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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 25, 2018 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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low 205 as low 205 55 well. a5 we go the low 205 as well. as we go through the low 20s as well. as we go through wednesday night we will continue to see rain across particularly north—western parts of scotland. further south the skies will be relatively clear and it will be fairly chilly, perhaps not quite as chilly is the last few nights. good see some faulty batches during thursday in southern areas but the southern parts could see the best of the sunshine and the best of the warmth during the day. but through the north—west something cool and fresher showing its hand behind this band of cloud and patchy rain, which will be sinking its way further south—east was as the day wears on. during thursday night that band of cloud and frontal system is going to sink south eastwards and that means for all of us on friday we import some cooler airfrom the for all of us on friday we import some cooler air from the north—west. so whereas thursday might bring temperatures in the south—east about 23 degrees, by friday you can forget about that. there will be a fair amount of sunshine, some patchy cloud especially up into the north—west but these are the top temperatures you can expect, 13— 17 degrees. then we go into the weekend and it looks like high pressure will
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be calling the shots. centre just to the west of the uk, frontal systems perilously close to northern areas so we perilously close to northern areas so we could see some extra cloud, maybe the odd spot of rain, certainly more of a breeze through northern scotland during the day. elsewhere some good spells of sunshine but still in that cool air, 14 to 17 sunshine but still in that cool air, 1a to 17 degrees. and where we see the clear skies by night we will have some chilly nights. so perhaps a touch of frost to start sunday morning, the odd frost, a decent speu morning, the odd frost, a decent spell of sunshine with high pressure in charge but with the higher sitting out west, the wind coming round from the north—west, it will never feel particularly warm. this is the big picture as we go into the start of next week. this is what the jet stream will be doing. moving gci’oss jet stream will be doing. moving across the atlantic, bending its way northwards and southwards. the high—pressure areas tending to sit to the south of the jet. low pressure whenever the jet dips its way southwards, and it may well be that, as we head into the start of the new week, this piece of the jet
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stream, the wind is higher in the atmosphere, will die of a long way south and that could introduce some showery rain across eastern areas for a time. but to the south of the jet we will keep high—pressure and that looks like building its way back again as we go through next week. with a high centre just out west, it looks most likely it will bring some cooler air down across the country. what that means for next week is we see some cool days, and where the skies stay clear, some chilly nights, it will be generally dry with plenty of sunshine and so mist and fog patches through the morning. temperatures up and down a little bit through the week ahead. hello. this is bbc news, i'm rachel schofield. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines: —— morning's. the american comedian bill cosby has been sentenced to between three and ten years in prison for drugging and molesting a woman in 200a. thejudge said he is a sexually violent predator. jeremy corbyn says if parliament rejects a brexit
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agreement brokered by theresa may, britain will have to go back into talks with the eu to seek a better deal. in a speech at the un general assemby, president trump has attacked the iranian leadership, accusing it of sowing chaos, death and destruction. life expectancy in the uk has stopped improving for the first time since 1982, when figures began. a beluga whale has swum into the river thames, near gravesend in kent. experts say it's obviously very lost and quite possibly in trouble. a warm welcome to our look ahead at what the papers will be bringing us
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tomorrow. with me arejim waterson, media editor at the guardian, and rosamund urwin, financial services correspondent at the sunday times. most of tomorrow's front pages are in. the metro reports that police in birmingham are offering a halloween sleepover in a cell which once held the serial killer fred west. the ft says donald trump took aim at the us‘s oil producing allies in the middle east during his address at the un by saying they were ripping off the world by failing to bring down prices. the guardian leads on the jailing of bill cosby, as the entertainer known as america's dad was sentenced to serve between three and ten years in jail for drugging and sexually assaulting a women. the telegraph looks ahead to tomorrow when the prime minister will pledge that she wants to cut corporation tax to make brexit britain an economic powerhouse. the mirror looks ahead to the labour conference tomorrow wherejeremy corbyn will vow to put children and parents at the heart
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of his plans to rebuild britain. the mail claims banks have mounted a secret lobbying campaign to avoid having to refund victims of fraud. and the times reports that the russian billionaire, roman abramovich, has been accused of money laundering and having links to organised crime, according to a leaked swiss police report. we're not going to start there. take us we're not going to start there. take us to the guardian, rosamond, and perhaps to liverpool. the labour party conference and inside the mind ofjeremy corbyn party conference and inside the mind of jeremy corbyn overtake party conference and inside the mind ofjeremy corbyn overtake us there! not sure about that! jeremy corbyn tomorrow will give the closing speech to the conference. he's obviously keen to move the conversation on from brexit, the divisions in the party have dominated the coverage of the conference. instead he has gone on
