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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 25, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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today at five, the labour conference is all set to vote on a motion which will define its approach to a brexit deal. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, tells the bbc that labour will measure any deal against the six key tests that it's set out. this government has had 37 months to negotiate a brexit deal, has not done so, and that our party represent people in communities that voted both leave and remain but all of whom are worried about theirjobs and worried about the economic future of this country. — 27 months. but the shadow brexit secretary says all options should be kept on the table, including a so—called people's vote, and the possibility of remaining in the eu. it's right that parliament has the first say, but if we need to break the impasse, our options must include campaigning for a public vote and nobody is ruling out remain as an option. cheering and applause we'll have the latest from the labour conference, where the vote is due to take place in liverpool within the next hour. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the cabinet agrees in principle that migrants from the eu should be
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treated the same as those from the rest of the world after brexit. the inquest into the death of a teenager who had an allergic reaction after eating a pret a manger sandwich hears that several other people had previously had allergic reactions to the product. president trump launches a forthright attack on iran at the un general assembly, calling it the world's leading sponsor of terrorism. and, spotted swimming in the thames, a beluga whale. rescuers urge the public not to get too close. it's 5 o'clock.
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our main story is that labour's conference in liverpool is about to vote on a motion which could keep open the possibility of supporting the uk's continued membership of the european union. the vote will take place within the next hour. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has just told the bbc that any brexit deal brought back from brussels by theresa may needs to pass labour's six tests for future prosperity. mr corbyn has been speaking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg, who began by asking him if he had any sense of what the final shape of the brexit deal will be. no, i don't. all i know is that this government has had 27 months to negotiate a brexit deal, has not done so, and that our party represents people in communities that voted both leave and remain but all of whom are worried about theirjobs and worried about the economic future of this country and therefore we have set down our six tests by which we willjudge the government whenever theresa may chooses to bring a deal back to parliament. if you don't know yet then the shape of the final deal, how can you decide now that
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you are almost certainly going to vote against it? i've never said that. i said we would test whatever they come back with against the six tests that we've put down. but your shadow brexit secretary said today, if theresa may brings back a deal that fails our tests, that looks increasingly likely, labour will vote against it, no ifs, no buts. well, how is that different to anything i've just said? he said if the six tests are not met, we will vote against the deal. we have made that very clear for some months now. it a bit more than that, though, isn't it? keir starmer sending a very strong message to the country that labour is planning to vote down the brexit deal. we have made it very clear all along that our tests are on access to the market, are on customs union, are on appropriate regulations that protectjobs, environment and consumer rights, and of course an end to the speculation of the danger of a border between northern ireland and the republic. the six tests that you set out
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last year were actually about fair migration, strong collaboration with the eu. yes. protecting security, delivering for nations and regions, protecting workers‘ rights and having the same benefits as the single market. that is not precisely what you just outlined. well, you've got the six tests there, you've read them out, you can see exactly what they are, but my general point is that it is about ensuring we have a trade relationship with europe that protects jobs. our manufacturing industry is already under great stress. jaguar land rover have gone onto a three—day week, others have made investment decisions to go elsewhere, and many are worried about the supply chain both in the food processing industry as well as in heavier manufacturing industry. i'm trying to understand if you asked a genuinely going to compare the final deal with the six tests, why then make such a public announcement today that you are planning to vote against the deal? keir said, i repeat, we would test what the government says against the six tests we have put down and vote
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accordingly and he has made the point that the government, in 27 months of negotiating, has not come up with anything near to those results that we want. if there were another referendum, would you vote leave or remain? well, we don't know what the question is going to be in the referendum so that is a hypothetical question. but this is all hypothetical, as you said yourself. it's completely hypothetical. as you say yourself, what the party has been talking about this week is what to do... we don't know what the question will be so i can't answer that question. i can't answer that question because we don't know what the question is going to be. but many members here this week are desperate for you to say, i would campaign to stay in. what members are desperate for here is for us to challenge this government, to challenge this government on what it is doing, challenge this government on its incompetence and that is exactly what we're doing. that was jeremy corbyn, the that wasjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, talking to laura kuenssberg short while ago. earlier, the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said that labour was likely to vote down any brexit deal brought back from brussels by theresa may because it looked set to fail labour's six tests
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for future prosperity. speaking at the labour conference in liverpool, he received a standing ovation from much of the hall when he said that the option to remain in europe should not be ruled out of a possible public vote on any final brexit deal. having swept them away, we want to install a radical labour government capable of transforming this country. and that's what should happen. after two years of negotiations ending in failure. but if that's not possible, we must have other options. and, conference, that must include campaigning for a public vote. cheering and applause conference... it right that parliament has the first say, it's right that parliament has the first say,
