Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 22, 2018 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

10:30 pm
on sunday with the breeze. temperatures between 11 to 15. we've lost the wet weather during the course of sunday evening and then things quietened down into the new working week. a few showers around on sunday night and on into monday but high pressure starts to build in from the west, so to start the new working week, high—pressure moving in, won't be as wet and won't be as windy as we've seen through the course of this week. a bit of rain and fairly breezy and the far north and north—west. warmer, brighter, and drier in the south. goodbye for now. hello. this is bbc news. in a moment, we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers. first though, let us remind you of those headlines.
10:31 pm
media giant comcast has outbid rupert murdoch's 21st century fox for control of the broadcaster sky after a dramatic auction. the foreign secretary urges eu leaders to "step back from the abyss" of a no—deal brexit and find a way to make theresa may's proposals work. jeremy corbyn addresses labour's women's conference in liverpool, saying his is the party of equality. gunmen have attacked a military parade in iran. at least 29 people are killed, with dozens more injured. president rouhani has promised a "crushing response". and tributes are paid to chas hodges, lead singer of the musical duo chas and dave, who has died at the age of 7a. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.
10:32 pm
with me are martin bentham, the home affairs editor for the london evening standard, and martin lipton, who's chief sports reporter at the sun. lovely to have you both here. in a moment and we're going to discuss some of this front pages. verse, a quick summary and we're going to start off with the sunday times. it says the prime minister's team has begun contingency planning for a snap general election in november. the sunday telegraph says a conservative donor is threatening to fund a breakaway party if theresa may doesn't deliver brexit. in the sunday express, the prime minister says britain must hold its nerve in the standoff with the eu. meanwhile, the observer says the deputy labour leader tom watson has told the party leader, jeremy corbyn, they must back a second referendum. finally, the sunday mail says that an mp who's criticised jeremy corbyn needs an armed guard at the labour conference after receiving death threats.
10:33 pm
plenty to discuss with my two guests. i've got the two martins. really made myjob easy, didn't i? you know what? is all about labour and the brexit, really. saturday night is brexit, really. saturday night is brexit night! again! top viewing, brexit. let's start off with the observer, shall be? we must back members on a new brexit vote, so says tom watson to mr corbyn. it's interesting. we know that corbyn is afan of interesting. we know that corbyn is a fan of brexit. he nominally campaigned to remain but he did not really. he's made quite clear he's going to go down the brexiteer park but watson appears to be taking the view that you kind of rick nor the use of the majority of labour
10:34 pm
members, not labour voters but labour members. whether he can actually persuade corbyn to do a u—turn, ifind it actually persuade corbyn to do a u—turn, i find it hard to actually persuade corbyn to do a u—turn, ifind it hard to believe. it's about the terms of the brexit rather than the brexit, per se. he's being very cautious. that's one of the criticisms when it comes to jeremy corbyn. labour would actually rather have a general election. still unclear in this in what tom watson is exactly saying. asked if it means labour should commit to another national vote in the next manifesto, he says there's going to be pressure for this to happen. on the one hand, if labour does endorse a second referendum, as a straightforward policy, and seeks to argue for that any g5 that in parliament, that's obviously very significant. if their strategy is actually to say, we would only commit to what if there was an
10:35 pm
election. too good to an election is a whole different ball game altogether! two years or three years down the line, it will be irrelevant... down the line, it will be irrelevant. . . that's down the line, it will be irrelevant... that's obviously predicated on the idea they can somehow force a general election or they have the votes. or if the deal they have the votes. or if the deal the theresa may gets gets voted down, which is entirely possible, and that triggers an election. that's what perhaps he is talking about. but that's a slightly separate thing. if you have an election... it's very easy when you're not in power. at the end of the day, they will staff to do with a brexit. even if we went to a general election, and it seems to be that's where they are going at the moment. you would have thought it would be easy as in opposition to oppose, but yet the boys over the labour party over this couple of days as the nonexistence... —— the
10:36 pm