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safe jeremy salman abedi conference. instead he has gone on safejeremy salman abedi populist ground. he is going to criticise... ten yea rs ground. he is going to criticise... ten years on from the financial crisis, the poor suffered the most ——jeremy crisis, the poor suffered the most —— jeremy corbyn populist ground. we never fixed the system, we patched it up and propped it up rather than looking at the heart of why this was allowed to happen. he's also setting out new policies, including a green jobs revolution. that will talk about renewable technology. is saying it will. .. about renewable technology. is saying it will... 400,000 new posts —— he's saying. saying it will... 400,000 new posts -- he's saying. you can probably say we've had about 40 millionjobs if you add up all of the conference announcements over the past ten years. tidal power, and even nuclear, which might be
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controversial. i'm sure there will be more meat on the bones and other policies that haven't been set out because they want something to surprise the papers with or tomorrow evening. he's really making a big bid to move the conversation on from brexit. jim comey to put some clear bluewater between himself and the old —style bluewater between himself and the old—style new labour as it were —— jim, clear blue water. it's weird looking back on the ed miliband in error. ed miliband was tonight hosting a pub quiz for momentum activists. that's where he is tonight! —— ed miliband era. there you had labour putting forward slightly more radical versions of new labour. brownite is plus, you know, with a tiny bit more talk of reform —— know, with a tiny bit more talk of reform — — brownites. know, with a tiny bit more talk of reform —— brownites. a bit of fiddung reform —— brownites. a bit of fiddling around the edges. ten years after the crisis you have a labour
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leader saying we'll do our best to rip up the system. almost saying gordon brown got it wrong. but the details on some of these policies are still not there. he's talking more run a core language, particularly on things like redoing the banking system —— more radical language. raising taxes on corporations or example. it depends on wherever we have the next election that manifesto is. for the labour party, rosumond, there's been talk, albeit hopeful talk, of a general election, this is our moment to start capitalising on the opportunity. we're a long way from that but their mind will be focused on the fact they need to get past brexit and start laying out other ideas. that's understandable. the brenda from bristol line will be recycled. that's the woman who... not another one, that's what she
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said. i don't think there will be an election. who wants an election? do you? i remember in about march of this year, a columnist at the daily mail, it slips my mind who, predicted an october general election. i kept it because no one ever holds you to these things, so they are wrong, we won't have one in 0ctober. they are wrong, we won't have one in october. nobody wants one in winter, it would be miserable. for some of... you were talking about the momentum activists, people flocking to the labour party conference full of excitement about jeremy to the labour party conference full of excitement aboutjeremy corbyn, they would love to see it again and see if they can get their man into the big job. all joking see if they can get their man into the big job. alljoking apart, no party would voluntarily hold an election in winter because it would be hard to get people on the doorsteps and are voting. we haven't had a winter collection in post—war. .. had a winter collection in post-war. .. i suppose the had a winter collection in post-war... i suppose the more pressing question is whether we're going to get a second, if you call
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ita going to get a second, if you call it a second referendum, another referendum, because some would say what we're hearing from the labour party is there's a acceptance that might be the case. obviously it's a bit of a mixed bag. keir starmer today was saying that... the options might include, on the table, remain. he gotan might include, on the table, remain. he got an odd standing ovation where people slowly got up. it went on for a full minute, but it wasn't your ordinary applause in relation to something going down well. a slightly odd situation. that's what lots of people in the room wanted but he couldn't believe he was saying that when he heard john mcdonnell only a day earlier say something very different. you can see there's still the split there, but that's clearly the position they're moving towards at the very least. gym, we had called him saying and greed, capitalism, on the daily telegraph, theresa may speaking to
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business leaders in new york, slashing taxes and saying we want your business in britain and we will give you a tax incentive ——jim, we had jeremy corbyn saying greed. you have jeremy corbyn talking had jeremy corbyn saying greed. you havejeremy corbyn talking about the end of the capitalist system as we know it, then theresa may in new york pledging to cut... this is an announcement we have had slightly reheated, she's announcing it again and saying it will be an unequivocally pro—business regime under her watch in britain. that's your choice, do you want a free trading, low tax, pro—business environment in the uk under theresa may? 0r environment in the uk under theresa may? or do you want to smash the system and start again underjeremy corbyn? that's unusual after two decades of basically messing around the edges of a centrist consensus. british politics now has a proper divide. the subtext here, rosumond,
