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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 24, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello it's 9:00, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. after a wait of almost three decades, an inquiry begins today into the contaminated blood scandal of the 19705 and 805 — which has led to the deaths of nearly 3,000 people. we bring together six people whose lives have been devastated by the scandal to ask them how they feel on the day the inquiry they've fought for years, finally begins one of labour's top team says all of the party's mps should get behind jeremy corbyn — or quit. anyone that isn't on board with that needs to really seriously think why they are still in the labour party as an mp. it is a pretty simple proposition and i don't think it takes rocket science and if you'd like that, maybe it's time to call it a day. it comes as labour members prepare to vote on what the party should do about brexit if they can't force a snap general election. this 27—year—old
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boxer from sheffield waives his right to anonymity to talk about being raped when he was ten, a rape committed by a teenager. callum hancock wants to encourage other male survivors of rape to break their silence. we'll talk to him after 9.30. and, what did you think of the finale? final warning! raise your hands! pull back! it's a dead man's switch — if anything happens to me, it will go off! did it live upto your expectations? hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until 11:00 this morning. it was the most popular television drama in a decade, with more than ten million people watching the first episode. what did you think of the final episode last ngiht? let me know — use the hashtag victoria live. our top story today:
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after five and a half hours of discussions behind closed doors, labour officials have hammered out a brexit motion to be discussed at the party conference in liverpool. it states that, if there isn't a general election, labour should support all options including, campaigning for another referendum. let's get more from our political guru norman smith, who is at the conference in liverpool. what is their position today? the position today doesn't really seem clearer in a sense that after the fraught meeting that went on for ever and ever last night, what they
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eventually agreed on was to give everything on the table, including the possibility of having another referendum. they haven't committed to having another referendum, they haven't committed to putting it in labour's next general election ma nifesto. labour's next general election manifesto. they just left it labour's next general election manifesto. theyjust left it hanging out there as a thought. in la, it seems to me that what is becoming clear in the resistance of the leadership, to be bounced into some kind of referendum that could reverse the brexit vote. we heard from len mccluskey yesterday saying, if we don't get a general election and if, if there is a referendum, do not think on the ballot paper, there should be the option of remaining in the eu. precisely what many of those in the labour party pressing for a referendum once. and then this morning, in his round of early—morning interviews, john mcdonnell reiterated that. he said,
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if hypothetically there is another referendum, it should not include the option of staying in the eu. so what is becoming clear is the labour party, if it was to hold a referendum underjeremy corbyn‘s leadership, would only put the same options on the table as theresa may is putting on the table. it would be a vote on the deal as negotiated by labour. 0r no deal. albeit this morning, labour was stressing their preferred option is for a general election. have a listen tojohn mcdonnell. what we want now is a general election. let's have a proper debate at a general election, then people can choose what team goes forward to negotiate in the future. if we can't get that, yes, we will campaign for a people's vote, where people can have their say. but we'd much prefer a general election. the problem with that, is that labour have absolutely no levers to pull to get a general election.
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because if they wanted to force a general election, basically they would have to win a vote of no—confidence in the commons. the only way you do that is dup mps abandon mrs may, while they are not particularly enthusiastic about the prime minister, they are less enthusiastic about jeremy corbyn. prime minister, they are less enthusiastic aboutjeremy corbyn. 0r a number of tory mps will vote with labour in having no confidence in mrs may. i cannot see that happening. it is very hard to see how labour can actually trigger a general election. thank you, norman. now, a a bbc summary of the rest of the day's news. a public inquiry into a contaminated blood scandal, described as the worst treatment disaster in nhs history, opens today. thousands of patients that had transfusions in the 1970s and 1980s were given blood products from overseas infected with hepatitis c and hiv. at least 2,400 people have died as a result. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns reports. it was supposed to keep
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them alive but for many it was a death sentence. thousands of people were infected with hiv and hepatitis c after getting contaminated blood. it is impossible to know how many people were infected by transfusions during surgery or childbirth. and thousands of hemophiliacs received contaminated blood too. there were not enough supplies in the uk so some was imported from america, from paid donors and prison inmates. he just was an incredibly brave man. barbara scott's husband, ronald, had hemophilia and contracted hiv. he died a few days after his 50th birthday. it feels like, you know, you kind of dragged your children up as best you can and that, in many ways, you know, the state is indifferent to the plight of these people. there was a privately funded
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review in 2009 but it had no official status. in 2015, families dismissed a scottish enquiry as a whitewash. now, after years of campaigning, this enquiry will be led by a judge and will be able to compel witnesses to give testimony. the key questions are, when did authorities know about the risks? and did they act quickly enough on that information? catherine burns, bbc news. and victoria will be speaking to people who've been personally affected by the blood contamination scandal just after this bulletin and finding out what the inquiry means for them. new figures from the crown prosecution service show that men aged 18 to 2a are less likely to be found guilty of rape, than older suspects in england and wales. campaigners are calling for an independent examination to establish why fewer than a third of prosecutions brought against young men result in a conviction. the cps says addressing the low rate is a challenge for the entire criminal justice system.
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a second woman has come forward with allegations of sexual assault against the us supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh. democrat senators are said to be investigating the latest claims, which are reported in the new yorker magazine. mr kavanaugh denies the alleged event took place and has called it a smear. earlier, christine blasey ford, who has accused mr kavanaugh of trying to rape her when they were both teenagers said she would speak to the senate judiciary committee on thursday. he also denies her allegations. a 20—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder, in connection with the disappearance of a student in his first week at university. thomas jones was last seen near the river severn in worcester during the early hours of last wednesday morning. police have said searches are still ongoing and the arrested man is in police custody. obesity is set to overtake smoking as the biggest preventable cause of cancer in women. currently, 12% of cancers in women
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are linked to smoking, and 7% to being overweight and obese. however, with the number of smokers falling and obesity rates projected to rise, cancer research uk predicts that gap will disappear in 25 years time. an international mission is under way to rescue an around—the—world sailor, who is seriously injured and stranded in the middle of the indian ocean. abhilash tomy, an indian national, suffered a back injury when his vessel was damaged during a violent storm. australia, india and france are all sending help. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith has more. confident and capable, this was abhilash tomy at the beginning of the 30,000 mile race around the world. the indian naval officer set off from france on july 1st, sailing down around the western coast of africa before heading into the indian ocean. there, with his yacht in third place, he hit 45 foot waves, which rolled his vessel 360 degrees and broke his mast. he sent a distress message saying... he is now confined to his bunk. an aircraft has spotted his yacht
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nearly 2,000 miles off the coast of australia. the race is now on to reach him. the boat is a replica of the first yacht to be sailed around the world single—handedly 50 years ago, by sir robin knox—johnston. the first to reach him may be another competitor, gregor mcguckin, whose boat was also damaged in the storm. a french patrol vessel and an australian frigate are also on the way to try to bring them to safety. hywel griffith, bbc news. in the past few minutes we have heard he has been found safe and well. we will keep you updated on
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back good news. ajournalist in saudi arabia has made history by becoming the country's first female news anchor. waam al dakheel, presented the main news bulletin for al saudiya, a state—run tv channel. the journalist received praise on social media, with viewers complimenting her work and pointing out that her appearance marked a milestone in the deeply conservative kingdom. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. if you haven't watched the last episode of the the bodyguard, we will be talking about it now. so if you haven't watched it yet, turn your tv down. i have watched it yet. andy said, we loved it. the hardwick household in gloucester said, it was edge of your ctv but the only criticism the police officers
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dismissed anything bud said, especially when he had the bomb stretched to him —— strapped to him. the bbc should be proud of this amazing drama. jonathan on twitter says the final persona of the bodyguard taught us not to underestimate women are not overestimate men's mental health. it made me feel i needed a stiff drink 01’ made me feel i needed a stiff drink ora made me feel i needed a stiff drink or a hug for 75 minutes. i cannot remember a show this gripping of a lifetime. bryony says, whatever your opinion, you will agree it was worth the licence fee alone, in that it brought us together and stopped us tweeting about brexit. luke says the finale was so tense, got edge of the seed status, i have really enjoyed this series. jodi, i drama at its absolute best. i loved it. they said
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throughout the last ten minutes, i really thought julia would throughout the last ten minutes, i really thoughtjulia would appear, gutted that he did. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtage victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. what did you think of the ending, we'll be talking about it throughout the programme. let's get some sport. katherine downes is at the bbc sport centre. is this the greatest sporting comeback of all time? the date will be ranging in offices, cafes a nd the date will be ranging in offices, cafes and radio stations around the world. is tiger woods' return to golf, the best sporting comeback? think about what he has overcome to win his 80th pga tour event. lasse jensen said he may not play competitive golf again but the decline started a long time before that. november 2009, he decline started a long time before that. november2009, he crashed decline started a long time before that. november 2009, he crashed his car outside his house and it emerged transgressions in his private life we re transgressions in his private life were behind the turmoil. he and his
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wife divorced and combined with that and back surgery and injuries, he dropped outside the world's top 500, outside the top 1000. at one time he was 1199 in the world. he had to have multiple surgery on his back and the last of those came last year with spinalfusion and the last of those came last year with spinal fusion surgery. and then the famous mugshot beamed around the world where he was arrested and found asleep at the wheel of his car. 0nce accepted his chances of making it back to the top were slim and many had written him off, but he was back playing in november last year and his improvement has been gradual. he was in the chase at the open this summer. he was in the chase at the us pga, the final major of the year in august as well. now he is back in the winner's circle at the tour championship. he is back in the winner's circle at the tour championshiplj he is back in the winner's circle at the tour championship. i just think that what i've gone through and what
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i've dealt with, i've gotten lucky to be honest with you. i have gotten very lucky. i am to be honest with you. i have gotten very lucky. iam not to be honest with you. i have gotten very lucky. i am not playing a full contact sport where i have got to move people around in that regard. 42 years old, accused lower spine, thatis 42 years old, accused lower spine, that is not going to happen but in this sport, it can. the other story yesterday, justin rose, the world number one tied for fourth, winds the fedex cup and with it, a $10 million bonus. not bad at all. good morning, welcome to the programme. a public inquiry finally starts today into one of the biggest medical disasters in this country's history. in the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of nhs patients were infected by contaminated blood products. many, including newborn babies and children, were later diagnosed with hepatitis cand hiv. almost 3,000 people
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are known to have died, possibly many more. the contaminated blood scandal of the ‘70s and ‘80s is often called the worst treatment disaster in the history of the nhs. broadly, two groups were affected. first, people with the blood disorder haemophilia. almost 5,000 were given a treatment contaminated with hepatitis and, in many cases, hiv. of those, around half lost their lives. the problem was a new medication made from the pooled blood plasma of thousands of donors. just one infection and the whole batch was contaminated. britain, though, couldn't make enough, so bought from the united states, where prisoners and drug addicts were paid to give blood. there were warnings as early as 1983, but the products were still used on adults and children. more than 80 boys were infected at just one specialist school in hampshire.
