception ofjournalistic material also violated the right to freedom of information. negotiations between british and french fishermen to end the row known as the scallop wars in the english channel have collapsed.
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french fishermen have aggressively confronted their british counterparts in the channel in recent months and industry leaders had been working to agree compensation for smaller fishing boats to stop foraging for the molluscs during a period when the french are banned under domestic law. the head of the french normandy fishing committee says the british rejected the last offer made. forecasters in the united states are warning of life—threatening waves and rainfall, even though the powerful hurricane approaching the east coast has weakened to a category two storm. georgia hasjoined north and south carolina, virginia and maryland in declaring a state of emergency over fears that hurricane florence may cause catastrophic floods. officials say that the storm is moving more slowly so may lingerfor longer, causing more damage. more than a million people have been ordered to leave their homes. the company which runs john lewis and waitrose has announced that its profits were virtually wiped out in the first half of the year. in the six months to the end of july, pre—tax profits at thejohn lewis partnership plunged by 99 percent, compared with the same
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period last year, to £1.2 million. the chairman of the partnership, sir charlie mayfield, said the retail industry was facing challenging times and said the ongoing brexit negotiations were in part to blame for uncertainty in the economy. a ten—year—old boy in missouri is recovering after he was attacked by wasps and fell from a tree house face first on to a meat skewer. you mightfind face first on to a meat skewer. you might find these x—ray images disturbing. the thin spike that went through there be a cunning's had miraculously missed his eyes, brain, spinal—cord and major blood vessels. —— xavier cunningham. he fell from the tree house on saturday. the hospital say he should recover fully but his voice could be effective. —— could be affected. more news at
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10:30am. thank you. those images we re 10:30am. thank you. those images were incredible. there are warnings that sharing scary childbirth stories could be making fear of childbirth worse. you affected by that? are you thinking that you can't give birth because it is so bad? we will be talking about that later on to mumsnet and the lecturer suggesting this. if you think that sounds like you, please get in touch: there is twitter and facebook and all the rest as well. now the sport with steve. good morning, victoria. there's been plenty about serena williams since that controversial us open tennis final, but now we've heard
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from the winner too. japan's naomi 0saka, who grew up in america, has been talking to ellen degeneres about saturday's events, when serena williams berated the umpire and accused him of sexism. whilst 0saka claimed the title in new york, her moment of glory was rather overshadowed, and she even thought the booing on court was for her, not the umpire. when you're little, you're taught not to look, like, if your opponent gets angry or anything, told to just turn around and try to focus. so i tried to do that. but i heard a lot of people in the crowd making noises and i really wanted to turn around. at the time i did kind of think they were booing me. oh, no! i couldn't tell what was going on because it was so loud in there. right. so it was a little bit stressful. receiving the trophy, there was a lot of booing in the crowd and then serena leaned over and said something to you. what did she say to you? that she was proud of me and that i should know that the crowd wasn't booing at me.
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british cycling remains on course for a clean sweep of the grand tours. chris froome won the giro d'italia, geraint thomas the tour de france, and now simon yates is just a few days away from winning the vuelta a espana. it was a foggy stage 17, won by canada's michael woods. yates, who you can see here in red, had his overall lead trimmed by eight seconds, but still has a 25 second advantage with four stages to go. the former england one—day captain paul collingwood is retiring at the end of the season, 22 years after making his first—class debut. he played in 68 test matches, was part of three ashes winning sides and led england to victory at the icc world t20 in 2010. collingwood's final game for durham, at the age of 42, will be at home to middlesex, starting on 24th september. david silva has enjoyed huge success in his career,
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winning three prmeier legaue titles with manchester city, and a world cup and two european championships with spain. but the premature arrival of a son, mateo, in december had an understandable impact on him as a person and a footballer, and says that football helped take his mind off what was happening at home in spain. it was really tough, it was so difficult him being in hospitalfor so long. he was in spain. it meant i had to travel a lot and i could hardly train. i didn't sleep well and i wasn't eating well. luckily the team was playing well and that really helped me a lot. i've said it before, the only time i could get it out of my mind was when i was playing. i would start thinking that everything once the match was over. but yes, it really was a good escape. football is what we like and enjoy the most. and you can see more of that interview with
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david silva on the bbc‘s premier league show at 10 this evening. that is all the sport for now. good morning. it is 10:12am. what will be the impact on your mobile phone roaming charges when you go abroad, your driving licence if driving in a european country and your passport if the uk cannot get a deal with the eu? mrs may and her top team are discussing all that right now — specificaly what to do in the event of a no deal brexit. let's get more from norman who's at downing st. good morning. we had a surprise visitor to downing street this morning, one mark carney, governor of the bank of england, who was also at that meeting, i assume to give ministers the third degree on the possible economic cost if we have got to leave the eu without any deal, because today is really for