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brexit is making us look like we're going to be closing down and everything is grinding to a halt, this is her attempt to say we're going to be an economic powerhouse, we are generating again, we can do what we want, set taxes. that won't be music to the ears of the eu. it's a straightforward attack on them really. this is what... to be fair, some brexiteers had always talked about this, although they tended not to have that as their emphasis because it isn't attractive. there's plenty here that's actually a literally toxic to a huge chunk of the electorate, but anyway! yes, not exactly what the eu wanted to see, but lots feared this was what theresa may would be setting out. it's popular to a chunk of her party, and if she's got her own conference next week, this is what she wants to be saying ahead of facing them all —— and she's got her
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own conference. i don't think it's popular with that many tory activists, it's a thing that many brexit mps would want. i don't see where there's votes in this. maybe this is the message for the international audience, this is the message for the internationalaudience, britain this is the message for the international audience, britain is open for business. the daily telegraph think it is going to play well at home because it's on their front page! staying with america, jim, but let's go to the ft, they are focusing on trump, a lovely photo and a wry smile as un delegates at the general assembly listen to him set out his worldview and his views on how great america is, and perhaps the odd snigger. he said words to the effect of we've had the most successful administration in the first two yea rs administration in the first two years in american history, at which point the world's diplomats slowly burst out into ripples of laughter and a slightly baffled donald trump was forced to go, i wasn't expecting that! i love the other image, not on
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any of the other front pages, from the meeting, of the new zealand prime minister, i always say her name wrong, jacinda ardern... you never try and say the name of someone you don't know. her few months old kid. she had a security pass specially made for it. she had her partner with her to look after the kid. she did a speech and then came back to the kid. her maiden speech with the un and she had a small baby. a good justification. the modern face of government and then quite the opposite with trump. take us to the daily mail, rosumond, the photo at the bottom of bill cos by, the photo at the bottom of bill cosby, who was sentenced today for sexual assault. he's looking at somewhere between three and ten yea rs somewhere between three and ten years injail, a really arresting image and a significant story? absolutely. this is one of the first michu related trials that we have
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had in court and seen convictions for —— #metoo. a victim described this as a hallelujah moment. he had a catalogue of offences, some outside that statute of limitations, so the sentence might not be as long as what many would have wanted or seemed fitting. those offences date from 1965 to 2008 —— saw as fitting. he was getting more away with here at the behaviour towards women for so long and that 81, justice is being done —— horrific behaviour. it's come very late for a lot of people. i suppose in the coming couple of years we will have a lot more of these cases, particularly in america. a moment of reckoning, but it's taken far too long to get here. it is also a moment of reckoning
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when donald trump has not always been the best in his behaviour in the white house. and some people are finding their behaviour is punished, and others are still getting away with it. i must admit, looking on twitter, there are a lot of comments about isn't it ironic that... and comments about brett kavanaugh, and so on. but an 81—year—old man going to prison is one thing, but isn't there a wider problem in us society? it not time to discuss all of that. let's go on to the times. this is about roman abramovich, who is in a spot of bother. earlier this year roman abramovich, very close to vladimir putin, was refused a
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british visa. he hasn't been seen in britain since, despite his major investment in the country, his ownership of chelsea and his home in london. and now it looks like he was also... he ended up getting israeli citizenship, no one knows how that happened, and it looks like he was trying to get swiss citizenship, which is surprisingly hard to say, and they refused on the basis that he was potentially a threat to public safety and the stain on the country's reputation. if you are a stain on switzerland's reputation for money—laundering than you are doing pretty well. we should say this is documentation which has been obtained from a swiss police report a p pa re ntly obtained from a swiss police report apparently leaked obtained from a swiss police report a ppa re ntly lea ked to obtained from a swiss police report apparently leaked to one of the swiss newspapers. we haven't seen that evidence and he has quite clearly denied that he was involved in anything illegal. but it is an interesting story nonetheless. certainly, and this information was leaked at the start of this year, and then of course his lawyers got
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out an injunction to prevent it being published, and that was overturned on monday, which is why it has come out now. and it is a pretty damning report. because of that we might be best to park that one day. we have the end on the whale in essex, the beluga whale, they are a very smiley looking whale. i am rather worried about this whale, because i went to see the poor bottlenose whale which swam up the poor bottlenose whale which swam up the thames 2006 and it didn't fa re up the thames 2006 and it didn't fare well, so i hope the beluga whale has a better time. it is wonderful people get to see wildlife, but this whale is horrifically of course, and usually found in the arctic, obviously. and so there are real worries of whether it will be able to get out and back where it should be. it is not even essex, it is gravesend.
