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tv   Sportsday  BBC News  September 16, 2018 6:30pm-7:01pm BST

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to discuss it in any kind of way, i'll leave that to other people because it should be discussed. but not for me. i'm just happy. in hollywood, the crown remains hugely popular, and it's in the running again. but what's the fascination with the royals? i think we're sort of secretly happy that their life is more miserable than ours, because they live in what we imagine is the gilded cage with everything that you could think of that you'd want to be, princes and kings and queens, they have this incredible lifestyle supposedly, but then you understand that in the middle, they've all the same problems we do. and that's what makes good drama, whether you're in la or the yorkshire dales. so, when i'm in england, iwatch, like, emmerdale and shows like that. you do not! you're an emmerdale fan? me and my mum love all of those. why? they're just — they're very addictive. they know how to write a show, you know. they leave those cliffhangers real good. this annual bafta tea party is a curtain raiserfor the emmys, and very soon, we'll find out who'll be sipping the champagne.
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james cook, bbc news, los angeles. in a few minutes' time, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a full round up of the day's news with mishal husain — before that, it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello. we had the autumnal chilly start with a little mist and fog last week. this week, we have autumnal gales and some soaking rain in the forecast. we've had a little rain around this weekend, and through the course of sunday, it's made its way further south across england and wales, as we saw in wigan. this is the main band of rain, but all the time it tends to be petering out, just a lot of rain and low cloud with it. to the north, it's brighter, with showers and some sunshine either side as well to the end of the day. through the evening and overnight, that misty, drizzly weather will sink into southern areas. behind it, as the skies clear, it will turn a tad chilly with a bit of mist and fog around and generally light winds. further north and west, already we are starting to see a sign of a change coming into the south west of ireland towards morning. that's the first of the rain associated with the remnants of ex—hurricane helene,
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which is the tropical air, so will give us some soaking rains and, potentially, as you can see up through the irish sea, some strong to gale force winds. so, some autumnal gales up on the way before it whisks away, and we could have more gales on wednesday. but interestingly, as well as the wet and windy weather forecast, we'll also see temperatures really lifting as the warm, humid air drags its way into southern areas. so, the tropical air will also have the effect of giving southern parts temperatures in the mid—20s with some sunshine, as well. but clearly, there's concern about the amounts of heavy rain we'll get and the strength of the wind, which could cause disruption through monday evening, overnight and into tuesday. so, for monday, dawn‘s a little grey and drizzly, with some mist across the hills in the south. further north, brighter — any fog clears away. it's a gradual improvement, a brightening spell through england and wales, but for scotland and northern ireland, there's a lot more cloud around, and some really quite heavy rain for a time. where it stays dry, potentially, south—eastern northern ireland, south—east scotland, 18-19, but 24-25 in the south and east. so, it will feel quite
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summerlike again. then through monday evening and overnight, we see more of rain, that deepening area of low pressure moving its way northwards. so, bringing gales to the irish sea coasts of england, wales, perhaps southern scotland as well. so, it will be a very mild night. these temperatures are really akin with the average by day at this time of year. so by tuesday, that's starting to move out the way, so quite a windy start tuesday morning, then we look to the atlantic for this next area of low pressure, which could bring even strong winds, potentially, some severe gales to the north and west. she says she's determined to reach a good deal with the eu that works for people across the country. a good deal with the eu that works this is where i get a little bit irritated. this is not... a little bit irritated. this debate is not about my future. a little bit irritated. this debate is about the future of the people of the uk. one brexiteer, the cabinet minister michael gove, says chequers is the right plan for now, but could be changed by a future leader. for now, but could be also this evening: for now, but could be typhoon mangkhut reaches the chinese
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coast after killing dozens of people in the philippines. coast after killing dozens ruth davidson, leader of the scottish conservatives, reveals her struggle with depression, suicidal thoughts and self—harm. with depression, suicidal commentator: with depression, suicidal he breaks the world record commentator: he breaks the world record by an astonishing margin. and kenya's eliud kipchoge runs the fastest marathon ever in berlin. good evening. theresa may has insisted her chequers proposals are a workable plan for brexit, saying she gets irritated when the debate focuses on her leadership rather than the future of the country. on her leadership rather the prime minister made the comments in a bbc interview to mark six months to go till we leave the eu. in a bbc interview to mark six this morning, the environment