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ministers to look at the practical nitty—gritty implications and to set out what sort of plans they are putting in place. but it is also about waving a bit of a stick, frankly, at the eu, to say to them in effect that we are absolutely serious about leaving without any deal if you don't give us the deal we want. then yes, mrs may will walk away from the negotiating table. so it is also an attempt to put a bit ofa it is also an attempt to put a bit of a squeeze on the eu, and to add to that we have had dominic raab, the brexit secretary, this morning, saying if we don't get the deal we like, you ain't going to get the £39 billion divorce bill that you want. have a listen. we wouldn't pay the amount that has been agreed as part of the financial settlement, but i think we would recognise our strict legal obligations, and i think that would be significantly, substantially lower. and it is not just the issue of quantum. i come back to that. it is the rate of payment and the way in which it is
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done. we will be haggling for every penny and paying effectively the bare minimum. i think you can expect that. i think we just need to be clear about that, but that is nothing new. the prime minister said this week and i have said it before andi this week and i have said it before and i think it is well understood. of course the eu always say there is no deal until we get the whole deal. this isn't just about waving a no deal until we get the whole deal. this isn'tjust about waving a stick at the eu. it is also about waving a stick at mrs may's troublesome brexit backbenchers, who don't back her plan on chequers. the thinking is that if she does manage to get the eu to sign up to some sort of chequers agreement, she brings it back to parliament, and then she will be able to say to her troubles are backbench mps, look, if you guys don't back my deal, then really, really, really, we are going to leave without any sort of agreement, and that has all sorts of knock—on consequences. in other words, to try
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and maybe give her mps a bit of a reality check, in hopes that those of them opposed to a chequers deal will blink if the alternative is only no deal. thank you, norman. let's hear from one of those troublesome backbench mps, as you describe them. yesterday a group of conservative leave—voting mps who call themselves the european research group and who don't like mrs may's brexit plan known as chequers came up with their own proposals for solving the irish border question after the uk leaves the eu, which would potentially include customs checks miles from the border minimised by using technology and similar rules to the eu, but only in some areas. the proposals were dismissed by ireland's foreign minister who said said the proposals were an unworkable distraction. let's hearfrom a member of the group of eurosceptic tory mps, the european research group, they want a hard brexit and are vehemntly opposed to the pm's chequers deal. he's called sir bernard jenkin and i asked him how much he thought
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the uk shld pay to the eu if there's no brexit deal at all. nothing. it won't be nothing according to the brexit secretary. and article 50, the eu has agreed by treaty with all its members, that if you leave, all obligations seize on the day you leave. dominic raab says we have legal obligations so we will have to pay something. no, even the house of lords constitution committee, which is dominated by people who voted remain, agree there is no obligation for the uk to pay an extra fee. there are brexit secretary is wrong? there are brexit secretary is wrong? the brexit secretary has said if it is not a conference of deal, we
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are not paying. that is what i understand him to say this morning. i have just heard understand him to say this morning. i havejust heard on understand him to say this morning. i have just heard on television this morning talking to my colleagues saying we will honour our legal obligations. we will honour our legal obligations. and we will have to pay something, that is what he is saying. but it will be a much smaller amount. the house of commons has got to approve this expenditure. british voters aren't going to take kindly to handing billions of pounds to the eu as a kind of thank you for having me leaving present when we have got hospitals and schools and police and armed forces to fund. i am certainly not voting for it myself. in your view, is no deal prefera ble myself. in your view, is no deal preferable to mrs may's chequers plan? infinitely. why would we pay £40 billion to be trapped in the eu for another 21 months without any say over the laws and then be stitched into the eu rule book and undertakings to maintain broadly all the regulatory obligations of eu membership? this is why. because no deal would be a higher risk to businesses, jobs and the livelihoods of the people of britain in the short term. well, i think people accept that there is a period of
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transition to go through. you make it silent so benign. —— you make it sound so benign. the people are losing theirjobs... sound so benign. the people are losing theirjobs. .. there won't be massive job losses. how many will there be? the government predicted 600,000 job lossesjust there be? the government predicted 600,000 job losses just when we voted leave. we have created 600,000 morejobs instead. they said we would go into recessionjust if we voted leave and in fact the economy has carried on growing very strongly. the scare stories are not believable. just though i am clear, because this is really important. everybody seems to say that there are risks with no deal in the short—term, apart from people like yourself and people in the european research centre. what exactly are these risks? are you seriously suggesting that the german car industry... wait a minute. can i a nswer industry... wait a minute. can i answer the point you havejust industry... wait a minute. can i answer the point you have just asked me? when you say everybody says, i
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don't agree with you. what we are being asked to believe is that the german car industry, and we are their biggest market, they won't wa nt to their biggest market, they won't want to sell as cards any more? french manufacturers will not want to sell as food any more? the european union will not want to buy our medicines any more?” european union will not want to buy our medicines any more? i don't think anybody is saying that. what is this big risk then? for example, even todayjohn lewis profits are down to nearly zero in the last six months because of brexit uncertainty. i think people having difficulties with their retail businesses will blame all sorts of things rather than themselves for their problems. i think far more people are buying things online, and perhaps using john lewis as a very good benchmark and then going online and buying things elsewhere. that is what people are doing. and i think there are big challenges for the high street stores. we have just seen high street stores. we have just seen house of fraser go bust. this is not because of brexit. this is
