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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 26, 2018 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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ourtask, is to build britain, build a ourtask, is to build britain, build 3 britain ourtask, is to build britain, build a britain together, build a britain for that security together — and we can! thank you, conference! applause and cheering jeremy corbyn ending his fourth conference speech as leader of the labour party. there will now nod doubt be a long standing ovation. there were several through the speech and the labour leader was decidedly more comfortable than he's beenin decidedly more comfortable than he's been in recent years, it was a confident speech. he ended it saying that the party was united where the tories are divided. they will unite and they are ready to govern as labour was in previous governments after the second world war. he had an offerfor the prime minister. he said as it stood now labour would vote against theresa may's checkers plan but if she was
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to deliver a deal that included a customs union and no hard border in ireland and one which protected jobs, then that might be a deal labour could back. people obviously standing up and liking what they have heard. jeremy corbyn joining standing up and liking what they have heard. jeremy corbynjoining in the applause. he touched on all the issues you would expect and said it had been a tough summer for labour, pointing to the anti—semitism row. he said it had caused hurt in the jewish community but said we are your allies. that led to one of the first standing of asians. he condemned the conservatives for their support of the right—wing hungarian government and then set out his pledge on anti—austerity. nationalisation of the railways. he
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wa nted nationalisation of the railways. he wanted to but the mental health crisis as he called it and give it try —— parity of esteem and crisis as he called it and give it try -- parity of esteem and it crisis as he called it and give it try —— parity of esteem and it came to services. and talked about not leaving behind anybody. now forgotten communities. there is a solidarity fund on housing that labour would put in place. and the big pledge on universal free childcare for all two, three and four—year—old. he criticised the government for creating a hostile environment for the disabled. he mentioned john prescott the former labour deputy leader and thanked him for all his work and thanked him for being there. then he talked about foreign policy and mention the reckless attacks on salisbury saying the evidence points clearly to the russian state and he also said about the palestinian cause, something he has held close to his heart and said that when they came to office one of
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the first things they would do is recognise a palestinian state. with me here sitting and listening to that was the chief political correspondent, norman smith. what we re correspondent, norman smith. what were your initial thoughts? he looked extraordinarily relaxed. this isa man looked extraordinarily relaxed. this is a man who is a supremely confident in his own beliefs, in addressing a party that adores him. pa rt addressing a party that adores him. part of the reason he is so relaxed is not just he part of the reason he is so relaxed is notjust he is getting more from early with the job. you go is notjust he is getting more from early with thejob. you go back is notjust he is getting more from early with the job. you go back a year so and often he looked tense and unhappy. part of the reason he looks more relaxed is this is caught jeremy corbyn. these are his long—standing convictions. when you speak about something and you tell it as you see it it does give you a degree of fluency. he's not having
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to spin it. this is what he believes. he believes that devious labour governments by signing up to what he calls greed is good capitalism have paved the way for privatisation and deindustrialisation. his pledge to the party and the country is we will do things differently. we can hear the traditional rendition of the red flag. what does it mean now when they are talking about preparing for government? there is not a general election on the cards. there is a but the basic aim of this crop —— conference was for labour to come out of it and be seen as an alternative government in waiting and that is why the speech was so long because he did a wrap—up of all the policies that have been announced during this conference and
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they have been chunky policies like handing a 10% of shares to work forces, nationalising the railways, cracking down on second home ownership. a lot of policies. the idea is to create the impression of a government good to go. we have the ideas and policies and this is our agenda. the problem they've had is cutting through the brexit lies. that is still there. it was interesting at the end whenjeremy corbyn got onto brexit and i felt he was again trying to mould that stands on brexit. i imagine he and john mcdonald are petrified of brexit supporting labour voters thinking labour is backing another referendum. what did you make of the
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speech? this is jeremy corbyn standing there, this is his party lock stock and barrel. he owns every to the party and he is pushing through the agenda. in this very hall in liverpool in 2011 ed miliband did a very famous speech which was all about bad capitalism and good capitalism. i knew it would come. i think he is sending out a very strong signal that they have done some deep thinking. they have radical policy for childcare which is very poplar. older people as well, committing to keep all the triple pension. they know they have a problem with older voters. that is