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because we know a batch of treatment was infected, a large number of haemophiliacs at the school were all infected at the same time. my school year, for example, i think i'm the only one left now. as i say, many in the years above and below me also lost their lives. then there is the second group, those who received a blood transfusion after childbirth or an operation. exactly how many were infected with hepatitis c, we just don't know for sure. estimates range from 5,000 right up to 28,000. a public enquiry opens in westminster this week. it comes after years of campaigning from victims and their families. the key questions, did drug companies and health officials know about the risks? did ministers respond quickly enough? and, when it became clear that something had gone very wrong, was there an attempt to cover it up? the enquiry is being led by a judge, sir brian langstaff.
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it's expected to take between two and four years to reach its findings. let's talk now to some people who've been personally affected by the blood contamination scandal. steve dymond, is a haemophiliac infected with hepatitis c in the 1980s, here's here with his wife su gorman. andy evans, is a haemophiliac, he was infected with hiv as a child. barry fitzgerald's wife jane was infected with hepatitis c through a transfusion and died in 2015. jan smith's seven—year old son colin was a haemophiliac and died of aids.
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he died in1990. laura smith is jan s daughter in law and she's here to supportjan. thank you all for coming on the programme, iwant thank you all for coming on the programme, i want to ask you all, three decades you have waited for this enquiry and today it finally begins, how are you feeling? i'm just wondering whether they are going to have the courage and bravery to search fully into all those responsibilities, whoever it involves, whether it be government ministers, drug companies, etc, but it is also a moment when, today, we will have a commemoration for the 3000 dead haemophiliacss. andy, how are you feeling today? it is all a bit surreal, to be honest, it is a
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day that i never thought would come must as hard as i have fought and as long as i have campaigned, it has been, this is a day that i never thought would happen. 0ver been, this is a day that i never thought would happen. over the next three days it is probably going to hit home, when i meet up with everybody, all the victims come to the commemoration, we see what has happened with that, there will be a lot of joy, happened with that, there will be a lot ofjoy, there will be a lot of banks, and we are all going to have to support each other. because this is 30 years down the line, and for some people who have been there for all this time, it is a surreal moment. i'm quite nervous about today, funnily enough because we all support each other, through the internet. to actually sit and meet these people, ithink internet. to actually sit and meet these people, i think it is going to be very emotional today. this is the first time you have met everybody
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else? yes, but i'm always in contact with them, and... they support you so with them, and... they support you so well, to see other people, but they support you so well, and it will be wonderful but emotional to see people finally face—to—face. but we are hoping for, you know, the outcome to be, hopefully, what it should be. the truth. a bittersweet moment in the fact that is, it has taken so long to get here. but secondly, it was, the enquiry was preceded with such bad faith, the prime minister refused several times and outmanoeuvred herself and ended up and outmanoeuvred herself and ended up by and outmanoeuvred herself and ended up by getting an enquiry, and that somehow also puts an impact on people, they did not say, ok, something has gone terribly wrong, we need to look at it. it has never happened like that. how are you feeling today? i agree, it is
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surreal, but it hammers home the fa ct surreal, but it hammers home the fact that i am only here because jane is not, that hurts, we had been together a long time, next year, a0 yea rs together a long time, next year, a0 years together, it hammers home more to me than a lot of the others, not apart from young colin, who is never going to reach those heights. but, i am angry, i am very angry, because from the very beginning with jane, of obviously, we had no idea, from the very beginning, she was infected almost straightaway, at the beginning of our relationship. why didjane beginning of our relationship. why did jane have a blood transfusion, she was not a haemophiliacs. no, i must stress, we are all in the same boat together, i don't like the differentiation, but yes, she suffered an ectopic pregnancy, and i am sure most people know what that
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is. she became anaemic as a result of the operation to alleviate that medical problem. it was just one unit of blood. and that was right back at the end of the 1970s but we weren't to know for 25 more years, 200a, that she had been infected, 25 yea rs, 200a, that she had been infected, 25 years, that is a long time living in immigrants, sometimes ignorance is good and sometimes it is bad. how did she die in 2015? according to the hospital she died of pneumonia, we all know that was a suppression, as far as we all know that was a suppression, as faras i'm we all know that was a suppression, as far as i'm concerned, i had to fight for her death certificate to have the right verdict put on there, eventually i did succeed, she died as the primaries of having the administration of a contaminated blood products. how are you feeling? i think it is almost scary, it really is a voyage into the unknown,
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even those of us who have got into the campaign, people like andy, dealing with politicians, people have researched the science, the medical issues, none of us know what a public enquiry is because we have never been part of one. in one way it represents a loss of control, nobody has been doing anything for us nobody has been doing anything for us apart from the press, we have had to do everything for ourselves, all ofa to do everything for ourselves, all of a sudden, that is being taken away from us, lawyers involved, who have their own expertise, people who set up the enquiry. sir bryan, when he starts hearing us. for most of us, fundamentally, it is a very scary step into the unknown. us, fundamentally, it is a very scary step into the unknown! us, fundamentally, it is a very scary step into the unknown. a leap of faith? it is a leap, but after 30 years, it is difficult to have so much faith. there is a certain knowledge base of things that
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happen, who did what up to a point, if this covers even more, the other pa rt of if this covers even more, the other part of the iceberg, i think people will be really hurt, about how badly they have been betrayed and lied to. a problem as well, sorry to keep interrupting, we are three to four decades down the line, the people who were around and responsible for these decisions, 30 to a0 years ago, some of them won't be here any more. as we know, some of the documents, you know, some of the evidence that we have gathered, they are very few in comparison to what they should be out there, and we know a lot of those have already been destroyed. so, how deeply the enquiry can get into the truth of this remains to be seen. into the truth of this remains to be seen. that is probably a cause for scepticism amongst our community, in so far as how much of the truth can be discovered. added to that, it is
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clear that a number of the people who are ageing, as we say, should we say, they are saying they do not remember... can you tell the audience about your little boy, colin. i could write a book about him. i mean, i had four other boys, colin was the youngest, three other boys, colin was the youngest, but he was, he was funny and humorous, he loved lego. if you touched his lego, he did not like it, if he made a model and it got broke, he would hit the wall, did not like it. he was such a lovely boy, he never knew how ill he was, because he never brought it up, we would have been honest with him, but it was never
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discussed. in a way he must have known, a couple of times he would have a fight with his brother, something like that, or he would say to daniel, you can have my toys when you are gone. yeah, he said that, and towards the end, because he was amazing at drawing, he kept drawing gravestones, headstones... crosses... you never asked us, but i think he realised. i know that you have a tad to which you are ok with showing us, the last drawing that colin did before he died. aged seven, yes. and that is his writing. when he died, they sent his books home from school, and this was on the cover of one of his books. and the cover of one of his books. and
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the ripple effect through families of this scandal. how would you describe that? too many emotions to describe it, i see the effect it has on my mother and father and law, but also on my husband, totally different, in fact, he has gone through life up and down, really, he has had depression, which has all stemmed back to his little brother. so, and... in the 19805, little brother. so, and... in the 1980s, which is when colin was infected, a time when there was real stigma about aids, which is what colin died of, because he was given contaminated blood because he was a severe haemophiliacs, what was that like? it was a very hard time for us, we had "aids dead" written on the house, graffiti. cross scratching in the door. people would
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cross the road if we... we were known as the aids family, not the smith family, the aids family. in the end we could not take much more, so we the end we could not take much more, so we moved. andy, as i said, you we re so we moved. andy, as i said, you were infected with hiv as a child, you nearly died, you told the audience about that before, did you feel the stigma around hiv? audience about that before, did you feelthe stigma around hiv? in audience about that before, did you feel the stigma around hiv? in some ways, it was almost a benefit that i was so young because my parents protected me from a lot of that, and i feel that my mum, the only one of my parents still alive, is probably still protecting a little bit from what went on back in the day. because, you know, if she told me the truth, i think i would probably have caved in and stop campaigning altogether... i was unaware of all of this until i was told by my pa rents of this until i was told by my parents when i was 13 years old and that was at the point when i was
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getting ill. and so, again, moving from a normal teenager into hospital... that shielding of the stigma there. we will put in with cancer patients, with leukaemia patients, in the children's hospital, and you would make friends, they would pass away. this was all after growing up and going to clinic appointments for my haemophilia, at the children's hospital, slowly the patients would stop coming in as well and you would wonder why and you would hear the news. that is something that really shapes you. you lose people even when you don't know what is happening, losing those people along the way, and suddenly finding out why it has been all along, it is really ha rd to why it has been all along, it is really hard to take. it does affect people differently. my it does affect people differently. my sister, who was four years
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younger than me, had to bring herself up at the time and that has impacted the rest of her life. she is fiercely independent now. you know, but also we get to meet at conferences and places like this with the enquiries and the protests, people we would never meet before. i actually met my wife at a bereavement event for one of these because she lost her brother. she was 16 and he was 2a. that is one good thing that has come out of this. steve, you have had a really ha rd this. steve, you have had a really hard summer, haven't you? you have been really ill, connected to the hepatitis c you were exposed to. tell us about that? one of the things as a consequence of having hepatitis c for so long destroys the liver and liver. the blood doesn't
