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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 25, 2018 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. president trump holds back on the fire and fury at the united nations. last year he set the global body's hair on fire with his defiant tone. this year the message was a little more subdued. though his belief in america first is clearly undiminished. there's really not much love from mr trump for the world's global institution. we reject the ideology of globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism. even in new york, the president can't escape questions about dramas playing out in washington, casting doubt on the credibility of a second woman accusing brett kavanaugh of sexual assault. also on the programme... labour have six tests on which they willjudge the final brexit agreement. but it seems the opposition are already resolved to reject whatever deal comes back from brussels. and sir andy murray involved in a rather awkward moment at a tournament in china. safe to say he is better
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with the drop volley than the dropping plate. hello and welcome. i'm katty kay in new york, and christian fraser is in london. there were boasts about his own administration, recriminations, jokes, and even a fashionably late arrival as donald trump addressed the united nations general assembly in new york a few hours ago. the us president told the delegation that more had been accomplished in his two years in office than "almost any" time in us history. and he didn't mince his words on iran, accusing the country of sowing "chaos, death and destruction" across the middle east. our north america editor jon sopel was watching the speech from new york. when roads are closed for you and red lights really aren't a thing, there is not much excuse for being half an hour late for a journey of less than a mile. but donald trump missed his speaking slot this morning and made himself
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even later by stopping to talk to reporters on his way in and when he did get under way, he went on a bit of a victory lap, with unexpected consequences. in less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any other administration in the history of our country. america's... so true. mild laughter didn't expect that reaction but that's ok! the audience just giggled. us presidents are occasionally reviled, sometimes adored, but they are rarely laughed at. last year he threatened to destroy north korea and taunted little rocket man. what a difference 12 months makes. the missiles and rockets are no longer flying in every direction. nuclear testing has stopped. i would like to thank chairman kim for his courage and for the steps he has taken, though much work remains to be done.
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today it was iran in the cross hairs, america having pulled out of the nuclear deal. he called on nations to isolate iran's rulers and support its people. not quite a cry for regime change but it is clear where he stands. iran's leaders plunder the nation's resources, to enrich themselves and to spread mayhem across the middle east and far beyond. and this american first president rounded on opec, the international criminal court, and the world trade organisation. he justified his trade war against china and then set out a vision, starkly at odds with the internationalist audience listening to him. we reject the ideology of globalism. and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism. and on immigration and to those refugees fleeing persecution, donald trump said, stay at home and make your own country's great again.
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that was heard in icy silence and the only time his speech was interrupted was with laughter. you get the impression that the un is not much like donald trump and it is a sentiment that is probably reciprocated. jon sopel, bbc news, new york. i wonder when it comes to the laughter, which was extraordinary to watch, whether it speaks a little bit about the world donald trump works in, the fact that he surrounds himself with yes—men and people who flatter his ego, perhaps he is not used to that sort of reaction, people dig a link at the sort of exeter city ‘s wheat sione teu bassist —— people giggling at the eccentricities we see on a daily basis at. he has come off the campaign trail, going around these big rallies at which he talks about the triumph of his administration
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and he is met with applause and people loving what he is saying and saying yes, we love this. he is perhaps using that same line of talking about the triumphs of his administration but of course in a different venue and maybe he had not read the crowd well also i have to say, i thought his comeback was pretty good when he turned it into a joke, changing the mood in the room. one thingi joke, changing the mood in the room. one thing i would say, these speeches are as important by what they don't say as what they do save on the fact the president did not mention russia once in the whole course bit when russia is so deeply involved in syria and iran and ukraine, i thought was very striking. very exciting indeed and we will talk plenty more about what we will talk plenty more about what we have seen this afternoon. we will turn briefly to pennsylvania. we are watching closely a court room. the disgraced comedian bill cosby, who was convicted of sexual assault in april, is being sentenced at a hearing taking place in pennsylvania. cosby was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault against a former basketball player.
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aleem maqbool has been following the hearing from washington. we have heard thejudge will classify bill cosby as a sexually violent predator. what does that mean? it means he will have to register on a sex offenders list and he will have to receive counselling and it is something that is busily gone down on his record, but what we re gone down on his record, but what were waiting for and we understand the judge is speaking right now, if the judge is speaking right now, if the sentence bill cosby gets. he has a maximum of ten years in prison he could get. he has argued he is now legally blind according to his lawyer and he cannot go to prison. three years under house arrest is essentially has taken a toll on him,
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those are his arguments. there are those are his arguments. there are those arguing he should get the maximum sentence those arguing he should get the maximum sentence because he has, as you said, been found guilty in this one case. that was the only case of the dozens of women who came forward alleging that he had assaulted them that was within the timeframe where they could be a prosecution. all the other allegations happened before a judge when they could be prosecuted and even then it had to go to trial twice. and the woman involved had her life, her case, absolutely exposed in the media through this trial. she was put under pressure in the witness box but eventually bill cosby, one of the most famous men in america, certainly during the 19805, was found in the three counts of a55ault was found in the three counts of assault and they have been merged into one in terms of sentencing but we are expecting that any moment.
