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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 26, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: bill cosby spends his first night behind bars after being jailed for up to ten years for sexual assault. jeremy corbyn will promise to tackle "greed is good" capitalism as his makes his leader's speech at the labour conference. more misery for manchester united. paul pogba watches from the stands as his side lose on penalties and are dumped out of the league cup by championship side derby. off life support. a deal is reached to restart construction of a new hospital in liverpool, after the collapse of carillion left the future of the project in doubt. we will be live in gravesend as a beluga whale is spotted for the first time in the river thames. good morning, from one of the largest spaces outside in london. we are in the hunt for some conkers
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this morning. a cold start in the south, very mild as we push further north, sunshine in the south. more in15 north, sunshine in the south. more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 26 september. our top story: the american entertainer bill cosby has started a prison sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 200a. the judge branded the 81—year—old a sexually violent predator, before sentencing him for between three and ten years. lawyers for cosby have already said they will appeal. nada tawfik has the details. reporter: mr cosby, any comment, sir? this will now be the image that defines bill cosby‘s life, in handcuffs and headed to prison to pay for his crimes. for decades, he led a double life, and the man affectionately referred to as ‘america's dad' will now be classified as a sexually violent predator. it is a moment his victims never thought possible. outside of court, they celebrated. this is just going to show victims
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that they can make it through, and that there's justice at the end, and hallelujah. amen. all: hallelujah! this is notjust about #metoo on the internet anymore. it's about a defendant having to be accountable in a court of law, and being confined in state prison as a result of his criminal acts. do you think this will lead to a real sea change? well, i think it sends an important message. more than 60 women came forward with strikingly similar allegations, but only andrea constand's attack was recent enough to bring charges. a former university employee, the entertainer entrapped her by posing as a mentor, before drugging and molesting her at his pennsylvania home. her relief after the sentencing was visible. bill cosby has admitted to giving young women drugs before sex, but says it was done with their knowledge, and throughout the trial, he has shown no remorse. mr cosby clearly has been denied his right to a fair trial. these injustices must be
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corrected immediately. at the height of his fame, bill cosby was the most watched man on television. his wholesome, lovable persona on the cosby show made him an icon. the fact that he will now serve time in prison, after a long and fierce legal battle, is a palpable shift of power and a major milestone for women and victims‘ rights. the authorities in switzerland have rejected a residency application from russian billionaire roman abramovich. the owner of chelsea football club had applied to live in the alpine resort of verbier, and officials initially said yes, but then the swiss federal police said they suspected he posed a security risk. jane—frances kelly reports. roman abramovich is a well—known figure in britain due to his involvement with chelsea football club. the billionaire had hoped to
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establish his legal residence as the swiss alpine resort of verbier, but it has now emerged that the swiss police have denied his application, because they suspect he posed a threat to security, and a reputational risk to switzerland. the swiss authorities don't have to have legally proven grounds to reject an applicant. it is known they had concerns relating to possible money laundering, although there is no proof of any offence, and mr abramovich's lawyer said such suggestions were entirely false. mr abramovich has never been indicted in switzerland or anywhere else, and the allegations are based on unverified police suspicions. so what of the man himself? roman abramovich is one of roger —— russia's richest people, with a fortune estimated at more than £8 billion. he made his money in oil in the 1990s. he took over chelsea football clu b the 1990s. he took over chelsea football club in 2003. and it is
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believed he is close to russia's president putin. switzerland has recently tightened laws ruled regarding financial crime after decades of allegations about its secretive banking practices. any concerns about an individual, even without foundation, would be enough foran without foundation, would be enough for an application to be turned down. details of this case have only emerge now because mr abramovich's effo rts emerge now because mr abramovich's efforts to stop them being reported we re efforts to stop them being reported were rejected by the swiss federal court. it is the final day of the labour party conference in liverpool today, and party leader jeremy corbyn is due to speak. he will use the speech to denounce what he calls the "greed is good" capitalist system, and set out his plans to change the direction of the economy. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in liverpool for us this morning. chris, what else can we expect? yes, good morning to you. all week at this conference the political elephant that has been plonking its way around every square inch of disk
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conference hall, and dipping its trunk in the mersey for good measure, has been brexit. jeremy corbyn‘s revolution within the labour party has been about handing power to its members. that is fine asa power to its members. that is fine as a leader if they agree with you but on brexit they don't. the majority of people here want to see another referendum with remain on the ballot paper. jeremy corbyn much cooler about it. today is his big pitch to move beyond brexit, to talk about transforming the economy, to talk about 400,000 new so—called greenjobs in things like installation and onshore and offshore wind, and to shake up the economy sufficiently to revolutionise things. his argument was that in 2008 with the financial crisis, effectively he thinks the political establishment, as he will describe it, merely tried to patch things up. humpty dumpty, if you like, was put back together again, rather than the whole thing being started from scratch. it will be a reminder of another big team here at
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the labour conference this week, that this is a very, very different affair as that this is a very, very different affairasa that this is a very, very different affair as a gathering of a major party from what it was just a matter of years ago. jeremy corbyn has been leaderfor a while now, for three yea rs, leaderfor a while now, for three years, but his revolution within the party, shaking up how it works, shaking up who turns up at events like this, does seem now a com pletely like this, does seem now a completely different party. thank you very much, chris mason. we will be speaking to the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, at 7:50am. president trump will chair a meeting of the un security council for the first time today. he is expected to focus on the threat that he says is posed by iran. earlier, a senior us official warned iran there will be hell to pay if they harm the us, its citizens or allies. yesterday, president trump's address to the council was met with laughter as he boasted about his achievements in the white house. in less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country. america's... so true.
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laughter didn't expect that reaction, but that's ok. girlguiding has defended its decision to allow transgender members and leaders, after it expelled two volunteers who objected to the policy. one of the expelled volunteers said girls had a right to female—only spaces. but girlguiding says including people who identify as female does not put girls at risk. there was an unusual sight in the river thames yesterday, as a beluga whale was spotted swimming near gravesend, in kent. crowds gathered on the riverbank to watch, and vessels were kept back from the whale to keep it safe. it is hoped the outgoing tide will take it to safer waters. beluga whales are usually found in arctic waters, and they were last spotted in the uk three years ago. suggestions its sonar may have gone
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a bit wonky. and we will be talking about it a little bit later, because as you say, lots of concerns for this whale, because it should not be on the thames. it should be elsewhere. no idea where it is this morning, but we are in gravesend. the copy of lady chatterley‘s lover used by thejudge who presided over the famous obscenity trial in 1960 is to be sold at auction next month. sir lawrence byrne carried the novel, which tells the story of a passionate affair between an aristocrat and her husband's gamekeeper, into court each day. sothebys say the judge's wife had even picked out the sexually explicit passages. it could fetch £15,000. thejudge's the judge's wife stitched together a lovely damask bag, to provide a demure covering so this racy book would be hidden away before her
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husband took it into the court room. i love that even the cover of the book had to be covered up, and it was put in a special bag. and his wife had gone through and picked this bit, this bit, this it... £15,000. might be more, who knows? and things go from bad to worse for manchester united, but i will start by talking about derby. a great result for frank lampard. he excelled as a footballer, tried his hand in television studios and was pretty good at that, and did something thatjose mourinho was talking about, he got off the sofa and has gone out to manage aside. we have a relatively inexperienced manager doing what could be great things. derby county pulled off the biggest upset in the league cup last night, beating manchester united on penalties at old trafford. paul pogba was watching from the stands, after news emerged he had been told byjose mourinho he would not captain the club again
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because of his attitude. philjones missed the 16th kick of a dramatic shoot—out, to send frank lampard's side through to the last 16. aberdeen are through to the scottish league cup semi—finals for the fourth time in six years, after also beating hibernian in a penalty shoot—out. tiger woods says he is hoping to change his bad run of form as a player in the ryder cup this week. he hasn't won the competition as a player since 1999, and the us have not won the trophy on european soil for 25 years. andy murray continues his comeback from hip surgery, at the shenzhen 0pen after his opponent retired. he will play goffin next. are we ready
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to go back to dan and louise? dan is still getting dressed. to go back to dan and louise? dan is still getting dressedlj to go back to dan and louise? dan is still getting dressed. i went a little bit donald trump on the tight, it was too young. the viewers get quite itchy if his tie is not perfect. standards!” get quite itchy if his tie is not perfect. standards! i now have the bottom bit longer than the top that. i will sort it out while carol is on. carol is out and about for us in south london this autumn morning, but she is bearing bad news for those of us who like to hunt for conkers. good morning to you. good morning all. you are quite right. i am at moreton hall park in london, one of london's largest open spaces, and there is thought that there might be fewer conkers on the ground because of the heatwave we have had and also high winds. i will be speaking to someone high winds. i will be speaking to someone who knows a lot more about it than i do later in the programme. if you are in the south of england this morning, especially out in the countryside, it is cold. temperatures falling to about two or
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three celsius. in manchester at the moment it is around 12. as we move to belfast and also glasgow and edinburgh it is 14, parts of western scotla nd edinburgh it is 14, parts of western scotland 16 or 17 so a very mild start to the day. as we go through the day, the forecast is that it will be warm, especially in the south. later we will see temperatures getting into the low 20s and in the north it is still going to be pretty windy. you can see why. we have got high pressure dominating the weather in the south. in the north we have got a weather front. so not only is it windy but we're also looking at some rain. and thatis we're also looking at some rain. and that is how we are starting today. we have got rain across northern and western scotland. now, that rain is heaviest in the west. it is also windy in northern and western scotland, all of scotland, and also northern ireland in northern england. for northern ireland, northern england and west of scotla nd northern england and west of scotland it is a cloudy start. a
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brighter breakeven scotland it is a cloudy start. a brighter brea keven death scotland it is a cloudy start. a brighter breakeven death through the course of the day but further south we have got sunshine. when we lose any mistand we have got sunshine. when we lose any mist and fog patches forming overnight, ties up around 21. aberdeen could also see 21 in the shelter of the grampians. through this evening and overnight, the front producing the rain across scotla nd front producing the rain across scotland moves further north. what you will find is the rain will be heavy, and then the front pivots and it starts to come south once again. soa it starts to come south once again. so a lot of rain to you and still quite windy as well. variable amounts of cloud, clear skies and temperatures down to six to about 12. for some parts of the uk. tomorrow morning we start off with all that rain in scotland and as it moves all that rain in scotland and as it m oves a cross all that rain in scotland and as it moves across northern ireland, into northern england and wales, it will wea ken northern england and wales, it will weaken and become a band of cloud with patchy, light rain on it. kind of sunshine and showers and ahead of it still warm. i is getting up to about 22 or 23 across east anglia and the south—east, but pressure behind that cold front. by friday the front eventually makes it down to the south of england and wales, bringing its cloud, any patchy light
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rain on it before it moves away and all of us will see some sunshine. but it will feel a bit cooler for those of us who have had those high temperatures. we will be closer to where we should be, looking at around the mid—teens. into the weekend, quite a bit of dry weather around. rain on sunday for some of us around. rain on sunday for some of us but it won't feel as mild in the south as it is going to be through the course of today. can you imagine getting up to 23 tomorrow? that is not bad at all. it seems extraordinary. there you are in your big coat and your gloves and it is going to be 23. just amazing. thank you. you could even see her breast. —— breath. show me some of louise's armpit! a random shot! let's take a look at some of the front pages. theresa may will tell a us audience that britain will have the lowest rate of corporation tax in the g20 after leaving the eu, that's according to the telegraph. the main image is of the duchess
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of sussex attending her first solo engagement last night, at london's royal academy of arts. jeremy corbyn will announce a massive expansion of free childcare for the poorest households, claims the front page of the mirror. the main image shows ant mcpartlin, who is currently taking time off his tv work to focus on his recovery from drink and drug addictions. the times carries a story we'll be talking about later, the high street sandwich chain pret a manger was warned nine times about sesame—related allergy incidents before a 15—year—old girl died from an allergic reaction. the main image is of striking autumn colours in county durham. beautiful! the sun reports on the lost whale that has been spotted in the river thames, and it carries a story about fred west. and here's how the washington post reports the sentencing of comedian bill cosby. it says he was a once—beloved father figure and african american cultural icon, but then became the first celebrity trial of the #metoo era. you know that fred west story,
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police officers have been slammed for inviting the public to sleep in his old self or £75. a bizarre stories. in birmingham. they held the real—life pea ky stories. in birmingham. they held the real—life peaky blinders, who inspired the bbc drama, a big backlash to that, £75 to sleep in fred west's cell. sean, good morning. ryanair cancelling flights on friday. 190 of its 2500 scheduled flights it has on friday. because of cabin crew strikes around europe. it declined to reveal which flights have been cancelled. so how do you know? it has told individuals, e—mailed and texted them individually, but it's not like we can say here's a list, go online. if
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you've received an e—mail or a text about your flight cancelling, your flight about your flight cancelling, your flight is cancelled, but that is the only way. if you've got a fight, if you're one of those 2500 flights you'll due on on friday, check your e—mail. you'll due on on friday, check your e-mail. do you get compensation? yes, at that short notice, you would get another flight or something like that. another one, rail delays, wrong type of delays on morning commuter delays. the latest in a long line of reasons rail companies are giving because the angle of the sun in the south of england, on the line that operates between london and essex, has been at an awkward angle for the trains. they have had to slow them down, because it is dangerous, clearly the right thing to do. eurostar has blamed snow for being too fluffy recently. south—western had a problem with wasps that set in overnight on board. a yacht was blown onto the line in the highlands at one point.