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a problem with older voters. that is a great hall for him and he can stand out. i liked the stuff he said today. he said to theresa may you have promised a lot but what can you deliver? can he convince the public, notjust that hall, to get him into downing street? they are dancing in the hall. there is a party atmosphere inside the hall which underlines that they love him. the labour party are very much him now. what about the wider audience?” thought that he looked prime ministerial in this speech. as well as having that characteristic humanity and tenderness, i think he
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was country facing. the childcare policy would go down very well with the women of my family who's childcare outgoings were so high. the renewal of a green industry. addressing the social and economic causes that drove brexit rather than treating it as a parlour game. this was a tremendously unifying policy platform and it shows labour are really occupying that coveted centre ground in terms of economic orthodoxy and i imagine it will go a great way towards healing the divisions that "the 16. the calculation of the jeremy corbyn tea m calculation of the jeremy corbyn team is that the centre ground has shifted so they take the view that a lot of these policies which might in previous years have been pitched,
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they take the view that years of steady have now moved into middle—class confidence of the way things are and that families previously who would not be thinking about nationalisation are beginning to think there is a point there. they take the pitch that the policy agenda is now a left—wing policy agenda, that will be tested and the credibility factor will be tested. you cant ignore the alarm in the private sector about this —— what this is going to mean. but john mcdonald has set out his plan regions of reaching out the business. do you think he is credible with his offer?” business. do you think he is credible with his offer? i think jeremy corbyn talked about prawn cocktails and dinner parties but john mcdonald has been doing
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precisely that. trying to offer some sort of reassurance this is not a madcap idea to tear down capitalism. it's about reframing it and rebalancing the workplace, which he argues actually might boost productivity of employees if they feel they have incentive in a company and might encourage investment in the company if they have a stake in wishes and money should go. it's all about tilting the balance as they see it to the worker and away from employers. this isa worker and away from employers. this is a big theme ofjohn mcdonald's economic narrative. it's about giving workers control and a greater voice and a seat at the table. this is an idea that theresa may herself at one point floated but what i'm struck by this conference is the
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numberof struck by this conference is the number of that businesses have come back to conference. the last few years the lobbyists and business organisations have stayed away. interestingly they are back this year and the one they want to meet is the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonald. because they might have to prepare for a labour government because it could happen if there was a general election. some of the plansjohn a general election. some of the plans john mcdonald has a general election. some of the plansjohn mcdonald has put forward, there has been an adverse reaction from the cbi another part of the business community. if you look at the proposals in terms of worker shares and representation, shares a roughly 10% and there is room for that go further down the line and work as representations are to third, that is not to coney and oil. there is a real case of nothing to hide. all of those companies who have been relying on a credibly opec
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decision—making structures, who have been banking on exploitative hiring practices, they are the ones who have got something to there. we can talk tojohn have got something to there. we can talk to john mcdonald have got something to there. we can talk tojohn mcdonald about the plans and how they would be following them up with businesses who at this moment are against some of the plans that he has. let's talk aboutjeremy of the plans that he has. let's talk about jeremy corbyn and of the plans that he has. let's talk aboutjeremy corbyn and john mcdonald. if been a close partnership for a long time. asjohn mcdonald been more of a star this week whenjeremy mcdonald been more of a star this week when jeremy corbyn. they are a double act and jeremy corbyn is the front man. he is the figure who many people can relate to because he is a different sort of politician. tony blair used to be streaming in sweat. jeremy corbyn is like your affable uncle. he is a different sort of politician and it does appeal to a
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lot of people. john mcdonald is like the intellectual ha rd—nosed lot of people. john mcdonald is like the intellectual hard—nosed of the operation. vicky young is mingling in the crowds. you are there with some delegates. i lost count of the standing ovation is but it was a great reception in the hall. let's find out what people thought. great reception in the hall. let's find out what people thoughtm great reception in the hall. let's find out what people thought. it was really charismatic. he touched on everything that people wanted to hear. he said what people wanted to hear. he said what people wanted to hear. people were pleased to get it because once he said it he will have to stand by as word. how you ready for a general election? yes. everybody is ready for a general election. if we don't get a proper except from brexit he will demand a general election and i think most labour party members are ready for