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flow around the body properly and it creates varices of the stomach wall. and they burst and as a haemophiliac, you are in serious trouble. that has happened six times in the last two years. also, not living next to a specialist hospital, there is also an added fear that the medical staff who are treating you are not sufficiently expert to be able to cope entirely with the whole conditioned. 0ne expert to be able to cope entirely with the whole conditioned. one of life's little ironies is the drug that cleared my hepatitis c in 2015 has caused massive hearing loss. it is almost, as andy was saying, you never enjoyed good health throughout your life. one of the things that made life very hard was hepatitis c wasn't really identified clearly with symptoms until the early 90s. all the symptoms i had where other
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things. they didn't realise, yes. thank you all for coming on the programme and we will continue to talk to you throughout this enquiry so let's hope it brings you what you need which is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. thank you very much. still to come. determined to break the taboo of male rape — boxer callum hancock opens up about being raped by a school bully when he was 10. obesity is set to catch smoking as the top cause of cancer in uk women within 25 years, but why do so few people know about the link between being overweight and cancer? we ll be hearing from cancer research uk and the national 0besity forum. after five and a half hours of discussions behind closed doors,
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labour officials have hammered out a brexit motion to be discussed at the party conference in liverpool. it states that, if there isn't a general election, labour should support all options including, campaigning for another referendum. what we want now is a general election. let's have a proper debate at a general election, then people can choose what team goes forward to negotiate in the future. if we can't get that, yes, we will campaign for a people's vote, where people can have their say. but we'd much prefer a general election. a second woman has come forward with allegations of sexual assault against the us supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh. democrat senators are said to be investigating the latest claims, which are reported in the new yorker magazine. mr kavanaugh denies the alleged event took place and has called it a smear. earlier, christine blasey ford, who has accused mr kavanaugh of trying to rape her when they were both teenagers said she would speak to the senate judiciary committee on thursday. he also denies her allegations. the indian navy sailor seriously
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injured around the world yachtsman stranded since friday has been rescued. an indian national suffered a back injury when the massed of his boat broke on friday during a storm more than 3000 kilometres off the coast of australia. that is a summary coast of australia. that is a summary of the latest bbc news. people are loving the end of the bodyguard. the acting was next to nothing. don't be what to do on sunday nights now. rose on twitter, talk about edge of your seat. the two involved in the conspiracy, one
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i doubted slightly but her, never once. brilliant conclusion. emma on twitter, seeing as i am so attached tojulia, twitter, seeing as i am so attached to julia, can we twitter, seeing as i am so attached tojulia, can we get a season two. spoiler coming up now. where she is alive in season two and takes up her rightful role as prime minister after he resigns. keep them coming in. and now let's get the sport. tiger woods won his first pga tour in atla nta. tiger woods won his first pga tour in atlanta. some say he was the best sporting comeback of all time. he fell out the world 1000 last year after back surgery and personal problems. arsenal are building momentum, according to petr cech. it is for premier league winds in a row now for the gunners after they beat everton 2—0. celtic have had their
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worst start to a season in 20 years. they were beaten 2—1 baikal monarch yesterday. brendan rodgers says fans should be alarmed. and ben youngs has withdrawn from the england camp ahead of the international ‘s. those are your sporting headlines. if you have children watching, you may not want them to listen to the next conversation. callum hancock was ten when he was raped by another boy while he was playing near his home. he was bullied for years by the boy, including one occasion when he was stripped of his clothes. he didn t talk about the abuse for a long time, he s now 27 and is a boxerfrom sheffield. he's decided to waive his anonymity to share his story, in the hope that other male survivors feel inspired to break their silence and get
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the help and support they need. explain to our audience why you are waving your right to anonymity?‘ lot of people are suffering in silence and i know what it is like to suffer in that silence. it is never just to suffer in that silence. it is neverjust an to suffer in that silence. it is never just an individual, to suffer in that silence. it is neverjust an individual, it affects a unit, mum, dad, partners, brothers and sisters and the silence has got to stop. if people like you and me are talking about it, the perpetrators will not be so co mforta ble perpetrators will not be so comfortable in doing it. do you think male rape is a taboo subject? massive. it is a tough cookie to crack. this is rape, completely out of your hands. i was powerless, i didn't have any control over the
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situation, i was a child, ten years old. it is definitely a taboo subject and i think airing it, it will get clearer and more of an understanding and we will move on from these times. it was 17 years ago, you were ten, as i said and the perpetrator was 1a. what can you recall about what happened ? perpetrator was 1a. what can you recall about what happened? where we used to live at our old house, i used to live at our old house, i used to live at our old house, i used to wave to my mum and i used to have a fence and i would crawl under the fence. if my mum waved back at me, it was all right for me to go. i crawled under the fence and i was making a dent. the person who bullied me most, he came up and he tried to pull me back under the fence. he was adamant on helping me make the den, went and got the hammerand make the den, went and got the hammer and nails make the den, went and got the hammerand nails and make the den, went and got the hammer and nails and helped me make it. that is where he sexually abused and raped me. what impact has that
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had on your life? absolutely devastating, many years of suffering in silence. i can remember being child. i was questioning, because i had been with a man, was i gay? i was so had been with a man, was i gay? i was so confused. from 13, 1a up until my mid—20s, i was filled with so until my mid—20s, i was filled with so much rage and anger. he had tricked me and manipulated me into doing such things. it will have a traumatic experience on anybody. did you think about telling your mum and dad? there were a few times i thought about telling my mum. but the thought of telling my mum and dad, it was too scary, it was too challenging and i didn't want them to think they had let me down or miss something in my childhood, because they never have. we never stopped anywhere other than that my
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grandad's house. we have the best holidays, our lives were filled with so holidays, our lives were filled with so much love and laughter, none of this is where their fault and i didn't want them to burden them with that. when did things come to a head? things came to a head for me...i head? things came to a head for me... i have always pushed it to the back of my mind but when it came to the forefront of my mind is when i lost a close friend to suicide. i was stood at his funeral believing, iam coming was stood at his funeral believing, i am coming tojoin you soon, i believed i was going to take this to the grave with me. you thought you might take your own life? yes, suicide and murder, that is what i had in mind for many years. i was so up had in mind for many years. i was so up and confused and trapped inside. i had lived a self—destructive life and that destruct button, whether on my perpetrator or army, i didn't wa nt to my perpetrator or army, i didn't want to affect other people. he ended up going to jail because of
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this self—destructive button, you assaulted a dormant? yes, march 2015, i did lose my close friend. i wrote a letter on my bedroom floor andi wrote a letter on my bedroom floor and i was crying my eyes out explaining what happened to me and i couldn't finish the letter. i put it in my safe and i didn't go back to it. i went to have a shower, put my mask back on and i went out with the lads. i should mask back on and i went out with the lads. ishould never mask back on and i went out with the lads. i should never have gone out. i was sat in the casino that night, so i was sat in the casino that night, so down in the dumps. just believing i had nowhere to turn. i thought i couldn't talk to anybody about my problems and it was too much to handle. 0ne problems and it was too much to handle. one thing led to another and when the dorman was on my back, and my back is in good and that is when i exploded. after that, a couple of yea rs i exploded. after that, a couple of years ago in fact, you actually bumped into the perpetrator in a shop. he was with his family and as
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a result of that, you went round to his house that night? november 2000 and 16. my girlfriend had bought my mum some perfume and it was her birthday and we walked into the local shop to get a gift bag. i bumped into my perpetrator. he was with his mum, his wife and his two little girls. i was with my girlfriend and one of my friends, who didn't know at this time. that night i ended up sitting my perpetrator down in his house and having some troops out with him. what did that feel like? when i first bumped into him, my livestock, my heart was beating my chest. i felt sick. but i'd just knew i had to face this. it was a blessing in disguise that there were so many people because the situation and
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when we bumped into each other. when i sat when we bumped into each other. when isat him when we bumped into each other. when i sat him down in his house, you can look at me, you couldn't take his head up off the table. he looked so wea k head up off the table. he looked so weak and embarrassed. he was evil and a horrible individual, a bully. he was now playing the victim. all i was doing was asking him why, why did you do this? there was no man about him whatsoever. he was telling you he could remember and didn't know what you were talking about? yes, he said he couldn't remember. he said, i can't, i can't... he couldn't acknowledge saying my name. he was dissociating himself and he was calling me connor, which is my brother's name. i said, let me refresh your memory. i said when i was making the hot across the road. and he said i remember, i remember
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touching tales. his mum broke down and she was crying saying, you have lied to us, you said you could remember everything. his dad said, it is the start. i said to my mum, we are going. i have got what i need. and we went. he has recently pleaded guilty to sexual assault against you. he is awaiting sentencing. he has pleaded guilty. absolutely, yes. what does that make you feel like? free, and massive weight off my shoulders. this has been a long, drawn out process and i have had the weight of the world on my shoulders for a long time. he has acknowledged, admitted his guilt and the change within myself, i am no longer carrying such a wait. no one
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can question my innocence, no one can question my innocence, no one can question my truth. after all, thatis can question my truth. after all, that is all we have got to hold onto and my truth moving forward is, i am callu m and my truth moving forward is, i am callum harriott cup, yes this happens, but everyone has a start in life, but there is a middle and an end. iam life, but there is a middle and an end. i am determined to make a good life and a good go of things and i wa nt to life and a good go of things and i want to help others where i can. i wa nt to want to help others where i can. i want to help others where i can. i want to help myself, i want to help others and i want mainly, i want things put in place at schools where children are able to talk to a parent, where parents are able to talk to their kids in a professional way. i cannot see why professionals cannot be involved with such things and we can talk about such a to—do subject in a healthy and happy manner. after all those years i was eaten up, my mum and dad were the best and they have been there. i should have been able to turn around to my mum and dad and cried to them.