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i've never heard about the yacht. just an excuse. the wrong type of simon! i don't often say this, dan, but you've let me down today —— wrong type of sun. i forgot my ryder cup outfit. i expected the fulfilling. when i'm not on the tv i'm ready for golf! —— full thing. is your ryder cup jacket the waterproof one? i'm ready to go. was going to wear it for the ryder cup reports today but i have left it at home. is it an old one or a new one? it is the same one. i have a chat with ryder cup europe. what happens if thomas bjorn gave me a last—minute call up? if thomas bjorn gave me a last-minute call up? he's not even joking, he's got the real one just so joking, he's got the real one just so he is ready. it might happen! it
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is like gareth southgate's waistcoat, you never know if you need to step in. and be a football manager! team europe looking very smart, we just need a little space for our dan. he could be there. on a more serious note, this picture is in the mirror today, interesting things last night for manchester united at old trafford. paul pogba in the stands... if you are going to try to be discreet about not playing, not being there, not being captain of manchester united, would you wear a white tracksuit with a white coat and a white hoodie on the top in the freezing cold 0ld trafford last night? all is not well. the mirror saying joe is a is going to win this battle. the war of the ego is. good tv at the moment. we have the bodyguard. also we have killing eve. i'm a bit late to
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killing eve. i'm a bit late to killing eve. i'm a bit late to killing eve. doctor who and the apprentice starts next week. killing eve. doctor who and the apprentice starts next weeklj killing eve. doctor who and the apprentice starts next week. i won't have time to do anything else! they come up with ridiculous quotes before they start. some of the guff is incredible, they say money can't buy happiness but i would rather be crying in a sports car than a banger. i'm not anyone, crying in a sports car than a banger. i'm notanyone, iam... if you're not your own biggest fan, who do you expect it to be for you? one of them says i'm the beyonce of business, whatever i say, i'm going to make it happen, my daughter once a pool and i will make sure that happens. i'm used to laying down the law in the court room, now i'm going to do the same in the boardroom. they all sound the same!” to do the same in the boardroom. they all sound the same! i liked the way you've done the voice—over! they all sound the same! i liked the way you've done the voice-over! i'm sure producers have a hand in this. say something ridiculous, they said. is it on tonight? it starts on 0ctober is it on tonight? it starts on october the third. already talking about it! and now we have our own
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beyonce business! who needs anyone else? you stole my line! i'm so obvious! well done, sally! good morning, sean. how aru? very well. you're going to talk to us about the royal liverpool hospital —— how are you? carillion, not going away, they went bust earlier in the year and the consequences are still huge across the country. it was involved in ton of projects, fingers in many different pies, and did up owing a lot of money when it went bust. it had liabilities. nearly £7 billion i think. £6.9 had liabilities. nearly £7 billion i think. £69 billion is how much it ended up effectively owing. liabilities across the spectrum of whether it was supplying school dinners, maintaining prisons or building big products. there's 278 contracts that were reliant on carillion in some way. most of those have had a plan put in place, but
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the royal liverpool hospital, which was meant to be built, that was fully reliant on carillion. some projects had a couple of different contractors, but this one was just carillion so that got stalled for a long time. i went along to see how people were being affected. this £335 million, 650 bed hospital should have been built by carillion and be up and running by now, but doctors and nurses are still working behind the windows of one built in the 1970s, with the patients having to deal with the consequences. it's an honour hospital. it needs updating, upgrading in every department. the general state of the place is definitely run down, you know? it needs a real good making over. but that's all they could do, because i don't think it's fit for purpose now. this new building should have been openedin this new building should have been opened in march last year, but instead it's only 90% complete with
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m ista kes instead it's only 90% complete with mistakes still to be corrected by a new construction company, while the old hospital just new construction company, while the old hospitaljust behind is still in use. to get the job finished as soon as possible, the hospital trust has cancelled the contract with the original investors. but should it be the taxpayer who now steps in to foot the bill? i think the government should have been involved right from the start, as soon as been involved right from the start, as soon as everything was stuck, they should have been sorting things out. the government help other places. it depends how much clout you have and where you are, and if you're in london, you get a bigger say. a lot of money has gone into that, a lot of taxpayers' mo'nique. sol that, a lot of taxpayers' mo'nique. so i think the government should jump so i think the government should jump in now and say, come on, let's get it open. and when people say to you where your next appointment might be? i can see it being here in the foreseeable future, i can't see the foreseeable future, i can't see the other hospital getting it any time soon. that's a big disappointment to a lot of people.
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speaking to people in liverpool about the new hospital. what is the next stage of this, sean? it is who is going to pay for what happens next. the costs have really mounted. the pictures look beautiful on the outside, but the cladding, the hospital trust say that carillion put and save cladding on there, so m ista kes to put and save cladding on there, so mistakes to be fixed as well as the completion of the project —— say. they say it could cost another £100 million to fix it. that's not 90% done, as carillion gave the impression. it's expected the government will step in, expected to hear something today from them about the exact terms of that. but for the patients, still looking like 2020, the middle of 2020, some point in 2010 key to open. it was meant to be march last year. —— 2020. what carillion were involved in and the
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fa ct carillion were involved in and the fact that they went bust is absolutely massive, and that's one more small example... big example across the country, representative of what people are dealing with. good to look at the consequences of things. today we are looking at public speaking. 55% hate the sound of our own voice, a third don't even like leaving a voicemail. really? i have heard about that. were you always a confident public speaker? probably, you probably work as well? probably. we area you probably work as well? probably. we are a bit biased probably. not the best people to speak about this. we will speak about this with others and let us know. i suppose the key is it can give people confidence to do public speaking, what can help? people say they would be more successful and better at their job if they were better at public speaking. let's crack it. let's sort it out! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm good morning from bbc london news, i' m charlotte good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. the father of stephen lawrence, who was murdered in eltham 25 years ago, is among high—profile community leaders launching their own strategy to combat knife crime. supported by the met, the independent violent crime prevention board said its aim is to work with communities to identify the root causes of violence and promote more positive images of young people. we are approaching it from a different angle, so we're not really a group, we are a movement, and we wa nt a group, we are a movement, and we want ordinary people in the community to work with police, and the police belie themselves cannot solve this. costly delays to the opening of totte n ha m costly delays to the opening of tottenham hotspur‘s new white hand line —— new white out lane stadium will mean their fans will have to
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watch tonight's home efl cup tie in milton keynes —— white hart lane. it has played havoc with the premier league and champions league fixtures, trying the patients of supporters and set the club on a collision course with football's governing bodies, who remain unimpressed. commuters are being warned to com plete commuters are being warned to complete their journeys commuters are being warned to complete theirjourneys on the piccadilly line by 1pm as rmt drivers are due to walk out on strike. there would be a service on the piccadilly line until friday afternoon but the night tube on friday will also not run. the drivers are striking of a breakdown in industrial relations. let's look at the travel situation now and minor delays on the district line this morning, good service on all other lines. in limehouse, one lane is closed on the 813 and belgrade st is closed due to a police incident. lambeth bridge is closed southbound for emergency gasworks. in west hampstead, west
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end lane is closed northbound outside the tube stationjewjew roadworks. the side road is slow due to traffic diversions and it will be closed until sunday. —— due to. get a check on your weather with lucy martin. —— let's get a cheque. the dry and sunny weather continues. 18.5 in kew gardens yesterday, today will be a touch warmer. a cold start. temperatures in the single figures, a good deal of sunshine from the word go. barely anything happening on the map. a few patches cloud here and there but not spoiling things. temperatures a bit warmer, a maximum of 21 with a gentle south—westerly. through the night, again, nota gentle south—westerly. through the night, again, not a great deal happening on the map. holding on clear skies and we're looking at another chilly night, temperatures falling into the single figures, an overnight low of 4—5. a few patches of mist and fog forming, any mist and fog that forms will lift fairly
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quickly, and we're looking at another bright, sunny day. staying dry with the temperatures a touch warmer still, a maximum of around 23. turning cooler into friday with a chance of a few spots of brazil, brightening up in the afternoon with sunny spells on the weekend. i'm back with the latest in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: the beluga whale in the river thames. we will be asking how and why it ended up there. the science of singing. dr michael mosley will be here to tell us about his latest programme, showing how music can give us a natural high. and it is the new bbc drama that has got millions of us binge—watching. we are talking to the man who has created the super—cool female characters of killing eve. good morning.
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here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the american entertainer bill cosby has started a prison sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. the judge branded the 81—year—old a sexually violent predator before sentencing him for between three and ten years. lawyers for cosby have already said they will appeal. around 60 other women made similar allegations, but because of time limits, their cases couldn't be heard. the lawyer gloria allred represented some of the victims. this is notjust about #metoo on the internet anymore. it's about a defendant having to be accountable, in a court of law, and being confined in state prison as a result of his criminal acts. jeremy corbyn will attack what he calls "greed is good" capitalism in his closing speech at the labour party conference today. corbyn will also set out his plans to overhaul the economy, as well as pledging more free childcare and a "green jobs revolution". brexit has dominated
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the conference week, with labour members voting on tuesday to keep all options on the table, including a fresh referendum, if there is no deal with brussels. theresa may has renewed calls for the release of a british charity worker as she met with the iranian president in new york. the prime minister told president rouhani she had serious concerns about the jailing of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who was sentenced to five years in a tehran prison after being accused of spying. mrs may also used the meeting to confirm the uk's commitment to the iran nuclear deal. the authorities in switzerland have rejected a residency application from russian billionaire roman abramovich. the owner of chelsea football club had applied to live in the alpine resort of verbier, and officials had initially said yes, but switzerland's federal police said they suspected he posed a security risk and so the application was rejected. there is no evidence of any offence, and mr abramovich's lawyer says the suggestion is entirely false. girlguiding has defended
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its decision to allow transgender members and leaders, after it expelled two volunteers who objected to the policy. one of the expelled volunteers said girls had a right to female—only spaces. but girlguiding says including people who identify as female does not put girls at risk. the duchess of sussex has carried out her first solo royal engagement, attending the opening of a major exhibition. meghan joined guests at the royal academy of arts in central london. it is the first major showing of art from the pacific islands to be held in britain, and marks the 250th anniversary of captain cook's first voyage to the region on the endeavour. good morning. show us some back pages? just because there are some great back pages. pog's dinner,
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about manchester united, the manager, jose mourinho, saying he will not be captaining the side again. pogba hinted he is not happy with the way the team is playing, they are not attacking enough, and jose mourinho has quite simply said he will not be captain again. you have to look at that story and look at what happened last night and think that things are not right with that club. the main beneficiary was jose mourinho's player when he managed chelsea. it was frank lampard's first meeting against his old mentor. the derby county manager kept things simple, and was handsomely rewarded, as nick parrott reports. 0ne one thing frank lampard lured —— learnt from playing forjose mourinho was to take the lead cup seriously. winning it kickstarted their success at chelsea and defeat their success at chelsea and defeat the derby will pile more pressure on
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the derby will pile more pressure on the manchester united manager. initially it looked like mourinho's gamble in making known changes would pay off, as mata put them ahead. the stronger side fought back in spectacular style thanks to man of the match harry wilson, and more pressure from the 21—year—old saw sergio romero sent off for handball. a man now —— down, united were soon a goal down as jack marriot sent their malarious —— delirious, and fellani took the tie to penalties. both sides were nervous from the spot until philjones lost his with the 16th kick of a dramatic shootout. mourinho was quick to consult him but it will take much more to sort out united's season. so paul pogba was left out of the side and has been told he won't captain it again. things don't look good between him and his manager, jose mourinho, but how did the situation between the pair get so frosty? it all started last season, when there were reports linking him to a move to barcelona,
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despite united insisting he wasn't for sale. then, after captaining united to a win over leicester in their opening game of the season, he hinted that he wasn't happy at old trafford. he went on to say that there were things i cannot say, otherwise i will get fined. after their draw against wolves at the weekend, pogba added more fuel to the fire by criticising the team's tactics, saying it was a mistake for united not to have attacked more. he did then take to twitter to play down those comments, implying some of the things he said had been twisted. aberdeen are through to the scottish league cup semi—final, after beating hibernian in a penalty shoot—out at easter road. it was goalless after extra—time, and it was thomas agyepong's penalty which came off the crossbar to end hibs' chances, sending aberdeen through. the build up is well and truly on ahead of this week's ryder cup in france, as europe look to wrestle back the title from the usa. tiger woods is fresh off a great comeback win on sunday. the former world number one and 14—major winner actually hasn't got the best record
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in the competition, and is hoping to improve that. my overall ryder cup record, not having won as a player since 1999, is something that, you know, hopefully we can change. and we haven't won as a us squad in 21 years, here on foreign soil, and hopefully that will change this week as well. andy murray continues his comeback from hip surgery. he is through to the second round at the shenzhen 0pen, after zhang zhizhen retired. he led in the third set, before zhang ended the game. murray is appearing in his penultimate event of the year after deciding to end his season early. he will play david goffin in the next round. the man city women manager, nick cushing, has praised captain steph houghton's professionalism following her husband stephen darby's retirement. the bolton player was forced to end his career after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease. city will host atletico madrid in the champions league tonight.