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where it should be. it is not even essex, it is gravesendlj where it should be. it is not even essex, it is gravesend. ithink it is spending a bit of time around the station. i am being told between kent and sx is the information i am getting from my geographically astute producer. -- essex. u nfortu nately astute producer. -- essex. unfortunately he only surfaces every 15 minutes. and it is not a great photo. it is a bit like the loch ness monster, you get a hump. they are keen he will swam out of the estuary, so maybe by morning he will be gone, but we will wait and see. i will pause and look ahead, not from the papers themselves but the tory party conference starting next week, we are in that kind of season. you we re we are in that kind of season. you were saying that you are free of conference season. will you miss going to the conferences?”
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conference season. will you miss going to the conferences? i will get to the tory party conferences, it is a strange event compared with the labour one, because the labour one is heading towards something where members have a say, and the tory party conference remains one of the most stage—managed events, and it says a lot. they are still ahead in the polls but they do not have an awful lot of members. they are older, they don't tend to go to conferences. so you have the strange mix of labour with 500,000 members, and the conservatives with 140,000, many of whom are not that active. so you have a strange thing where you talk to any tory mp where they know their party needs renewing, but they are still behind in the polls. and give us a sense, looking ahead, let's predict some headlines from the tory party conference. it has been pretty unpleasant watching the labour conference and the divisions. they won't have got it all sorted
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for next week. note, and there is a question about how much the conversation will inevitably be about brexit, but where exactly is going to go? all of this is still simmering, because theresa may has both sides to fight, she has the remain favouring mps, who are distraught, and many of them think the worst possible option is boris johnson orjacob rees—mogg, and on the other side she has the ranting brexiteers who are not happy with her and don't like chequers and wa nted her and don't like chequers and wanted all torn up. looking ahead, we like to second—guess the headlines a week in advance. that is all we have time for in the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer.
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thank you tojim waterson and rosamund urwin. goodbye. with your sport on the bbc news channel. well, what drama we've had at old trafford in the league cup tonight. frank lampard, in his first meeting against his old mentor jose mourihno, has come away with an 8—7 win on penalties for derby against manchester united, to reach the last 16. there was action a plenty in normal time, too. a stoppage—time equaliser from marouane fellanni pushed the tie to spot kicks. and this, too, after the news that mourinho has told paul pogba he will not be captain again, because of concerns over his attitude. well, watching the game for us was nick parrott. in the league cup, league cup is often rest big players. jose
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mourinho gambled, making nine changes, but it looked like that wouldn't matter thanks to mata, the game less than three minutes old when derby's hopes were dented. but being a goal down at the interval didn't seem to bother manager frank lampard. perhaps he knew something is old chelsea boss didn't, possibly the left foot of harry wilson, as the left foot of harry wilson, as the 21—year—old on loan from liverpool stunned 0ld the 21—year—old on loan from liverpool stunned old trafford. united were rocked again soon after when sergio romero was sent off for handball. a man down, gaps appeared and substitute jack mariette made the most of the space. but six minutes of injury time was too much to hang on for, with marouane fellanni bearing down on derby. both sides were nervous, taking penalties, until philjones lost his was with a 16th kick of the shootout, lampa rd was with a 16th kick of the shootout, lampard rewarded for not bringing the changes while mourinho was left to rue hears. —— he is a
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mac his. so let's have a look at the other scores from tonight's games. a stoppage—time winner from callum wilson sent bournemouth into the last 16. burnley are out. they lost 2—1 to league one side burton albion. a straightforward win for manchester city away at oxford. middlesbrough and leicester needed penalties to progress. and a seven—goal thriller at wycombe. the visitors, norwich, hung on in the end, they were 4—1 at one stage. full details on the bbc sport website. hibernian and aberdeen couldnt find the net, goalless after extra—time. the match went to penalties where aberdeen came out on top. thomas agyepong's penalty for hibs came back off the crossbar, and aberdeen won the shootout. we are just three days from the start of the 42nd ryder cup, which is taking place at le golf national in paris. the big star of the show is tiger woods, who arrives fresh off the back of his first pga win in five years. tiger woods is looking forward to taking on some of the younger stars
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who were not playing when he was at his best. the younger guys were on their way in when i was on my way out, and they had never really played against me, when i was playing well. it has been five years since i won a golf tournament, i feel like i have always been a tough person to beat, and they have been jokingly saying that, you know, we wa nt to jokingly saying that, you know, we want to go against you. all right, here we go. boxer billyjoe saunders has been fined £100,000 and given a severe reprimand about his future conduct after a social media video from him which the police described as sickening. and just a warning there's some flash photography coming up. saunders has apologised for the video, in which he tells a woman he will give her drugs to perform a sex action. the british board of boxing control has found him guilty of bringing the sport into disrepute. the fine will go to charity.