voice over in the labour party. the trouble is, what they have not articulated them what they actually like. the second referendum... depends on with the question is are questions. is it a binary one or is it? who knows? more straightforward do we accept a deal or do we remain? that gets labour off the hook of setting a position of what brexit they would want, which they've never really clearly set out. if they went down the road, actually, we're going to support a second referendum and we would support staying in, that makes it that much clearer for them. whether do that are not is still unclear. we've heard a lot about the six tests in the last 2a, 48 hours. six tests in the last 24, 48 hours. what do you make of those six tests? not very much. is a sticking... both
10:37 pm
major parties are split. perhaps thatis major parties are split. perhaps that is the country. there is no grey area , that is the country. there is no grey area, it seems, in british politics and world politics. if one side or the other. what has happened there is keir starmer trying to hold there is keir starmer trying to hold the different elements of labour, some of which are in favour of brexit in some effects, and some of which would you hold a voting worry about, this is the corbyn i position, worrying about the potential for the european union in the european court ofjustice to interfere. he actually talked about at the end of that speech, the quote you are playing earlier, to be able toa—— you are playing earlier, to be able to a —— allow labour dier to deliver... what aspect of major is
10:38 pm
concerned about your up and presenting... that whole test is designed to hold that altogether. putting the onus on the government to say, we put this test to you. let's stay with the observer. meanwhile, cabinet ministers, cabinet colleagues are warning the pm that we risk breaking up the uk, and this is in terms of the border? and also, interestingly, bringing scotla nd and also, interestingly, bringing scotland into it as well. i'm not... i'm not 100% sure that the digital aspect of it comes in. —— where that aspect of it comes in. —— where that aspect of it comes in. the i received, splitting the country in that sense. i'm sure the other argument is if we crashed out committee argument is there would be a border between northern ireland, the republic of ireland and that,
10:39 pm
according to some analysis, might create some support for a united ireland and break of the union that way. clearly the s&p and the scottish, people in scotland, might argue that don't like brexit, did i vote that way. i would like to know who cabinet colleagues are. it does strike me that that does not seem to bea strike me that that does not seem to be a large group within the cabinet. i think there seems to be a much more aggressive effort by the brexiteers within the cabinet to try and drive the narrative brother. what they sought this week... and clearly it was the way things laid out in salzburg... it's clearly it was the way things laid out in salzburg. .. it's notjust the brexiteers. jeremy hunt, who is a remainder. people talking about this
10:40 pm
being a dramatic calamity on the scale of the suez crisis... 0k. and there was something here i picked up. some tory aides are said to be so up. some tory aides are said to be so worried about the lack of support for may's current aggressive when they fear a snap election. even tory members are going for, talking of a snap election, and they're saying and of the year as well stop live well, it keeps the talked about... the problem still remains that you've got to get enough tory mps to agree to vote for something that's very risky. and that's where a lot of minds will be concentrated, actually, that clearly very many tory mps will be worried about is by doing such a thing and allowing... they might lose their seat. and also allowing a corbyn government if it
10:41 pm
would be disastrous. if we turn to the sunday telegraph. we've got a tory donator is not happy with the way things are going. he's threatening to set up a breakaway brexit party. jeremy hosking is his name. i'm not sure that... we've got one called ukip, — name. i'm not sure that... we've got one called ukip,— we? it you could argue if brexit is not happening, it's all going to be rather too late, isn't it? for him to set a party in election in some shape or form... with this notjust split the probe exit vote? —— would this not just split the probe brexit vote? "beaten up like..." surely he would
10:42 pm
be more sensible going in behind the current members of the conservative party in government who are trying to deliver what they believe entirely is the brexit the people wanted. i don't know if either of you picked up the line... so the paper reports, believed to be on the brink of... there were three of them, were there? three of them have been on the brink of quitting for a while. and it's like all other things that may happen. boris johnson, there was talk in that other people would follow. somebody was going to quit on sunday or monday and then they change their mind because they wanted to show some sort of strength for may's response to salzburg. such feeble
10:43 pm
atmosphere at the moment. it's not good for anyone. the instability is there. they've got to remember that in government, holding it together at the moment is... if they don't hold it together, then it becomes talking about the risk of a labour party coming in, which would do something completely opposite to what they would want. interestingly enough, at the bottom of this, we see the return of a canada style deal. this was... what you make of that? is it set? ithink it's perhaps looking to be cruising we the most viable option other than having no, if there is going to be any sort of deal. the norwegian effort, and also giving too much act