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and put this in the context of who bill cosby was referred to the fact that he was known as america's dad, he had had honorary degrees, a very early award winner among african—american actors, even an honorary title from the us navy. how much of a come—down is this notjust for him but a cultural dissidents from the time he was at his prime? he was so huge across america but internationally as well. clearly, and this was part of the case the prosecution made, he felt he was untouchable. which is what aided him being able to perpetrate the assault that he did that we know about but of course there are these other allegations. of course, this brings us allegations. of course, this brings us to this whole movement that has been going on in the last year or so where people in positions of power
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are being exposed for taking advantage of their positions to commit very serious assaults against women. you'll cosby, if he ends up going to jail, will be a big signal to all those others out there that theirtime to all those others out there that their time could come as well —— bill cosby. we have been watching some of the pictures of him coming out of court and you get the sense there is a defiant tone and body language in him. does that speak of the lack of remorse he has shown through the trial? he has shown a lack of remorse. i was at his first trial in pennsylvania, the one that endedin trial in pennsylvania, the one that ended ina trial in pennsylvania, the one that ended in a mistrial, because, as it stands in america, if it is not a unanimous verdict, it is a mistrial which is why so few people who are accused of serious sexual assault end up getting convicted because women are worried about coming
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forward , women are worried about coming forward, firstly because their lives will be scrutinised and also because getting a conviction, securing it, you have to have a unanimousjury verdict and that was so difficult. but i was there and it was clear that bill cosby did not show any remorse because he insisted yet never done anything wrong. he was playing very much to the fact he was an 80—year—old and it was difficult for him to see and walk and he needed support and all that kind of thing. obviously he will have to face up to all of this if he is sent to prison. thank you very much. we hope to get more from outside the court room later in the programme but the keeper the moment. the brexit spokesman for the uk's opposition labour party has indicated that the party's highly likely to vote against any brexit deal secured by the prime minister with the eu, making it much more difficult for her to win a majority in parliament. sir keir starmer told labour's party conference that any deal was likely to fail the party's six tests, which he says are designed to protectjobs and prosperity and in the past hour delegates at the labour conference have voted
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overwhelmingly in favour of the motion to keep open the option of another referendum. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at that conference in liverpool. their position on brexit is starting to crystallise? it is in the sense that they have certainly got on the table this option of pushing for a so—called people's vote, a second referendum. i think the dispute is over what that referendum would be about. we do not know what is going to happen in the next few months, and it is their that there is still and it is their that there is still a lack of clarity and certainly disagreement in the higher echelons of the labour party, with sir keir starmer saying on the one hand that remain has to be on the table, and seconds later in a debate a senior
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person in one of the union saying that it cannot be on the table, it has to be a referendum, if there is one, on how to leave otherwise we are betrayed the millions of people who voted for brexit. jeremy corbyn, the labour party leader, has himself been asked about this and has been pretty quiet about what he thinks should happen but this was his answer. all i know is that this government has had 27 months to negotiate a brexit deal, has not done so, and that our party represents people in communities that voted both leave and remain but all of whom are worried about theirjobs and worried about the economic future of this country and therefore we have set down our six tests by which we willjudge the government whenever theresa may chooses to bring a deal back to parliament. if you don't know yet then the shape of the final deal, how can you decide now that you are almost certainly going to vote against it? i've never said that. i've said we would test whatever they come back with against the six tests that we have put down. we are saying it is starting to
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crystallise but spell out what happens. it does not now mean there is going to be a vote. it depends how many rebels defy the government, doesn't it? exactly. to talk about the six tests, the main one that people think the so—called chequers deal, the compromise theresa may has come up with on the table, they think it will not pass the test because one of them is that we will end up with the exact same benefit as we have now been in the single market and customs union. it looks like labour are market and customs union. it looks like labourare preparing, if she comes back with a deal in that form, to vote it down. he has a lot of her owi'i to vote it down. he has a lot of her own eurosceptic mp5 saying she will not —— they will not vote for it. if it fails, that is when we don't know what happens next. they have this so—called meaningful vote, parliament could take over the process and decide what happened and thatis process and decide what happened and that is where this number of labour
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mp5 feel they can push for a second referendum but we are a long way from that at the moment. 0k, thank you very much. aleem maqbool has been following the hearing from washington. i understand we have a sentencing? we said it was imminent that has now come. the judge has sentenced bill cosby to three to ten years in prison and he will serve an innate state prison. he argued that he would have to stay at home because he was in firm and blind and could be confined to his home as an option but the judge instead has gone for the severe end of what he could have dished out to bill cosby, saying that a lesser sentence would appreciate the seriousness of the crime. this is a huge victory not just for andrea constand, the woman who won this case —— would depreciate the seriousness. it was