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that is all the sport for now. you can keep updated on the website. goodbye. hello. it has been a day of contrasts across the uk. plenty of sunshine across much of england and wales. this is portsmouth at sunset this evening, a beautiful scene here. meanwhile, across northern ireland scotland it has been cloudier, windy, some outbreaks of rain and a very soggy looking dated sterling. 0ne rain and a very soggy looking dated sterling. one of the wettest places in the uk, actually, with 15 millimetres of rain. 0vernight more rain to come across northern ireland, the heaviest and most rain across the northern isles and highlands of scotland, working its way into elsewhere. for northern end scotla nd way into elsewhere. for northern end scotland and northern ireland, temperatures widely into double figures. the cooler night and some of our rural hollows seeing a touch of our rural hollows seeing a touch of frost. 0n of our rural hollows seeing a touch of frost. on wednesday a similar dated tuesday, the best of sunshine across much of england and wales. cloudy and windy across northern ireland and scotland with gusts of
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40 mph fora ireland and scotland with gusts of 40 mph for a time across western areas of scotland. to the east of scotland, some spells of sunshine the aberdeenshire and murray. these are average winds drink through the afternoon, some of the gusts will still be higher for a afternoon, some of the gusts will still be higherfor a time. in the sunshine, temperatures quite widely up sunshine, temperatures quite widely up to 20 or 21 celsius across much of england and wales. more cloud across the far north of england, the best of the sunshine of further north and east that you are. as we go through when they evening and overnight into thursday our area of rain starts to push its way further northwards for a time, but then on thursday it slides its way very slowly south and eastwards. ahead of it we still have this area of high pressure keeping things dry and settled across much of england and wales. is that end of rain runs into that area of high pressure it will slowly start to fizzle out and ahead of it we will see some warmth for a time across much of england and wales. temperatures getting up to 22 or 23 celsius, and the dividing line really is that band of cloud, because behind it we will see something cooler and fresher.
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eventually all of that will slide its way south and eastwards as we go into friday but thursday looks likely to be the warmest day of the week. 22 or 23 celsius across parts of south—east england and east anglia. 0n of south—east england and east anglia. on thursday into friday, that front starts to slide away south and eastwards, this area of high pressure building on behind. as we go through friday and into the weekend, things will slowly start to turn cooler for all of weekend, things will slowly start to turn coolerfor all of us. weekend, things will slowly start to turn cooler for all of us. also, away from the far north of scotland it will be mainly dry with some spells of sunshine. into the weekend, we are going to have some cooler days and chilly nights. most it will be generally dry. some spells of sunshine, just a little bit of rain in the north. goodbye. this is newsday on the bbc. i am
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rico hizon in singapore. the headlines: the comedian bill cosby is jailed for sexual assault. the judge says he will serve between three and ten years in prison. donald trump addresses the united nations general assembly, putting his america first policy centre stage. we reject the ideology of globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism. globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotismlj globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism. i am babita sharma in london. also in the programme: a breakthrough in the battle against malaria. scientists use gene editing to make an entire population of mosquitoes infertile. and the duchess of
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