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secretary, michael gove, said the chequers plan for brexit was the right one "for now" — but could be altered by a future prime minister. our political correspondent chris mason reports. to emerge from this period of change stronger... the path towards brexit has involved plenty of speeches and plenty of characters. involved plenty of speeches some still in government and some not. and plenty of negotiation, too. and some not. here at home and in brussels. and some not. after a week in which some of her mps met in public to plan how to derail her blueprint for brexit and others openly plotted ousting herfrom office, theresa may is defiantly fighting back. this is where i get a little bit irritated. this is not... a little bit irritated. this debate is not about my future. a little bit irritated. this debate is about the future of the people of the uk and the future of the united kingdom. the people of the uk and the future that's what i'm focused on, and that's what i think we should all be focused on. and that's what i think it's ensuring that we get that good dealfrom the european union which is good for people in the uk. dealfrom the european union
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some brexit supporters say her plans involved to close a relationship with the eu. say her plans involved to close others, like michael gove, acknowledge they've compromised. but, he says, those compromises needn't be forever. a future prime minister could always choose to alter the relationship between britain and the european union. but the chequers approach is the right one for now, because we've got to make sure that we respect that vote and take advantage of the opportunities of being outside the european union. but this former conservative leader and a good number of his colleagues are not convinced. leader and a good number michael gove has said now is the time for compromise, change can come later. is the time for compromise, what do you say to that? is the time for compromise, i think that's a bit of a copout, really, to explain away what is essentiallyjam tomorrow and we can prophesy what the future is. and we can prophesy we can't. and we can prophesy we only have what is now, what the public voted for, which is brexit. what the public voted with so many arguments still swirling around, who makes the final call? still swirling around,
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the labour mayor of london thinks it should be us, voters, in a referendum. thinks it should be us, the question should be a choice between the deal done by this government or staying in the european union, and the deal done by this government, we can now see what actually the consequences would be. we can now see what actually labour's leadership remains to be convinced on another referendum. the prime minister insists it won't happen. and, she says, she will fight for her plan. you know what some people say. fight for her plan. they rather liked it when you joked about being that bloody difficult woman. when you joked about being that they liked that, and they sometimes say, where's she gone? we want her back. say, where's she gone? she's still there. say, where's she gone? but i think there is a difference between those who think you can only be bloody difficult in public, and those of us who think actually you bide your time and you're bloody difficult when the time is right, and when it really matters. difficult when the time is right, that resolve will certainly be tested in the coming months. and chris masonjoins me now. tested in the coming months.
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not tested in the coming months. just the coming mon a notjust the coming months, she has a big eu gathering coming up this week? yes, she is heading to salzburg in austria for an informal gathering of the eu's heads of state, and she knows that they know that her chequers plan has not been universally liked here in the uk, and europe has asked some pretty searching questions as well. those in government point to some warm words from brussels, but they still have problems with it. so the big push from downing street and the ministers is talking to four different audiences. the eu, their own mps and others, the conservative grassroots and the broader public, and there will be a big social media push starting tomorrow with a video authored by the prime minister. for those of the top of government, there is a determination, but there is an awareness that this negotiation is proving tough. as some people hope. chris, thank you
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very much. china's most populous province is being hit with torrential rain and high winds after the arrival of typhoon mangkhut. the storm, which is the most powerful to hit the region this year, moved towards guangdong and hong kong from the philippines, where it claimed around 60 lives. and hong kong from the philippines, jonathan head reports from there. and hong kong from the philippines, after the deluge. the shrieking wind was bad enough, but heavy rain brought a landslide to the northern philippines, burying vehicles, houses and people. the rivers are also dangerously swollen. here, rescuers managed to pull a mother and child to safety from theirflooded home. a mother and child to safety the storm has passed on, but everywhere it's left a trail of destruction. but everywhere it's left people are returning from evacuation shelters to find their homes in ruins. from evacuation shelters or, as for this man and his family, swept away completely. there's nothing they can do but to pick up their possessions.