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about an assault that happened 14 years ago, but it is also for the dozens of others, and i have met many who are outside the courthouse, who made the allegations against bill cosby but could not be prosecuted because they were too far backin prosecuted because they were too far back in time. and also of course it isa back in time. and also of course it is a victory for all of those campaigners across this country for women's rights who have said that, however big the personality, however powerful the petition, they must be brought to book. with someone like bill cosby going to state prison and getting toward a maximum sentence for his crime, this will send a message to all of those out there who have, as yet, been prosecuted and found guilty. he is the first big—name to go to jail after the meath movement. he absolutely is. --
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the metoo movement. it will but there are still huge difficulties in terms of people coming forward in terms of people coming forward in terms of people coming forward in terms of the difficulties of getting these types of cases through, even when were not talking about celebrities and powerful people, it is difficult to get convictions in this country when you need a unanimousjury this country when you need a unanimous jury verdict. a5 this country when you need a unanimousjury verdict. as many women see it, they are humiliated and scrutinised on the witness stand in the way that they are, but perhaps with this strong sentencing of bill cosby, it might encourage others to come forward. thank you very much forjoining us. let's speak to caroline polisi, a lawyer who specialises in criminal defence and regulatory investigations. she's here in new york. we asked you earlier if you would come on to speak about kavanaugh and we will get to that later but we
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wa nt to we will get to that later but we want to talk about bill cosby and the significance of this sentence. a5 the significance of this sentence. as all the reporting has indicated, this is hugely significant for the metoo movement and what is interesting about the bill cosby case, his first trial hung, that was before hardy weinstein. by the second trial, that a jury convicted him because the judge let in more prior bad acts witnesses, other women apart from andrea constand who said that he did it to me, the exact same thing, yet a pattern and practice and it is a behaviour will stop he was convicted. i think 3—10 years is a stop he was convicted. i think 3—10 years is a message. stop he was convicted. i think 3—10 years is a message. when you think about sentencing, you'd think that specific deterrent and general deterrence. in this case, although his lawyers argued that he was not a violent predator, his lawyers argued that he was not a viole nt predator, he his lawyers argued that he was not a violent predator, he was classified asa violent predator, he was classified as a sexual predator and the judge
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upheld that. that sent a message in terms of the specific nature but in terms of the specific nature but in terms of the general nature, this was america's dad and it shows nobody is above the law, men are being put on notice that this type of behaviour is criminal and watch out. we have seen it in this country and we referred to it, the fact that we have these tv personalities that previously people thought could do no wrong. rolf harris, stuart hall, jimmy savile, they get this initial sentence and jimmy savile, they get this initial sentence and more jimmy savile, they get this initial sentence and more people come out of the woodwork so is that likely to happen all the way through the metoo movement and not just happen all the way through the metoo movement and notjust in this case? i don't know how many more can come out for bill cosby, i don't know the numberat out for bill cosby, i don't know the number at this point and counting. thank goodness andrea constand's claim fell within the statute of limitations and it was the only one could move forward with prosecutions. it is a contribution controversial prosecution because it
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was so many years controversial prosecution because it was so many years after the incident. we are seeing in the brett kavanaugh case, the voice of one woman other women come forward and make them feel that they have a platform and they should no longer be ashamed. all of the reporting indicates that victims of sexual abuse wait to come forward to tell their stories. i think it is very likely that we will hear more victims. stay with us, we want to ask you about brett kavanaugh. president trump seemed as preoccupied with domestic politics as world affairs today, telling reporters here that a woman who's accused his supreme court nominee of sexual misconduct was drunk and lacked credibility. last night brett kavanaugh and his wife went on fox news to once again deny the allegations. which led to an uncomortable conversation about when judge kavanaugh had lost his viriginity. it had more than a whiff of the reality—show confessional, in stark contrast to the the prestige of thejob he is seeking. nonetheless, the nominee says he is sticking with it. this is an allegation about a party
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in the summer of 1982 at a house near connecticut avenue with five people present. i was never at any such party. i have never sexually assaulted anyone. i did not have sexual intercourse or anything close to sexual intercourse in high school or for many years thereafter. the girls from the schools i went to and i were friends. so you're saying, through all these years that are in question, you were a virgin? that's correct. what a situation. right now it would seem almost the entirety of the democratic party believes the confirmation should be suspended. while republicans, eager not to dismiss the allegations out of hand, believe it should go ahead despite the cloud judge kavanaugh is under. the white house press secretary sarah sanders has been speaking this morning, saying dr christine blasey ford, and the former yale student deborah ramirez, should have the right to give their accounts. you have said that everybody‘s voices should be heard so does
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the president want ms ramirez to appear before the senate judiciary committee as well? certainly we would be open to that and that process could take place on thursday. again, the president has been clear. let them speak but let's also let brett kavanaugh speak and let's let him tell his side of the story. whether they give evidence or not, majority leader mitch mcconnell is adamant that a vote will come to the senate floor. the chairman has made sure the facts will be heard. judge kavanaugh, the american people deserve nothing less. and i want to make it clear, mr president, judge kavanaugh will be voted on here on the senate floor. up or down. on the senate floor, nominated to supreme court will receive a vote in this senate in the near future. the politics of this seemed to mean that on the republican side senators