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steph is steph, she is the england and manchester city captain for a reason. she trains like she always has done and she applies herself the way she always has is our captain. herfamily is way she always has is our captain. her family is also very important to her and manchester city, and all of us here will support steph and stephen all the way through their journey, because that is what we are, we are a family here. and we saw pictures of her wedding, her training, i have interviewed and met her many times, and she is always a captain. she is a leader, wherever she is, and she is taking on this new kind of development in her life, this terrible turn of events, in that same way. she is a brilliant, brilliant woman. thank you very much, we will see you a bit later. more now on that unusual sight in the river thames yesterday
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— the beluga whale spotted swimming near gravesend in kent. crowds gathered on the riverbank to watch and vessels were kept back from the whale to keep it safe. it is hoped the outgoing tide will take it to safer waters. lucy is the head of science and conservation for the charity 0rca, and joins us now. good morning. how unusual is it? i know it is unusual to see a beluga whale anywhere near the uk, but to see one in the thames, is it way off course? it is very much so. thousands of miles, actually. these are arctic animals, so they are found around greenland. they have visited the uk over the past few decades. the last time there were two individuals in 2015 seen off the northumberland coastline. those individuals were seen for a day and swa m individuals were seen for a day and swam away. this is the most southerly recording of a beluga in
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the uk and it is very rare. so the hope is it will go away naturally, but what can we do to help?” hope is it will go away naturally, but what can we do to help? i think the biggest thing that we as the public can do is to give this animal space, so public can do is to give this animal space, so not to get in the water with it, it can cause it distress, it could disturb it, we don't know if this animal is already feeling any distress at the moment. it is reported that it is swimming well, it seems to be healthy. and there are all the correct authorities out there looking after the animal, for example british divers, marine life rescue, that is what they specialise m, rescue, that is what they specialise in, so they are being monitored. these animals can navigate very well in shallow, coastal waters, so hopefully it will swim away into deeper waters. so has something gone on with the sort of navigation system, is that why we would find a beluga in the thames? that would be one of the reasons. at the moment we don't really know, we need more information. that is what makes the
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marine environment so fascinating, as well. but yes, it could be due to the individual. if it is unwell it can impair its navigation. it has a very sophisticated sonar system, similarto very sophisticated sonar system, similar to what bats use to communicate and navigate, so if there is any noise in the water, disturbance, that could have impaired that navigational system, which led it to be off course. and we have a picture behind us, it is an extraordinarily beautiful looking animal. just tell us a little bit about them. so they are very easy to identify, this beautiful white colour. the babies are warned dark grey, but they turned whiter with age. and you can see a really big, bold as forehead —— bulbous forehead. so that crumpet is an adaptation to live in cold arctic waters. you don't want that finn scraping on pack ice above them ——
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fin. they have been known to use that big forehead of theirs to smash through the ice. they need to come to the surface to breathe.” through the ice. they need to come to the surface to breathe. i suppose you are hoping that we don't see it again in the thames, and that hopefully means it has gone back out and is in open water somewhere and can and is in open water somewhere and ca n safely and is in open water somewhere and can safely navigate its way it back to where it needs to be. that is what we would hope. if anyone does get any sightings of the animal, then reported to the correct individuals so they can monitor it, but we hope it will swim on its way. and we have a reporter, as we say, and we would love to see it but if we don't, that is probably a good thing. thank you for coming in to talk to us about such evil animals. and looking at the papers, beluga is all over the papers. as you say, i really rare sighting and we have gone a bit whale crazy. everyone loves a whale. carol's out and about for us in south london this autumn morning, but carol, there's bad
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news for those of us who like to hunt for conkers? it does look absolutely beautiful. you have some conkers, but they might be red this year. that's right, good morning, all. iam in morden hall park in south—west london. look at the view, isn't it gorgeous. you can see the bridge on the horizon. you can see the conkers i have in my hand, they are quite small. if we lived this bit up, if you are going to be picking up conkers today, they are prickly, so probably a good idea to wear your gloves. and one of the ideas as to why they are a bit fewer and further between this year is because we have had a heatwave, high winds. there has not been a lot of rain so they have absorbed the water to make big. through the course of the morning i will be speaking to an expert who will be speaking to an expert who will give us more information about that. and we will be having a game with them later on as well. this morning it is a cold start if you are waking up in rural parts of
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southern england. the temperatures around two or three degrees. around the country, 12 and manchester, 14 in belfast, glasgow and edinburgh, 16 or 17 across the far north—east of scotland. i will pass these conkers to my fabulous assistant and get them out of the way. as we go through the course of the day what you will see it is it is fairly warm but we will have rain in the north courtesy of the weather front which is across the far north of scotland. high pressure is in charge of the weather further south. if you high pressure is in charge of the weatherfurther south. if you look at the spacing of the isobars you can also see it still is quite windy across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. so this morning the weather fronts producing rain across parts of the highlands and western scotland. for the rest of scotla nd and western scotland. for the rest of scotland and northern ireland and northern england there is a bit more cloud around, producing some drizzle here and there but we will see some brighter breaks develop through the day. south of that, through the rest of wales and also england we are
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looking at a dry and sunny day, and a warm one. 21 will be the top temperatures somewhere in the south—east and also around aberdeen, but we are looking at the 20s as well. as we look into the evening and overnight our weather front across scotland moves northwards, taking its rain with it. then it sta rts taking its rain with it. then it starts to sink southwards once again. there will be some areas of cloud that there will also be some clear spells. again, some shallow mist and fog could form overnight and we are looking at temperatures roughly falling to about six to may be around 12 or 14 depending on where you will. tomorrow, then, we start off with the same weather front producing the rain across northern scotland but as it thinks southwards across the rest of scotland, northern ireland, northern england, in the north wales through the course of the day, it won't be much more than a band of cloud with the odd spot of rain, and behind it fresher with sunshine and a few showers. and ahead of it, warm. tomorrow the south—east could hit 22 or 23 celsius. by the time we get to the end of the week, by friday, our weather front will have careered down towards the south, as a band of cloud with the odd spot of rain with it. for all of us are dry day and the temperatures will be a little
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bit lower than they have been, as we go through the day. as we go through the weekend, saturday is looking drive. sunday there will be a little bit of rain around the temperatures will be closer to where we would expect them. and not only are the conkers prickly, they are sticky as well. it doesn't want to say goodbye, completely stuck to my glove! iwell, carol. thank you. we will see you a little bit later. with your dogs, you have to look out for conkers. they always say keep your dog on a lead if there are conkers on the floor. my dog has been eating rows breeze straight off the bush. —— raspberries. sheed literally everything. —— she eats literally everything. —— she eats literally everything. teenage drinking has declined more dramatically in england than many other european countries, according to new research. the world health organization looked at 36 countries and found a reduction in weekly alcohol use among adolescents in all of them, but the largest decline for both boys and girls was in england.
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so what are the reasons behind the fall? we've asked students in manchester how they think young people's drinking habits have changed. when i was 15, i think... just seeing older people drinking, i'd wa nt to seeing older people drinking, i'd want to drink as well, but now health is really big, especially, health is really big, especially, health and healthy lifestyle so i think more people are aware of dangers of drinking.” think more people are aware of dangers of drinking. i think people do drink less now, it is less accessible maybe, stricter legislation, fake ids, is easierto get id when you're young.” legislation, fake ids, is easierto get id when you're young. i have a younger sister at that age and i find when she goes to parties she doesn't drink as much. may be peer pressure is becoming less of an issue these days. young kids standing up for themselves and finding they dhoni to be drinking to have a good time. there's always going to be that attitude towards alcohol and the party lifestyle, when you're a teenager you want to grow up quickly and the 18. i think
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it's always going to be there, i don't think a change in society is going to affect that. thanks to them for speaking to us. the lead editor of the report, jo inchley, joins us now from edinburgh. some ideas given for the reasons behind that by some of those young people, what do you think are the factors behind these changes? well, there's been a lot going on over the last 15 years at different levels, and there's many factors that might have a role here. 0bviously there's been policies at national level, legislative changes, increases on the price of alcohol and we know affordability is a big factor. there's been restrictions on things like happy hours and d—rings promotions, so they're important initiatives. the other area we've seen initiatives. the other area we've seen is around family life —— drinks promotions. there is evidence we've seen promotions. there is evidence we've seen parents promotions. there is evidence we've seen pa rents are promotions. there is evidence we've seen parents are restricting the alcohol within the home, and that's having an impact on young people. they may be talking to young people
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more about how much alcohol their drinking, it might be less accessible in the home, and that might bea accessible in the home, and that might be a positive change as well. reduction especially in england, but how do we compare to europe? reduction especially in england, but how do we compare to europe7m 2002, the uk was top of the table in england, scotland and wales for weekly drinking. 50% of boys in england said they drank alcohol every week. that has fallen to one in ten, 10% of boys in england, that is similarforgirls and in ten, 10% of boys in england, that is similar for girls and boys in ten, 10% of boys in england, that is similarfor girls and boys in the uk. we've seen dramatic shifts in alcohol consumption. we're about average for boys and below, above average for boys and below, above average for boys for weekly drinking —— above average for girls. girls in the uk are more likely to drink excessively than their peers elsewhere. that's one of the areas for concern. i wanted to ask about that, there's been a decline in numbers, but it is still quite high. do you think more work needs to be done and if parents are already
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taking a lead, and there's other social factors making a taking a lead, and there's other socialfactors making a difference, where else could that change come from? i think we need to build on the efforts that we've seen are already successful. it's great to hear it's more socially accessible not to drink, it's really important to continue with prevention efforts to continue with prevention efforts to stop young people starting to drink in the first place, because we know the earlier young people start to drink, the more likely they are to drink, the more likely they are to have health—related problems later in life. all these efforts around family, around school and national efforts from government are already important parts of this picture. jo, thank you for that, really interesting. let us know what you think. if you've got any comments about that or anything else you see on breakfast, you can find us on e—mail, and we're also on twitter. there's always a healthy debate that goes on on facebook about that and other issues. we're talking about public speaking, why so talking about public speaking, why so many talking about public speaking, why so many are talking about public speaking, why so many are afraid of it and what can be done about it to help you.