10:44 pm
to the eu for a lot of brexiteers. the canada style deal means that there is much more of a free—trade arrangement, is my understanding of it stop live the drawback is that the northern ireland issue. obviously the argument will be people talk about the candidate on the plus, plus, plus —— canada plus plus plus. we have this you will begin around the canada deal. there are people arguing for that... david davis. david davis, jacob rees mott. a much looser richmond recycling because it does give freedom on trade deals and takes us further away. he struck to get over the irish issue —— you still have to get over. the canada style deal took seven yea rs. get over. the canada style deal took seven years. is it seven months or seven years. is it seven months or seven years? and i think we are
10:45 pm
talking about a two—year transition. but we are in a different position, clearly. i suppose. 0h, but we are in a different position, clearly. i suppose. oh, no, we are starting, staying on the telegraph actually. the return of rates. starting, staying on the telegraph actually. the return of rateslj forgot to say, i apologise to all my readers who actually have places, homes in places like cornwall. basically whatjeremy homes in places like cornwall. basically what jeremy coren apparently is saying is promising to announce a levy of topping holiday homes, using that money to a currently paid to help families with children living in temporary accommodation, of whom there are largely many. that's the first thing tuesday. the other point is a long time, people got discounted rates for having an empty home. 50% rather than... if you've got a holiday
10:46 pm
home, personally, i know people will be spitting about this idea but you've got enough money to have a holiday home and i don't think it necessarily a disastrous extra burden to place on them and indeed, there are problems of having people having holiday homes. on this particular occasion, i think that there's something to be said for that. the other policy being mentioned here is this potential return of rates, 1990, when we had the fun of games of the poll tax? the short—term are tentative —— alternative. it's interesting. dreamt of by 36 councils. labour lead, i assume. dreamt of by 36 councils. labour lead, iassume. obviously, this would mean
10:47 pm
in upgrading of the pavements, and they're talking about... similar system in northern ireland. yeah. people want better value for money in their services, but the issue is that councils are claiming that they are seriously suffering from ongoing, long—term restrictions placed on them to raise money, and people want better services. it's a difficult circle to square, as it were, in that regard. it is. it is definitely the case that had reduced funding fora definitely the case that had reduced funding for a long time. so whether that's the precise solution... you always get the reason the council tax rates have not been revisited, of course, it creates a politically toxic thing. people's goes up and start adjusting what people are paying and it's a difficult one for any party to grasp. nobody! let's
10:48 pm
turn to the mail. corpsman critic —— corbyn critic needs a in armed guard. do you want to... we don't know who this is. it's a backbencher. that's all we know. it's fair to say there are people in westminster were not massive fans and friends ofjeremy corbyn. threaten seriously by... there is no proof of these threats existing. labour is saying, "our mps are threatened," so it could be anyone. it does not look good, does it, if you have a party... the supporters of the leader seem to be as determined to bring down those critical of him within the party as
10:49 pm
they are the opposition? it's a bizarre scenario. if this goes back to the anti—semitism row which has dogged labourfor to the anti—semitism row which has dogged labour for months and to the anti—semitism row which has dogged labourfor months and does not seem to go away as of yet. also goes back to the two attempted pushes within the parliament to party to get rid of corbyn after his election in the first place. party to get rid of corbyn after his election in the first placelj party to get rid of corbyn after his election in the first place. i think the other thing to say but this is we really cannot judge the the other thing to say but this is we really cannotjudge the merits the other thing to say but this is we really cannot judge the merits of this particular story in the sense of, we don't know who it is, we don't know with the precise level of threats are. clearly a more broadly, the level of abuse and worse directed at certain mps, that, whatever you think of them, probably 99.9% of them are trained to do their best and try to serve the public. i think they're not doing a good job but that is a problem, i think, and we've obviously team the worst manifestation of that with the jo cox murder and so on. let's go
10:50 pm
back to the telegraph. this is a fascinating story, this. a detective ordered to drop russian corruption inquiry. this actually came up, was it last year or a couple of years ago originally? this is it chap, claiming in march of 16, he was basically ordered to drop the inquiry into russian money—laundering. this is all going back to the information he says it was handed to him by bill browder, who the russians are trying to get a hold of, so to say. he was very much involved in the case of sergio magnitsky, which is this act,