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but if we need to break the impasse, our options must include campaigning for a public vote and nobody is ruling out remain as an option. cheering and applause a significant speech by sir keir starmer, the shadow brexit secretary. not everybody agreed with that emphasis for that we have been talking about the evident divisions between the party leadership which they have denied that there is a clear different emphasis in some of the remarks being made about the prospect of another referendum or a vote of some kind in the absence of a general election. will that attempt to bring more clarity, will it work? the vote has still not happened, it will be pretty soon. our chief political correspondent vicki young is there for us now. how does it look there right now?m
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is interesting because the vote itself if you look at the text they are talking about, it's all about keeping all options on the table including campaigning for a so—called peoples ford. there is no actual words in their about a commitment to have the remain option on the ballot paper —— people's vote. but people in the room and those pushing for a second referendum say it is implicit that would be the case and of course keir starmer saying it so clearly earlier was a significant moment but it is absolutely the case that not eve ryo ne absolutely the case that not everyone in the labour leadership thinks it is a good idea. there was a real concern they would be seen to be somehow betraying the millions of labour voters and supporters who voted for brexit so it is a real dilemma for the party. i am joint by the shadow international trade secretary, barry gardiner. where do you stand on this? it seems to be a conflict. emily thornberry said that we have had a referendum, we said it
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was serious and we would stick by the results is that the case? let's just get it in perspective. there is a hierarchy of what needs to go on. firstly, the government is supposed to negotiate an agreement with the eu and bring it back to parliament and, at that point, keir starmer set out clearly, at that point, if it ever happens because we have had to years of negotiating and they have not managed to secure an agreement, but if they do and they bring it to parliament, we will assess it on the six tests which reflect the six promises that they made, promises about security, is about respecting peoples rights in the workplace, about the environmental safeguards, all of these things we willjudge any deal on those six tests. you have said it has to have exactly the same... no, no... this is one of your tests. the very clear. theresa may said that it would secure the
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exact same benefits, she said that and so did david davis. and it's in one of your tests. indeed, but we will apply all the tests and look at how much it meets each one and then ta ke how much it meets each one and then take a judgment as to whether we can agree with whatever they bring back. don't forget, she still has nothing to bring back. in that situation if we agreed then it will go through and intoa we agreed then it will go through and into a bill and we agreed then it will go through and into a billand it we agreed then it will go through and into a bill and it will become a treaty and we are committed to unerring that and respecting it. if we cannot come if she cannot bring anything back and if there is no agreement for us to look at, we will say, ok, you failed. —— we are committed to honouring that. you failed to do what you promised you would. they said it would be the easiest deal in human history to negotiate. they will have failed in negotiating that easiest deal and we will say to them, move out of the way, let us form a government and let us negotiate with the eu. you
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know they won't do that because conservative mps will not vote for a general election. you mean turkeys will not vote for christmas. that's not how i put it between no conservative mps are very unlikely to push for a general election. and why? because they know the country will look at them say, what a shower. they promised this, they failed to deliver, give them another five years of course we won't! they know they would lose their jobs five years of course we won't! they know they would lose theirjobs in a moment. you can't force the general election so what you do? but we can't force anything at that point. yes, if we don't get a general election, we will call for a people's vote but we cannot force them to do that either. the problem with opposition is that you don't have the government's authority to decide the law. that is why we have said we will call for a second vote, for a people's vote, at that point.
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and no option is ruled off the table. would you be uncomfortable with remain being on the ballot paper giving you said you would respect the referendum, we have had it and people voted to leave so surely if there is a second referendum it should be on the terms of the departure. what i'm pointing out to you is that if she has not managed to bring back a deal, then there is nothing to decide about that. it cannot be heard deal or stayed in the eu because she has not got a deal. —— her deal. that is the problem, this government has put the country in chaos and now in imminent danger of going onto world trade organisation rules. this is the territory you will remember over a year ago when emily kay said i think on question time, that flights would not take off or land and the audience laughed, they thought it was so audience laughed, they thought it was so ridiculous that it could not possibly be true and now everybody understand it is true. this is
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serious and this government needs to get serious. they need to go back to brussels, negotiate a deal that meet the six tests that we can all say, we're not happy with this, we don't think it is perfect but we are prepared to live with it because that has to be better than going onto no deal. but whatever you say about that, if it come to the point, and seeing the headlines and listening to keir starmer, the labour party is being painted as a party for the mennie that maybe wa nts to party for the mennie that maybe wants to go back on the result of the referendum and you will be under huge pressure —— a party for remain. can we just have clarity? keir set out clearly. we want the government to come back, honouring the referendum result and honouring the promises they made. if they fail to do that, it is them that are throwing this country into test and at that stage if they still will not move out of the way and let somebody come in and takes charge, of course
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there is no other option but to say, please allow the people a choice. but that's not the primary. the primary here is to get a deal. the government has the obligation to do it, they have failed for the past two years and they are causing a crisis in this country. we can't get on with the real issues in this country, issues of jobs, on with the real issues in this country, issues ofjobs, housing, of the gig economy, the fact that the wages in this country have stagnated for the past decade under this lot. we are in a crisis and everything is being sucked into brexit because they have failed to negotiate a proper settlement. thank you very much indeed. as barry gardiner says, all of this will come to a head probably sometime before christmas but we will have to wait and see. many thanks. in the past hour the prime minister has said ending the free movement of people from the eu is non—negotiable in the brexit negotiations.