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because of the changing nature of retail across the whole world. so are there no risks with no deal, in your view? there are huge risks of doing the chequers deal.” your view? there are huge risks of doing the chequers deal. i am asking you about no deal. are you saying there are no risks if there is no deal outcome? every time you step out of the door, you are taking a risk. you won't answer the question. cani risk. you won't answer the question. can ijust risk. you won't answer the question. can i just answer your question, please? please do! there is a balance of risks which are because we take. however there has been a referendum and the united kingdom has voted to leave, to leave the single market, and the government's only blip that that is what would happen. we voted to try and get a free trade deal with the eu. if they don't give us a free trade deal, that would be the lowest risk option for the uk that would be the lowest risk option forthe uk and that would be the lowest risk option for the uk and eu, that would be the lowest risk option forthe uk and eu, but that would be the lowest risk option for the uk and eu, but if the eu won't do that, we will go for the world trade organisation terms, which have the advantage that we don't have to pay them any money. so
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for people watching this morning, what are the risks to them? there may be a little short—term disruption. what does that mean for people's lives? i don't think people will notice. honestly. the idea that suddenly there will be a blockade of the channel ports, and as the brexit secretary says himself, we are not going to run out of food and medicines. this is absolutely absurd. unless the eu is such a bad organisation that they want to inflict these problems on their own people and on ireland in particular as well as ourselves, i don't think they want to do that. i think good sense will prevail. 0k. they want to do that. i think good sense will prevail. ok. if mrs may goes to the conservative party conference in a few weeks, sticking with the chequers proposal, what are you and your colleagues who think the same as you, what is your plan b? the plan b is to go back to what the policy was in the manifesto and in the leadership speech, and in the
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lancaster house speech and so on, that we should offer the eu is a comprehensive free trade deal, which is greatly to their advantage, because they export so much more to us than we do to them. and if she doesn't change her mind, which he doesn't change her mind, which he doesn't look like she is going to do, what is your plan b? to leave the european union on world trade 0rganisation terms, which is is how we trade with the vast majority of countries in the world, world trade 0rganisation terms. countries in the world, world trade organisation terms. and if she won't change her mind or scrap chequers, what will you do? i think we will try to persuade her to do that. you haven't been able to do that. can i finish my point, please? you keep interrupting me. the house of commons is not going to vote for a chequers deal. there are votes in the house of commons and the labour party is against it and the scottish national party is against it and a substantial number of conservative
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mps will not vote for it. the chequers proposal is not an option. it is either a free trade deal, which is what the british people voted for, or world trade 0rganisation terms, which is obviously the only alternative. do you agree with your colleague, iain duncan smith, who has told everyone in your party to stop plotting against mrs may? he said stop it, it is just against mrs may? he said stop it, it isjust stupid. against mrs may? he said stop it, it is just stupid. yes. what against mrs may? he said stop it, it isjust stupid. yes. what would you say to those continuing to talk about getting rid of mrs may? every time you open your mouth and talk about the leadership, you distract the public and the media from the issues that we need to be discussing with the government. we want the government to change its policy, not its leader. and what word would you use to describe the prime minister? jacob rees—mogg yesterday described her as dutiful. what would be your adjective? i think she is devoted to public service. i think she is
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personally a person of great principle, and i hugely admire her courage and tenacity. the eid -- the idea is that you have made about the irish border have been knocking around for a couple of years and have been rejected. do you accept that mrs may has already looked at those options? she looked at those options but she took no for an a nswer very options but she took no for an answer very quickly from the eu and there was no press pack. she didn't come back to the house of commons and say i very much regret that the european union has rejected these proposals, we are not going to change our position, we are going to stick to this, and we either do a free—trade agreement with the european union or we leave on world trade organisation terms. i think thatis trade organisation terms. i think that is what she should have said. i don't think the eu wants us to leave without a deal. they want our money and they want our trade. your view is that mrs may is going to have to change her mind in the next few
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weeks because she won't get hurt deal, her plan through parliament?” think she will change her mind. i hope that the eu don't trap her into this position before she realises that she needs to change her mind. but the conservative party does not support this. the labour party does not support this. the chequers proposals won't go through. they don't deliver brexit. we don't take back control of our own laws. we will still have to apply what we call the eu rule book. the bernard jenkin, conservative mp, who as you may have gathered does not mrs may's chequers plan at all. coming up: posting your graphic descriptions of giving birth online is contributing to a growing phobia of childbirth, that's according to one senior midwife and mumsnet.