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dad, this has happened, mum, why has this happened? my mum and dad would have been there for me. moving forward from here, i want to get things put in place for children in schools. you are amazing. thank you. thank you so much forjoining us on the programme. thank you for having me. we wish you all the best. there you are, sorry. coming up, a british business excess story. —— british business success story. four years ago one woman started a fashion brand, out of frustration that she couldn t find nude tights to match her skin tone. ade hassan created lingerie and hosiery for a range of skin colours, and now has customers in more than 50 countries. thank you for your messages about
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callu m thank you for your messages about callum and the interview he just gave where he talked about being raped as a ten—year—old and the reason he's talking about it now and waiving right to anonymity is to break the silence around male rape. so bout of you for staying strong through it all and moving on whilst justice is served, says one viewer. tadhg furlong, my respect and regard for your bravery is boundless. thanks, thank you, this will help so many other people. amazing, incredible, so proud of callum on your programme. thank you for those. #breakthesilence. obesity is set to overtake smoking as the biggest preventable cause of cancer among uk women in 25 years time, according to a cancer research uk report published today. let's talk to nicola smith, from cancer research uk, tam fry from the national 0besity forum, and in bristol we can speak tojo richings,
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who was 20 stone when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. nicola, first of all, what is the link between being overweight and getting cancer? having excess weight in your body does increase the risk of 13 different types of cancer, and there is also a link with smoking that we know about and we are seeing estimates that in 25 years, the number of obesity related cancers in women will overtake the number of smoking—related cancers because when you carry excess fat, that fat is active, it does not sit there, it is creating hormones and growth factors and information which can increase the risk of cancer. potentially related to 13 different types of cancer, name some of them. breast—cancer and bowel cancer are linked to being overweight and obese, and other types like pancreatic and liver, once that fat is in your body and creating those
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hormones and that information it can cause damage across your body. what you make of this, that, obesity is now the second biggest preventable cause of cancer, projections that it could overtake smoking in terms of cancer in women in 25 years. could overtake smoking in terms of cancer in women in 25 yearslj could overtake smoking in terms of cancer in women in 25 years. i am really sad about it, the real problem is that we have known for a long time that this is likely to happen, back in the year 2000, we started to beat the drum about the consequences of obesity, of which cancer was one of the major three, we implored the government to do something about it because we knew that it was a time bomb about to go off. unfortunately, the government did nothing and we predicted, if you will, the same kind of thing as cancer research uk. let me bring in jo, cancer research uk. let me bring in jo, you have struggled with your weight since you were a child, when you were diagnosed with breast—cancer, was being overweight a contributing factor as far as you
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we re a contributing factor as far as you were aware of? i think so, personally, yeah, doctors did not say anything but my lifestyle was not healthy at all, i was not eating healthily, i was stressed, massively overweight, so i think it will have beena overweight, so i think it will have been a contributing factor, definitely. did you have any idea about a link between being overweight and certain cancers? probably, to be honest, you know, most people i know that our overweight don't want to be overweight, we all know there is health risks to that. this news today, it is going to worry women but unfortunately i don't think it will have a huge impact on whether they lose weight or not. why do you think that? i have done a lot of research into this since i had my cancer, most women i know in particular, i know a lot of overweight women that would do anything in their power to be thinner than they are, they try on an hourly basis to do that, so this
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added worry, that yes, being overweight is now going to cause cancer, it is not going to be a magic pill that will make them diet and keep it off, it is not that easy. do you think that is fair? even with this warning, which is pretty stark from the organisation, it might be hard for people to change their lifestyle. it can be really difficult to keep a healthy weight, in the world we live in, it can feel like you are constantly bombarded by marketing and advertising and price promotions in supermarkets and even when you are trying to keep a healthy weight, it can feel like everything is stacked against you, we want the government to act to level the playing field. if the government has opposed the new childhood obesity plan, and if that comes into force and it is seen through, that legislation, we will have a ban onjoel and marketing advertising to children before 9pm, so we can advertising to children before 9pm, so we can stop family viewing time being overtaken by advertising for
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fast food. it can be quite difficult when parents go into a supermarket and are bombarded by unhealthy options. it will take more than that. one thing i would like to pick up that. one thing i would like to pick up on, education, really, there is no education at the right time. that is not when you already overweight, thatis is not when you already overweight, that is going back into school. there is so many reasons why women. . . there is so many reasons why women... state schools do absolutely masses about eating healthily, they really do. notjust with the kind of lunches that they provide, but in ps hv lessons. it is not getting through and the real problem, we have many reasons to be worried about overweight women. -- pshe lessons. particularly before we get to cancer, we are getting to pregnancy, we have 50% of women going into pregnancy already overweight or obese, that is
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something... 50%?! 50%, overweight or obese. 80% —— 18% are really obese. that has to stop, that is the beginning of the cycle which leads into this kind of thing. how did you make changes in your lifestyle, jo? i have been on a diet since i was eight years old and it has been a daily battle with my weight but i think having cancer, that was the wake—up call! think having cancer, that was the wake—up call i needed. it is different in knowing that it can cause cancer but when you are in it, you have cancer through being overweight, that is different. that was the catalyst for me, i decided, i have gone vegan, clean eating, i meditate every day and exercise, i have lost seven and a half stone, i have lost seven and a half stone, i have gained around 15 lb over the la st have gained around 15 lb over the last couple of years, it is a daily struggle, to be honest, but having cancer was the catalyst. ok, thank
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you, all of you, thank you, thank you, all of you, thank you, thank you for coming on the programme, thank you, jo stop what we will bring you the news and sport at 10am, before that, the weather forecast. when i left the house at forecast. when i left the house at for 10am, it was very cold! scarf and a hat, women were leaving the house morning. thinking back to last week, very unsettled weather, the storms. -- 4.10 am. this weather is going to be completely different, we woke up to a glorious sunrise, for many of us, blue skies across many areas. it was pretty chilly this morning. that is how we will keep things as we go through the rest of the setup is the big area of high pressure which has dominated things for many parts of the uk today, and under this area of high pressure, things are settled, clear skies for england and wales, more in the way of cloud across northern ireland and the far north and west, producing a few showers, those showers will
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continue into the afternoon, risk of isolated showers, but foremost, it will a dry day, blue skies, some fair weather cloud, maximum temperatures, 14 to 17 degrees view showers in the north west of scotland, you need those clear skies, the heatjust escaped, and it will turn quite chilly, a chilean night compared to last night, temperatures more likely to get close to freezing. rural areas, could be below freezing, and those are the typical values in towns and cities. not quite as cold as scotland and northern ireland, the weather system will move in, high pressure is down there towards the south—east, the isobars, the white lines, closer together across the far north and west, indicative of a windy day as well. tuesday, for
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many, chilly start, is lots of sunshine for england and wales, cloud with you, some rain moving into the north and the west, and it is here where we will have the strongest of the wind, perhaps even gales or severe gales will stop further south, high pressure near you, wind will be lighter. temperatures may be a degree or so higher, 16 or 17 degrees. 13 or 14 celsius further north. through the re st of celsius further north. through the rest of the week, the weather system in the north, high pressure still with us in southern areas, by the time we get to thursday, another area of high pressure, squeezing the weather front, it means there will not be much in the rain as it moves south, so wednesday and thursday, scotland, northern ireland, more cloud around, further south, plenty of sunshine, warmer, 22 degrees on thursday, turning a bit more cold on friday. hello it's 10:00, i'm victoria derbyshire. it's time for labour mps to support jeremy corbyn or quit now —
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that's the view of one of labour's top team anyone that isn't on board with that needs to really seriously think why they are still in the labour party as an mp. it is a pretty simple proposition and i don't think it takes rocket science and if you'd like that, maybe it's time to call it a day. it comes as labour hammer out a brexit motion which keeps the option of a second brexit referendum on the table. we'll get the views of labour voters shortly. we'll bring you the dramatic rescue of the sailor who'd been stranded, injured, in the middle of the indian ocean since friday. it's one of the most remote areas in the planet. the fact we have got something there as quickly as we haveis something there as quickly as we have is really good news. we will
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talk live to race organisers to hear how the rescue unfolded. and twist after twist after twist... final warning! raise your hands! pull back! it's a dead man's switch — if anything happens to me, it will go off! we'll talk about the finale of the biggest new tv drama in over a decade. did it live up to your expectations? do get in touch. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the days news. after five and a half hours of discussions behind closed doors, labour officials have hammered out a brexit motion to be discussed at the party conference in liverpool. it states that, if there isn't a general election, labour should support all options including, campaigning for another referendum. what we want now is a general election. let's have a proper debate at a general election, then people can choose what team goes forward to negotiate in the future. if we can't get that, yes, we will campaign
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for a people's vote, where people can have their say. but we'd much prefer a general election. what we want now is a general election. let's have a proper debate at a general election, then people can choose what team goes forward to negotiate in the future. if we can't get that, yes, we will campaign for a people's vote, where people can have their say. but we'd much prefer a general election. a public inquiry begins today into what's been called the "worst treatment disaster in the history of the nhs". around 2,500 haemophiliacs and other patients are thought to have died after being given contaminated blood when they had transfusions in the 1970s and 80s. campaigners claim the authorities withheld information for many years. it's a day that i never thought would come. as hard as i fought and as long as i've campaigned, it's been — this is a day that i never really thought would happen. i think over the next three days it's probably going to hit home when i meet up with everybody and all the victims come to the commemoration, we see what happened with that. there's going to be a lot ofjoy, there's going to be a lot of angst and we're all going to have to support each other.