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have decided how they will vote and pretty much whatever happens in the hearing on thursday, it will not change their minds, and on the democratic side we have had senators saying we believe the accuser, christine blasey ford. what will happen on thursday? what can happen to get us closer to the truth? first of all you are right, i think many if not most of the senators on the committee have already made up their decision on how to vote on brett kavanaugh based purely on his judicial standpoints, his record on a woman's right to choose or not, on executive power and privilege. there are a few fence sitters that might be effected by this hearing. i have just heard that the chairman said they would use of independent counsel to use the budget of christine blasey ford which they had been teasing before but i think is kind of ridiculous. if they don't
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like the optics of an all male panel republican panel, asking her about an uncomfortable situation, maybe they should think about the panel in they should think about the panel in the first place. it sounds like it will be like a court but we should remember this is not a court of law also we don't really know what the burden of proof is because there is no procedure set in stone for handling these types of cases. they muddled through the anita hill hearings and there was never a plan put in place to make sure everybody was consistently on the same page with how things were going to go so i think it will be more of a circus on thursday. his school yearbook is damning, painting a picture of heavy drinking, and i'm not saying his school life 30 years ago speaks of who he is now or how he has let his life, but the problem, and this is why it was risky, is that he was saying he was a paragon of virtue and clearly there is some contrast to what we're reading in the book
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and that presumably is where the democrats will go on thursday. absolutely. we definitely need to learn more about that yearbook, especially the 4th ofjuly entry, i know the lawyer has been outspoken, saying he represents someone else in that time period who knew brett kavanaugh. i think markjudge has to be subpoenaed to testify if we are going to get any where close to the truth but it does not look that is going to happen. judge knows a lot about brett kavanaugh's days at georgetown prep. thank you very much. one thing we can say is that the state will be a big day and i have horrible feeling it will be an ugly have horrible feeling it will be an day have horrible feeling it will be an as have horrible feeling it will be an ugly day as well thursday. now you'd think as a tennis player your coordination skills would be pretty good but it seems sir andy murray doesn't have reflexes quite quick enough. this was a rather awkward moment ahead of a tournament in china. not sure how much of this is his fault or the person
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who we thought had attached it to the box. you wonder if it is an incredibly valuable plate he hasjust you wonder if it is an incredibly valuable plate he has just thrown on the ground! poor sur andy murray! he looked suitably sorry and i'm sure is hosted the mind. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news, emmanual macron — is he as popular at home as he is abroad? and hundreds of miles from home. a whale, believed to be a beluga, is sighted in the thames. that's still to come. we will tell you all about it. hello, there were big differences
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weather—wise depending on where you spend it for the southern everett had the best brightness, beautiful blue skies in hastings. further north it could not have been more different —— southern areas. more cloud and strong winds, two different days clear on the satellite and radar picture. where we keep the cloud in northern ireland, scotland and the far north—west of england, some outbreaks are rain and more of a breeze and it will stay mild with overnight tempest is holding into double digits. yellow and even orange shades —— temperatures. but further sub it will be chilly again, maybe not as much as last night but some rules spot in the far south—east might get close to freezing again. split fortunes continuing tomorrow, the best sunshine in the midlands and the southern part of wales and the south of england. north wales and
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north—west england as well as northern ireland with some cloud and patchy rain but it should brighten up patchy rain but it should brighten upa bit. patchy rain but it should brighten up a bit. we will keep cloud and rain in the north and west of scotland, quite windy as well but for eastern scotland where you get some shelterfrom for eastern scotland where you get some shelter from the window you will keep some sunshine and temperatures reaching 21 in aberdeen which is not bad for this time of year, and a similar value in london with the sunshine continuing. on wednesday night, the rain in the north will move northwards but then sink southwards as this front moves on thursday and behind it there is cooler air. the head of it, we have some warm air. thursday in england and wales, the warmest day of the week with quite a lot of sunshine. the system moves across scotland and northern ireland bringing cloud and patchy rain and behind it the wind moving to aid north—westerly and it will turn quite a lot cooler and fresher. afternoon temperatures of 15 or 16 degrees but in the sunshine
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and warm air in the south—east, 23 degrees. the system will move south—eastwards on thursday and friday, some cloud and rain but behind it with all have some cooler at the soap into the weekend, the daysis at the soap into the weekend, the days is a bit cooler and the nights again chilly but generally dry with again chilly but generally dry with a little rain in the north. you're watching beyond 100 days... our top stories: at the united nations president trump attacks the iranian leadership, accusing it of sowing "chaos, death and destruction" across the middle east. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, has told the labour conference it is "increasingly likely" that the party will vote against any deal that theresa may agrees with brussels. also on the programme... the former entertainer bill cosby is sentenced to between three and ten years in jail for sexual assaulting a woman in 2004. and a long way from home — this beluga whale has been spotted in the thames in london — thousands of miles from its normal habitat in the arctic. in the last half hour,
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the disgraced comedian bill cosby has been sentenced to between three to ten years in prison, after he was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault against a former basketball player in april this year. mr cosby will be held in a state facility. nada tawfik has been following the hearing and joins us from pennsylvania. just described for us if you would the atmosphere in the court is that sentence was the atmosphere in the court is that sentence was read the atmosphere in the court is that sentence was read out? well, several of bill cosby's accusers were there, embracing each other, waiting for that moment, and then the judge read out the sentence, three to ten years in state prison, and immediately bill cosby's defence attorneys tried to argue against the judge, because the judge went to revoke his bale.