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her comments to reporters as she travelled to the un general assembly in new york follow the cabinet agreeing to new uk immigration rules after brexit. under the plans, european union nationals wanting to live or work in the uk would be treated the same as migrants from elsewhere in the world. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, is at westminster. talk is through what was agreed and what the prime minister has underlined. -- talk us through. the cabinet met yesterday and they received a briefing from the chair of the migration advisory committee, an independent body that was asked last week to report on future immigration framework post brexit and their recommendation was for the eu citizens not to be given preferential treatment over citizens from other parts of the world after we leave the eu and for the government to prioritise highly skilled migrants over lower skilled migrants. the cabinet yesterday,
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after hearing the conclusions and recommendations of that report, broadly agreed to support the key principle of not treating eu citizens any differently from any other citizen of another country after brexit and that marks a significant shift in current immigration policy. theresa may this afternoon reiterated that free movement of people from the eu would come to an end after brexit, which has long been one of the red lines in this negotiation and she has stuck to it and said that the future immigration rules must also continue to bring net migration down in the way that works for the british economy. there have been some concerns from businesses about lower skilled jobs and how they will fill vacancies after brexit but theresa may was clear that make the little net migration must come down. the banister was not ruling out that
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treatment of eu citizens after brexit, how they will live and work in the uk, their access to the uk, would not be off the table in the negotiations and this is the crucial point, that there is the possibility that doing a deal over access to the uk will be part of trade talks with the eu, and indeed trade talks with other countries, government sources stressing that the offer of giving eu citizens and other countries citizens access to the uk in return for reciprocal treatment for british citizens could be part of any trade deals. i think what we are seeing is the broad outline of post brexit immigration policy starting to take shape. the headlines on bbc news... jeremy corbyn says if parliament rejects a brexit agreement brokered by theresa may, britain will have to go back into talks with the eu to seek a better deal. the cabinet has agreed in principle that migrants from the eu should be treated the same as those from the rest of the world after brexit.
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after eating a pret a manger baguette has heard that several other people had suffered similar allergic reactions at the sandwich chain. and in sport, tiger woods draws a crowd as he heads out onto the course with the rest of the us ryder cup team as the players enjoy a first in paris. it is master against people in the league cup at i'm every woman play derby county and frank lampard and jose mourinho go head—to—head in the dugout —— as manchester united play derby county. billyjoe saunders is fined by the british boxing board of control for a social media video that police described as sickening. more on that after half—past 52. —— half—past
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five. an inquest into the death of a girl who died after eating a pret a manger sandwich has heard that another nine pret customers suffered allergic reactions to similar products in the year before. 15—year—old natasha ednan—laperooze, who had a severe sesame allergy, collapsed during a flight from heathrow to nice and died within hours. our correspondent angus crawford is following the inquest in west london. what has been said today? more details coming out? indeed. the court heard that in the 12 months before natasha died there had been 21 before natasha died there had been 2i serious similar events and nine of them had involved sesame, six of them the very type of that natasha aid which contain it and effectively led to her death. the 21 incidents, four were so serious that they lead
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to medical or even hospital treatment and a letter was read to accord from a young woman who had a life—threatening attack in 2015, similarto life—threatening attack in 2015, similar to natasha's. she had gone to pret and bought a similar sandwich and eating it and had a very serious reaction and she said her life was saved because her father is a doctor and he was with her so he treated immediately and took her to a very close by hospital which then gave her intravenous medication and that saved her life. she also said that her mother, who was a she also said that her mother, who wasa gp, she also said that her mother, who was a gp, rank pret to warn them that their allergen warnings simply will not adequate. at this point, you have to say that the law does not oblige pret to put on the individual sam wood is the detailed of everything in them because a they make them in—house. we also heard from their head of risk and compliance, jonathan perkins, who said that after those incidents they reviewed the stickers on the fridge
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is where you get your sandwiches, for some time and byjanuary 2017 they did contain all the details of they did contain all the details of the allergens within the sandwiches but clearly that took more than a year from that terrifying earlier incident. mr perkins also took a moment to save to the court that he wished, as a father, he could change everything about what had happened on that date to natasha. many thanks. president donald trump has opened his address to the un general assembly by saying that the american economy was booming like never before, and his country had been made safer by his moves to control us borders and to strengthen the american military. mr trump said north korea nuclear testing had ceased due to his policies and he had pulled out of the iran nuclear deal because tehran was a leading sponsor of terrorism. live to the un and our correspondent lyse doucet. this is quite a thai raid from the
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president but the main target was iran? —— a tirade. president but the main target was iran? -- a tirade. indeed it was that the speech this year was not as bombastic, less fire and brimstone, than we saw when he first addressed this world body last year. who could forget, when he warned north korea that he would totally destroy it and described the north korean leader as little rocket man. this year talking about north korea the talked about a bold new push in making progress in putting down tensions on the korean peninsula but even though there was a lot of talk about what was happening elsewhere in the world, and he started with a bright vision with all of humanity, that at all the stamp of president trump all over it. america first, american interest, american sovereignty and, yes, american progress. when he began his speech in that way, he got a surprising reaction. in less than two years,