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third of people hate the sound of their voice so much they don't even like leaving a voicemail. u nfortu nately we a re like leaving a voicemail. unfortunately we are speaking as people who do like the sound of their own voice! interestingly, if you can work on your public speaking, there is evidence it makes a massive difference to how successful you are in yourjob and all sorts of areas of life. it makes me nervous even talking about it. about? i do still get very talking about it. about? i do still get very nervous talking about it. about? i do still get very nervous if i have to stand ona get very nervous if i have to stand on a stage. in that little bit before? i've seen it! you've seen it. someone who is i think naturally confident and good in that situation... it's really interesting. when we're both on stage, we were once hosting an award, ten seconds before... you're singing may have had something to do with it! you walked on and you said you didn't want to do it, i reassured you and you were brilliant! we all need dan saying,
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it's ok, you can do this, because when dan says it it turns out you can! the duchess of sussex has attended the opening of a major exhibition. shejoined guests at exhibition. she joined guests at the royal academy of arts from the central... it marks the 250th anniversary of captain cook's first voyage to the region on the endeavour. will gompertz has had a little look. —— endeavour. we're used to a bit of a song and dance being made about an exhibition opening, but not quite on this scale. this is the pacific islanders' way to mark the first—ever show of their art and culture at the royal academy in london. a special event that was made even more memorable with the arrival
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of the duchess of sussex, for her first solo official engagement. she appeared particularly taken with this 18th—century costume of the chief mourner from the islands of tahiti. the exhibition covers around 600 years of 0ceanic artworks, from this centuries—old maori carving to these photographic portraits of life—casts taken in 2010. it's actually these treasures from the past, as well as the contemporary works, that are building connections and understanding between pacific islanders and people in britain and in europe. the exhibition tells many stories. obviously there is captain cook's pacific expeditions in the late 18th century, and their impact on the indigenous islanders, and on europe, where many of these objects were brought back and displayed in museums, where they were seen and studied by leading modern artists. for example, this fabulously decorated wooden beam, which depicts a comic tale, inspired the german expressionists. and carvings such as this male deity figure clearly influenced those artists working in paris in the early 20th century, who made those stylised, abstracted sculptures. and picasso was so mesmerised
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by this deity that he had a bronze version in his studio. the show of such wealth of pacific island treasures, or taonga, as they are known, held by european institutions, raises the question of ownership, and whether any of these objects should be returned to the countries from which they came. for indigenous peoples all around the world, if they came back and were shared, they would actually accrue more knowledge, research from on the ground, and that these gifts would probably come back again, too. sometimes we don't necessarily want to repatriate these taonga. for the duchess of sussex, the exhibition serves as a useful introduction to the cultures of the pacific region, where she is going on an official visit with prince harry next month. will gompertz, bbc news. the number of european eels has
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dropped so dramatically in recent yea rs dropped so dramatically in recent years they have become a critically endangered species. wildfowl and wetla nd endangered species. wildfowl and wetland trust has come up with a unique experiment, micro— chipping eels. breakfast‘s unique experiment, micro— chipping eels. brea kfast‘s john unique experiment, micro— chipping eels. breakfast‘s john maguire signed up and he's at the river severn in gloucestershire. good morning! good morning, we are on the banks of the severn, but you can see emma hutchinson behind me from the wildfowl and emma hutchinson behind me from the wildfowl a nd wetla nd emma hutchinson behind me from the wildfowl and wetland trust is going to tell me what you're up to. you've got a bit of kit. what are you up to? we have some nets set last night in the like, and we are going to catch eels. we have adult eels, we have hundreds here but we don't know how they move around and when they leave to breed. they have this extraordinary life, the sargasso sea is off the caribbean thousands of miles away? thousands of colm utters, a 7000 kilometre journey
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from here to the sargasso sea to breed ash kilometres. they will breed ash kilometres. they will breed and die in the sargasso sea —— kilometres. then we wait for the babies. the lifestyle of an eel, fascinating! we measure them with this piece of elaborate gutting with a tape measure in the bottom, that will happen later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. the father of stephen lawrence, who was murdered in eltham 25 years ago, is among high—profile community leaders launching their own strategy to combat knife crime. supported by the met, the independent violent crime prevention board says its aim is to work with communities to identify the root causes of violence and promote more positive images of young people. we are approaching it from a different angle, so we're not really a group,
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we're a movement, and a movement asking ordinary people in the community to work with police, because the police themselves alone cannot solve this. costly delays to the opening of tottenham hotspur‘s new white hart lane stadium will mean their fans will have to watch tonight's home efl cup tie in milton keynes. it has played havoc with the premier league and champions league fixtures, trying the patience of supporters and set the club on a collision course with football's governing bodies, who remain unimpressed. commuters are being warned to complete theirjourneys on the piccadilly line by 1pm as rmt drivers are due to walk out on strike. there would be a service on the piccadilly line until friday afternoon, but the night tube on friday will also not run. —— there won't be. the drivers are striking of a breakdown in industrial relations. let's look at the travel situation,
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now and minor delays on the district line this morning. the a2 is busy coming into town, fairly slow this morning. lambeth bridge is closed southbound for emergency gasworks, causing long delays yesterday. in west ham stood, west end lane is closed northbound outside the tube station due to roadworks. the side road is slow as traffic diverts and it will be closed until saturday. let's get a check on your weather with lucy martin. the dry, bright and sunny weather continues. 18.5 in kew gardens yesterday, today will be a touch warmer. a cold start. temperatures starting in the single figures, a good deal of sunshine from the word go. barely anything happening on the map behind me. a few patches cloud here and there, but not spoiling things. temperatures a bit warmer, a maximum of 21 with a gentle south—westerly.
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through the night, again, not a great deal happening on the map. holding on to clear skies, and we're looking at another chilly holding on to clear skies, and we're looking at another chilly night. temperatures falling into the single figures, an overnight low of 4—5. a few patches of mist and fog forming, any mist and fog that forms will lift fairly quickly tomorrow, and we're looking at another bright, sunny day. staying dry with the temperatures a touch warmer still, a maximum of around 23. turning cooler into friday with a chance of a few spots of drizzle, brightening up in the afternoon with sunny spells on the weekend. i'm back with the latest in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: bill cosby spends his first night behind bars after being jailed for up to ten years
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for sexual assault. jeremy corbyn will promise to tackle "greed is good" capitalism as he makes his leader's speech at the labour conference. more misery for manchester united. paul pogba watches from the stands as his side lose on penalties and are dumped out of the league cup by derby. 0ff life support. a deal is reached to restart construction of a new hospital in liverpool, after the collapse of carillion left the future of the project in doubt. we will be live in gravesend, as a beluga whale is spotted for the first time in the river thames. and we are in stockport ahead of bbc music day on friday, finding out why schools are being encouraged to get singing. good morning from morden hall park.
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iam good morning from morden hall park. i am with albus, who is one of the rangers. he is nine months old, he has been arranger since three months, and he is adorable. it is a chilly start in the south, much milder as we travel further north. more sunshine in the south today. i will have more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 26 september. our top story: the american entertainer bill cosby has started a prison sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. the judge branded the 81—year—old a ‘sexually violent predator, before sentencing him for between three and ten years. lawyers for cosby have already said they will appeal. nada tawfik has the details. reporter: mr cosby, any comment, sir? this will now be the image that defines bill cosby‘s life, in handcuffs and headed to prison to pay for his crimes. for decades, he led a double life, and the man affectionately referred to as ‘america's dad'
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will now be classified as a sexually violent predator. it is a moment his victims never thought possible. outside of court, they celebrated. this is just going to show victims that they can make it through, and that there's justice at the end, and hallelujah. amen. all: hallelujah! this is notjust about #metoo on the internet anymore. it's about a defendant having to be accountable in a court of law, and being confined in state prison as a result of his criminal acts. do you think this will lead to a real sea change? well, i think it sends an important message. more than 60 women came forward with strikingly similar allegations, but only andrea constand's attack was recent enough to bring charges. a former university employee, the entertainer entrapped her by posing as a mentor, before drugging and molesting her at his pennsylvania home. her relief after the sentencing was visible. bill cosby has admitted to giving young women drugs before sex, but says it was done with their knowledge, and throughout the trial, he has shown no remorse.
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mr cosby clearly has been denied his right to a fair trial. these injustices must be corrected immediately. at the height of his fame, bill cosby was the most watched man on television. his wholesome, lovable persona on the cosby show made him an icon. the fact that he will now serve time in prison, after a long and fierce legal battle, is a palpable shift of power and a major milestone for women and victims' rights. we will talk about that further on brea kfast we will talk about that further on breakfast in about ten minutes' time. it is the final day of the labour party conference in liverpool today, and party leader jeremy corbyn is due to speak. he will use the speech to denounce what he calls the "greed is good" capitalist system and set out his plans to change the direction of the economy. 0ur political correspondent
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chris mason is in liverpool for us this morning. chris, what do we expect elsewhere at the conference today, and especially from this sort of keynote address from the lido? yes, it is the big kind of sendoff for tonight for activists, the closing of the conference byjeremy corbyn. you have probably spotted the odd glass of noise from liverpool on all things brexit. today jeremy of noise from liverpool on all things brexit. todayjeremy corbyn will try to shift to other stuff, and the jeremy will try to shift to other stuff, and thejeremy corbyn agenda, how he has reshaped this whole movement and this whole party. he will talk about so—called greenjobs, this whole party. he will talk about so—called green jobs, an this whole party. he will talk about so—called greenjobs, an extra 400,000 over the course of the decade under a labour government. a big investment in solar and wind power and in installation for housing. he will talk about renationalisation. we have heard that already as far as the water industry is concerned, and the ra i lwa ys industry is concerned, and the railways as well. and what he will emphasise, i think, railways as well. and what he will emphasise, ithink, and railways as well. and what he will emphasise, i think, and this whole
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week has emphasised, is how much the labour party and the labour movement has shifted. yes, jeremy corbyn has been the leaderfor three has shifted. yes, jeremy corbyn has been the leader for three years, but when he took over the kind of people on the important committees behind the scenes were as they had been for about a generation. you see it on the conference floor, you see it in what fires up activists, and you see it on the fringes. last night one labourmp it on the fringes. last night one labour mp called for a general strike if they couldn't get conservatives to call a general election. there was last a general strike nearly a century ago.” election. there was last a general strike nearly a century ago. i am sure theresa may is keeping a close eye on what is happening in liverpool with what is happening with the labour party this week, but she has also been in new york this week. she has been at the united nations in new york, inevitably domestic politics has followed her all the way across the atlantic. she was asked about events in liverpool, particularly those comments by keir starmer and his suggestion that
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labour should have a position where they would be willing to have another referendum on brexit with the option of remaining in the european union on the ballot. prime minister absolutely categorical that there should not be another referendum, and that it is the duty of any government to deliver what the last referendum had presented as a result. so she is absolutely of the view that that shouldn't be entertained. it will be her turn to set out her beliefs in a couple of days, as the conservative party conference begins at the weekend. we will be speaking to the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, at 7:50am. the authorities in switzerland have rejected a residency application from russian billionaire roman abramovich. the owner of chelsea football club had applied to live in the alpine resort of verbier, and officials had initially said yes, but switzerland's federal police said they suspected he posed a security risk and so the application was rejected. there is no evidence of any offence, and mr abramovich's lawyer says the suggestion is entirely false. teenage drinking in england has
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declined more dramatically than many other european countries, new research shows. the world health organization study analysed data over a 12—year period across 36 countries. it shows a long—term downward trend in alcohol consumption among teenagers in almost every european region, but researchers warn the numbers still remain high. girlguiding has defended its decision to allow transgender members and leaders, after it expelled two volunteers who objected to the policy. one of the expelled volunteers said girls had a right to female—only spaces, but girlguiding says including people who identify as female does not put girls at risk. beluga whales are not usually spotted in the river thames, but yesterday, one was seen swimming near gravesend. crowds were on the riverbank and
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vessels were wisely kept back, trying to keep the whales safe. it is hoped the outgoing tide will take it to safer waters. beluga whales are usually found in arctic waters, and they were spotted last in the uk backin and they were spotted last in the uk back in 2015. we will be in gravesend a little bit later to see if the whale is still there. the copy of lady chatterley‘s lover used by thejudge who presided over the famous obscenity trial in 1960 is to be sold at auction next month. sir lawrence byrne carried the novel, which tells the story of a passionate affair between an aristocrat and her husband's gamekeeper, into court each day. sothebys say the judge's wife had even picked out the sexually explicit passages. it could fetch £15,000. the judge's wife stitched together a lovely damask bag, so — to provide a demure covering, so this racy book could be hidden
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away before her husband took it into the courtroom. you are up to date with many of the day's main stories. we return to our main story. the news that the american entertainer bill cosby has been sentenced to prison for sexually assault. cosby will serve between three and ten years for the attack on andrea constand in 2004. here is a look at how america has reacted to the news. we are going to begin tonight with the sentencing of bill cosby. cosby is now behind bars in pennsylvania after a judge sentenced him to serve between three and ten years. cosby is now 81 years old. he was convicted of drugging and sexually assaulting andrea constand at his suburban philadelphia mansion 14 yea rs suburban philadelphia mansion 14 years ago. the second trial. did you really believe that bill cosby would be convicted? i can't say i believed. what i did is i hoped, and
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i fought, believed. what i did is i hoped, and ifought, and believed. what i did is i hoped, and i fought, and i tried to do everything that was right to support him going to jail. i feel like my mum is in heaven watching over me, crying, saying he did it, baby, you stood up, you fought, and the bogeyman going to jail. angela rose is from the organisation pave, who work to help survivors of abuse, and has been advising ms constand. shejoins us from philadelphia now. good morning to you. thank you so much forjoining us. just tell us, when you heard what was going to happen, that he was going to be sentenced, how did you feel?” happen, that he was going to be sentenced, how did you feel? i think there was a lot of mixed emotions. of course the elation and vindication for so many of the survivors. it took over 50 survivors coming forward, but of course in this case he was indeed convicted. but there's a lot of other survivors who felt that three years just wasn't enough and didn't adequately... didn't really speak to the fact that there are so many women that have a lifetime of trauma, and have to healfrom these crimes. he was marched out of court
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wearing handcuffs. what kind of message do you think that sends?” think it sends a very powerful message, and i think it sends a message, and i think it sends a message not just message, and i think it sends a message notjust to survivors, to hopefully more people who will report these crimes, but also the potential perpetrators, that the days of using power is over, and it is time to take these crimes very seriously. i know that you have been working closely with andrea. just tell us a little bit about how she coped with the whole trial, and how she is now. you know, andrea is an amazing woman, and thankfully she had an incredible support network from herfamily, had an incredible support network from her family, which had an incredible support network from herfamily, which is very, very helpful, and she just always wanted to tell the truth in court, which she was able to do. she is very, very brave, and i really think of her as a hero. she had also talked, didn't she, about how the assault had affected her, and really change the course of her life. absolutely. she talked about the fact that this
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assault completely derailed her life, in so many ways, that she was once an innocent, carefree spirit, and it is very hard to trust after something like this happens. especially because the man that perpetrated this, bill cosby, was a trusted adviser. and that happens so often. 0verwhelmingly sexual violence is committed by somebody that we know and we trust. and we also know through this trial that other witnesses were able to give evidence. how significant was that, do you think? i think it was very significant to really paint a picture of what this man is, which isa picture of what this man is, which is a serial predator. so i think having other women come forward and speak the truth as well absolutely helped in this case. and one of the key issues, and there were so many issues throughout the trial, was about consent, wasn't it? so how do you think that will change the idea of consent, particularly in america? i think the consent conversation is one that is so important. i have a lwa ys one that is so important. i have always said this case is so much
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bigger than cosby. it is about consent, and the definition of consent, and the definition of consent, that it is a freely given, enthusiastic, sober yes, and not the absence of a no, that is so important. i hope this allows pa rents to important. i hope this allows parents to talk to their young boys and girls about these conversations. the campaign by pave is working with children up to college—age to understand consent and what it means. do you think the trial will have an impact on other people who have an impact on other people who have been afraid in the past to speak out about what has happened to them? i think so, we know sexual assault is one of the most underreported crimes, and so many are suffering in silence. i can't tell you how many survivors i have talked to who have felt so triggered by all the recent media attention on this. we still unfortunately live in a very victim blaming society, survivors are made to feel like it is ourfault for survivors are made to feel like it is our fault for these crimes happening to us, and that absolutely
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needs to change. and if anybody needs to change. and if anybody needs help they can visit shattering the silence .org to find out about making a difference. thank you for joining us this morning. we will give you more detail on that story throughout the morning. there is plenty more available on the bbc website throughout the day. conkers with carol, a dog earlier, a p pa re ntly conkers with carol, a dog earlier, apparently she has a heron, she isn't holding one, but i can confirm thatis isn't holding one, but i can confirm that is a heron. good morning!m isn't holding one, but i can confirm that is a heron. good morning! it is indeed. good morning to you both. beautiful here. look at the view. look at the heron looking straight into the camera, a few ducks as well. this is one of the largest open spaces in london. it's apparently a good place to find conkers, which is why we are here, because there's a thought that says there aren't as many conkers around this year and those that are
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around this year and those that are around are smaller and the thought is it is down to the weather. we have a heat wave, the lack of water, the conkers didn't absorb it and expand, and high winds, so not as many on the branches. they're pretty if you pick them up until you get to the conqueror inside —— prickly. this morning you need your gloves not just for the conkers this morning you need your gloves notjust for the conkers but this morning you need your gloves not just for the conkers but for the temperatures. —— conquer. moving further north it is quite mild, three orfour in further north it is quite mild, three or four in the south. in manchester, around 12. belfast and glasgow, around 14. north—east scotland, 17. today will be quite warm for some, but still some wind and rain in the forecast, mainly across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. here we have a weather front producing rain. and northern england. here we have a weatherfront producing rain. with high pressure in charge of the weather further south, things are settled. any early morning mist or fog patches will disperse readily. for most of wales and most of
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england, a sunny, dry day. moving into northern england, a lot of cloud around producing a bit of drizzle, especially in the north—west. similar in northern ireland and scotland, but we have the rain in northern scotland and a bit of brightness developing through the day, and temperatures, in aberdeen today, 21, in eastern england, 19—21, in the west, 18—20 but cooler in the outer hebrides, for example. this evening and overnight, our weather front producing the rain moves across northern scotland, pivots and then goes on south. a lot of rain for you, quite blustery. elsewhere, largely dry and temperatures from around 6—12 or 13 as our overnight lows. tomorrow our band of rain in scotla nd lows. tomorrow our band of rain in scotland moves south across the rest of scotland, into northern ireland and northern england and north wales. it will be a band of cloud and they be some rain in it by then. behind it, sunshine and showers.