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now of course the women in that courtroom were hoping, they said they'd been waiting for decades to see bill cosby taken away in handcuffs, but the defence attorneys have tried to argue against that, and there is still a recess here in court to determine if bill cosby will be leaving this courtroom in handcuffs straight to prison or if he will be allowed to remain free on bale, but the judge has said he wants to revoke that bale. this was just a very interesting decision from the judge, in terms of his thinking here —— revoke that three macro. he spoke out this was a key issue of consent, bill cosby never had verbal consent, and a lesser sentence would appreciate the seriousness —— depreciate the seriousness —— depreciate the seriousness of this crime. sexual assault. nobody was above the law, and he heard andrea constant when she wrote in that impact statement, how bill cosby had taken her spirit
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and crashed it. he also told bill cosby i understand that a fallen angel suffers most from the fall of grace. he says i recognise that and lam grace. he says i recognise that and i am sorry for that. so it was a very powerful moment in court as you'll cosby and the rest of the world learned his fate. you spoke to us world learned his fate. you spoke to us yesterday about howjudges take into account whether somebody has expressed remorse during the course of the trial, and he did not express remorse was how important is it to those women that he does leave the court in handcuffs, that he does not go home on bale, with the prospect that he is 81 years old of course, that he is 81 years old of course, that could be another prospect that could drag out? absolutely, that is the key, that he gets to go home, he appeals this, he never set foot in a prison. that is extremely important because this case is so symbolic to victims. andrea constand was the only woman who could legally still bring charges, but more than 60
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other women have accused bill cosby, and forthem, other women have accused bill cosby, and for them, they said they had been praying for this moment, had been praying for this moment, had been waiting decades for this moment, and they have come to the trial, both trials, to see this happen. for them, they really feel this will send a powerful signal, that if victims do come forward and speak about what happened to them, thatjustice is within reach. this is of course a momentous moment for the meat to macro movement, because bill crosby —— for the me as well macro movement, because bill cosby, this is such a powerful moment for all those women inside and andrea constand. what actually happened in this assault that she outlined to the court? andrea constand said that
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bill cosby essentially entrapped her by posing as a mental. she was a university employee at his alma mater, and he invited her over to his philadelphia home in 2004, and she said he gave her two blue pills stop they were discussing her career. he said she told her she needed to relax, so he gave two blue pills which she said that her becoming incapacitated, and she said she laid there unable to move, unable to speak. she said june screaming inside of her head to try to move when bill cosby proceeded to attack her, to molest her. she described the shame she felt, and the impact this had on her life after that. she moved to see her family in canada, and her family spoke about how a woman who was an athlete, who was so physically capable, who was full of energy and zest of life, transformed into a woman zest of life, transformed into a
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woman who was just so deeply impacted by this, and was nervous and week after the attack. there we re and week after the attack. there were five other women who were able to testify as well during the trial, strikingly similar allegations. thank you very much indeed. such a depressing story. finally those women getting some sense of closure. in his speech to the united nations a few hours ago, president trump delivered a robust defence of his policy of national sovereignty — as well as criticising iran, and accusing china of unfair trade practices. mr trump also spoke of the strength of the us economy under his administration. it's no secret that the president thinks that america's contributions to the united nations are too high and that other member countries should shoulder a greater share of the burden. so how much does the us contribute to the un? the bbc‘s reality check team has been taking a look. the us pays around $9.7 billion
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overall to the un, which, as you can see, is much more than everyone else. but something interesting happens when we look at those numbers as a percentage of each country's gdp. the uk and canada are joint first, germany comes in at number three, japan that number poon number three, japan that number poor, the usa is at numberfive, and china comes in last, at mother six. in real numbers, total us contributions are by far the largest overall, but as a proportion of economic output, it pays less than other leading industrialised nations. let's bring in ron christie, former adviser to president george w bush. iurge i urge there are several times you came up to the un general assembly with your boss, president bush, and
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things didn't go quite as smoothly and as warmly as you might have hoped for? it was of course the time of the iraq war come of the world was not thrilled with what united states were doing, but i honestly can never remember a time when the world sat there and laughed, effectively, the president of the united states. good afternoon to you, katty, iwas united states. good afternoon to you, katty, i was smart enough during my four years working for the president to avoid coming to new york city at all costs, because as we know the traffic you can be terrible. yes, i should have done the same, frankly! but i can't recollect the same, frankly! but i can't re colle ct a the same, frankly! but i can't recollect a time we have seen the president get laughed at on the world stage will stop there was rather unprecedented, and you could also tell it rattled him a little bit, it took him a few more seconds to get back into the groove of his speech. he was busy talking about all the accomplishments he had done, and no president had apparently done more than he had, and i think it took a lot of world leaders by surprise. katty was making a point that this was a little bit more