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a second woman has come forward with allegations of sexual assault against the us supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh. democrat senators are said to be investigating the latest claims, which are reported in the new yorker magazine. mr kavanaugh denies the alleged event took place and has called it a smear. earlier, christine blasey ford, who has accused mr kavanaugh of trying to rape her when they were both teenagers said she would speak to the senate judiciary committee on thursday. he also denies her allegations. a 20—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder, in connection with the disappearance of a student in his first week at university. thomas jones was last seen near the river severn in worcester during the early hours of last wednesday morning. police have said searches are still ongoing and the arrested man is in police custody. the indian navy say that a seriously injured the round—the—world yachtsman, stranded in the middle of the indian ocean since friday, has been rescued. abhilash tomy, an indian national, suffered a back injury when the mast of his boat broke on friday
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during a storm, over 3000 kilometres off the coast of australia. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. need daily—macro i am just reading your many messages about male rape, and callum who wants to change it from being a to—do subject. julia on e—mail says, i from being a to—do subject. julia on e—mailsays, iam from being a to—do subject. julia on e—mail says, i am sitting here crying listen to the bravery of this man. my heart breaks for him and i wish you all the best in your future. 0n wish you all the best in your
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future. on twitter, what an amazing man, very brave to come out and tell the story to save lots of other children. the perpetrator should be brought tojustice. children. the perpetrator should be brought to justice. that will happen, the rapist has recently pleaded guilty to several sexual assault and he is awaiting punishment. millie onto to say so braving and move to hear callum speak about his childhood rape. louise ellman twitter says, such a powerful interview, in awe of your bravery, i am powerful interview, in awe of your bravery, iam pleased powerful interview, in awe of your bravery, i am pleased you are able to move on in such a positive way. sophie says, callum was incredibly moving, what an inspiring man. sophie says, callum was incredibly moving, whatan inspiring man. i hope his campaign to get children help in schools is successful. somebody else says, what a brave man, so brave to share your story andi man, so brave to share your story and i hope your openness will encourage others to talk and get their perpetrators charge. david, well done callum, i hope this helps any more who have experienced this,
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really. thank you for getting in touch. let's get some sport now. kat is at the bbc sport centre. good morning. it's one of sport's most remarkable comebacks. tiger woods has won his first golf tournament in five years at the pga tour championship in atalanta. englishman justin rose finished fourth and became the season champion, earning £7.5 million in the process. but you can see who the crowds were there for. plenty of love for tiger who slipped out of the world's top 1000 injuly last year after personal problems and a long—term back injury. ijust think that i just think that what i've gone through and what i've dealt with, i have gotte n through and what i've dealt with, i have gotten lucky, to be honest with you. i have gotten very lucky. i am not playing a full contact sport, where i have got to move people
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around in that regard. i am a2 years old with a fused lower spine, it's not going to happen, but with this book, it can. well tiger takes this form into the ryder cup where he'll play for team usa in paris — and our golf correspondent iain carter is there: both captains will arrive here for their news conferences and we know that tiger woods is going to be top of the agenda for those. but there is an massive sense of anticipation about this ryder cup. officially, this will be the first ever ryder cup in which each of the top ten players in the world will be competing. they are either american or european, two strong teams and tiger woods, playing his first ryder cup since 2012 ads are substantial x factor. cannot wait for that. well it's early stages in the scottish premiership but the signs are that we could be in for the most open race for the title in years.
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that's because celtic suffered defeat for the second time in their opening six games. they conceded in the last minute to lose 2—1 at kilmarnock, and are six points off hearts who are top. it's celtic‘s worst start to a season in 20 years. steven gerrard's rangers are now above celtic and up to second in the league after thrashing stjohnston 5—1 at ibrox. gerrard said it's the best football he's seen from his side since taking over in the summer. arsenal made it five wins in a row in all competitions with a 2—0 premier league victory over everton at the emirates. alexandre lacazette's brilliant opening goal but them in front after arsenal keeper petr cech had made a number of saves to keep them in it. aubameyang made it 2—0, but replays showed he was well offside. in the days early kick off west ham drew 0—0 with chelsea. in the women's super league, leaders arsenal twice came from behind to beat west ham a—3, to maintain their unbeaten start to the season liverpool clinched a win over brighton in theirfirst
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game since the resignation of manager neil redfearn. elsewhere, everton drew 0—0 against chelsea and manchester city drew 2—all with bristol city. that's all the sport for now. as labour s conference enters full swing, a key member ofjeremy corbyn steam has told this programme it may be time for mps unhappy with his leadership to quit the party. clive lewis, who s been talked of as future labour leader, hit out at critics of mr corbyn, saying if they couldn t get behind him then it could be "time to call it a day". it comes after a difficult summer for the party, dominated by the row over how to define anti—semitism. our political guru norman smith is at the labour party conference in liverpool. what is labour's opinion and brexit? i wish i could give a straight answer. boiled down, those who want answer. boiled down, those who want a second vote believed last night
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they made significant progress after they made significant progress after they got the party to agree to a motion, which would keep a second referendum as an option. however, when you talk to those around the leadership, they said that's no real change from what we've always said, we would like a general election. if we would like a general election. if we can't have a general election we will look at the possibility of having another vote. they say we haven't conceded anything, those in favour of a second vote say you have and you are moving ever closer to another referendum. but the significant development is the language we are now hearing from the key players around jeremy corbyn. like len mccluskey and this morning, from john mcdonnell, who are saying 0k, from john mcdonnell, who are saying ok, if we do agree to another referendum, it is not going to include the option of staying in the eu. in other words,
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include the option of staying in the eu. in otherwords, remaining in the eu. in otherwords, remaining in the eu will not be on the ballot paper, it will be a choice between the deal that a labour government does or no deal. it will be two versions of brexit. i don't think that message has quite percolated through to a lot of the labour activists here, who are pushing the party to campaignfora who are pushing the party to campaign for a referendum in the hope they might be able to unpick brexit. that is not the position of the leadership. their view is brexit is happening, we have had a vote. if we have do have another referendum it will be on two questions of how we leave. i think that is the significant development we have had here. what other policies are they talking about this week? people like me, we often whinge about the fact that there is nothing substantive being discussed. but there is actually at this conference. we have had a steady stream of quite chunky policies. so yesterday, we had this
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idea of placing workers on company boards. today we are getting a proposal to make all larger companies set aside 10% of their shares into an employee fund, so employees can benefit from shared dividends and get a commence at —— commence at share voting power as well. we are to get an announcement on ending the academy schools and the free schools policy. policies to help people renting in the private sector to make sure they can get legal aid if they are involved in a tussle with their landlords. we are getting chunky policies and that is because labour want this conference to be about pitching themselves as an alternative government in waiting. and one with a clear, different, radicalagenda. that waiting. and one with a clear, different, radical agenda. that was meant to happen over the summer but over the summer, labour were
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com pletely over the summer, labour were completely blown off—course over the row over anti—semitism. the question is now, can they pick up the pieces and begin to seriously position themselves as an alternative to this government? my colleague and good friend sean clare has been taking a look at labour's prospects of moving forward and their long, hot summer. our new story on 5 live this hour — labour faces renewed claims of anti—semitism. the former chief rabbi jonathan sacks has accused jeremy corbyn of being an anti—semite. now, labour's anti—semitism row shows no signs of abating this afternoon... by any measure, it's been a difficult, uncomfortable summer for labour. the headlines have been dominated by how the party should deal with anti—semitism, prejudice againstjewish people. this summer, it has been damaging to the labour party. the rot that jeremy corbyn brought in has gripped the party. i don't thinkjeremy corbyn can solve the problem because he is the problem.
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but could things be about to get even more fraught, as calls mount for labour mps to quit the party? this programme has spoken to a senior member of jeremy corbyn's team, who says it's decision time for those opposed to the leader. that's what we're here for as mps, to make sure that we have a labour government, and anyone that isn't on board with that needs to really seriously think why they are still in the labour party. we are going to change things! birmingham, warrington. .. with more than 500,000 members, labour says it has become the biggest centre—left party in western europe since jeremy corbyn took over. they did far better than predicted at the last election, when he confounded expectations. but how damaging has the rift with parts of the jewish community been to the party? the labour party isn't somewhere that i feel i can be proudlyjewish. and with huge divisions in the labour movement over how to approach or oppose leaving the european union, can the fractured party
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come back together? all this matters because brexit and political flux means that there could well be a general election sooner rather than later. and, injeremy corbyn, labour has a potential prime minister in waiting with policies the likes of which this country hasn't seen for a generation. away from westminster, the relentless row over anti—semitism has struck to the heart of what it means to be jewish and on the left in britain. so what's it like when your community is headline news and the subject of angry political debate? ella taylor, noah libson, aron keller and josh garfield are young, left—wing and jewish. i feel politically homeless. i don't know where i fit best.