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it. let's find out over here, what did you make of the speech?” thought it was wonderful. just what we wa nted thought it was wonderful. just what we wanted to hear. it was a fantastic speech. we are really pleased to hear we are going to recognise the palestinian state as soofi as recognise the palestinian state as soon as labour gets into power. what did you think of the speech? very good. i liked his comments on palestine and recognising palestine isa palestine and recognising palestine is a state. what did you make of the speech? brilliant. inspiring. he is ready for number ten. labour is going to build in a galaxy in society. theresa may, get out of there. we got the picture. what did
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you make of it? phenomenal speech. it shows we need a radical change. how will he pay for all of these things? the manifesto will show that. it is finally time for the riches to play their fair share. what did you make of it? inequality is unsustainable. our future generations should be painful by the rich. bringing the party together. we are together. we will get there. as you expect, they completely loved it. the delegates enjoyed it. let's put some of these questions tojohn mcdonald the shadow chancellor. jeremy corbyn has just finished. he looked very comfortable. do you expect to be in power this time next year? i would not be surprised. the
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tories are in such disarray. how will it happen? i think the tories will it happen? i think the tories will implode over brexit. the tories hate each other more than they hate us hate each other more than they hate us at the moment so they might fall apart. so is it a fingers crossed strategy? yes. you say they are going to implode over brexit but jeremy corbyn has stated today that of theresa may delivers a deal that meet certain criteria you will back her. that is what we have always said. we are trying to look after the interests of the country so she can geta the interests of the country so she can get a deal and meet the criteria we will support her. but it's highly unlikely. does it deliver the same benefits as we currently have is members of the single market and the
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customs union? do you think theresa may can get that? that was the promise they gave us in parliament. i don't think they can because i don't think they can agree amongst themselves. it implies that if theresa may were to agree to a customs union that that would deliver a frictionless border in northern ireland. he would be able to develop a tariff free role. we would say all along if you can put that package together it will assist us that package together it will assist us to resolve the situation but i don't think they can. if a miracle occu i’s don't think they can. if a miracle occurs and she comes back with something that protects jobs and the economy and we would support it but it's not going to happen. are you convinced that it is a reaching out olive branch to theresa may and a
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deal labour can get behind? i'm not sure. lam i am broadly... lam broadly... i i am broadly... i feel the lam broadly... ifeel the labour party leaves with a more coherent brexit position than we arrived with. all the options are still on the table. including remaining in the table. including remaining in the eu. he said that wouldn't be an option. we have to respect the original referendum but we have to keep the options on the table. my view is i think we can get into government and negotiate a deal which will protect the economy and jobs. i cant see the tories doing that. joel is in the newsroom and has been listening tojeremy corbyn.
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does the offer from jeremy corbyn on brexit, when it deliver a frictionless border in northern ireland? that was the significant line where he said if the government we re line where he said if the government were to have a deal which stayed in a customs union with no hard border then the labour party could support it. the plan as to have a customs union with the eu but not be a memberof the union with the eu but not be a member of the single market like norway would deliver no hard border. i called the european commission and they remind me of something michel barnier said back in march which is this, it should be well understood that even in a customs union a country which is outside the single market always faces border checks to ensure compliance with european standards. this is the case for turkey. turkey is an example of a
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country that is in a customs union arrangement with the eu but not in the single market and it's been well reported thereat extensive checks on the border between turkey and bulgaria even though bulgaria is a member state. yesterday they said they would like this strong single market deal with the eu but what we don't know is what that means and whether that plus a customs union would deliver a no hard border. john, respond to that. they country outside the single market would face border checks. that is what we have been saying. we believe we can negotiate that. as soon as we get into those negotiations the atmosphere will change dramatically. we have worked on the basis of
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mutual wrist back —— respect. i think the tories should move to one side and give us a try. how would you vote in a future referendum?” campaigned for the remain but we will have to see the circumstances at the time. i want to get us into government, negotiate a deal and be able in government to protectjobs and the economy. i don't think any body else is capable of doing that. if there were to be a referendum would you remain leave? we will take our decisions as they arise. the first issue for me is getting into government and negotiating the deal. let's talk about some of your policies from earlier in the week. you outlined loads of proposals for restructuring the british economy. the headline measure was to take 10% of shares in companies that it's a