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subdued, and it tends to be when he sticks to the script rather than when he is out on the campaign trail. the standout line was the one john paul bode in his report, we reject the ideology of globalism, and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism. that was not an explicit endorsement of nat —— nationalism, but it wasn't far off. this was the tale of two presidents, president obama, when he would speak on the world stage, would not talk about american exceptionalism, and it seems to be president trump as you noted in a very subdued tone went out of his way to talk about how great america was. he understood that other countries and cultures obviously would look inward, but he made it very clear in his remarks today that he believes america and american exceptionalism is right back on the world stage. that is very interesting you say that, because my notion of america exceptionalism is notjust that
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america as a country founded on ideals, but it leads through those ideals, but it leads through those ideals, that it is that shining city on the hill, that there is a kind of moral purpose, if you like, two american global leadership. that is my understanding of exceptionalism, maybe i am wrong in that, but that is not what president trump is talking about, he is talking about the transactional nature of america's relationship with the rest of the world, isn't he? isn't that fascinating, katty? iagree of the world, isn't he? isn't that fascinating, katty? i agree with your definition of what exceptionalism should be. president trump agrees he will engage with other state actors when he sees fit. his discussions with nafta, canada and mexico. really what he wants to project is, he thinks america is great, we are back on the world stage, but you are going to deal with us and we are going to deal with us and we are going to deal with you on my terms, donald trump '5 mac terms, rather than what we have seen in presidency is passed, a very interesting way he phrased his foreign affairs world deal. ron christie, thank you very much. it is
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when he comes it to the united nations wejoke when he comes it to the united nations we joke about what a nightmare it is to get around new york and it has been pouring with rain, i always complain about the weather, i am a bit like goldilocks in that respect. what does that make me? the three bears. there is this discrepancy between donald trump and his worldview and what this global body represents, which is this idea of globalism, and it is this idea of internationalism, and there are a lot of european leaders in particular who are particularly concerned right now that the world order we have known for the last 70 yea rs, order we have known for the last 70 years, which was created by an led by the united states, is disappearing before their eyes, and whilst donald trump is not the only factor behind that, certainly when he stands up there and he pushes the idea of patriotism and america first, it reminds those world leaders that that is the world he wa nts, leaders that that is the world he wants, he doesn't want the global war old order we have seen the loss
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yea rs. war old order we have seen the loss years. —— global world order. war old order we have seen the loss years. —— global world orderlj war old order we have seen the loss years. -- globalworld order. i like that, goldilocks. all right, little bear. the uk's opposition labour party has passed a motion at its annual conference leaving open the possibility of campaigning for a second vote on brexit. but the wording of the motion was ambiguous — committing the party to absolutely nothing. still, the second referendum campaign ‘our future, our choice' say that the mood in the united kingdom is changing, especially among young people. here in the studio we have lara spirit, university student and anti—brexit campaigner. so you campaigned, along with others, for another referendum. where you satisfied with what you heard from the conference today?” think we are definitely hearing positive signs from the conference. it has been a busy few days, but keir starmer's announcement that remain must be on the table is a really welcome development, something we are finding very positive. allan that is your union is coming your groups around the country, there was a senior unite
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official that said another vote would reopen the wounds of brexit, not heal. i think what the wounds of brexit right now is the inability of this government to negotiate a deal good enough country. but the poorest are given is against people campaigning fora are given is against people campaigning for a people's vote is that it would reopen divisions, that is absolutely terrible. the idea that this country is not divided enough, we are so, so divided, and another vote would not help or hinder that particularly, but it is necessary. lara, you are clearly very involved in this, you are very committed to the political cause of this. what about your contemporaries? part of the reason of course that britain voted to leave the european union was that young beaver didn't turn out in particularly large and others who might have voted to remain. do you get any sense that they have changed, not their political views, but their actual drive to get out and makea but their actual drive to get out and make a cause out of this and vote, were there to be another referendum, if that were to happen?