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you'll hear from them before 11. the number of domestic abuse cases reported to the police in england and wales where men rather than women were the victims has more than doubled in the last five years, according to figures obtained by 5live's afternoon edition. the numbers, from the charity mankind initiative, show that there were around 72,000 reports to police in 2012 involving male victims, which rose to more than 149,000 last year. around a fifth of reports of domestic abuse concern a male victim. the number of reports of domestic violence offences against female victims has also risen since 2012, to a total of almost 450,000 last year. let's talk to mark brooks from the male domestic violence charity mankind initiative, who produced today's figures, jo majauskis from the charity safer places who provide support for male and female victims of domestic abuse in essex and hertfordshire, and leon who says he was abused physically and emotionally
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by an ex—girlfriend. he's asked for us to protect his identity. leon is not his real name. good morning to everybody. how did she treat you? she was very clever. it started quite subtly and it worked up started quite subtly and it worked up to physical, which led to emotional, and ultimately if you like financial. everything was control. i lived in fear. i didn't know what i was coming home to. what was the physical abuse? what did she do to you? punches to the torso so it couldn't be seen at work. and what would lead to that? describe scenario where she would end up punching you in the chest. it would be anger of some kind, something that had happened in her day and she wa nted that had happened in her day and she wanted to vent when she got home. 0r if something had gone right. it would be small things to big things. things beyond my control mainly.
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what impact did that have on you?” was a shell of a person. i felt very vulnerable because i didn't even know my identity any more. i didn't even know what i was coming home to at the end of the day. you left feeling half the person you should be. very, very damaging. did you think about calling the police, going to the police.” think about calling the police, going to the police. i did. the problem you have is that you are in denial that it is happening at all. you kind of i to blame for that? it was only when i came across somebody else going through it that i thought, i recognise half of those things in my own life. ifound thought, i recognise half of those things in my own life. i found the police not very helpful at all. we probably discussed this. there is an educational need for the police to accept that domestic violence isn't
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accept that domestic violence isn't a female monopoly. how did they treat you then? dismissive. i am still waiting two years later for domestic abuse support. it doesn't appear on their radar. that men can be victims. presumably it is really difficult to move on if there is no help for you? it was nowhere. it was only really the nature of good friends. i couldn't turn to family, because she could identify where i was. that would lead on to further issues. it is really down to friends. there was no other help anywhere. my gp was helpful in terms of prescribing medication, but even their hands were tied. antidepressants? and sleeping pills. have people ask you why you didn't leave your abusive partner? yes. in some way, i think there is a lot
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more understanding, that because there is nowhere for men to go, they kind of, i wouldn't say they are a bit more understanding, but it is when you give them the picture, a lot of people go, i hadn't considered that the problem you have got is because of men don't talk about it, therefore it isn't a problem, therefore there's no need for a resource. let me bring in mark, from the charity man kind initiative. men are the victims, the statistics have doubled in. initiative. men are the victims, the statistics have doubled inm initiative. men are the victims, the statistics have doubled in. it means more men are coming forward to getting help, whereas years ago. they are coming forward but not necessarily getting help as we have just heard. a lot of men aren't getting the help, that is one of the reasons we need to see more funding for male services but alongside more funding for female services because it is not a competition and i think
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there is an issue about men where they have been signposted to, where they have been signposted to, where they are referred to and whether they are referred to and whether they know that services are available to them, in their local towns cities or county. what are the services available? is it charities like yourself, like your, is that it? yes, it is broadly and broadly commissioned by or paid for by local councils or police and crime commissioner bus there are more services now foremale victims, ten yea rs services now foremale victims, ten years ago there was 60 to 70, there is now 200. 0ften years ago there was 60 to 70, there is now 200. often they are services traditionally run for just women is now 200. often they are services traditionally run forjust women but have opened their doors for men now. that is something we welcome. joe, how do the services differ? whoever we work we will differ, you have to have a individual responses to their needs, we offer the same services
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whether that is community support, refuge, individual case work, we find when men come they need different support, they are asking for practical support, housing and access to children, and that sort of thing. the offer is the same. except there aren't male refuges, are there? we do have some accommodation for men. there are gender disparities between violence against men and women. women are far more likely to be killed in the context of domestic violence than men, when we talk about refuge we don't necessarily want that to just by a accomodation because it can be really, it can displace them and can be unsettling, take them away from their support network, we tend to put them in the they are at risks of of serious harm. there is less of a need for men. why do you think the numbers have doubled ? need for men. why do you think the numbers have doubled?” need for men. why do you think the
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numbers have doubled? i would like to think it is is a positive thing and people are having more confidence in services and more confidence in services and more confidence in services and more confidence in coming forward, as you said numbers have gone up for female victim there is a greater understanding of coercive control with the new legislation that came m, with the new legislation that came in, so certainly, as a service we have seen the number of male victims go have seen the number of male victims 9° up have seen the number of male victims go up as well. is there still a stigma for male victims in speaking out? yes, there is, i mean there is a real fear that they won't be believed, that they are to blame, and also, they feel alone, because they don't hear so much about male victims, they think they are the only man in the world this is actually happening to, and that is why there's been a huge push from police forces, to actually have awareness campaigns to encourage more men and women to come forward. we think that is having a real impact here. leon, how long were you subjected to physical and emotional abuse from your ex. 12 months. i