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ahead of it, dry, sunny and warm and highs in east anglia and the south—east of up to 23. by friday, our weather front will continue to go to the south of england before moving away, taking any rain with it, but there won't be much, and then everyone will have a dry day. sunny spells again, temperatures town a touch where it's been so warm, roughly between 14—16. if you're wondering about the weekend, saturday will be dry, sunday will have some spots of rain but temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage of the year. dan and low. looking lovely this morning. we've had a heron, conkers, what have you got next, this is going to bea have you got next, this is going to be a good morning! a squirrel went scooting past! a squirrel, not good enough! a cat as well! you set the bar very high, very early this morning, carol!
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thank you so much. we will see what happens later. a quick look at the front pages and theresa may will tell a us audience that britain will have the lowest rate of corporation tax in the g20 after leaving the eu, according to the telegraph. the main picture is of the duchess of sussex, attending herfirst the main picture is of the duchess of sussex, attending her first solo engagement last night at london royal academy of arts. jeremy corbyn will announce a massive expansion of free childcare for the poorest households, claims the front page of the mirror. their main image shows and mcpartlin, currently taking time off tv work to focus on his recovery from drink and drug addictions. the times carries a story we will talk about later, the high—street sandwich chain, pret a manger, was warned nine times about sesame related allergy incidents before a 15—year—old girl died from an allergic reaction. their main image isa allergic reaction. their main image is a rather striking image of autumn colours in county durham. the sun reports on the last whale
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that's been spotted on the river thames and it carries a disturbing story saying police officers are in a spot of bother for offering the chance to stay in fred west's cell in birmingham for £75 per night. shall we do a whale update? there isn't one. fresh from the port of london authority, sightings of the beluga whale overnight. which according to our guest earlier is good news. i've been doing a bit of research for you. i'm so surprised. i love a whale fact, in order to maintain their energy beluga whales consume on average two to 3% of their body weight on a daily basis, which can be up to £70 of food every day —— £70. that is weight, not £70! i was wondering... that is a lot of grub! —— 70 £. i was wondering... that is a lot of grub! -- 70 f. a i was wondering... that is a lot of grub! —— 70 £. a voice in my head
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was telling me... hopefully the beluga whale has gone back to where it belongs. i do a very good impression for a beluga whale. -- you do. during the break with the weather i was trying to speak to the director to see if we could get a shot. i was asking... i was doing a whale impression, but he understood me. uncanny! tim, our director, is very good at charente.” me. uncanny! tim, our director, is very good at charente. i am so used to it that i ignored the behaviour! such a pro! the royal liverpool hospital was one of many projects put on hold when the construction firm carillion collapsed back injanuary. a deal has now been struck to complete the building but could taxpayers be about to foot the bill for it? sean's been looking into this. what's going on sean? this brand... we would have seen it on construction sites nationwide before it went bust. carillion going bust earlier in the year, it has left a lot of liabilities,
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effectively owing nearly £7 billion. it has fingers in lots of pies, maintaining prisons, building schools or maintaining big projects. there's 278 contracts they were involved in, most of those have had plans put in place but at the royal liverpool hospital, those plans have been stalled because carillion was the only contractor. when it went bust, huge questions about what happens next. i went along to liverpool to see the effect of those delays on the people there. this £335 million 650—bed hospital should have been built by carillion and be up and running by now, but doctors and nurses are still working behind the windows of one built in the 1970s, with the patients having to deal with the consequences. it's an old hospital. it needs updating, upgrading in every department. the general state of the place is definitely run down, you know? it needs a real good making over. but that's all they could do, because i don't think it's fit
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for purpose now. so this new building should have been opened in march last year, but instead, it's only 90% complete, with mistakes still to be corrected by a new construction company, while the old hospitaljust behind is still in use. to get the job finished as soon as possible, the hospital trust has cancelled the contract with the original investors. but should it be the taxpayer who now steps in to foot the bill? i think the government should've been involved right from the start, as soon as everything stopped, they should've been sorting things out. the've given help other places. it just depends where you are and how much clout you've got, and if you're in london, you get a bigger say. a lot of money has gone into that, a lot of taxpayers' mo'nique. so i think the government should jump in now and say, come on, let's get it open. and when people say to you where your next appointment might be? i can see it being here
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in the foreseeable future, i can't see the other hospital getting done any time soon. that's a big disappointment to a lot of people. you really get a sense of the disappointment, frustration. what happens next, sean? where is the money coming from? the department of health saying we should expect an announcement imminently about where it goes next, the original contract with original investors will be pulled by the hospital trust this week. it's a lot of money. the project is around £330 million, we expect another £100 million, we expect another £100 million at least to get it done. it looks nice but the type of cladding is wrong that carillion put on. it's notjust the much is wrong that carillion put on. it's not just the much the people is wrong that carillion put on. it's notjust the much the people saying the hospital is on its knees and isn't functioning, it is, it's that they've been promised in this brand—new hospital right next door, that was meant to be march last
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year, and now it could be 2020. colette, who i was speaking to, they have a countdown clock saying this is when you're get your new hospital, that's been taken away. a really big letdown. so frustrating. thank you very much, sean. thanks for getting in touch with us today on so many for getting in touch with us today on so many things. michelle has got in touch about public speaking, 55% of people hate the sound of their own voice and it affects them at work, michelle said i had to cancel an interview because it meant speaking in front of a group. we could try to cure that for michelle, it is really scary and the nerves can be daunting and paralysing. michelle, i don't know if you're about later, if you're out and about, watch on iplayer, we will speak to a public speaking expert to find out how to get to the bottom of these things. you're just getting to these things. you're just getting to the into killing eve? i am -- getting into. luke jennings is going
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to be here later. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's the bbc music day on friday and school children are being encouraged to get singing for it. colin paterson is at a school in stockport for us this morning. bbc music day is about celebrating the power music has to change lives, there is an initiative called get singing, get schools like this one in stockport singing. i like the fa ct we in stockport singing. i like the fact we hit the instrumental during that. either and iris, what do you like about singing? it brings a smile to faces and makes you happy. iris, when you're singing in a class like this, how do you feel? it makes me happy, you can sing about being happy or sad, it helps you express your emotions. thank you very much. a bit more of that singing and then we will have the news, travel and
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weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. the father of stephen lawrence, who was murdered in eltham 25 years ago, is among high—profile community leaders launching their own strategy to combat knife crime. supported by the met, the independent violent crime prevention board says its aim is to work with communities to identify the root causes of violence and promote more positive images of young people. we are approaching it from a different angle, so we're not really a group, we're a movement, and a movement asking ordinary people in the community to work with police, because the police themselves alone cannot solve this. commuters are being warned to complete theirjourneys
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on the piccadilly line by 1pm today as rmt drivers are due to walk out on strike. there won't be a service on the piccadilly line until friday afternoon, but the night tube on friday will also not run. the drivers are striking of a breakdown in industrial relations. —— over a breakdown in industrial relations. following a mediterranean diet could help prevent mental illness according to researchers in the capital. experts at university couege capital. experts at university college london looked at studies of more than 36,000 adults and found those eating more plant based foods, nuts and fish had lower risk of developing depression. their findings also showed the relationship between the gut, brain and our mood, which they believe can be altered by what we eat. let's look at the travel situation, now and minor delays on the district line westbound this morning. that is due to a signal favour
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failure. this is the fulcrum would interchange. fairly slow this morning but not too bad —— fulcrum would. long delays yesterday for these gas work issues. in west ham stood, west end lane is closed northbound outside the tube station due to roadworks. the side road is slow as traffic diverts. let's get a check on your weather with lucy martin. good morning. the dry, bright and sunny weather continues. 18.5 in kew gardens yesterday, today will be a touch warmer. a cold start. temperatures starting in the single figures, a good deal of sunshine from the word go. barely anything happening on the map behind me. a few patches cloud here and there, but not spoiling things. temperatures a bit warmer, a maximum of 21 with a gentle south—westerly. through the night, again, not a great deal happening on the map. holding onto clear skies, and we're looking at another chilly night. temperatures falling into the single figures, an overnight low of 4—5. a few patches of mist and fog
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forming, any mist and fog that forms will lift fairly quickly tomorrow, and we're looking at another bright, sunny day. staying dry with the temperatures a touch warmer still, a maximum of around 23. turning cooler into friday with a chance of a few spots of drizzle, brightening up in the afternoon with sunny spells on the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london news room in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. but for now, back to dan and louise. bye—bye. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: the american entertainer bill cosby has started a prison sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. the judge branded the 81—year—old a sexually violent predator before sentencing him for between three and ten years. lawyers for cosby have already said they will appeal. around 60 other women made similar allegations, but because of time limits,
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their cases couldn't be heard. this is notjust about #metoo on the internet anymore. it's about a defendant having to be accountable, in a court of law, and being confined in state prison as a result of his criminal acts. jeremy corbyn will attack what he calls "greed is good" capitalism in his closing speech at the labour party conference today. the labour leader will also set out his plans to overhaul the economy, as well as pledging more free childcare and a "greenjobs revolution". brexit has dominated the conference week, with labour members voting on tuesday to keep all options on the table, including a fresh referendum, if there is no deal with brussels. theresa may has renewed calls for the release of a british charity worker as she met with the iranian president in new york. the prime minister told president rouhani she had serious concerns about the jailing of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe,
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who was sentenced to five years in a tehran prison after being accused of spying. mrs may also used the meeting to stress the uk's commitment to the iran nuclear deal. the authorities in switzerland have rejected a residency application from russian billionaire roman abramovich. the owner of chelsea football club had applied to live in the alpine resort of verbier, and officials had initially said yes. but switzerland's federal police said they suspected he posed a security risk, and so the application was rejected. there is no evidence of any offence, and mr abramovich's lawyer says the suggestion is entirely false. girlguiding has defended its decision to allow transgender the duchess of sussex has carried out her first solo royal engagement, attending the opening of a major exhibition. meghan joined guests at the royal academy of arts in central london. it is the first major showing of art from the pacific islands to be held in britain, and marks the 250th anniversary of captain's cook's first voyage to the region on the endeavour. those are some of the main stories
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around this morning. we have been hearing how the number of european eels has dropped so dramatically in recent years they have become a critically endangered species. now, the wildfowl & wetland trust is microchipping them. breakfast‘s john maguire is at the river severn in gloucestershire this morning. how do you microchip and he'll?” think you need a bit of drainpipe. —— an eel. think you need a bit of drainpipe. -- an eel. drainpipe with a tape measure at the bottom, and that is how we will measure the eels. emma, what are we doing here and why? we are measuring the eels in this lake, and what we don't understand is how they are moving between the various water bodies and when they are
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choosing to return to the sea. what we are doing today is we have nets out in this and the number of lakes across the site. we will be bringing in the eels, measuring them, by getting their length we can work out how heavy they are and then we will be tagging them, like you take domestic cats and dogs, and then using our microchip readers, both in hand but as we exit the site as well, to see it when they leave and spawn. because a brief work -- word on what they do. they will have come from the sea about 7000 kilometres away, they will have spent three years drifting as larvae, they will have been washed here by the tides and the currents, and washed into the river severn. they come into water bodies like ours here. we will be bringing in the eels, i am sure there is a song about that, later in
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there is a song about that, later in the programme. and the team will be tagging them, releasing them, and we will know more about european eels, perhaps more than we have known for a very long time. i am looking forward to that, thank you very much. we are doing a proper experiment on the programme. coming up on the programme, we will have the weather with carol. but first we have sally here with the sport. don't you love a good ounce in football? you know, when footballers are celebrating, a good bounce? we are celebrating, a good bounce? we are about to show you a brilliant bounce started by frank lampard. the back pages of the morning papers are all about derby and manchester united. and the main beneficiary of all the turmoil at old trafford last night was mourinho's former player when he managed chelsea. it was frank lampard's first meeting against his old mentor. the derby county manager kept things simple, and was handsomely rewarded, as nick parrott reports. one thing frank lampard learnt from playing forjose mourinho was to take the league cup seriously. winning it kick—started their success at chelsea, now defeat to derby
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will pile more pressure on the manchester united manager. initially it looked like mourinho's gamble in making nine changes would pay off, asjuan mata put united ahead. lampard in his 12th game as manager fieleded his strongest side, and fought back in spectacular style thanks to man of the match harry wilson, and more pressure from the 21—year—old saw sergio romero sent off for handball. a man down, united were soon a goal down, as jack marriott sent derby delirious, but in the fifth minute of added time, and marouane fellaini took the tie to penalties. both sides were nervous from the spot, until philjones lost his with the 16th kick of a dramatic shoot—out. mourinho was quick to console him, but it will take much more to sort out united's season. so paul pogba was left out of the side and has been told he won't captain it again. things don't look good between him and his manager, jose mourinho, but how did the situation between the pair get so frosty?