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we don't know where we're going to live, he told me. our house is gone, and we'lljust have to go anywhere we can. you've only got to look at the state of this school roof to see just how powerfully destructive this storm was. all this damage is a really heavy blow for communities which have got very few resources, and where government help is sparing and flew at best. and where government help butjust as worrying for them is what happened to their crops. how badly damaged is this, roger? is what happened to their crops. like his neighbours, roger relies on his three cornfields for most of his income. roger relies on his three cornfields almost ripe, his crop has been flattened. we can save some of it, he said, but the rest is ruined. as we left his town, a good part of the population was where we'd first seen them, waiting in the hope of government
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assistance or private donations. waiting in the hope of government typhoon mangkhut has now moved west across the sea, hammering hong kong and showing that even one of asia's most modern and well built cities is no match for it. those who ventured outside soon wished they hadn't. even from indoors, the storm's power was a frightening spectacle. southern china is next in its path. jonathan head, bbc news, northern philippines. meanwhile parts of the us east coast are continuing to experience intense rainfall, with at least 14 people killed by storm florence in north and south carolina. with further flooding expected, those who evacuated their homes are being urged not to return. those who evacuated their homes
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our north america correspondent those who evacuated their homes chris buckler is in wilmington for us this evening. chris. for us this evening. the for us this evening. still. if you take me, you can see the still. if you take me, you can see what is the start of a very, very long queue that stretches right the way down this road, down another road and then further back until you eventually get to the petrol station over here. that is a priority the people, because they need it for generators, because so people, because they need it for generators, because so many people, because they need it for generators, because so many homes, hundreds of thousands of households, are without power at the moment. and just take a look at this queue at the moment. there is about 400 cars, we believe it is taking two and a half to three hours to actually manage to get fuel. that is a real problem for people. but beyond that, the other issue is that the rain continues to fall. already there has been a huge amount of rainfall, and as hurricane florence which is now
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just a storm, continues to move west, she is continuing to dump huge amounts of water, rainfall, and emergency services are still having to rescue people here. chris buckler in north carolina, thank you. a five—year study has found that there's no tangible benefit to healthy elderly people in taking aspirin as a preventative measure. it says adults aged over 70 who are in good health do not benefit from taking low doses of the drug, and could increase their risk of potentially fatal internal bleeding or cancer. the scottish tory leader ruth davidson has said she never wants to be prime minister, because she values her "mental health too much". because she values her in an interview with the sunday times, she's revealed struggling with self—harm, suicidal thoughts and depression as a teenager. suicidal thoughts and steven godden has more. suicidal thoughts and in reviving the fortunes of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson's personality has been to the fore. her leadership style has convinced some in the uk party she might succeed theresa may.
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some in the uk party she might but today in the sunday times, she insisted she'll never be prime minister because, she says, she values her mental health too much. she says, she values her in the interview, she describes going into a tailspin as a teenager. "i started hurting myself, punching walls, cutting my stomach and arms with blades or broken glass, drinking far, far too much. diagnosed with clinical depression, she was given medication which led to desperate, dark, terrible dreams. her struggles came when she was the same age as many of the students now at university in her edinburgh constituency. at university in her it's definitely something that lots of young people are going through, and having someone like her talk about it can only be a good thing. if everybody's open about it, it kind of will help other people that are struggling come out. it kind of will help other people mental health charities have also welcomed her openness. i think it's very brave for any politician, leader, to come out and speak about their own struggles
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with a mental health problem, because the reality is that especially in politics, mental health is still seen by many as a weakness. mental health is still seen on friday, in a bbc interview, ruth davidson was asked about a move to westminster. ruth davidson was asked myjob's here in scotland. ruth davidson was asked i want to retain my seat in edinburgh central in 2021. i want to be the next first minister of scotland. the first conservative first minister of scotland. that's always been my aim. minister of scotland. the fact she and her partner are soon expecting a baby is another reason. partner are soon expecting in three years' time, the voters will decide whether ruth davidson achieves her goal of becoming scotland's first minister. achieves her goal of becoming her political ambitions, we've now learned, shaped by her own personal struggles. we've now learned, shaped steven godden, bbc news, in edinburgh. and if you've been affected by any of the issues raised by that report, you can find more information and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline. with all the sport now, here's karthi gna nasegaram at the bbc sport centre. here's karthi gna nasegaram hello,