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my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in history of our country. america's. .. so true. mild laughter didn't expect that reaction but that's ok! laughter when it came to the rest of the speech, he had strong words for both enemies and allies but in terms of the ranking of enemies, no question this year it was iran. he talked about the horrible iran nuclear deal the united states has now pulled out and he accused iran of being the biggest global sponsor of terrorism. additional sanctions will resume november 5th and more will follow. and we are working with countries that import iranian crude oil to cut their purchases substantially. we cannot allow the world's leading
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sponsor of terrorism to possess the planet's most dangerous weapons. we cannot allow a regime that chants, "death to america," and that threatens israel with annihilation, to possess the means to deliver a nuclear warhead to any city on earth. just can't do it. president trump called on the rest of the world to isolate iran and yet it is president trump you find himself isolated when it comes to iran policy, certainly isolated from other members of the security council which were very much part of that landmark deal on curbing iranian nuclear programmes in exchange for economic benefits. last night it was the eu foreign policy chief, federica mogherini come up with countries like britain saying
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they would try to keep the deal in place because they believed the deal was working but for president trump it is not. yet again, he finds himself at odds with many of the themes that we will hear in the united nations but it is a speech that will go down well with his supporters here in the united. let's take a look at some of the other stories here on bbc news at 5. life expectancy in the uk has stopped increasing for the first time since 1982, when figures were first collected. women's life expectancy remains at 82.9 years, and men's 79.2. the office for national statistics say that, in some parts of the uk, life expectancy has even decreased. the bodies of a british man and his thai wife have been found buried in the garden of their home in northern thailand. thai police say two men have been charged with the murder of alan hogg and his wife. her brother has been charged with conspiracy to murder. there's been a sharp rise in people being tricked into paying money from their bank accounts
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to accounts set up by fraudsters. the total jumped 44% to £145 million in the first six months of the year. and in most cases the victims didn't get their money back. a whale has been spotted in the river thames estuary off kent. it's thought to be a beluga whale and was first reported by an ecologist who saw it feeding around barges near gravesend. marine life rescuers have urged the public not to get too close. 0ur correspondent simonjones is whale—spotting at the thames estuary near tilbury. what is the latest and any spotting is near you? a lot of excitement, people have gathered on the bank for eight sighting and the wail is currently in that section of water over the —— the whale. you can see
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it every few minutes, a bit of white but you have to watch very carefully. people have a lot of time and they are prepared to wait to see it because it is something extremely, extremely unusual. this whale should be thousands of miles away from here so eight sighting is not something you see everyday. we can't talk now to the man who first spotted it, dave andrews. what did you see? i was doing a bird survey and this white shape appeared on the water in front of me and i thought it looked unusual, could it have beena it looked unusual, could it have been a wail? i thought it was very unlikely —— whale. i thought it must have been something from a boat and i thought nothing more of it. about an hour later i thought nothing more of it. about an hourlaterl i thought nothing more of it. about an hour later i was sat there and i heard a noise and i looked up and it was the noise of a whale and it had come upjust was the noise of a whale and it had come up just in was the noise of a whale and it had come upjust in front of me here on the thames. as you can imagine, i
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was quite shocked. i knew what it was quite shocked. i knew what it was almost immediately because i have seen them before in the arctic andl have seen them before in the arctic and i could not believe what i was seeing. you were the right man to spot it! and you posted it on social media and it went a bit crazy?|j spot it! and you posted it on social media and it went a bit crazy? i was keen to get some photos or video footage of it so i managed to get that through my telescope. i put that through my telescope. i put that on social media and it just we nt that on social media and it just went crazy from there. people might say you see these things but you like to see proof so i was glad to get the photos and video. you know about wales so although it's great to see, there is some concern that it is here —— about whales. to see, there is some concern that it is here -- about whales. it should not be this far south, it should not be this far south, it should be thousands of miles north in the arctic. it is a social whale, they like to swing in pods so the fa ct they like to swing in pods so the fact is on its own is worrying —— they like to swim. they do feed and live in estuaries in the arctic
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although those are probably much cleaner than here although those are probably much cleanerthan here in although those are probably much cleaner than here in london so from that side of things, it should be able to find food. because it is a small whale, the depth of the water is not a problem. it isjust whether the pollution is going to make it ill or the fact that it is here a nyway ill or the fact that it is here anyway could be a sign it is ill.|j will let you get back because i know you are keen for another sighting. some concern over the position of the whale but they are hopeful it will be able to swim its way out potential trouble in this water behind me. thank you for now assignment. archaeologists have found a 400 year—old shipwreck off the coast of portugal. the team believe the ship was returning from india when it sank sometime between 1575 and 1625. spices, ceramics and cannons engraved with portugal's coat of arms lie all around the wreck, found near the capital lisbon. those are the latest images. and
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thinking of those lovely blue skies above the thames is true, let's see what is going on more blue skies for some of us tomorrow under warm day as well. it has been a super day for the bulk of england and wales with plenty of sunshine, a different story further north with some fairly brisk, west to south—westerly winds and this evening and overnight they will blow in more cloud into the northern part of the uk with some rain in scotland. very mild dollar and further south in mid wales southwards and the midlands southwards and the midlands southward it will be cold and the temperature is could be lowered in rural areas, perhaps not as cold as last night. sunny skies in the south, some rain in north wales and north—west england first thing but it will move away and brightening up