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after captaining united to a win over leicester in their opening game of the season, he hinted that he wasn't happy at old trafford. he went on to say that there were things i cannot say, otherwise i will get fined. after their draw against wolves at the weekend, pogba added more fuel to the fire by criticising the team's tactics, saying it was a mistake for united not to have attacked more. he did then take to twitter to play down those comments, implying some of the things he said had been twisted. lots of papers saying that in the end there will be one winner, and that will be jose end there will be one winner, and that will bejose mourinho. aberdeen are through to the scottish league cup semi—final after beating hibernian in a penalty shoot—out at easter road. it was goalless after extra—time, and it was thomas agyepong's penalty which came off the crossbar to end hibs chances, sending aberdeen through. the build—up is well and truly on ahead of this week's ryder cup, in france, as europe look to wrestle back the title from the usa. tiger woods is fresh off a great comeback win on sunday.
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the former world number one and 14—major winner actually hasn't got the best record in the competition, and is hoping to improve that. lesson, i turned off siri on my old phone, because when i said syria it went off, and iforgot phone, because when i said syria it went off, and i forgot to turn it off on my new phone. you should tweet that. anyway. my overall ryder cup record, not having won as a player since 1999, is something that, you know, hopefully we can change. and we haven't won as a us squad in 21 years, here on foreign soil, and hopefully that will change this week as well. andy murray continues his
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comeback from hip surgery. he is through to the second round at the shenzhen 0pen, after zhang zhizhen retired. he led in the third set, before zhang ended the game. murray is appearing in his penultimate event of the year, after deciding to end his season early. he will play david goffin in the next round. i really hope you are still recording this, because the next story would be brilliant. i would love to know what siri makes obvious next story. you may have played some frisbee on the beach, but some people take it very seriously, especially these guys. the american ultimate disc league is an professional league in the usa dedicated to ultimate frisbee, and this is being hailed as the greatest throw in frisbee history. and a quick look at the reply will show that the catch isn't too bad, either. it was a relatively simple catch,
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wasn't it? he has dropped it! i love frisbee, do you love frisbee? ultimate frisbee is basically american football with a frisbee. and unpredictable, as well. and more violent than you would think. depending on who you are playing with. you will be very glad to hear it managed to write down all of your words pretty much accurately. it managed to write down all of your words pretty much accuratelym it managed to write down all of your words pretty much accurately. it is a new way of broadcasting via your phone. and remarkably unprofessional as well. we are going to talk now about talking. did you know that more than half of us hate the sound of our own voice?
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a new survey by a speech analysis company suggests most of us would like to communicate more effectively, and lots of us hate filler words such as innit and basically, but we're still using them. we did find some people who were willing to talk on camera. here is what they had to say. uh... like... ithink in general most people don't do public speaking, especially with the internet, social media. um... people use um a lot. it is one of those things i always pick up on when i am in lectures, and it is all i can hear. we do use them too much. it is easier to use those words rather than put together a structured sentence. perhaps individuals are less confident than they used to be in public speaking, it might be because there are less opportunities to public speak. however, perhaps younger generations coming forward
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might be affected slightly by the impact or influence of social media. i think we use those words, if thou words, too... i used itjust that, because... yeah, for some reason silences are a bit awkward. so... yeah... all those filler words. we are joined in the studio by sue addlestone, a speech and language therapist, and rishi venkatesh, a student who improved his public speaking by taking a specialised communication qualification. good morning to you both. thank you very much indeed forjoining us, and what is clear from all the messages we are getting today is people do get really nervous about public speaking. they feel really scared to do it. is that normal, for example? i would say it is not across the board, because i suppose people who are confident in public speaking, it isa are confident in public speaking, it is a combination of personality type, experience, and also audience
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size. so the difference between standing up and giving a speech at a wedding and having a chat with some friends in your local pub is quite a different scenario. how did you improve? can you give us an idea of what things were like before and afterwards ? what things were like before and afterwards? i just couldn't what things were like before and afterwards? ijust couldn't speak when there was a lot of people. i couldn't go up to one person and talk. but when i started with english speaking board, it really helped to boost my confidence and it felt like people wanted to hear what i wanted to say. lots of people this morning are saying they get that sort of panic that sets in, and they might have a job interview or they know they have to speak in public, and they don't go or they cancel that because of that fear. do you have something you go through, do you have a process you have before you have a process you have before you get up to speak?” you have a process you have before you get up to speak? i think i basicallyjust constantly you get up to speak? i think i basically just constantly reassure myself. you know what, you can be confident about this. because i feel like public speaking is definitely a
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pa rt of like public speaking is definitely a part of our lives, and that we do need to as a culture and as a country get more used to it. and if you do it well, it can have a really beneficial effect on, for example, your career, on whether you get a job, so many things. i am really interested that this study proves that how we speak actually carries much more weight than what we are actually saying. and that is so true, because the content of what you say, statistically that only relates to 7% of the message, and 30% is the rhythm and tone of voice. so if! 30% is the rhythm and tone of voice. so if i came in and said it is really nice to see you and i am very glad to be here, obviously that negates the whole message, so it is a lot to do with your rhythm and your intonation, and your pitch, and how you phrase being. and you were diagnosed with autism, as well, and did that diagnosis actually help you? my diagnosis with autism was about five years ago, and it was
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honestly quite a surprise to me and my mum. because we both didn't see it coming. but the more we looked back, i had showed those signs before i had exley started by public speaking training. since then, they kind of helped me to recoup the communication skills i would anyway have been lacking. i think public speaking helped with that. so you area speaking helped with that. so you are a clear example of how you can learn and improve. what are your top tips with people, first of all, dealing with the nerves. let's start with that. i suppose with the nerds, if you are just in with that. i suppose with the nerds, if you arejust in a with that. i suppose with the nerds, if you are just in a safe environment within your comfort zone, you probably don't get that many nerves. but let's say if you stand up in front of an audience or you give a presentation, your head is probably filled with thoughts like i hope i remember to say this, what sort of time factors have i got, and my boring people, am i allowed enough. so there is so much going on through your head, i think when your head gets overcrowded with all of these nerves and anxiety, thatis all of these nerves and anxiety, that is probably when people start
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to use those filler words. you know, like... because it is almost like there is too much going on. multitasking, really. loads of people getting in contact, dave said it was about self—confidence when i was younger, hated it but i was self—confident. it's always about speaking to one person. mark used to worry about public speaking, he dealt with those thoughts creeping in about what people would think about what i might save. he used to think about staying with the moment and going with the flow —— might say. going with the flow if you make a mistake, which can affect people badly, can't it? you have dealt with the fear, what's the best way for you to cope with it? whenever the fear creeps in that i'm doing something wrong, or people don't want to listen to what i'm saying, which is the main fear, i reassure myself, i'm in this position because people specifically wa nt position because people specifically want to hear what i have to say and
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it really helps with other parts of my life. for example, university and the interviews were as scary as i thought they'd be because i already had experience with public speaking and getting my point across. it's important to remember what you said earlier, sometimes, sue, confident people and people like louise, good at public speaking, get really nervous and you convince yourself you can't do it. for me it's been about dealing with that fear, i know foran about dealing with that fear, i know for an example after a triathlon, the first 100m of a swing, i'll be fine, the first ten seconds of a speech, you have to commence yourself you have to start and then it will be ok. so much is about mindset, and interview is a good example, you have a window to sell yourself —— an interview. ten minutes, make or break, a really high—pressure situation! in interviews, if you go in with that mindset... the other thing is
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preparation, that's the key, exactly like rishi said, the more prepared you are, the less nervous you will be and that will impact how you come across. if you're someone who struggles with public speaking, that's been helpful we hope. you will do some bits for social media. some of your top tips for people getting in contact this morning to tell us how much it pa ralyse morning to tell us how much it paralyse is then. what do you say to young people who are nervous and they don't want to do itand are nervous and they don't want to do it and they don't like the sound of their own voice —— paralyse is. they wouldn't be up there speaking unless someone wanted to hear what they had to say. that's what i've think! thanks forjoining us. carol is out and about for us in south london this autumn morning. so far we have had a heron, a dog that works as a ranger, some conkers, good morning, carol! i'm in south—west london and it is
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gorgeous, warming up nicely after a cold start. 0n talking conkers, i have my glamorous assistants behind, or looking for them. have you found any yet? you have. here comes niamh. you must have a lot. come on over, niamh. you're on your way to school yep. they are nice ones. good job. —— to school? some crackers. big ones and smaller ones. the truth is some of the conkers we think are smaller this year and fewer and further between because of the weather. we've had heat waves, droughts, so they haven't absorbed the moisture, haven't absorbed the moisture, haven't swollen as much, and quite a bit of wind as well. the sun is out, the temperature starting to rise. for many today it will be quite a warm days. we've still got some rain and wind, though, across the north. more especially in parts of scotland and also northern ireland and northern
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england. we've got a weather front draped across the north of scotland this morning, which is producing the rain, but further south under high pressure, things are much more settled. any shallow mist and fog overnight will disperse rapidly. you'll notice the further north you travel, the milder the start to the day is. parts of north—east scotland starting at 17 celsius. the rain across the highlands and western scotland, windy across scotland, northern ireland and northern england and where you don't have the rain, you will have cloud and rain and drizzle here and there are. further south, sunshine. you will hang onto it through the day. where we have the cloud, brightening up a bit through the day and the top ten is in the east at 20 or 21, even in the west, some will see 20, but cooler in north—west scotland. a weather front drifts northwards in north—west goblin, pivots and comes south, bringing the rain with it. for much of the country, clear
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skies, variable amounts of cloud and overnight temperatures falling to as low as seven or eight to about ten or 12 low as seven or eight to about ten or12 —— low as seven or eight to about ten or 12 —— scotland. sinking south across scotland, northern ireland, northern england into north wales, not much more than a band of cloud with some spots of rain on it. behind the weather front, sunshine and showers but ahead of it, dry, sunny and warm with tomorrow's temperatures in the south—east getting to 22 or 23, but fresher in the north. by friday, our weather front gets to that south of the country before clearing, taking the cloud and any light rain on it with it. then we're all in for a dry day with sunshine, but temperatures lower where they've been hyped so generally where they should be at this stage of the year. on the weekend, saturday looking bright. sunday, sunray and around but temperatures around 14 or 15 —— been high. lovely. thanks, carol. look at the
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conkers! see you later. you're watching breakfast from the bbc is. thanks for being with us this morning. —— from the bbc. the final day of the labour party conference gets under way later, with party leaderjeremy corbyn giving his anticipated speech. we can speak now to the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, from liverpool. good morning, rebecca. thanks for coming on breakfast and speaking to us this morning. plenty to talk to you about, can we start with brexit, which has dominated much of the conference this week. we'll get on to whatjeremy corbyn has to say later, but personally, do you support the position keir starmer painted yesterday that labour is not ruling out remain as an option in another referendum ? well, what we've said, and there's been a lot of hype about what happened yesterday, but we had a fantastic discussion about it at conference. a number of constituency parties and trade unions supported a
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joint motion that basically said we're going to be pushing for a general election if we don't get the deal we want, covering the six tests keir starmer laid out, getting the same benefits in the single market that we have, a new customs union arrangement that insures we have no caris at borders and no hard border in northern ireland, and a transitional period that protects businesses and doesn't push them off a cliff if we don't get that —— tariffs. and if we reach an extreme situation where we don't have a general election then we won't rule anything out. it wasn't a case of selecting a predetermined selection of options. 0bviously selecting a predetermined selection of options. obviously there will be a debate within the party on which options are available at that time, but at the moment we are still championing trying to get a good deal with the eu on the basis that i've just set out. is that a yes then? a rather long—winded yes, you agree with keir starmer yesterday? he was simply, you know, reflecting