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think it took about nine months for me to realise. to realise that you... that things weren't right. that you were a victim of domestic abuse. i spent a long time justifying that action, she was clever, she became proficient at it. she had a history of that any way, and like mark, you have hit the nail on the head, men feel as if they are on the head, men feel as if they are on their own, especially when row go looking for support and advice, it is very much tailored towards the female victim, and therefore that puts you, if you like, at a low priority, that is how you feel most certainly. has it, does it continue to have an impact on you? most definitely. in what way? you, the depression doesn't go away, the self—doubt doesn't go away, the trusting of other people doesn't go away and the lack of faith in the system and the services as a result my view of the police has changed to
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one of distrust, and certainly no faith, i was brought up in a time where you had to respect authority. but i have learned that has to be learned and when you turn to the police, the one and only time you need their help and they're not there, that is it, that is all your cards played. i wonder if there is a man watching, who may find themselves, maybe in a scenario similarto themselves, maybe in a scenario similar to the one you have described, would you recommend they contact the police? i should say yes, but speaking from experience, i think you will probably leave yourself wide—open to further accusations because what will happen is she will accuse you, and you will be taken away, is that what happened to you? absolutely. you went to the police, she accused you of what she accused me of assault and i had evidence. i had photographic evidence, written evidence whiched hay given to my boss, and the police decided to dismiss that because it didn't fit with what they perceived to bea
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didn't fit with what they perceived to be a domestic abuse situation. i have spoken to other men about this, it is easy to take the man away, you are taken away but where do you go? that is why i say i don't really trust the police. what happened to you, she reported you for assault, did they come and arrest you? they took me away. they arrested you? it went to court. the judge said there is no evidence, it was thrown out. i raised the fact i had evidence for my case, and the police went, we are not going to do anything about it, it is done and dusted. do you come across that kind of example? we do from time to time. ten years ago, we used to get a lot of those types of situation, men going to police, not being believed, even when they had strong evidence. occasionally we would get that now. would the ex taking revenge by effectively friending it was the man that was abusive. yes, certainly. i mean the whole issue round counter or false
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allegations is continually a problem, including the, including the threat of, if you go to the police i will tell the police you have done x or even sometimes saying if you go to the police, i will say you have done something to the children at home as well. so we do get those calls and they have been increasing, but, response from the police over the last ten years generally is far better than it was. 0k. generally is far better than it was. ok. thank you all very much. and if you have been affected by domestic violence you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website — at bbc.co.uk slash actionline. still to come. a warning that mums who post graphic and terrifying accounts of birthing stories online like these are contributing to a growing phobia of childbirth. hurricane florence has weakened to a category 2 storm as it approaches north and south carolina
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—— but could still cause serious damage. breaking news and it is to do with waiting times in england and wales, the number of people waiting more than 18 weektors non—urgent operations is at the highest level ina operations is at the highest level in a decade. let us talk to our health editor hugh pym. this is not good. well victoria these are the latest figures from nhs england, covering a whole range of data. relating to how long patients have to wait. once again, all the key targets a re to wait. once again, all the key targets are being missed. and the things that we can just pick out, there is an 18 week target for
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waiting for non—urgent surgery operation, hips and knees and so on, there are more than 503,000, that is there are more than 503,000, that is the highest in a decade. the total waiting list for all operations is 4.12 million, the highest since 2007. a lot of those will be being seen 2007. a lot of those will be being seen within 18 weeks but it shows you the scale and it has been known in the nhs for a while, that hospitals have had so many priorities, they have been encouraged to down play this one, and to concentrate on a&e and dealing with other issues but for people waiting on that lists, it is pretty grim. the only one i was going to pick out was cancer patient, there should be a 62 day wait and no longer, between urgent referral by a gp and the start of treatment, and the percentage who have started treatment within that time is the lowest since records began in 2009. less than 80%, the target should be 85. so more strain
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on the nhs, these waiting lists getting longer. why? welll on the nhs, these waiting lists getting longer. why? well i think it is the number of patients growing faster than the budgets that they have got, theresa may and jeremy hunt when he was health secretary have pledged more money from next year but right now, the nhs feels that it year but right now, the nhs feels thatitis year but right now, the nhs feels that it is doing the best it can with the money it has got, the numbers coming through the door but it doesn't have enough, and there are more and more people presenting with different condition, people are living longer and are older so there will be more people who get cancer, and need this sort of surgery well into their 90s and the nhs is having to deal with that. but they are seeing a lot people, and dealing with a lot of people but these waiting lists do get longer. thank you. "giving birth was the most painful thing i've ever experienced bar none."