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in northern ireland, northern england and eastern scotland as the rain is confined to the north and west. some sunshine in aberdeen and it could be 21 degrees tomorrow, significantly warmer than today also 20 and 21 widely in england and wales. 0n 20 and 21 widely in england and wales. on thursday, we start with some heavy rain in northern scotland, the band of rain moving southward through the dates and petering out. cooler and fresh air following but a cross and wales, even warmer on thursday, especially eastern england, 23 or even 2a celsius. this is bbc news. the headlines... jeremy corbyn says if parliament rejects a brexit agreement brokered by theresa may, britain will have to go back into talks with the eu to seek a better deal. the cabinet has agreed in principle that migrants from the eu should be treated the same as those from the rest of the world, after brexit. an inquest into the death of a 15—year—old girl, who died after eating a pret a manger baguette, has heard that several other people had suffered similar allergic reactions at the sandwich chain. in a speech at the un
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general assemby, president trump has attacks the iranian leadership, accusing it of sowing "chaos, death and destruction." so at 5:33pm, it is time to catch up with the day's sport, with sarah at the bbc sport centre. the build—up as well and truly on, ahead of this week's ryder cup in france as europe look to wrestle back the title from the usa. tiger woods, despite his great comeback win on sunday, has not got the best record in this competition, and he is hoping to improve that, but he is also looking forward to taking on some of the younger stars who weren't even playing when he was at his best. the younger guys playing when he was at his best. the younger guys were on playing when he was at his best. the younger guys were on their way in when i was on my way out, and, you know, they had never really played against me, you know, when i was
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playing well, and it's been five yea rs playing well, and it's been five years since i won a golf tournament. i feel like years since i won a golf tournament. ifeel like i'd years since i won a golf tournament. i feel like i'd always years since i won a golf tournament. ifeel like i'd always been a years since i won a golf tournament. i feel like i'd always been a tough person to beat, and they've been jokingly saying that, you know, we wa nt to jokingly saying that, you know, we want to go against you. all right, here you go. jose mourinho has told paul pogba he will not captained manchester united again, due to concerns about the midfielder‘s attitude. rob and the rest of the united players were told of the decision today ahead of their league cup third round tie with derby cou nty cup third round tie with derby county later, where mourinho comes up county later, where mourinho comes up against former chelsea captain, frank lampard, who is now managing derby. he says mourinho was hugely influential. will be great to see him and to chat. i know he will be supportive, in a sense, of my managing career, not supportive on tuesday night! but jose managing career, not supportive on tuesday night! butjose mourinho will spawn a lot of managers, a lot of his players at whatever club you
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play for underneath him, you will see people coming through and managing, you already seeing it in different areas. i appreciate the support, i have got support from a lot of the managers i worked for. england's most capped player fara williams is backing phil neville's squad for the two internationals next month. injury kept out of the last round of fixtures when england secured their qualification for next yea r‘s world cup secured their qualification for next year's world cup in france. the lionesses continue their preparation for the tournament with matches against brazil on october six, and australia three days later. boxer billyjoe saunders has been fined £100,000 and given a severe reprimand about his future conduct, after a social media video from him, which the police described as sickening. just a warning, there is some flash photography coming up. saunders has apologised for the video, in which he tells a woman he would give her drugs to perform a sex action. the british board of boxing control has found him guilty of bringing the sport into disrepute. the fine will go to
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charity. it was very poorjudgment on his behalf. he has a responsibility, and he knows that now better than anybody, and he has already apologised, if apologies can be accepted. hopefully he can move on with himself. but you can't do things at that, you have a responsible of the as a boxer, a high profile sportsman, not to take advantage of people and hopefully thatis advantage of people and hopefully that is behind him. it is a serious fine, i can't think of a bigger one than the board has ever put out, so thatis than the board has ever put out, so that is where we are at. tyson fury and deontay wilder will come face—to—face on monday when the venue face—to—face on monday when the venue for their matchup will be announced. the pair will fight in december and fury‘s promoter frank warren has admitted it is happening sooner warren has admitted it is happening sooner than he would have liked but that furia was adamant he is ready. he also said contracts would not event fury from facing anthony
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joshua in april, if he beats wilder. the netherlands dominated the women's individual time trial at cycling's road cycling championships in austria. the 17 mile course was finished almost 30 seconds quicker by the winner. britain's alice barnes and haley simons could only manage to finish in 22nd and 20 third place. we will have lots more for you in sports day at 6:30pm. see you then. thanks very much, the time is 5:37pm. back now to the labour conference in liverpool, there is a series of votes happening, one of which will be the vote that defines labour's approach to the brexit process from now on and what indeed happens if there is and what indeed happens if there is a no—deal brexit at the end of the day, what would labour's position b there. this is the motion that
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a p pa re ntly there. this is the motion that apparently puts all options on the table, though i have to say there are different readings of that, depending on who you speak to at the labour conference. vicki young is in liverpool, let's have a look inside the hall, tell us what is at stake here. yes, i think it might have just happened, it was the first vote, and i think she said it is passed overwhelmingly, so i am pretty sure it has happened. in some ways, the result of that was never in doubt. you know, this is a compromise really that was hammered out behind—the—scenes, and they came forward with what is known as a compper site motion, —— composite motion, a mixture of all the different things people want to say about brexit. i have it in front of me, there are a lot of words here but it is quite interesting, it talks about labour mps, they must vote against any tory deal failing to meet their six tests, which we had about earlier, and that a no—deal brexit must be rejected. it also says should parliament vote
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down a brexit deal, all the talks end in no deal, they want an immediate general election. we have discussed that, quite hard for the opposition to achieve that, and they say if we cannot get a general election, labour must support all options remaining on the table, including campaigning for a public vote. but this doesn't do, what they have just voted on and approved, it doesn't explicitly say that the party would make sure that that option to remain in the eu was on any ballot paper if this second referendum were to happen. but that means the most significant thing that has happened today has been keir starmer getting up and saying, in his view, and he is of course the shadow brexit secretary, in his view that remain should still be on the table is one of those options. so there are people here who have been pushing for this so—called people's vote for a very long time. they feel that the voting of that motion is a significant step towards getting