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yes, it is no news that young people are pro—european but the anger we are pro—european but the anger we are feeling on the ground the young people is quite spectacular. thousands of young people across the country are engaging with our message and really feeling like, especially those who did not get the vote in 2016, over 1.5 million people who have turned 18 since the referendum, who are now passionately feeling they would like to remain in the eu. they are watching their government being completely incapable to negotiate a deal that safeguards their future and watching their opportunities being really curtailed. so what has changed, they have the chance to vote first time around, what break them go and vote now? three quarters of them did turn out and vote remain. now in a recent poll, 78% of recent people would vote remain. we are seeing that figure really rise, and it is a common misconception that young people are lazy, that they don't wa nt people are lazy, that they don't want to get out and vote, they don't wa nt want to get out and vote, they don't want to get out and vote, they don't want to campaign. actually we are seeing the complete opposite in our
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campaign, young people really angry and upset about this. young people on the ground at labour conference are really angry about this, and they are saying the membership especially is really turning towards a people's vote is the only route. young people have been the driving force behind that they will continue to be so. good to hear your thoughts, thank very much indeed. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — thousands of miles from its usual arctic habitat , a beluga whale has been spotted in the river thames in london. theresa may has said ending the free movement of people from the eu is non—negotiable in the brexit negotiations. it follows the decision that eu citizens should face the same migration rules as those from elsewhere. leila nathoo reports. the cabinet met here yesterday in westminster, and received a briefing from the chair of the migration advisory committee, an independent body that had been asked last week
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to report on future immigration framework, post— brexit. to report on future immigration framework, post—brexit. their recommendation was for the eu citizens not to be given preferential treatment over citizens from other parts of the world after we leave the eu, and for the government to prioritise highly skilled migrants over lower skilled migrants. the cabinet yesterday after hearing the day conclusions, the recommendations of that report, broadly agreed to support that key principle of not treating eu citizens any differently from any other citizen of any other country after brexit, so that does mark a significant shift it in the current immigration policy. theresa may this afternoon reiterating that free movement of people from the eu would come to an end after brexit. that has long been one of her red lines in this negotiation, and she has stuck to that, and said that the future immigration rules must also continue to bring net migration down ina way continue to bring net migration down in a way that works for the british
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economy. there have been some concerns from businesses about lower skilled jobs and how they will fill vacancies after brexit but theresa may made clear that net migration must come down this afternoon. the prime minister incidentally was not ruling out that treatment of eu citizens after brexit, how they will come and live and work in the uk, their access to the uk, would not be off the table in the negotiations, and this is the crucial point, that there is a possible to that doing a deal over access to the uk will be pa rt of deal over access to the uk will be part of trade talks with the eu, and indeed trade talks with other countries. stephen's centre—left president is due to stand down after losing support from the party. the vote of confidence was backed —— of no confidence was backed —— of no confidence was backed —— of no confidence was packed. he is
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expected to stay on as caretaker prime minister while his replacement is decided. the main parties still in the 2015 iran nuclear deal say they will set up a new payment system so they can maintain business with iran and bypass us sanctions, which take effect in november. the european union foreign policy chief, federica mogherini, said they were determined to develop a new legal entity that would facilitate oil companies and businesses to continue trading, without relying on the us—led global market and dollar. exactly how it will work is still being determined. the texas department of criminaljustice received a donation of bananas, which turned out to have nearly $18 million worth of cocaine hidden inside the boxes. the drugs were found in two pallets of bananas that were donated because they were already ripe. the department wrote on facebook: "sometimes, life gives you lemons. sometimes, it gives you bananas. and sometimes, it gives you something you'd never expect!" president trump has made no secret of his
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views about the un — previously he's said the "utter weakness and incompetence" of the organisation has made it a hindrance. and in the past 18 months, the president's actions have more than matched the rhetoric. he has cut funding to un bodies he has pulled out of several international agreements. the united nations population fund — the world's largest for population and reproductive health programs — lost us funding in april last year. then injune, the us pulled out of the paris agreement on climate change mitigation. america then decided to withdraw from unesco, the program responsible for corralling international cooperation on issues like science and education, and designating world heritage sites. the united nations human rights council was next. the us pulled out injune 2018. and then in september, the united states ended all funding to the un agency charged with supporting palestinian refugees, describing the body as "irredeemably flawed." let's speak to nicholas burns —
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a former us ambassador to nato — now based at harvard university — he's in boston now. thank you very much were joining us, what did you make of the president's speech today? extraordinary speech. normally you would expect the american president to act like the leader of the world community. donald trump today ran against the world community, against the international system we have helped to build up over the last southern to build up over the last southern to three years. i thought it was an unfortunate speech, when he was so boastful, and frankly he was so resentful. he said several times in the speech the world are taking advantage of the united states, i don't agree with that at all. it was a speech that lacked self—confidence, and i think it probably hurt again the image of the united states on the world stage. interesting idea that it lacked self—confidence, he was very critical of iran, pretty critical of
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china, very critical of the united nations itself, saying you on warning, you did not reform, so i pulled out of the human rights commission. noticeably absent from his list of countries he is critical, russia, infact his list of countries he is critical, russia, in fact by my listening there was not a single mention of russia during the whole speech. why not? i think you are absolutely right, there wasn't. if the united states president should be critical of any country right now, it should be russia for having assaulted our 2016 elections through assaulted our 2016 elections through a cyber attack, and the president consistently has not wanted to play that role. he has not been critical of putin, in fact he has praised vladimir putin several times. he has not established a national commission to try to raise our defences in our 50 states that organise our elections, and he has beena very organise our elections, and he has been a very weak leader i think in opposition to russian aggression, both in eastern europe but also in the cyber world. there are a lot of reasons for this, one is i think he