10:51 pm
sentences on russia and the you —— us. the foreign office basically told them to drop this inquiry. given the ongoing situation between the russian government and salisbury and other things, it does not seem quite —— it does seem quite an embarrassing scenario here. clearly, we don't know are the reasons these allegations were pursued. and sometimes, there are legal hurdles that make things look definitely suspect not possible to pursue and also some areas of life. but on the other hand, as you just said, one would hope that every single effort was made to deal with the sort of russian dirty money, notjust russian dirty money, notjust russian but any sort of dirty money coming into this country. not enough action has been taken in this. we
10:52 pm
have yet to see a great deal of substance. it is troubling and certainly one thing that, i have met bill browder and he is very tenacious campaigner who is doing a lot of... he's a financier, isn't he? is that right? i think we do need to be concerned that too many people with very suspect pasts and very suspect sources of money have come into this country and managed to put their money into this country and exist here. just very quickly, in the nhs judgement, and exist here. just very quickly, in the nhsjudgement, this is not in the uk, it's not effective to carry out a full investigation where major criminals cannot be brought to justice. this is their line... sometimes there are reasons. very quickly, we've got about a minute. the express. i'm going to hand this one to you. you were, shall i say excited? keeley
10:53 pm
one to you. you were, shall i say excited ? keeley is one to you. you were, shall i say excited? keeley is tipped to be the next bond girl. it's been very watchable. not every aspect of it is exactly spot on in terms of from reality. in the other hand, it's just interesting. i think all the papers have been desperate to find them think on the front pages as all to lighten the mood. there's the brexit talk of over the place and i think that's part of it. whether she ends up being the next bond girl, who on earth knows? shall we ended there? and on a bit of bond. martin lipton and martin bentham, thank you so lipton and martin bentham, thank you so much for that. both will be back with me at 11:30pm for another look at the papers. do stay with us. you're watching bbc news. good evening. saturday brought us a day of mixed fortunes in terms of the weather.
10:54 pm
quite a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain over the southern half of the uk. this was the picture in rye in east sussex earlier today. this picture taken in east lothian, clear blue skies there. the cloud has been streaming in across the southern half of the country. we are set to see more of that cloud, with further outbreaks of rain in the south. let's fast—forwa rd to the let's fast—forward to the course of tonight. you can see the first batch of rain clears the south—east coast and the next works in to the south—west later tonight. colder under those clearer skies with a few showers, particularly to the north—west of scotland, but there could be a touch of frost. you can see the blue colours indicating the coldest temperatures in the morning. temperatures not far from freezing across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, too. let's ta ke let's take a look at sunday's
10:55 pm
weather. high pressure sitting out towards the north—west, but here is that weather front set to bring some rain. heavy rain across south wales and the south—west of england. that rain pushing eastwards through the day. some fairly heavy spells of rain for a time over the south east combined with gusty winds, too. gusts possibly as strong as 50 miles an hour over some of the exposed coasts in the south—east. further north and west, a different story. clearer skies, a scattering of showers and sunshine across wales and northern ireland as well. some of thesr showers could be heavier later on with the odd rumble of thunder, but quite a chilly feel to the weather through the day on sunday with the breeze. temperatures at best between 11 to 15. we've lost the wet weather during the course of sunday evening, and then things do start to quiet down into the new working week. monday, but high pressure
10:56 pm
a few showers around on sunday night and on into monday, but high pressure starts to build in from the west, so to start the new working week, high—pressure moving in, but it won't be as wet and won't be as windy as we've seen through the course of this week. a bit of rain and fairly breezy and the far north and north—west. warmer, brighter, and drier in the south. goodbye for now. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11:00: the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says eu leaders must engage with the government to solve questions over the irish border. the us cable giant comcast wins a multi—billion—pound battle to takeover the broadcaster sky. a man is rescued two days after a ferry capsized in tanzania, killing hundreds. he was found alive in an air pocket. and chas hodges, one half of the musical duo chas and dave, has died at the age of 74. and anthonyjoshua knocks out
10:57 pm
russia's alexander povetkin in the seventh round to retain his world heavyweight titles.
10:58 pm
10:59 pm
11:00 pm

21 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on