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what the motion that was put to conference, keeping all options on the table. i was interested to hear what graham stringer said this morning, he accused keir starmer of trying to un—pick the manifesto?” don't think he's trying to do that, but the motion agreed at conference was essentially we respect the referendum. 0ur party position is we wa nt to referendum. 0ur party position is we want to get a deal with the eu, we know we're going to exit the eu but we can't leave any options of the table. we know the government have made a shambolic attempt at negotiations so far, we had theresa may inside downing street on friday essentially implying she was pursuing a no deal option despite the fact a number of businesses, such as jaguar land rover, airbus, have already stated clearly a no deal would be catastrophic for industry and we would see job losses. it's concerning, the government direction of travel, they don't know what direction they want from one day to the next but our position isn't a second referendum
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as the first choice, it's to make sure we have a general election. if she can't get a deal through parliament, if you can't get a no deal position through parliament, if that's what she wants, she will have lost the confidence of parliament and her own party, and in that situation she can't carry on as prime minister and it's time for a new leader, and in that case we want a vigorous general election so jeremy corbyn can carry on negotiations with the eu. you're the mpfor negotiations with the eu. you're the mp for salford and salford voted to leave, what do you say to constituents who might be watching and they say, hang on, we have cast our vote already? what we are saying to everyone, remain or leave, we respect result of the referendum and as far as respect result of the referendum and as faras me respect result of the referendum and as far as me and other members of the shadow cabinet are concerned, we are working towards securing a deal with the eu because we respect the result of the referendum and we know exit will happen. however, at party
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conference we've agreed there has to be flexibility and pragmatism in a... that in a set of extreme circumstances, no options can be put off the table, including a people's vote, whatever that might be on. i have voiced vociferous concerns about my concerns around a people's vote if the government was holding the pen and their ability to skew it in their direction to secure support for particular particular standpoints that political standpoints. that could be dangerous with this current government. but if we can't get a deal then we want a general election, because we have other issues beyond brexit. in my constituency there are many deprived areas, people living on the bread line, and they can't continue with a conservative government not investing in our communities. two more questions, firstly, jeremy corbyn has been speaking to chris mason today, he will denounce greed is that deregulated financial
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capitalism. 0n those radical plans, last night, labour mp for crewe and nantwich, jennifer smith, she was talking about a strike and there we re talking about a strike and there were members applauding her along, do you go along with that idea?” didn't hear the whole speech —— laura smith. she's one of my favourite mps. do you support a general strike? no, that is not labour party policy. that was laura's opinion at the event last night, she talked about other issues and gota night, she talked about other issues and got a standing ovation. she's a very good public speaker. the other thing i wanted to talk to you about, you're well aware of the plans of a female labour deputy were withdrawn over concerns it might throw shadow onjeremy corbyn. you've spoken passionately about this in the past, does it upset you, do you understand
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it, do you want to return to that?” was perplexed if i'm honest, it isn't anything that's come from the leader's office or the nec. we understand the constituency party that put the motion forward yesterday withdrew it. that's sad, we had a nec meeting on monday where the nec unanimously said we need a second deputy poster that was a female. it would have shown a dedication towards working to that diversity within our labour party —— post. it's not going away. the nec isn't going away, tom, jeremy, others support it. i would be surprised if anyone didn't support it, but i haven't spoken to everyone. it won't go away, i will championing this going forward. the next nec meeting will discuss how we bring this back to the table. rebecca long—bailey, thanks for talking to us. —— i will champion.
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in the next hour we will talk about tagging eels, beluga whales and conquers. that is quite a lot! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. the father of stephen lawrence, who was murdered in eltham 25 years ago, is among high—profile community leaders launching their own strategy to combat knife crime. supported by the met, the independent violent crime prevention board says its aim is to work with communities to identify the root causes of violence and promote more positive images of young people. we are approaching it from a different angle, so we're not really a group, we're a movement, and a movement asking ordinary people in the community to work with police, because the police themselves alone cannot solve this. the met police has relaxed some of
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its policies and will consider applicants with visible tattoos. the move is part of a new recruitment drive as the force seeks to double the numbers joining up drive as the force seeks to double the numbersjoining up next year. those signing up will also be paid as trainee officers while they com plete as trainee officers while they complete their course. commuters are being warned to complete theirjourneys on the piccadilly line by 1pm today as rmt drivers are due to walk out on strike. there won't be a service on the piccadilly line until friday afternoon, but the night tube on friday will also not run. the drivers are striking over a breakdown in industrial relations. let's look at the travel situation, now and minor delays on the district line westbound this morning. upminster to earls court due to a signalfailure. there upminster to earls court due to a signal failure. there were delays on the a2 coming into town early this morning, but the situation is ghastly improved. —— vastly improved. lambeth bridge is closed southbound
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for emergency gasworks, causing long delays yesterday. in west hamstead, west end lane is closed northbound outside the tube station due to roadworks. the side road is slow as traffic diverts. it will be closed until sunday and victoria street is closed. let's get a check on your weather with lucy martin. good morning. the dry, bright and sunny weather continues. 18.5 in kew gardens yesterday, today will be a touch warmer. a cold start. temperatures starting in the single figures, a good deal of sunshine from the word go. barely anything happening on the map behind me. a few patches cloud here and there, but not spoiling things. temperatures a bit warmer, a maximum of 21 with a gentle south—westerly. through the night, again, not a great deal happening on the map. holding onto clear skies, and we're looking at another chilly night. temperatures falling into the single figures, an overnight low of 4—5. a few patches of mist and fog forming, any mist and fog that forms will lift fairly quickly tomorrow, and we're looking at another bright, sunny day. staying dry with the temperatures
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a touch warmer still, a maximum of around 23. turning cooler into friday with a chance of a few spots of drizzle, brightening up in the afternoon with sunny spells on the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london news room in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. but for now, back to dan and louise. bye— bye. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: bill cosby spends his first night behind bars after being jailed for up to ten years for sexual assault. jeremy corbyn will promise to tackle "greed is good capitalism" as he makes his leader's speech at the labour conference. more misery for manchester united, paul pogba watches from the stands as his side lose on penalties and are dumped out of the league cup by derby.
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the most breakdowns for 15 years and a pothole epidemic has led to a big fall in profits says the aa. it's the bbc‘s new hit about a supercool female assassin. we'll speak to the author who created the world of killing eve. and the head of bbc music day on friday, we are in stockport because we wa nt friday, we are in stockport because we want kids singing in assembly halls, in the corridors and in the classrooms. good morning from south—west london. we are talking about conkers this morning. we have a lovely start to the day across most of england and wales with sunshine after a chilly start. scotland, northern england and northern ireland, have more
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clout some rain and it is windy. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 26th of september. our top story. the american entertainer, bill cosby, has started a prison sentence for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. the judge branded the 81—year—old a "sexually violent predator" before sentencing him for between three and ten years. lawyers for cosby have already said they'll appeal. nada tawfik has the details. this will now be the image that defines bill cosby‘s life. for decades he led the double life and the man affectionately referred to as america's dad will be classified as america's dad will be classified asa as america's dad will be classified as a sexually violent predator. it isa as a sexually violent predator. it is a moment his victims didn't think possible. outside court, they celebrated. this will show victims
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they can make it through and there is justice at the end and hallelujah. this is notjust about the internet any more it is about the internet any more it is about the defendant having to be accountable in a court of law and being confined in state prison as a result of his criminal acts. do you think this will lead to a real sea change? well, it sends an important message. more than 60 women came forward with similar conditions but only andrea constand one was recent enough to bring charges. he trapped air by posing as a mentor before drugging and molesting out his pennsylvania home. her relief after the sentencing was visible. bill cosby the sentencing was visible. bill cos by has the sentencing was visible. bill cosby has admitted to giving young women drugs before sex, but says it was done with their knowledge and throughout the trial he has shown no run loss. bill cosby has been denied his right to a fair trial. these
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injustices must be corrected immediately. at the height of his fame, bill cosby was the most watched man on television. his wholesome, lovable persona made him an icon. the fact he will now serve time in prison after a long and fierce legal battle is a palpable shift of power. and a major milestone for women and victim's rights. it's the final day of the labour party conference in liverpool today and party leader jeremy corbyn is due to speak. he'll use the speech to denounce "greed is good" capitalist system and set out his plans to change the direction of the economy. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in liverpool for us this morning. i think the conclusion is a lot of this conference has been about brexit. will he be talking about that today? good morning. absolutely. the political elephant that has been plonking its round every square inch of this conference
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hall and dipping its trunk in the mersey has been brexit. the party is ina bit mersey has been brexit. the party is in a bit of mersey has been brexit. the party is ina bit ofa mersey has been brexit. the party is in a bit of a bind because lots of its activists want to see another referendum, they hate brexit yet they love jeremy corbyn. referendum, they hate brexit yet they lovejeremy corbyn. he has articulated a reticence to be too enthusiastic about the promise of another referendum. today, from jeremy corbyn, there will be referenced from brexit but he wants to frame a bigger argument about the revolution that he would like to see in terms of the outlook of the economy if there was a labour government. there has already been a revolution within the labour party. we see it in the people here, you see it on the main stage and the topics being discussed. he will talk about greenjobs, topics being discussed. he will talk about green jobs, 400,000 topics being discussed. he will talk about greenjobs, 400,000 greenjobs under a labour government. what's more, home insulation, more onshore
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and offshore wind and solar power. he will talk about how he feels the economy, after the crash of ten yea rs economy, after the crash of ten years ago was effectively amounting to putting humpty dumpty back together again rather than shaking things up radically. existing structures were rebuilt rather than reshaping, what, in his view, had caused the crash in the first place. a different feel to a labour party conference. jeremy corbyn has been around for a few years as leader but those who turn up at these gigs and those who turn up at these gigs and those behind—the—scenes on the committees and the kind of thing that get discussed, completely change from not many years ago. let's talk about what the prime minister has been doing, she has been meeting the uranium president in new york? she has, she has been talking about nazarenes gary radclyffe, the british woman held in iranfor radclyffe, the british woman held in iran for some time. it is useful to talk directly about that case. there
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has been missed long—running attempt by the british government to try and secure her release. the brief window ofa secure her release. the brief window of a couple of weeks ago where she was allowed out of prison briefly. the prime minister also reflecting on brexit inevitably and saying in new york, it is her view that she will deliver brexit and there will not be another referendum. chris creighton, thank you, as always, for your analysis. —— chris mason. the authorities in switzerland have rejected a residency application from russian billionaire roman abramovich. the owner of chelsea football club had applied to live in the alpine resort of verbier, and officials had initially said yes, but switzerland's federal police said they suspected he posed a security risk, and so the application was rejected. there is no evidence of any offence, and mr abramovich's lawyer says the suggestion is entirely false. teenage drinking in england has declined more dramatically than many other european countries, new research shows. the world health organization study analysed data over a 12—year period this
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across 36 countries. it shows a long—term downward trend in alcohol consumption among teenagers in almost every european region but researchers warn the numbers still remain high. girlguiding has defended its decision to allow transgender members and leaders after it expelled two volunteers who objected to the policy. one of the expelled volunteers said girls had a right to female—only spaces. but girlguiding says including people who identify as female does not put girls at risk. beluga whales are not usually spotted in the river thames but yesterday one was seen swimming near gravesend. members of the public were asked to watch from a safe distance and vessels were diverted to keep out of its way. simonjones is there for us this morning. we had an update from the port authority earlier, no sightings overnight, so what do we know this morning? the big question this
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morning? the big question this morning is where it is the whale. the banks of the thames were thronged with people looking out for it and they weren't disappointed. it was last seen around that area near that boat yesterday evening. i managed to see it several times yesterday. it was coming up to the surface. you saw a flash of white. we have to look carefully to see but when you did it was a pretty majestic sight. the authorities have not had any overnight, not surprising it was dark but now the sun is up. they are hoping people along the banks of the terms of further afield will keep a lookout and babs bird—watchers or people taking a walk, just look out for the swagger. in many ways, if we don't see it, but would be the best was because that would have meant it would have swam back out to sea of its own accord. but there is some concern because this mwale is thousands of miles from where it should be because they are normally