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another referendum, if these other things happen, if the deal is not voted through in parliament, and if there is no other option put on the table. so it is a big moment for the opposition party to be even considering it, and if you think about the dialogue around this coming you know, a few months ago when we talked about the idea of another referendum, really there was no one taken that seriously, it was very much seen no one taken that seriously, it was very much seen as no one taken that seriously, it was very much seen as a no one taken that seriously, it was very much seen as a fringe issue. i think that has changed. in the last month or so, and certainly now with this, it has put it back on the table as a possible scenario. this, it has put it back on the table as a possible scenariom this, it has put it back on the table as a possible scenario. it is interesting, because, as you say, so many ifs and qualifications, but it is quite possible that we will be chatting again in a few months‘ time, and we will look back at this moment as being one of very big political significance potentially? yeah, ithink political significance potentially? yeah, i think so, i think it‘s difficult for labour, and you have seen difficult for labour, and you have seen that even today, you know, you have keir starmer getting up, getting a standing ovation for saying that they remain option must
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be there and must be considered, and then almost immediately afterwards then almost immediately afterwards the assistant general secretary of the assistant general secretary of the unite union says whatever he just said, the second vote will not be about staying in, able be about the terms of leaving. so that row really is for another day, i mean, it is going on here but that has not been decided today. there are still enough wriggle room in this for the party leadership, jeremy corbyn and john mcdonald, emily thornberry as well, who have all spoken out, showing some scepticism about this, and the reason is that they are worried about seeing betraying the result of that referendum, when millions of people, a lot of them labour supporters, voted for brexit, and there are some here from the leave labour campaign warning that it could mean the loss of seats, the loss of mps in the midlands, in wales and other areas, if labour is seen wales and other areas, if labour is seen to go back on that. you can absolutely bet that theresa may is going to make sure people know what labour has been saying, and she will paint them as a party to try to
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reverse the referendum result. bear with us, we will be back with you in a moment, wejust want with us, we will be back with you in a moment, we just want to with us, we will be back with you in a moment, wejust want to recap on a couple of other things, including jeremy corbyn‘s remarks to the bbc earlier, because he told the bbc that any brexit deal brought back from brussels by theresa may needed to face labour‘s six tips for future prosperity. mr corbyn has been speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg, who began by asking him if he had any sense of what the final shape of the brexit deal will be. no, i don‘t. all i know is that this government has had 27 months to negotiate a brexit deal, has not done so, and that our party represents people in communities that voted both lead and remain but all of whom are worried about their jobs, and worried about the economic future of this country, and therefore we have set down our six tests by which we willjudge the government, whenever theresa may chooses to bring a deal back to parliament. if you don't know yet, then, the shape of the final deal, how can you decide now that you are
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almost certainly going to vote against it? i have never said that. i‘ve said we will test what ever they come back with against the six tests that we brought down. about your shadow brexit secretary said if theresa may brings back a deal... how is that different to what i have just said? he said if the six tests are not met, we will vote against the deal. it is a bit more than that, keir starmer sent it very clear message... we have made it very clear all along that our tests are on access to the market, a customs union, appropriate regulations that protectjobs, environment and consumer rights, and of course an end to the speculation of course an end to the speculation of the border between northern ireland and the republic. the six tests you set out last year are about their migration, strong collaboration with the eu,
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predicting security, workers' rights and having the same benefits as the single market, that is not precisely what you just outlined. you have the six tests, you have read them out, but my general point is it is about ensuring we have a trade relationship with europe that protects jobs. the manufacturing industry is all—rounder and under great stress, jaguar land rover have gone under a three—day week, others have made investment decisions to go elsewhere and many are worried about the supply chain in both food processing industry and heavy industry. if you are still genuinely going to compare the final deal with the six tests, why make such a public pronouncement today that you are planning to vote against the deal? keir starmer said, and i repeat, we would test what the government says against the six tests we put down and vote accordingly, and he has made the point that the government, in 27 months of negotiating, has not come up months of negotiating, has not come up with anything near to those
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results that we want. and by then making it clear it is very likely you would vote against a deal, aren't you pushing us actually towards what you have said, what many others have said in the labour party, aren't you pushing us towards leaving without a deal? not at all. this proposal that the government will make will have to come back to parliament, in come i suppose, the next month or so. that will be the point we make that decision. the government will then have to go back to the eu and say, look, our parliament can‘t agree to this, these are the parameters parliament wa nts these are the parameters parliament wants us to negotiate on, and go back and do that. but there is no mechanism for that to happen actually, you can't guarantee that would happen, and it is the case if you are saying it is very likely will vote down a deal, if labour votes down the deal with other people opposing at too, the chances of us leaving without arrangements, which some in your party have described as a catastrophe, you have set that will be the worst deal of all, that becomes more likely. the