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that's an example of one of the many comments that appear on websites like mumsnet from women describing their childbirth experience. and one midwife is saying that stories like these are increasing the number of women suffering from tocophobia — that's a fear of giving birth. "labour was the most horrendous experience i've ever been through." "i had a haemorrhage. my son and husband were taken out of the room and the consultant was called because the doctor couldn't stop the bleeding, turned out she had torn my cervix with the forceps." "i had a bad tear and big bleed, and only narrowly avoided needing a blood transfusion. " well, let's talk to catriona jones from hull and also to anna cook from mumsnet. also with us is claire mitchell from near harrogate. she was terrified of
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giving birth. thank you all very much for talking to us. let me talk to you, as a former midwife, then, first of all, what is the problem? right, first of all, i do need to say that there is a place for peer support mechanisms, such as mumsnet and netmums, and that is peer—to—peer action, it can be positive for a lot of women and a lot of women benefit from engaging on those forums, so i think it's first of all really important to get that message across, but what we are suggesting, and this is coming through from research that has been undertaken as well, is that birth media in general, can play a part in perhaps presenting birth in quite a negative light, and encouraging women to think negatively about
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childbirth. and the kind of messages that i just read childbirth. and the kind of messages that ijust read out are being posted on forums like yours, anna, has catriona got a point? we don't think so. they are grown women, they have the right to know the truth about childbirth. sometimes it is positive, sometimes it is negative, sometimes it is somewhere in the middle. if you are not having an honest conversation, what is the point? women need to know the truth. what we have found is it can have a negative impact on mental health after berth, we did a postnatal care campaign, what we discovered was that people did end up with mental health issues because they diilln't get the birth they expected or promised. do you accept that, in most cases women are being honest.” do accept that and for some woman that honest account, kit be helpful, -- it that honest account, kit be helpful, —— it can be helpful. women can arm
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themselves with that information, and proceed to go on into labour and have an experience that they found very satisfactory, because they have got some insight into some of the things that may happen, but what we are speculating, is that some of these stories do actually, can trigger a fear response in women, and that can leave women feeling as if they have perhaps got heightened anxieties about something that will happen in the next few months, so, what we are trying to do, is trying to make sure that our support mechanisms out there for women who do end up becoming fearful, of the prospect of childbirth and are carrying that fear and anxiety throughout the rest of the pregnancy. claire, hello, thank you for coming on the programme. thanks for coming on the programme. thanks for getting in touch, how were you feeling in the run—up to giving birth? i was terrified. feeling in the run—up to giving
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birth? iwas terrified. i had feeling in the run—up to giving birth? i was terrified. i had no birth? i was terrified. i had no birth plan because the baby wasn't coming out. i had no idea ho this was going to happen. i don't do pain, injections or anything? was going to happen. i don't do pain, injections oranything? as was going to happen. i don't do pain, injections or anything? as far asi pain, injections or anything? as far as i was pain, injections or anything? as far as i was concerned no pain, injections or anything? as far as i was concerned no baby was going to be appearing so the night before i actually gave birth, i was at the mid wive wife's the day before, in tears saying i can't do this, they we re tears saying i can't do this, they were saying you can. i said i can't, i was so scared, the following morning i collapsed, at home, and i was 999 into hospital and my body started to shutdown, they didn't know, the doctors didn't know what was going on so they decided to give mea was going on so they decided to give me a caesarian which at that moment in time! me a caesarian which at that moment in time i didn't care what was happening, because it was taking it out of my, didn't have any choice, after they had got the baby out, very quickly, my body was still shutting down, they pulled my bowels out, found i had dodgy bowels then
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they found my appendix was about to burst so they removed that, sol they found my appendix was about to burst so they removed that, so i was in surgery for four—and—a—half hours but i had a brilliant anaesthetist and my husband, sol but i had a brilliant anaesthetist and my husband, so i felt comfortable because i didn't do a pinch o labour pain, i was so terrified. why? you sound, i am not a medical person, but you sound like you haddock phobia, this fear of giving birth but why were you so afraid? i don't do pain, my husband once cut his finger and he had to drive himself to hospital and i sat on the table while he was stitched up, and... not because you were reading traumatic experience from people online? to be honest i couldn't read anything or see anything. i went to one of these groups and they call me the crying lady now, my daughter is 11, i was sat rocking and crying because i couldn't listen to what they were saying, or didn't want to hear it
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because i was terrified. i didn't know it was called something but i was totally terrified. your researcher asked me if! was totally terrified. your researcher asked me if i had any more children. no chance! i didn't have a second appendix to be removed. so no, no chance. i don't know why i was terrified but i don't do pain. i was terrified yes. anna, catriona, it is about you know, there being better support for women who are afraid. that is something thatis who are afraid. that is something that is definitely necessary. but we find that the support comes, like she said from peer the peer. on mumsnet there are threads about tocophobia every day and the users come up with brilliant mechanisms of support, go to your gp. seek help, look into getting a doula. what is a doula? someone who stays with you during birth. how much do they cost? iam not during birth. how much do they cost?