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found near russia and greenland. we're not sure why it has ended up here. it could because of noise issues. some people say could be due to climate change or recent weather. but people on the lookout, desperate to try and get as sight of it but fingers crossed it is still well and potentially may have swum away from this area. yes, that would be good news in some ways. simon, thank you very much. we will talk about that later on to an expert. an inquest has been hearing evidence about the death of a teenager, who fell ill after eating a sandwich from pret a manger. it emerged the baguette natasha ednan—laperouse had bought contained sesame. the inquest was told she'd had a severe allergic reaction. it also heard that pret a manger had been warned before that its labels didn't mention the ingredient, something the company says it has now changed. well allergies are reportedly becoming more common. so what should we be looking out for on food labels? we're joined by professor sheena
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cruickshank, an immunologist from the university of manchester. and holly shaw, who's a nurse advisor for the charity allergy uk is in our london newsroom. why are we suffering more from allergic reactions? it is 40 to 50% of children, who seem to be worst affected. we seem to see in increased year on year and we don't know why that is. there is a lot of ideas that we are cleaner than we used to be and our immune system doesn't get training up so it misfires. also it could be the microbes that inhabit has all the things we breathing in, the microbes we breathe in and it changes the way your immune system is educated and it misfires. some others have
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allergies and others have severe allergies, is it also increase, people who have life—threatening allergies? over all we are seeing a dramatic increase. the majority of allergies people with hay fever and that accounts for 25% of the stats and then you have people with asthma. food allergies are very rare, about 1%, 2% of total allergies. holly, there is strict rules around food packaging labels, and there are about 14 things labels have two list, is that right? yes, there aren't any cures for food allergy so avoiding the food you are allergic to is important to the daily management for someone who has a food allergy. they rely on the accurate labels on food so they can make informed decisions about what food is safe for them to eat. the
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people who have one of these allergies, they are routinely, because this affects their life, incredibly careful, rightly so? absolutely and living with a food allergy in all aspects of life, whether at school or a young person at university or college, the decision and choices you make throughout your day impact on your health and you do rely on information passed to you by other people to make safe choices. effective communication is really important for people with food allergies, so being clear and concise and getting the information you need to know whether something is safe to eat, if the information isn't available for you from a food label. let's talk about labelling because there are rules about labelling? yes, there is legislation which governs what information needs to be included on a food label. with regards to allergies, that means
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there is 14 allergens that do need to be listed on a food ingredient label. but we have to be mindful there are over 170 different foods that have been reported to have caused allergic reactions. some people may have an allergy to a specific food which isn't within the 14 listed allergens. it is important they are able to check a food label and see if the food is present and then they can make an informed decision on whether it is safe to eat. talking about a few of these allergies, particularly with children, my son was allergic to eggs but he has grown out of that, what's of people have problems with milk. what is that change that takes place? —— lots of people. how can they lose it as they grow older? we do not fully know the answer but one thing that can happen is your immune system thing that can happen is your immune syste m ca n thing that can happen is your immune system can re—educate, some of the new types of therapy are re—educating the immune system so either you make a different type of antibody response that will not
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trigger the cells that make the nasty things that cause anaphylaxis or allergy, or they look at how it is regulated and shout and calm things down. that may be something happening with your son, he is developing tolerance. can i pick up on your thoughts, it makes life incredibly difficult for people, having one of these allergies, what is your advice, particularly for young people dealing with it? recent survey carried out by allergy uk and the food standards agency highlighted the views of young people on eating out with food allergies, what it showed, more than half of those people that responded to the survey, there was over 2500 respondentss, only 14% felt confident to speak out, sol respondentss, only 14% felt confident to speak out, so i would like to see young people supported and empowered so they can make safe choices when they are out, i want them to feel confident in being able to communicate their specific
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allergy to people that need to know, the work in restaurants or food business outlets. very interesting, thank you very much. carol's out and about for us in south london this autumn morning. we had conquers today, earlier we had —— we had heron news, and i believe now we have another animal. named after the headmaster in harry potter. working dog, nine months old, started working as a ranger at three months, adorable, so placid, he helps the young urban ranges that are involved here and they are very much hands on, so they would be involved with planting trees,
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cleaning up parts, making them more accessible, making green spaces more accessible, making green spaces more accessible and encouraging us to get out into the green. i am going to ta ke out into the green. i am going to take him home with me, i out into the green. i am going to take him home with me, lam out into the green. i am going to take him home with me, i am very sorry, say goodbye to him, he is gorgeous. he is beautiful and he is raring to go. i will pass him back to his owner, hattie. thank you very much. this morning here, beautiful as well, what a sight if you want to come down, it is free, national trust, we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine coming through the trees after a cold start. mild as we push from birmingham northwards, so what we have today is quite a warm day for the time of year, also going to be some rain in the forecast and windy conditions as well. starting by looking at the pressure chart, you can see why we have the wet and windy conditions in the north, where the front coming south producing rain, ice bars telling you it is windy, and high
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pressure in charge of the whether further south, giving things fairly settled. starting with the rain across the highlands and western scotland, away from there, fair bit of cloud around as there is across northern ireland and northern england, producing drizzle. scotland, northern ireland and northern england quite windy especially in the west. for the rest of england and wales, dry and sunny, and we will carry on with that through the day, highs up to 21, also 21 in aberdeen. as we head through the evening and overnight, band of rain, cold front, moving north across northern scotland, pivots and then comes south, taking the rain back south. for many of us, dry night, not particularly cold in the north once again we will see double figures but down south, something like six in rural areas. tomorrow, starting with the weather front, producing rain, heavy rain in
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scotland, as it moves across the re st of scotland, as it moves across the rest of scotland into northern ireland and england, it will tend to weaken, band of cloud with the odd spot of rain. if i'm sunshine and showers, dry and sunny weather behind it, somewhere in south—east or east anglia, could hit 23 tomorrow. —— behind it, sunshine and showers. we will be fresher conditions by friday. we can, saturday looks dry, sunday, some rain around, temperatures where they should be. i rain around, temperatures where they should be. lam rain around, temperatures where they should be. i am off to find albus again, for more cuddles, that poor poochis again, for more cuddles, that poor pooch is covered in lipstick! how did you get a dog that is so beautiful and calm! he is lovely. he is perfect, just perfect. you get the feeling there is all these pets that carol takes home with her, she has like kirkwood zoo at her house!
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big drop in profits at the aa.“ you have been doing any driving over the last six months, you will be familiar with this. potholes! the aa have said an epidemic of potholes, caused by the extreme snow in february followed by the baking hot weather has led to it seeing the most breakdowns for 15 years. profits were hit by 65 per cent, while the company saw a slight drop in memberships. not all about the potholes, complicated. the taxpayer is set to stump up the cash to finish off the royal liverpool hospital. it was being built by carillion before it went bust, leaving more than £100 million of work to be done. it was supposed to be
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opened in march last year, but it looks more likely to be in 2020. and, the boss of nike says its controversial ad campaign featuring colin kaepernick has sparked "record" engagement and is driving sales. mr kaepernick is an american footballer, known for his refusal to stand during the national anthem in protest of police brutality and racism. nike sold $10 billion worth of sports gear in just three months, making a billion dollars in profits. a reminder that there's big money involved in these decisions. that is absolutely extraordinary, that turnaround, thank you very much. the power of advertising. thank you for so many of you getting
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in touch with us, the beluga whales potted swimming in the thames near gravesend in kent has caused crowds to gather on the river bank. vessels were kept back from the whale to keep it safe. it's hoped the outgoing tide will take it to safer waters. nowell sightings this morning, that isa nowell sightings this morning, that is a good thing. —— no whale sightings. lucy baby is the head of science and conservation for the charity 0rca and joins us now. it should be in arctic waters, thousands of miles away from its usual home, that raises questions. about sonar issues, you were telling us earlier on, the big hump at the front of the head is where the navigation systems are stored, and if something is wrong, that is why it could be thousands of miles from where it should be. we are unsure why this animal is in uk waters, in
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the thames, but one reason it could be is due to impaired navigation, they have a huge bulbous forehead, there is an organ in their called there is an organ in their called the melon, they use that for navigation and for communication. if that has been disrupted due to any environmental changes or noises in the environment, man—made causes of disturbance or if the animal is u nwell disturbance or if the animal is unwell itself, it can become disoriented and impair that communication. would it normally be on its own? they normally travel in groups, pods, over the on its own? they normally travel in groups, pods, overthe last on its own? they normally travel in groups, pods, over the last few years, more reports of individual animals but this is quite unusual. the sightings we have had around the uk overthe the sightings we have had around the uk over the last few decades have been of one or two animals, which does suggest they are not in their normal area doing their usual things. best case scenario, it has gone back the other way and is back in open water and everything is fine? that is what we would hope,
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has not been seen since yesterday evening, which is a good sign, hopefully it has gone out to deeper waters, it does raise the awareness and why it is important for organisations to be out there, monitoring these animals, to find out where they are going, what behaviour is, and maybe we will see rarer animals more common way around the uk. let's talk about where they normally are, they are not born white. they are born dark grey, as they reach sexual maturity, about age ten, they become whiter, and pure white then, that means they can blend with the sea ice that is up there but it makes it easy for us to see them against the dark ocean. 0ther see them against the dark ocean. other features on them, adaptation for living in the arctic and the cold, huge thick blubber layer, a layer of insulating fat all around their body, in that picture you can see the faults on the animal, that keeps them warm and insulated in cold waters. i was trying to dazzle
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the leas with some facts about whales. are they the smallest species? well, they are free to five and a half metres, that is small. big, but quite small for a while. the largest whale, the blue whale, that can be over 30 metres. —— .whales and, there are pygmy whales out there, that are of a similar size. —— whales. out there, that are of a similar size. -- whales. they try to maintain energy levels, they can presume between two and 3% of their body weight every day, 70 lb, everyday. and in cold water is you wa nt everyday. and in cold water is you want to keep that fat store, and another fact for you, the only whale that can move their head from side to side and up and down, they do not have fused vertebrae. that helps them with the navigation, it means they can pinpoint fray and exactly where they need to go. that is
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brilliant. the only whale that can move its head ? brilliant. the only whale that can move its head? yes, and they have facial muscles, they can change the shape of their face, facial muscles, they can change the shape of theirface, and facial muscles, they can change the shape of their face, and that melon, to help with navigation. you have been out fact! —— outfacted! good morning. it has been a chilly start across southern parts of england. temperatures down to two or three cells morning but we have had the clearest of the skies across southern areas. we have this feed of cloud moving in off the atlantic and it is an mild start to the day. temperatures already in double
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figures. throughout scotland there will be ad briggs of rain, particularly in western areas. ray mulls over the northern ireland. quite gusty winds. some cloud in northern england but across wales, these than southern england, more showers today. temperatures up in the 20s and in aberdeenshire, 21 celsius. this evening and overnight there will be rain at times, particularly in northern scotland because the rain can be heavy. for england and wales, clear spells. chilly across southern areas but the keeper temperatures in double figures across northern parts again. more sunshine on thursday across england and wales. more cloud for scotla nd england and wales. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland and that will move further south and any rain easing away. brighter skies developing in the afternoon. feeling colder, 14 to 16 degrees. for much of england and wales, one day and
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those temperatures up to 23 degrees. this cold front is moving south and behind the cold front it is going to getjust a bit colder. you can see that during friday, any cloud clears to the south and there will be lots of sunshine throughout the day on friday, dry day right across the uk. but there will be a drop in temperatures in southern areas. 23 on thursday, 16 on friday and 13 of 14 further north. different feel to the weather by the end of the week but it will be dry, fine and settled over the weekend. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. 0nwards and upwards — the fed prepares to raise interest rates in the us for a third time this year as the economy
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continues to strenghten. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 26th of september. as the world's most influential central bank prepares for the move we'll look at what it means for the rest of us around the world. also in the programme — it's a thumbs down for facebook‘s moderation system after the company says it's investigating a glitch in detecting hateful content. and after president trump's speech at the un yesterday —

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