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here's karthi gnanasegaram mishal, thank you verj great britain's simon yates is a few minutes away from winning cycling's vuelta a espana. minutes away from winning the 26—year—old will become the third different british cyclist to win a grand tour title in the same season. our correspondent, david ornstein is in madrid. provided david ornstein is in madrid. simon yates crosses ti line provided simon yates crosses the line in one piece, he will be found vuelta a espa na line in one piece, he will be found vuelta a espana champion. the stage isa vuelta a espana champion. the stage is a procession, the hard work has been done, this is merely ceremonial. tradition dictates that the leader is not challenged. he will this evening step onto the podium for his first grand tour win, and following the victory that the giro d'italia for chris froome and geraint thomas on the tour de france, britain will complete a clea n swee p france, britain will complete a clean sweep of the three tours, never clean sweep of the three tours, never have three riders, different
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riders, from one country done it in the same year. not so long ago great britain had little pedigree on the road, now they are kings of track and road cycling. it is also remarkable for the fact that simon yates blew up at the giro d'italia, allowing chris froome victory. this time there were no such mistakes. supported by his twin brother adam, he has done it. thank you very much. everton have been defeated for the first time under manager marco silva. for the first time under they lost 3—1 to west ham. for the first time under the win moves west ham from the bottom of the premier league table to 16th place. the bottom of the premier league marko arnautovic scored their third goal. while earlier wolves beat burnely i—0. lewis hamilton has extended his lead in formula i's world championship after a comfortable victory at the singapore grand prix. the night race finished with hamilton's mercedes ahead of max verstappen in second and title rival sebastian vettel in third, the same positions that they had started in. hamilton now leads the championship by 40 points. the marathon world record has been broken in spectacular style by kenya's eliod kipchoge. broken in spectacular style
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the 33—year—old olympic champion took over one minute off the previous best as he won the marathon in berlin. jo currie reports. the marathon in berlin. shock and surprise, perhaps not that it was eliud kipchoge who led the way, or that it was on the flat streets of berlin, where many of the fastest times have been run before. what was a surprise, though, was the margin by which he smashed the marathon world record. was the margin by which he smashed the kenyan's time of two hours, one minute and 39 seconds was over a minute faster than anyone else in history. ifeel great, to run two hours and one minute and 39 seconds. i am really happy and i'm grateful to those who worked with me closely. the 33—year—old is no stranger to marathon success. he claimed gold at the olympics in brazil two years ago. commentator: kipchoge is the olympic champion! and in april, he won the london marathon, claiming his third title. the london marathon, kipchoge was already regarded as one of the greatest marathon runners of all time.
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of the greatest marathon perhaps now, the greatest. of the greatest marathon boxing, and canelo alverez defeated gennady golovkin to take the wbc and wba world middleweight titles in las vegas. the mexican won on points to avoid a repeat of last year's draw between the two. a repeat of last year's it was golovkin's first career defeat. there's more on the bbc sport website including news of great britain's 3—1 victory in tennis‘s davis cup tie against uzbekistan and the latest from the final golf major of the women's tour, the evian championship. thank the evian championship. you very much. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at ten o'clock. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. for the news where you are. you're watching bbc news. british farmers could receive a share of a £400 million compensation scheme, after being caught up in banking scandals. the bbc‘s countryfile programme has discovered that concerns over a lack of regulation could still see
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farmers targeted by lenders more interested in taking their assets than helping their businesses thrive. charlotte smith reports. across the uk, many farmers are saddled with large—scale debt. today that stands at £19 billion. but can those farmers be sure their lenders are dealing with them fairly? we discovered farmers across the uk who have lost their land, their livelihoods and even their family homes because of how they were treated by their banks. kenny and emma riddoch and their four children today live in suburban hampshire. until two years ago, they were farmers in scotland. they say it was the high fees and interest rates on bank loans that they needed that forced them to sell their farm. i think the worst moment was leaving, everyone crying, the dog in the car and leaving your farm for the last time. that was hard.