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i know that the labour party isn't somewhere that i feel i can be proudlyjewish. the labour party has always reflected my politics and, even now, taking out the anti—semitism issue, it doesn't necessarily not reflect my politics. i wouldn't agree that this anti—semitism issue is of labour's making. they have reached out to jewish organisations that, in some cases, have been completely unwilling to compromise. i have got no plans of leaving because this may i was elected as a labour councillor. so me leaving the party helps nobody. myjewishness and my commitment to progressive politics are not in any way incompatible. i feel more represented by this labour party underjeremy corbyn than i have at any other point in my lifetime. my concerns are not being taken seriously by my local party, by the leadership, and that for me says a whole lot more than whether someone can declare anti—semitism is endemic or not, because we know it exists. i'm jewish, i say that the concerns are real and still on twitter i get people telling me that i'm lying. if you can't listen to a minority talk about their own oppression
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and accept that it's true, accept that it exists, then i don't know what we need to do next. ella and i have both said that we can't be labour members and be jewish. you know, that is a dreadful state of affairs. it feels like, within the jewish community, you're not allowed to be a labour member, you're not allowed to be left—wing. yet sometimes it feels like within labour you're not allowed to be jewish. labour is still the party that has the best chance of making this country better for everyone. however, we do have to get our own house in order, we do have to turn the mirror on ourselves and sort out what's going on. i admire you and i'm envious that you feel like it's still a home for you. but, for me, ifeel like it's been one catastrophe too far and i can no longerjustify why i'm still there. this summer, it has been damaging to the labour party. clive lewis is a leading member of jeremy corbyn's team and has been talked of as a possible future labour leader. i think to be called a racist party is damaging, and to have to deny that is damaging. i think the party has dealt with it. people can say, "well, you should have dealt with it quicker and sooner."
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it's been dealt with. damaging, yes, but i hopefully think we can now turn that chapter, that corner and move on. one of labour's most prominentjewish mps recently called jeremy corbyn a racist and anti—semite. so how does the party move on? jeremy corbyn has done all that he can now, i think, so faroverthe summer. i understand that people can be upset. but i don't thinkjeremy corbyn's going anywhere, and we can resolve this problem, it will be resolved with him in power, in charge of the labour party. but not all mps see it like that. the party is split. dame louise ellman is a jewish labour mp and critic ofjeremy corbyn. jeremy's leader of the labour party, and he must put problems right. this problem has grown worse since jeremy became leader. i think one of the issues is that many people on the far left who have held anti—semitic views have come into the labour party at the same time. good evening to you and a very warm
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welcome to the programme. labour mps critical of jeremy corbyn have faced opposition from party members in their areas. a number of them have faced a vote of no—confidence. two labour mps have faced a vote of no—confidence by local party... joan ryan, a critic ofjeremy corbyn is the second mp to lose... chuka umunna today urged jeremy corbyn to "call off the dogs" and stop mps being targeted... dame louise doesn't believe these no—confidence votes are expressions of local democracy. she again points the finger atjeremy corbyn. jeremy should call off the dogs, and these items aren't coincidental, they're not isolated, and there has to be a suspicion that this is coming from the leadership. we've got different musicians in. i think the idea... is that the reason for
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the stand—up comedy? there's some kind of a connection? some mps are blaming momentum, a grassroots organisation set up to support jeremy corbyn's leadership, for stoking that opposition to sitting mps. the group now has a big say in the kind of people getting the chance to become labour mps. laura mcalpine set up a local branch of the group here in essex and has been selected as labour's candidate. just want to raise awareness of the local labour party, really. got not many tickets left now, so you'd better get yours quick. she is organising a stand—up comedy night here at this theatre to raise money for her campaign. it feels a long way from talk of takeovers and hard left infiltration. we put on free film screenings. we also have got dementia friendly film screenings. lots of events for the community. we cleared up a garden in our local hospital. we put on bingo nights, music nights to fund raise for local homeless charities. she's an actress and jewellery designer, she's in her early 30s and comes from harlow, the town she was to represent. for far too long, we've had mps that represent us
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that don't understand the town or the constituency, and they've kind of been parachuted in. and their ideas are not truly reflective of the people they are supposed to represent. it's people in towns like this that labour needs to convince if it's going to win. since the constituency was established in the 1970s, whichever party has won here has also won the general election. it's full of voters who swing from party to party. "essex man" is seen as the archetypal swing voter. how doesjeremy corbyn go down on the doorstep with those swing voters? well, it's a tough one. he can be very popular because he's a man who sticks by his principles, and i think a lot of people have a lot of admiration for that. would you takejeremy corbyn out canvassing with you ? absolutely.
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absolutely, yeah. in fact, i've tried, but he's too busy. we are really trying to fuse music and art in with politics as well, to show it doesn't have to be dry and boring, it can actually be really exciting and dynamic. away from the bread and butter grassroots campaigning, labour is focusing on ideas, ideas it hopes will help it win. the world transformed is an ideas festival which was founded by momentum and runs in tandem with the main conference and is now in its third year. obviously, the political programme that has been coming out of labour over the last couple of years does speak to a lot of working class people on the ground, and people who care about issues like housing, health care, transport — issues that affect their everyday lives. we are platforming those very issues at the world transformed. but, back at labour's actual conference, there will be talk about whether the party can stay together. frank field, a veteran mp, has already left the party and parliament. others have hinted they might follow. shadow minister clive lewis has this advice for them. listen, get behind the leadership, get behind the policies that are going to be coming out of this conference, that have already come out, which will make our country a fairer place. that is what we are here for as mps, to make sure
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that we have a labour government. anyone that isn't on board with that needs to really seriously think why they are still in the labour party as an mp. it's a pretty simple proposition, and i don't think it takes rocket science. if you don't like that, well, maybe it's time to call it a day. and for those mps who aren't behind their leader? they have to make that call about whether they feel that they can be in a political party where, yes, you can have differences but if you can't agree with the fundamentals, you can't support the leader, you can't support the broad thrust of the economic policies and you want to speak against them constantly, then, yes, you have to question whether it is a political party you want to remain in. the other side of the coin is, at some point, that decision can be made for you.
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you may have members who democratically say, "unfortunately, we are not happy with the way that you're operating, not happy with the way you are rolling, we don't like how you are dealing with this issue and we want you to step up and change." and if those mps don't step up and change, well, the message is clear. if there are people who want to come forward and take them on, then how do we strike a balance to make sure that, rather than having to do it in a negative way, we can actually do it in a positive way where it is engaging... basically, it's discussing ideas, who's got the right ideas? and i think from that you can move forward and have stronger ideas and a strong voice in parliament. i think that's a good thing. what kind of country? what kind of world? what kind of society? so where next for the corbyn project? he faces a headache on how to navigate brexit when many on the left want to see more vocal opposition. but could he come out of this conference more secure than ever, in spite of the difficult summer? the party membership has grown and changed, some of the candidates being chosen to run for labour are changing. where that leaves labour mps who aren't on board with the change
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will be for them and their party members to decide. let's talk to labour's shadow treasury minister anneliese dodds. thank you forjoining us from liverpool, explain how a general election helps you out of the brexit stalemate? we're very concerned about whether government is going, currently with brexit, we seem to have reached a brick wall because of the red lines theresa may very recklessly set out at the beginning of the process, we seem to have a stalemate in terms of the government approach in relation to the eu, first we need to have a properly meaningful vote, we are very concerned about how the government has said the vote in parliament will be between no deal and the flawed steel theresa may, we think there should be an option to put this back to parliament, if theresa may is not
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willing to do that, we need to have a general election because we then need to have a responsible government looking at these questions. your brexit proposals have the exact same benefits as we currently have as members of the single market and customs union but you would end freedom of movement, thatis you would end freedom of movement, that is cherry picking, that is what the conservative government have been accused of doing by brussels, you are planning to do the same.|j have had a lot of discussions with politicians across europe, i was a member of the european parliament for two years and it is very clear we would be in a different situation if labour was in government. from the very beginning we said eu citizen should not be used as bargaining chips in the negotiations, they were, that created bad blood. the point i'm making is that you two are cherry picking. the eu will have no. —— will not allow that, how does a general election get the country out
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of the brexit stalemate? general election get the country out of the brexit stalemate ?|j general election get the country out of the brexit stalemate? i don't think we are cherry picking, we said we would need to have a combo pens of customs union, we have been clear about that, we have said we need to have a transition period is well under the same rules as there is currently a time—limited transition period, we have been very clear about that, and as i have said when we talk to people based in the rest of europe, in the 27 around this they say it is a much more realistic proposal, the problem with what the government is saying at the moment is that it is logically inconsistent, it cannot work, and we need to have a more sensible approach. do you accept you will not get a general election, you would have to have conservative mps voting for it and that will not happen. actually we have seen some principled conservative. principled conservative mps realising that this government is going to turn this economy off the cliff. there will