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greater likelihood is that the government would collapse itself, and we would have an election in which i hope the people of this country would make the choice of a different government that was serious about the relationship with europe and serious about protecting trade. and everybody here in liverpool absolutely want there to bea liverpool absolutely want there to be a general election, but you can't guarantee that will happen and it is the case, it is a matter of the arithmetic, the sums in the house of commons, if labour is inevitably almost going to vote against this deal, it is more likely we would move towards a situation where we might crash out. we are the opposition party, ourjob is to challenge and question the cover, to speak —— the government, to speak up all those people around the country, the manufacturing industry, worried about their own future and all the supply chainjobs about their own future and all the supply chain jobs that go with it. i think we are absolutely right to demand this of the government. what are we supposed to do? keep quiet and say nothing and leave it to the incompetence of this government and the looking over the shoulder policies of liam fox and company of how they would do a deal with
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america? if there was another referendum, would you vote lead or remain? we don't know what the question would be in the referendum, so it is a hypothetical question. question would be in the referendum, so it is a hypothetical questionm is all hypothetical, what the party has been saying... we don't know what the question will be so i can‘t a nswer what the question will be so i can‘t answer that. i can‘t answer that question because we don‘t know what question because we don‘t know what question will be. weeden but many members here this week are desperate for you to say i would campaign to stay in. what members are desperate for here is to challenge this government what it is doing, on its incompetence and that is exactly what we are doing. you saw the hall, there are people from different communities, different backgrounds, and they are very united on us challenging this government, on the economic strategy this party is putting forward. there was laura kuenssberg speaking tojeremy there was laura kuenssberg speaking to jeremy corbyn after there was laura kuenssberg speaking tojeremy corbyn after a day which has been dominated by brexit. i am
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joined by two delegates who were involved in that vote we were just listening to, thank you for speaking to us. this idea of another referendum, you know the accusation, you‘re trying to ignore the will of the people? it would be difficult to claim the referendum has not been respected, the trade union deal 0rton movement, we take deals back to the grassroots to decide on. 0rton movement, we take deals back to the grassroots to decide onlj think the thing is, we need to give the leadership all the options available to it, pending on the circumstances. what we would want is an immediate general election, but we may not get that, so then we need to push for a public vote, and the terms of that vote remain to be seen. terms of that vote remain to be seen. do you want on that boat, if it were to happen, there to be a remain option on there? because if
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you are respecting the terms of the original referendum, surely it should be, as len mccluskey says, aged be about the terms of your departure? we very much welcome keir starmer‘s statement that remain are still an option on the table, and because of what i said before, you should never bring a deal back to people than is worse than the status quo, that would not be an option people would vote for. you think remain should be an option, what about all those millions who voted for brexit, including lots of labour voters ? for brexit, including lots of labour voters? i think it depends on the circumstances. ideally we want the government to fall, we want an immediate general election. if that doesn't happen, then we need to go for a public vote, and i think other thana for a public vote, and i think other than a toxic tory brexit, then an option to continue with the current arrangement, remain, is the only other real option. having been involved in the composition of the text of this motion, i am really pleased this motion lays out a
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pathway for a labour government, which darts with voting against theresa may‘s deal in parliament, then moves to an immediate general election, and leaves the public vote on the table, and that is a pathway ala on the table, and that is a pathway a la labour leadership should follow. it is important to say it is not a motion that says there should bea not a motion that says there should be a remain vote, it is an option that it be a remain vote, it is an option thatitis be a remain vote, it is an option that it is there. thank you very much, that is the view of a lot of people here, there are some in the labour leave organisation, but the overwhelming majority of people in the hall today certainly in favour ofa the hall today certainly in favour of a second vote. many thanks. so where do we stand? let‘s go straight to westminster. thank you forjoining us. where do we stand ? do thank you forjoining us. where do we stand? do you detect any more clarity on the way labour might handle this massive brexit headache for politicians? i think you heard
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very clearly from jeremy corbyn that he would prefer the root of trying to shake a general election loose out of this chaos that has descended on politics at westminster, and out of the great and security on the tory side about what they are going to do next, in terms of pursuing a deal. but as we saw in the hall, many people who are motivated to attend this conference, and it was often said the people who would turn up often said the people who would turn up the jeremy corbyn often said the people who would turn up thejeremy corbyn would be the ha rd left of up thejeremy corbyn would be the hard left of the party, the new recruits, but whatever the constellation, there is a very strong view among them that actually going for a second referendum, a second vote, or at least pursuing a strong remain strategy is the way to go. so it is pretty obvious that these two things bifurcated. what jeremy corbyn has to do is get his party from this position of the worse the better, the more chaotic the situation, the more the likelihood of no deal and people being very uncertain what that would
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mean, the more from his point of view he can press for a general election. it must be said, it is still a pretty wild through, there is no guarantee all of these things could happen without the next necessarily coming true. but that is what he is aiming for. what about the politics between them and the conservatives, and vicki young suggesting earlier that theresa may will be able to point a finger at leyburn say these people simply want to rerun the referendum from 2016 and that is a reason not to trust them. that may well be the conservative position. if theresa may is that there may be people on her own side who are keen for a referendum if they are ardent remainers, admittedly rather fewer in the conservative party than there are in the labour party, but there is some small risk to her doing that, simply blaming jeremy corbyn for bringing about the collapse when actually the negotiations look pretty fraught anyway. she would have to be working quite hard to make that case stick. what she can say is, we are the party that is