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they were among 16,000 small businesses struck with fees by the high street bank rbs between 2008 and 2013. earlier this year, the bank's regulator, the financial conduct authority, said there had been widespread inappropriate treatment of its small—business customers. it said rbs had given businesses misleading information and failed to support them properly. we got hit with charges of £10,000 a month, £2,500 for consultants. the interest rate went up straight away by 2.5%. but isn't this what happens if the business gets in trouble — you will lose the farm? i'm not accepting that. if we didn't get hit with the charges we did, we would still be on that farm and probably bigger and better than ever.
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rbs insists it provided the riddochs with extensive support and forbearance and that the bank itself lost more than £2 million when their business failed. it says the regulator found no evidence that it artificially distressed otherwise viable businesses, or that senior management behaved dishonestly, but campaigners say a lack of regulations means farmers are unprotected from complex loans that carry high fees. anthony stansfeld is the crime commissioner for thames valley police. they investigated a separate lending scandal at hbos for which six people were jailed last year. he's been looking into ongoing allegations of sharp practice at some banks when it comes to farm lending. what makes you confident this is still happening? i'm still seeing people having their houses repossessed, who have had money taken fraudulently. one farmer sent me a photo
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of his farmhouse, which had been in his family for generations, and he was losing it. absolutely scandalous. meanwhile, the riddochs are among 1,500 businesses that have so far submitted claims to a £400 million compensation scheme set up by rbs, but they say this isn't just about the money. i want an apology. i want them to acknowledge what they did to us was wrong. rbs is now considering the riddochs' complaint and says the way it deals with business customers today is fundamentally different. hello. we had the autumnal chilly start with a little mist and fog last week. this week, we have autumnal gales and some soaking rain in the forecast. we've had a little rain around this weekend, and through the course of sunday, it's made its way further south across england and wales,
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as we saw in wigan. this is the main band of rain, but all the time it tends to be petering out, just a lot of rain and low cloud with it. to the north, it's brighter, with showers and some sunshine either side as well to the end of the day. through the evening and overnight, that misty, drizzly weather will sink into southern areas. behind it, as the skies clear, it will turn a tad chilly with a bit of mist and fog around and generally light winds. further north and west, already we are starting to see a sign of a change coming into the south west of ireland towards morning. that's the first of the rain associated with the remnants of ex—hurricane helene, which is the tropical air, so will give us some soaking rains and, potentially, as you can see up through the irish sea, some strong to gale force winds. so, some autumnal gales up on the way before it whisks away, and we could have more gales on wednesday. but interestingly, as well as the wet and windy weather forecast, we'll also see temperatures really lifting as the warm, humid air drags its way into southern areas. so, the tropical air will also have the effect of giving southern parts temperatures in the mid—20s with some sunshine, as well.
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but clearly, there's concern about the amounts of heavy rain we'll get and the strength of the wind, which could cause disruption through monday evening, overnight and into tuesday. so, for monday, dawn's a little grey and drizzly, with some mist across the hills in the south. further north, brighter — any fog clears away. it's a gradual improvement, a brightening spell through england and wales, but for scotland and northern ireland, there's a lot more cloud around, and some really quite heavy rain for a time. where it stays dry, potentially, south—eastern northern ireland, south—east scotland, 18-19, but 24 or 25 in the south and east. so, it will feel quite summerlike again. then through monday evening and overnight, we see more of rain, that deepening area of low pressure moving its way northwards. so, bringing gales to the irish sea coasts of england, wales, perhaps southern scotland as well. so, it will be a very mild night. these temperatures are really akin with the average by day at this time of year. so, by tuesday, that's starting to move out the way, so quite a windy start tuesday morning, then we look to the atlantic for this next area of low pressure, which could bring even strong winds, potentially, some severe gales
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to the north and west. this is bbc news. theresa may defends her brexit plan — as the prime minister hits out at speculation over her future. this is where i get a little bit irritated — this is not, this debate is not about my future. this debate is about the future of the people of the uk and the future of the united kingdom. typhon mangkut lashes china's coast — after killing dozens of people in the philippines and leaving a trail of destruction in hong kong "the risk to life is rising" — the north carolina govornor‘s stark words amidst warnings of flooding in the wake of storm florence. a major study has found that taking aspirin every day does not help healthy elderly people reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. it's been announced that glasgow's world famous school of art,
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