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not vote forjeremy corbyn getting into number ten. for a lot of people, the future of their job into number ten. for a lot of people, the future of theirjob in their constituency is incredibly important, and for some... inaudible we have to see, i think. go on.“ you can't get a general election, it seems highly unlikely, if you do get toa seems highly unlikely, if you do get to a second referendum, then the shadow chancellor said on the radio this morning said that he would argue for two options on the ballot paper: leaving with whatever deal is brought back from brussels or leaving with no deal. so you would not offer people the chance to vote to stay in which is what many party members want. if we were in that situation we would need to look carefully at what the technical requirements would be, there has been thinking around this ab out how it could work and whether we would have a 2—stage referendum, i don't
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think it is possible currently to define what the questions would be and what i am focused on is as having that meaningful vote, first of all, which i hope the government will give us, they have not been willing to do it so far but we will keep pushing them, and if theresa may cannot, and support in parliament to win the vote, then we need a general election, that is what we need to focus upon. let's speak with a group of labour voters. rhammel afflick is a 2a—year—old communications officer, who thinks opposition tojeremy corbyn's leadership from within labour is damaging the party. patrick moule is a former labour councillor, who thinks labour have been clever over brexit. muhamid pathan is a 26—year—old trainee barrister, who thinks labour's position on brexit could be more clear. kira lewis is an 18 year—old student, who thinks there should be a referendum on any brexit deal elsie greenwood is also an 18 year—old student, who would have voted to stay in the eu if she'd been old enough,
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but doesn't think there should be a second referendum. and brendan chilton is general secretary of the labour leave campaign, he thinks labour needs to rule out another referendum. which is not going to happen, it would seem, how do you feel about that? i think the wording of the motion which emerged after several hours yesterday, is really quite unclear, in the sense that it does not commit labour to holding another referendum, at the same point it does not rule one out, given their jeremy corbyn this weekend on the andrew marr show was very reluctant to say we want another referendum, given whatjohn mcdonnell has said this morning, on really there being two options in a future referendum, i think the likely hood of that happening is very slim. if we can get a general election, we will go for a second referendum, is what john mcdonnell said. he said the vote on the government deal, or there would be a no deal. there
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would not be the option to remain. let me ask your fellow labour voters what they think about that. if we got to that point, there wouldn't be an option to remain into the eu, what do you think about that? an option to remain into the eu, what do you think about that7m an option to remain into the eu, what do you think about that? it is clear to me and the basis ofjohn mcdonnell's comments earlier, he appeared to be and he used the term, he appeared to use the term in the event that we couldn't get another general election, people's vote. but he said there wouldn't be an option to remain in the eu. is it right or wrong? it's not clear what question they would be able to ask at this stage anyway. what would you want? the option to remain. what about you? john mcdonnell is a prominent
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figure but we are an organisation andl figure but we are an organisation and i want the option to remain because if we are giving the option of the chequers deal, we're not following our labour policies. it fell apart following our labour policies. it fellapart in following our labour policies. it fell apart in strasbourg. so it should be remain all leave, or leave or leave, because that isn't the option of the majority of the labour members or the majority of the public. i would argue for a two step referendum to see if people want this deal or not and then if they don't, it would be whether they want to remain only. be two step referendum? in two and a half years we would have had three referenda on this issue. there is democratic overload and you think about people being put off by too many referenda or too many votes. but with an issue thatis
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or too many votes. but with an issue that is so important, it cannot be a nswered that is so important, it cannot be answered within one referendum. we have seen it happen before when politicians try to simplify the referendum or the question and it ends up becoming yes or no, which people don't understand the ramifications of. but many people do? with any election, it is a two—way thing. do? with any election, it is a two-way thing. i think it is really angering that people making it out to bea angering that people making it out to be a simple issue. with the first referendum plea had issues with the conduct of the leader—macro campaign. we shouldn't go over it, but it should be considered. what do you want? it isn't clear cut as to whether we need a referendum right now, but we have a situation where the government have reaffirmed their position on a no—deal brexit, which i think is something we should never have been considering. that is why
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we are at the stage where people are panicking and saying we need people's vote. what do you think? i think the best way forward is listen to what the membership has to say over the next few days at conference. it is clear there is a big demand for a second vote, whether it is on different terms or remaining in the eu. we need to respect people who voted leave, but at the same time if the membership have a desire for a second referendum, we need a clear policy that reflects that. you will have seen that reflects that. you will have seen the poll yesterday which said a big majority of labour members wa nted big majority of labour members wanted a second referendum on what ever deal is brought back from brussels. labour could agree to that right now. that is what the party membership want? i don't think it is clear—cut. it doesn't matter what party you look at, it depends on the terms. the principal. do you agree,
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jeremy corbyn could say that right now, we could have one?” jeremy corbyn could say that right now, we could have one? i don't think it would be right for him to pre—empt the debate. think it would be right for him to pre-empt the debate. he said he respects it and that is important. if you look at where party members are at, it is overwhelmingly likely that the backing will come to pass. he did say i was elected to empower membership. in that sense what he's doing is empowering lusk saying, we will wait until we have the outcome of conference, see what the membership want and i will take a step forward and lead accordingly. that is what the membership be reflecting. do you think there will bea reflecting. do you think there will be a second referendum offer? from the vibe we're getting from co nfe re nce the vibe we're getting from conference and the polling, yes it will be. how will you react if this does come to pass? we will be serving a p a5 on dozens of mps in the midlands and the north. 80% of
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members support a second referendum, but the members are important, but they are not as important as the electorate. overwhelmingly in most opinion polls, people want is to get on with it, leave and remain supporters accept the outcome of the referendum and that is right in our brexit manifesto in 2017 we had one of the biggest shares of the vote in history. for the labour party here in liverpool talking to be talking about wanting a referendum is, to tear referendum, the country isn't listening, the country want us to get on with leaving and making a success of brexit and having a labour government outside the european union. we're looking at the past but we need to be looking at the future is that a fair point, they could do what the members want, but it wouldn't be popular in the wider country, which you need for a successful general election? we need to get on with things, but we have
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had a prime minister wasting 26 months of negotiation. what about the point brendan has made, the labour leadership might do what the party members want, but it is not popular with the rest of the country? if people do want to leave, they will vote to leave, in a second referendum, if they want to leave, they will vote to leave again and we respect that. but 26 months later we are here and if you want to leave again, then fine. we should not fear the second referendum, but you only do so if you feel the opinion has changed and you will lose that.” think it is important to think about what the outcome of theresa may's government's brexit negotiations will be. we don't know yet. that will be. we don't know yet. that will shape a lot on how we go forward. that has been a majority of the membership saying they want a second referendum. the conference is a moment for the party members to help shape the agenda for the party
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and if there is an overwhelming demand for a second referendum, the labour leadership should commit to. at what point will people access the outcome of the referendum? at what point will you accept the outcome of the referendum ? point will you accept the outcome of the referendum? you would have voted to remain if you had been old enough, when will you accept it? to remain if you had been old enough, when will you accept it7m people want and have changed their views, we need to ask them again. whilst we have had a referendum, it is clear the referenda was very confused and there wasn't a clear outcome of what was going to happen. some people find that so patronising. i can understand that but we have found out there has been misspending in the referendum in the league campaign and they have made hundreds of lies. and as a people voted said that with the thought the nhs would get £350 million and that was alive. it is not patronising to
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remind of that. —— lie. we need to be the country first, before the membership but if the labour party think brexit is going to be awful and it's going to have a major effect then we need to think about that and discuss the best way forward and maybe that is a second referendum. they go to leave again, there may be labour can be empower and stared of a deal like chequers. thank you all very much for coming on the programme. trapped in a bunk by a serious back injury thousands of miles from land for three days — yachtsman abhilash tomy is rescued by a french navy patrol ship. we'll hear how that rescue unfolded. ok, let's talk about the the final episode of the bodyguard on bbc one last night. figures in show that more than 10
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million people watched it. the audience reached its peak of 11 million in the final five minutes. if you haven't watched it and you don't want to know who did it, turn down the volume now, switch over. how do you think all the loose ends we re how do you think all the loose ends were tied up? was it satisfying and pulling conclusion? one of the most successful in a decade? you were right, boss. there's been an inside man all along. final warning! raise your hands! david, don't move, stay perfectly still. it's a dead man's switch. anything happens to me, it'll go off. control, active message.
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i didn't do this, you need to believe me. subjects armed with pbid, require safe route. message from sfc, critical shot authorised. received. no, stop! stop her. becky, no. becky, it's too dangerous. that's charlie and ella losing the both of us. i believe you david, i believe you are innocent. let's give you a chance to prove it. i'm not going to manage with one hand. sart by freeing your left hand. you will see a set of scissors. use it to divide the tape over your thumb to create two loose ends. after him.