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going to respect brexit. the labour party isn‘t. but the labour position is not even so clear on that. we have seen emily thornberry, senior shadow cabinet, saying actually the best thing would not be to leave at all, and to spin this out for another couple of years and tried to getan another couple of years and tried to get an eea option. that is not1 million miles away from what michael gove is saying on the conservative side, if you like, the position of what we could call moderately. i‘m sorry there are several tribes at work here. —— moderate leave. gove says we should leave and have two yea rs says we should leave and have two years to think about it, probably emily thornberry is saying don‘t leave at all and have two years to think about it. the public will find these differences vanishingly small, they will simply want to know, are we leaving or not, and will be get a second vote or not, and they will make their choice. it is six minutes to six. a beluga whale has been spotted near the mouth of the river thames. it‘s been seen feeding around barges at coalhouse fort, near tilbury and gravesend. sightings of the whales
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in uk waters are rare. members of the public are being urged not to get too close, and to watch from the shore. let‘s speak to rob lott, who is from the policy team at the whale and dolphin conservation — he joins us on the line from wiltshire. thank you forjoining us. how rare is it, and what kind of conservation concerns to this present? it is incredibly rare. my colleagues and i we re incredibly rare. my colleagues and i were just looking back, and incredibly rare. my colleagues and i werejust looking back, and there have been about 20 sightings ever recorded of beluga whales. in uk waters. the last were off the coast of northumberland in 2015, a single whale off northern ireland as well. we are concerned, it is probably a lost individual. it is used to estuaries and rivers, but never on its own, and never this far south. this is the species normally found in the high arctic, around
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greenland, and sal barred, north of norway and the veron see, aged not be in the thames history. what would you offer as a possible explanation for this whale being so far out of its normal areas? it is a very good question, it is speculation, but it could have been disorientated. there isa could have been disorientated. there is a lot of man—made noise in the ocean ‘s these days, it could have been separated from its pod. it may been separated from its pod. it may be sick or it may have decided to follow a shoal of fish into the estuary to feed. reports from the site appear that the wail is swimming strongly, behaving naturally, but in a very natural location for the species. what do you think would be the next steps for those on the ground there, those who are concerned, would they tried to intervene in some way, or guided away, what would be the measures?” think at this stage it is just a monitoring situation, because the wail appears to be swimming
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strongly, and we willjust assess the situation. you may remember back in 2006 there was a northern bottlenose whale in the river thames, which was seen going past the houses of parliament, so we sincerely hope this particular individual will turn around, head back out to sea and head north, not further up the river. good to talk to you, thank you for sharing your views with us. the time is four minutes to six, there will be more on bbc news at six injust minutes to six, there will be more on bbc news at six in just a few minutes‘ time, i will be back at 10pm, but let‘s have a look at the weather again with darren. 10pm, but let‘s have a look at the weather again with darrenm 10pm, but let‘s have a look at the weather again with darren. it is worth looking at, tomorrow could be very worth looking at, tomorrow could be very warm worth looking at, tomorrow could be very warm and dry across many parts of the country. it has been a lovely day today, mind you come across the bulk of england and wales. we have had blue skies, sunshine, light winds, very pleasant temperatures, a bit higher than yesterday. further north, scotland and northern ireland, a bit of a different story, a bit of rain and russell around the stock everything is coming in from
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the atlantic, this conveyor belt of cloud stretching across the atlantic, pushing into more northern pa rt atlantic, pushing into more northern part of the uk, some of the cloud spilling into north wales and northern ireland might now. we have some blustery winds across these northern areas, strong winds, maybe some gales across the far north—west of scotla nd some gales across the far north—west of scotland at times. the wind will ease down a bit overnight, but we will keep those atlantic winds bringing cloud in across the north of the uk. a bit of rain, chiefly across scotland, further south dry and clear but quite a range of temperatures, quite a contrast. 0ver the northern parts from north wales northwards, it will be very mild, temperatures not dropping much from today. further south, though, temperatures not dropping much from today. furthersouth, though, quite a bit chilly, probably not quite as cold as last night when the had a frost in quite a view rule areas. high—pressure giving it fine and dry across southern high—pressure giving it fine and dry across southern areas high—pressure giving it fine and dry across southern areas of the uk, further north, this weather front stuck across northern parts of scotland. may start with some cloud and a few spots of rain in the morning, that should move away and brighten up, we may get some watery
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sunshine across northern ireland, and eastern scotland as the rain becomes confined. with a sunshine and those westerly winds, 21 degrees is quite likely in aberdeen, maybe in dundee too. 21, 22 for london and east anglia where it will be a lovely day here. more sunshine to greet the day across england and wales, more rain for northern england and scotland. it peters out, later on some showers coming into the north—west scotland. here it will turn much cooler and fresher, whereas ahead of our band of cloud, we are still into this warm and sunny air, and temperatures could get as high as 23, even 2a celsius across eastern parts of england. the cooler fresher air coming to scotla nd cooler fresher air coming to scotland on thursday will then push its way down across the whole of the country on friday, with a north—westerly breeze, so temperatures will be dropping in england and wales, but with high pressure around that is never too far away, even into the weekend,
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there will be a lot of dry weather, not just there will be a lot of dry weather, notjust on there will be a lot of dry weather, not just on friday there will be a lot of dry weather, notjust on friday but into saturday and sunday. sunny spells, some cooler nights on the way perhaps, and those temperatures of 1a to 17 degrees are near where they should be at this time of year. labour warns the prime minister that if a brexit deal is rejected by parliament, she will have to go back to brussels and renegotiate. jeremy corbyn says the party will decide whether to back the deal the government will then have to go back to the eu and say, look, our parliament can‘t agree to this, these are the parameters that parliament wants us to negotiate on, and go back and do that. the shadow brexit secretary said labour would not rule out staying in the eu. holding back the years — there‘s no improvement in life expectancy for men and women in the uk for the first time in 30 years
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a victim of the contaminated blood scandal — which has left almost 3,000 people dead — tells an inquiry that those responsible should be prosecuted.
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