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smash and grab for the treasury because anything over a £500 dividend you would take. it's1% a year over a 10—year period so it's a gradual build—up of the ability of workers themselves to share in the wealth they create within the company. this happens across europe. we wa nt company. this happens across europe. we want to make sure everybody participates. when it reaches a certain level because the state provides the resource and the basic fabric profits can be made we would like a social dividend. so the state will take a fairly large amount of money. it will pay for hospitals and education and training. you can say see why businesses would say it's a smash and grab. i think what they get out of it, first of all evidence shows the schemes mean a more
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productive and stable company and the investment within local communities will help them grow their business. is this about workers ownership? we believe there should be a balance between what the workers themselves share and the social dividend forever be. how many companies will avoid this and delist from the stock exchange? we will go out and consult them now and open up the books of amanda once they have seen what our proposals are they will be reassured because most of them want a stable company which is looking to the long—term with their employers are working effectively. but you can't force these companies if they decide to go somewhere else. we have a huge market that these companies profit from. on that basis they're getting significant benefits from being located here. as a result of that i can see companies leaving. they are here because they sell
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goods to our people. when you look at foreign—owned companies, they would be exempt. 0ur mini workers are we talking about being able to get these dividends? 11.5 million. i think there is a low estimate actually. how would you stop big companies basing themselves in anotherjurisdiction. at the moment they would need to operate in this country to sell their goods and provide the services and make their profits. if they have an operation here they will be part of this scheme. i like the proposal and i think giving workers more of a voice and stake in a company 's very good. as to whether businesses would leave, some of them are leaving because of brexit anyway. we can solve the brexit problem when we go into government. hopefully the labour party, if brexit looks like
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it's going to harm the economy, i hope you can stop it. but the iod has called your plans to coney and. the cbi says it could convince investors to pack their bags. that's what i expect them to say initially. what i always say to them, this is what we're going to do, some things you like, some things you want. you will be able to get it decent rate of return but we expect you to share some of those profits with your workers. i think that's completely reasonable. you want to transform the economy in a short period of time. what happens in week one of john mcdonald in a number 11? time. what happens in week one of john mcdonald in a number“? the first instructions is we are rewriting the greenback. we are
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doing that now and hope to publish our redraft by christmas. we will define for them the criteria on which they will make their investment and the criteria will be about raising productivity, making sure we tackle climate change and making sure we end of the regional disparity of investment. we will be able to hand them that and say these are the criteria we will used for our decisions. one labour mp suggested if it is not the general election there should be a general strike. it's not labour party policy. i understand people are angry and are looking for different means but i think this government is going to fall apart anyway and we will get a general election and get into government. in the first five yea rs i into government. in the first five years i think we will transform our society in such a way that will be able to transform people's lives.
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you are going to push through the policies you want to do, has that same treasury default for what led to the crash? i don't think the management of the economy has been effective. what we are doing now is every fortnight my treasury team—mates. we go through an exercise which we looked at all the issues we will have to confront when we go into government. we are looking at past ministers as well and bringing in external advice from the private sector and elsewhere and preparing for government. that exercise will enable us to work when we go in. are you worried about the deep state that could preventjeremy corbyn do what he wants to do. when the deep state sees what we want to do they will be on—site straightaway. what did you think
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when you heard those comments?” enjoyed it british to. you are not quite prepared to say how you would vote in another referendum?” campaigned for a remain. vote in another referendum?” campaigned fora remain. i vote in another referendum?” campaigned for a remain. i wanted to remain. they lost so we have to respect that decision, try and negotiate the best deal they can. if the government can't do that we then have to have a decision. we have kept all the decisions and options on the table. we campaigned together. the thing we like about you is you say it how it is. imagine a situational, it has all gone terrible, we are having that second vote, how would you vote? i would vote, how would you vote? i would vote to remain. we need to work the sequences through. i think you would vote remain. that is all we have
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time for here at the labour party conference. hello. you're watching afternoon live. i'm ben brown. today at 2pm: n0 audio. at the labour conference, jeremy corbyn promises to transform and rebuild a divided britain, with what he calls a green jobs revolution and an expansion of free childcare 0ur programme will create over 400,000 skilled jobs to ensure that comes about. good jobs. the labour leader also laid down a challenge
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