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tommo walters tweeted: "how more british can you get that the final scenes in the biggest drama series in 20 years are a trip to occupational health and driving away in a nissan." ollie charles: "i didn t think it was possible to not breathe for 75 minutes". if you haven't watched it yet and don t
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want to know what happened — we are about to talk about how all the loose ends were tied up so beware. let's talk to ruth weir, a super fan of bodyguard, who used to work in the home office, john warwicker, who was a close protection officer for three former prime ministers over six years, including wilson and thatcher, and emma bullimore, a tv critic. and matthew clarke —— graphic designer for bodyguard. matthew, did you know what was coming ordid matthew, did you know what was coming or did you have to watch it last night? we were given the script from the start so we know how it is going to end so we can design everything based on the ending. what is it like being involved in one of the biggest of the decade? we knew it was going to be quite big, but we didn't expect it as big as this. but do you think about the reaction. didn't expect it as big as this. but
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do you think about the reactionm is fantastic. everybody has sat down to watch the evening rather than the iplayer catch—up. it is wonderful. what did you to think? it didn't let us what did you to think? it didn't let us down. the penultimate episode was saying, has a lost its momentum, but the finale, 75 minutes. tension and chasing through the streets, everything we wanted. sometimes they leave it to open ended, but it was satisfying. every week i had to watch it. tweeting about it, spoke to friends and family about it. it is the programme of decade for me. programme of the decade, wow. john you were a closed protection officer for three former prime ministers, what did you think of the finale?m is very profound and be very intelligent about this. it is a vast
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subject for me and it was covered in some depth in the series, which i enjoyed and i couldn't disagree with any of the comments that have been made about it. but and there is a but. if you are a bodyguard, if you area training but. if you are a bodyguard, if you are a training bodyguard or training them, please do not use it as a training manual. i don't think anybody will. maggie was smiling at that. julia montague is dead, matty? dead? yes, conclusively! well, we thought we had, and then keeley hawes said, or is she, and then we have had however many weeks hoping for her to return. apps in the shower —— perhaps in the shower, like dallas. i think she is gone, but people want her to come back. definitely, brilliant actress, it is
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the whole chemistry between the two of them. what a risk, killing her off in act three. totally change what you thought the series was about, it was about a frisson between the two of them, who can trust to, and then she is gone, it became about a big conspiracy, i think that is the genius ofjed mercurio, turning it on his head. were you satisfied that it was this mastermind, luke aitken, killing julia montague, were you satisfied, that the superintendent was corrupt, did it feel right, what did you think when you found out who built the bombs. it was brilliant, as a woman, as a muslim woman, the whole thing around oppression... that whole idea that she is not an oppressed woman, she is an engineer as well, as a feminist, it brought things to light that you don't normally cover. so much focus on the security services, gina maquis's character, and for it to be
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lorraine, that was a big twist as well. —— gine mckee. lorraine, that was a big twist as well. -- gine mckee. john, what did you think the tying up loose ends in that way? i enjoyed it very much, it was not easy for me to follow, because it was very quick and i am not as quick as i once was but it was a stunning arrangement to start with, of dramatic episode in version one, scene one, and then to finish it so well, or linking in. the intervening parts were very good indeed, in most cases, i think the police work as a whole was exceptionally well done. and i'm sure the police services will feel fairly pleased about their aspect in it. 11 viewers, i was the one. 10 million watched last night. -- 11 million watched last night. -- 11 million viewers, i think it was 11,000,001. small but dedicated fan
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base, so many shows, so to be part of something that is with so many people, people talking about it, watching on their phones on the train, the way it has become this huge thing, it is really wonderful. comments on twitter, talking about body guard last night, we found lots of plot holes and things that did not quite make sense but the point was, while we were watching it, none of it mattered, it was tense as hell. still quite stressed from the final bodyguard episode. catching up, that is not how you negotiate with a bomb laden man! you maniacs! laughter bravo, the team at bodyguard, good cast, great show, sad regarding keeley hawes, would have scripted that differently, was engaged with the tension between her and richard madden, but it was still a success. the odds on richard madden being the next james bond have
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the odds on richard madden being the nextjames bond have been slashed. seeing anybody in an action role would make me think, bond, perhaps, but, i don't know, he ‘s career will be glittering, it was already pretty good but everyone has been accessed with him for six weeks, great things beckon, whether it is bond or something else. congratulations. an indian sailor taking part in a round the world yacht race has been rescued after his boat was hit by a storm. the news came in as we came to air this morning. a huge international rescue operation was launched to find abhilash tomy, who got stranded 2000 miles off the coast of western australia after his mast got damaged by a5 foot waves. he manage to send out a message saying he'd suffered a severe back injury. for the latest, we can speak now to don mcintyre, he's the chairman of the golden globe race. tell us how this rescue happened?
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major international operation led by thejoint major international operation led by the joint rescue major international operation led by thejoint rescue cordon major international operation led by the joint rescue cordon nation centre in australia, basically, today, a fewer hours ago, there was an indian aircraft, navy aircraft overhead, a french fisheries surveillance vessel arrived on the scene, they launched two zodiacs, conditions were pretty good, two metre seas, the wind was 25 knots, got on board and applied immediate first aid to abhilash tomy and they we re first aid to abhilash tomy and they were able to get him back on board the ship, he is on the rescue vessel, not sure of anything other than the fact he is conscious and talking and we will get further updates as it happens. we are all incredibly happy and grateful to the support of the israelis navy, hms balmoral, on its way, also may be involved, transferring abhilash tomy back to australia, successful and happy day. what were your initial
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emotions when you heard he had been not only found but rest you, and he is conscious and talking? really good, tough days, we have horrible situations in the beginning where the message we had was simply that he had been dismasted and had severe back injuries and could not move. that is where he sat for the last four days. serious concerns, emotional roller—coaster, a day later, we got another message, short messaging, he did not get out of the bunker, had not drunk or eating anything, he is in pain. we are all very happy. thank you so much for speaking with us, and we will find out more, as soon speaking with us, and we will find out more, as soon as we hear speaking with us, and we will find out more, as soon as we hear from abhilash tomy himself. a second woman has come forward with sexual misconduct allegations against the us supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh. deborah ramirez was at yale with kava naugh, and claims he exposed himself
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to her during a party while they were both studying there in the 1980s. the first woman to claim brett kava naugh sexually assaulted her is due to give evidence on thursday. professor christine blasey ford will speak at the selection hearings which choose the replacement for a retiring judge in the highest court in the us. her sister—in—law has been speaking about why professor blasey ford has come forward now. she is a serious person, and she has a very full life, she did not need to bring this into her life. i believe her completely, there is no doubt in my mind, she decided to come forward and tell the story, and it is her story. some republicans, including the president have accused professor blasey ford and democrats of using the allegations to delay and obstruct the judge's confirmation. being a supreme courtjudge is a lifelong position and if kavanaugh were to be
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confirmed it would mean a conservative majority on the high court for a generation. the president has repeatedly endorsed him for the nomination. human being you will ever have the privilege of knowing or meeting. the president and i are confident that senate republicans will manage this properly with the utmost respect for all concerned, and i believe that judge brett kavanagh will soon be just as brett kavanagh... judge brett kavanagh will soon be just as brett kavanagh. .. applause and take his seat on the supreme court of the united states of america. thejudge has denied the allegation against him, saying it did not happen and calling it an attempt to smear him. no president has ever consulted more
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widely or talked with more people from more backgrounds to seek input about a supreme court nomination. mr president, i am grateful to you and iam humbled president, i am grateful to you and i am humbled by your confidence in me. this morning we have had many m essa g es me. this morning we have had many messages after an interview with a young man called callum hancock. he's a 27 year old boxer who was raped by another boy when he wasjust10. before i read some of those out, let's listen to a bit of that interview — and just to say, you might not want children to hear.. ican i can remember being a child, 11, 12, 13 years old, questioning, because i have been with a man, does
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this mean i am gay? i questioned my sexuality, i was so confused. from 13, 1a, into sexuality, i was so confused. from 13,1a, into my mid—20s, i was filled with so much rage and anger. he had tricked me, he had manipulated me into doing such things... it is a horrific and it would have a dramatic experience on anybody. did you think about telling your mother and father? there has been a few times where i've thought about telling my mum but the thought of telling my mum and dad, it's worth too scary, too challenging, andi worth too scary, too challenging, and i didn't want them to think they had let me down or mist something in my childhood because they never have. we never stopped anywhere other than at my grandfather's house. growing up, best holidays, our lives were filled with so much love and laughter. none of this was the thought of my mum and dad and i never wanted to burden them with that. winded things come to a head? wings came to a head for me. -- when
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did things come to a head?” wings came to a head for me. -- when did things come to a head? i have a lwa ys did things come to a head? i have always pushed it to the back of my mind but when i lost a close friend to suicide, that is when it came to the front of my mind, i was stood at his funeral and i honestly believe, iam owing his funeral and i honestly believe, i am owing to take this to the grave, iam i am owing to take this to the grave, i am coming tojoin you. i am owing to take this to the grave, i am coming to join you. you thought you might take your own life? yeah, yeah, suicide and murder, that is what i had in mind for many years, and again, that is because i was so head up —— het up and confused and trapped inside, i had led a self—destructive life, i didn't want to affect anybody but myself and my perpetrator. this guy, phenomenal, says one man on twitter, credit to his family. i salute you, you brave, wonderful man, iam salute you, you brave, wonderful man, i am sure salute you, you brave, wonderful man, i am sure your salute you, you brave, wonderful man, i am sure your honesty will help others suffering in silence. this had me in tears, for what callu m
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this had me in tears, for what callum has endured but more is the wonder at his bravery for going public on this for all the others suffering. you are a hero and i hope you find peace. thank you for those. bbc news room live is next. most of us will keep the fine and sunny weather insert this afternoon. chance of some showers in the north and west of scotland but they will be few and far between. some fair weather clouds here and there but that will not spoil the sunshine.
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feeling quite pleasant this afternoon. chillierfurther north. through tonight, there is the risk of some showers in northern and western scotland, otherwise clear skies through the night meaning another chilly night. in rural areas temperatures getting close to freezing by tuesday morning. the wind is picking up through scotland and northern ireland and choose mostly dry. england and wales will have a glorious start with more sunshine. goodbye. this is bbc news i'mjoanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at 11: labour conference will debate a motion which would leave open
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the possibility of the party campaigning for a further eu referendum. it would be on the deal and parliament would determine the form of words on that but we will campaignfora of words on that but we will campaign for a debate on the deal. the party will also announce plans to force big firms give shares to their workers worth up to £500 a year. a public inquiry opens into the contaminated blood scandal — in which 2500 nhs patients died. an indian round the world yachtsman who was seriously injured, has been rescued by a french navy patrol ship 2000 miles from western australia. and — tiger's burning bright again.
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