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i am not sure, that is one suggestionings but there is lots of different option, the other thing is to talk it through. there this is this culture of fear that can contribute to the issue. one user said she was absolutely terrified, she used the word terrified three times in the subject title but she was scared because she hasn't heard any birth stories so sometimes uncovering that myth and showing what the reality is can take away some of that fear, we haven't seen catriona's research and we would love to, we think that having that support on mumsnet makes a massive difference to women. can you prove catriona a link between women who have read traumatic experiences and being afraid of giving birth what the research is saying, it is not my research, what the research is saying previous research that has been undertaken is saying one of the factors that is feeding into women developing a severe fear of
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childbirth,/tocophobia is engaging with negative birth story, it is one factor, so we are not saying, yes, social media is entirely to blame, however, the research does indicate that engaging with birth storieses that engaging with birth storieses that are negative and portray birth ina that are negative and portray birth in a negative light can have an impact on how a woman perceives her pending childbirth to be, so, so that, as i say, we have got a programme of research around perinatal mental health in general and around the services that exist to support women with problems, but we, the work we are doing on tocophobia does sit alongside this, the overall perinatal mental health work. i suppose nature of online forums, is if you have had a great experience you don't go on and glowingly talk about it because it
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is annoying and you come across as smug, if you are on an online forum you have a problem to share or asking for advice, is that fair? you have a problem to share or asking for advice, is that fair7m can be, what you find if someone posts up something about their fears or anxiety and what happens is people come on with support and their experience and the positive message they have got. so the reverse is sometimes true as well. thank you all of you. thank you very much. your 11—year—old girl, it was all worth it, yes? i enjoyed pregnancy and enjoyed her afterwards but it was just the birth. and enjoyed her afterwards but it wasjust the birth. you have made that point, clear! thank you for coming on. ten million people across the united states remain on some form of storm watch — that's despite hurricane florence being downgraded to a category two storm as it approaches land. officials still warn
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of a "disaster at the doorstep" because its slow—moving nature could cause catastrophic flooding. the storm is likely to approach the coast tonight and drop very heavy levels of rainfall, up to 1.7 million people have been ordered to evacuate million people have been ordered to eva cuate a cross million people have been ordered to evacuate across south caroline that and north carolina. some have decided to stay put. why? have a look at this. have a look at this. this is something that we haven't seen in our lifetime here. it is going to be a devastating storm. you must evacuate. don't play games with it. don't bet your life on riding out a monster. folks chose to stay here and ignore the mandatory evacuation orders. one key feature of us as human beings is we tend to
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be optimists. we think about, on certain future things, we think about the way things will go right rather than the way things will go wrong, so naturally when it comes to a hurricane disaster, we tend to think about the fact that we're probably going to escape, we're probably going to be all right. we know somebody is going to get hit but it's probably going to be somebody else. why aren't you evacuating? to be somebody else. we feel more safe. to be somebody else. a lot of it comes from the fact that it's not a decision we make every day and because people don't have preset preparedness plans, all of a sudden you hear word, you need to evacuate, you need to prepare and people are pretty uncertain as to just exactly how to go about doing it, so as a consequence, you sit back and say, what should i do? and the more uncertain you become, the more you basically tend to keep doing the thing you were doing before, which is nothing. we are very influenced by what our friends and neighbours do.