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truly admires authoritarian leaders. you also notice today he praised kim jong—un excessively, xi jinping, the saudi king, he criticised the german government, one of our strongest allies in the world. it is a jarring juxtaposition when the american president praises dictators and criticises as he has ever passed, theresa may, angela merkel. there area theresa may, angela merkel. there are a lot of leaders pinning their hopes on 2020 but maybe theyjust need to face facts that america is realigning when it comes to foreign policy? i don't think it is at all, i think president trump is an aberration. if you look at our public opinion polls, the great majority of americans favour nato, free trade, believe it or not, and taking in refugees as we have throughout our history. the polls save the pubs open zone democrats, the people, don't support what this
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president is doing. of course, the ultimate verdict will be given on november six ultimate verdict will be given on novembersix in our ultimate verdict will be given on november six in our mid—term elections of this year and in 2020 in the presidential election. 0k, thank you forjoining us. all of that domestic politics, christian, playing very much into the president's speech today, he had two audiences, the world and voters in those mid—term elections as well. something completely different now. a beluga whale has been sighted in the uk, off gravesend in the thames estuary. conservationists say it's thousands of miles from the mammal‘s usual habitat in the arctic. sightings of beluga whales in british waters are particularly rare — the last sighting was three years ago off the northumberland coast. whale experts say the animal appears to be lost but it is swimming strongly. robert hall reports. thousands of miles from the arctic, just 24 from the centre of london. when a bird—watcher on the salt marshes east of gravesend caught a
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glimpse of a white shape just offshore, he couldn't believe his eyes. one of the rarest of sightings. within hours, the news had spread across social media, bringing wales spot is out onto the river banks for a glimpse of the visitor. as soon as i arrived i saw a glimpse of it, but this has only been surfacing about once every 15 to 20 minutes. i have seen the beluga whale, which i have never seen, never ever beluga whale, which i have never seen, never ever imagined i would seen, never ever imagined i would see in britain, liz lynne birchley in london. patrols from the port of london authority have helped to keep vessels clear and enabled world led experts to confirm this was indeed a beluga. the advice from losses for the navigators to keep an extra eye out and keep their distance from the animal. last time a wales straight into the thames back in 2006, rescu e rs into the thames back in 2006, rescuers failed to save its life. they hope to notice that the outgoing tide will carry this unusual tourist to safer waters. robert hall, bbc news, gravesend.
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as you know, christian like to have a bit ofa as you know, christian like to have a bit of a musical theme when it comes to this programme, so we are going to show you some footage of a seven—year—old girl who belted out the american national anthem this weekend to a stunned crowd at the la galaxy game against seattle. malea emma won a local competition to sing before the game. and before you watch this, i am just going to make the point that malea is not even four foot tall. # over the land of the free, and the home of the brave. cheering what about that? nearly as good as
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me. beat that, christian fraser. that was fantastic. very good indeed. that is all for tonight, we will see you same time tomorrow, thanks very much for watching. goodbye. there were big differences in how the day turned out weather—wise, depending on where you spent it. southern areas have the best of the brightness, in fact beautiful blue skies for this weather watcher in hastings. further north and west it could not have been more different, more cloud, some are bags of rain and a strong wind, two very different days of whether very clearly visible on our earlier satellite picture. where we keep the cloud across northern ireland, scotland, the far north—west of england, the mavericks of rain and more of a breeze. it will stay mild. in fact, overnight temperatures will hold up in double digits. you
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consider yellow, even orange shades on our temperature charts will stop further south it will be another chilly night, maybe not quite as chilly night, maybe not quite as chilly as it was last night. having said that, some rural spot in the far south—east may again get very close to freezing. our split fortu nes close to freezing. our split fortunes continue into tomorrow, the best of the sunshine and part of the midlands, the southern half of wales, north wales and north—west england as well as northern ireland seeing some clout and some patchy rainfora time, seeing some clout and some patchy rain for a time, though it should brighten up a bit. we will keep cloud and rain feeding in across the north and west of scotland through the day, quite windy across the north as well, but voiced eastern scotland, where you get some shelter from that wind you will keep some sunshine and temperatures in aberdeen up to 21 degrees, not bad at all this time of year. a similar value in london with the sunshine continuing through the afternoon. wednesday night for a term that rain in the north will shift northwards. and then starts to sink southwards, as this front moves southwards during thursday, behind that there are some cooler air lying in wait but ahead of the front, we start to
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tap into some warmer air. thursday for england and wales, the warmest day of the week with quite a lot of sunshine. some very patchy rain, some clout, and the wind switching to north—westerly, it will turn quite a lot cooler and fresher. afternoon temperatures of 15 or 16, but in the sunshine and warm air in the south—east, 23 degrees. our frontal system will sink south—eastwards during thursday night and friday, a band of cloud, a few spots of rain, behind that all of us getting into that cooler air, as we had to the weakened the days are cooler, the will be chilly, generally dry, perhaps some rain in the north. this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. the american comedian bill cosby has been sentenced to between three and ten years in prison for drugging and molesting a woman in 2004. thejudge said he is a sexually violent predator. labour warns the prime minister that if a brexit deal is rejected by parliament,
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she will have to go back to brussels and renegotiate. the government would then have to go back to the eu and say, "look, our parliament can't agree to this. these are the parameters that parliament wants us to negotiate on," and go back and do that. what i believe is when that deal comes back, members of parliament will obviously look at that, we'll bring a good deal back and they must remember that we are delivering on the vote of the british people.
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