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so if we don't know what to do, and we're not sure what actions to take, we go ahead and look what our neighbours are doing and if they are not evacuating, we don't see them stocking up very much, we just assume that they know what they are doing and we just imitate them, but of course we don't appreciate the fact that they are no more knowledgeable than we are. we love you all, we want you safe, get out of the storm's way. we can speak now to two people who live in south carolina and who haven't evacuated, matt mardell and john wilbanks. math is not evacuating. math, how is it going? so far, so good, but we'll see in the next 24 hours. can you, i mean is there any sign of it, can you hear the wind or not? no, right now i think the winds are round about 5mph and the skies are clear, so about 5mph and the skies are clear, so it will be a pretty sudden change when it gets here, i hear that it's
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arriving on shore now in north carolina with some of the winds, we will see effects probably later op tonight, into tomorrow. right. and what preparations have been made in the care home? well, they look after 222 residents, most of there, most of the workers' jobs have to make sure that the residents are co mforta ble sure that the residents are comfortable and they don't feel too afraid. the building is well—designed to withstand hurricane force winds, and topping up generators with fuel, so in the event of a power outage which is highly likely here they will be ready to keep on going with the electricity they need. plenty of food in store? plenty of food in store, as you can imagine, i am sure they got in some emergency orders,
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but we are also, everybody is kind of carrying food with them to the facility and taking plenty of bottled water just in facility and taking plenty of bottled waterjust in case. water supplies become tainted. what about boarding up windows or sandbags at the door, have you had to do that? not really here, we are not expecting the level of wind that they expect just on expecting the level of wind that they expectjust on the north carolina coast, so we are not boarded up, some businesses have taken to putting sandbags at their doors on the main street in our down town area, just because of the threat of some some flooding but we are on relatively high ground so we should be pretty safe from the flooding, the major issue with all the rain that is coming this way is going to be the weakening of the ground, and a lot of trees coming down. right. you are really quite relaxed, i think, down. right. you are really quite relaxed, ithink, matt. i've done it a couple of times before, but i think you have got to have, you have to be confident in
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your preparation, and i've had receive rail days now to —— several days now to kind of prepare for in and see what it bring, i know i will be safe at the residents' home so we will wait and see how it pansous. all the best. thank you for we were asking you what your are teen was like, if it was anything like mark wahlbergs. he goes to bed at 7.30 which is 15 minutes earlier than me! kevin says i wonder why his 6am shower lasted one—and—a—half hours. if he could get that down 15 he could say in bed longer. another one says i am up at nine and i have a morning pipe. i read my novel.
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lunch, cheese on toast. afternoon nap, another pipe, thenjudgejudy. iam76 nap, another pipe, thenjudgejudy. i am 76 and nap, another pipe, thenjudgejudy. iam 76 and! nap, another pipe, thenjudgejudy. i am 76 and i weigh 12—and—a—half stone. that is quite a lot of information colin but thank you for sharing it. regarding being frightened about giving birth. lottie says i am 31. i wanted children but i won't because all i hear is stories of how it destroys your body and long lasting damage in your body and long lasting damage in your intimate areas. it was v shows doesn't help. that is a real shame lot di. from my humble experience i would say just lot di. from my humble experience i would sayjust go for it any way, thanks for your company today we are back tomorrow at nine. bbc news room live is next. have a most of us woke up to some blue
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skies and sunshine and it is sunny out there at the moment. this is the scene out there at the moment. this is the scene in the south—west, obviously lovely blue sky, and many of us have those blue skies across england and wales, more cloud though further north in scotland, northern ireland, a few showers here which will drift southwards into northern england, perhaps north wales, there will be more cloud but bright spells and maximum temperatures getting up to 14 to 20 celsius in london. through this ‘ve anyone and tonight, with clear skies again, across england and wales, it will once again be chilly, to start off on friday morning, more cloud and rain spreading into scotland and through northern ireland. that rain will work its way south and eastwards throughout friday. so wet at times for scotland, through northern ireland, into wales too, but the further south and east you are, certainly round the south—east of england it should be dry with sunny
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spells. bye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11... cabinet crunch talks for a no—deal brexit. ministers meet for a special session as the government publishes contingency plans for driving licences and passports. it wouldn't be a walk in the park, but it wouldn't be the end of the world. one of the consequences of leaving without a deal, as reg retta ble leaving without a deal, as regrettable and unlikely as i think that would be, i am confident we could get a good deal, but we need
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to prepare for all eventualities. life—threatening waves and rainfall as hurricane florence bears down on the east coast of america. a weather warning for asia as well — thousands evacuate the coastal areas in northern philippines as a super typhoon approaches. challenging times forjohn lewis as profits slump 99%, its boss says uncertainty over brexit is partly to blame.
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