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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 30, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: devastation in indonesia as strong aftershocks continue to hit amid fears thousands of people may have died after the earthquake and tsunami. on the opening day of the conservative conference, theresa may accuses critics of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. a woman in the far east of russia tells the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury attack as a military intelligence officer. good morning. can team—work make the dream work? after another great day for europe at the ryder cup, they take a 10—6 lead over the united states into the final day's singles. another chilly start this morning with some spells of sunshine to come and also some areas of cloud and a few showers in places. all the details coming up. it's sunday, september the 30th. our top story: strong aftershocks have continued to hit the indonesian
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island of sulawesi, where a major earthquake and tsunami killed at least 400 people. rescue teams are still yet to reach some of the worst affected areas. the country's vice—president says he fears the number of dead could rise into thousands. simon clemison reports. it is the view now from the air which gives you a true sense of the power of this earthquake. a shopping centre, buckled. a road bridge, laid to waste. and what about the damage beyond here, in outlying areas? that picture is still not clear. the earthquake also triggered a tsunami which brought waves ten feet high into palu. a mobile phone captures the moment and a glimpse of the panic. there was a warning, but there wasn't long to get to higher ground, not before a packed city
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was quickly inundated. with strong aftershocks, people have been urged to move away from their homes. outside the hospital, patients are having to be treated in the open, too. the devastation has also made it difficult to get aid in, but the airport has now reopened. meanwhile, the search is on for survivors. rescuers today hunting through the ruins of a hotel, but one charity has warned that this crisis may only be getting worse. indonesia is used to earthquakes up with more information coming in all the time, this may only be some of the time, this may only be some of the destruction and loss of life here. simon clemison, bbc news. our indonesia editor rebecca henschke in en route to sulawesi. she sent us this report a short time ago. rescue teams are working to try and free people trapped in the debris of collapsed homes and teams from
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outside as well as personnel from the military are trying to get into the military are trying to get into the effect that area. that is proving to be challenging, as we are finding out. we are heading into the area and we are being told that many of the roads are blocked, fresh landslides occurred overnight. one of the main bridges into town has collapsed. the airport also remained closed to commercial flights. people are having to try and find alternative routes to get in. in the town of donggala and three other towns, indications and power is com pletely towns, indications and power is completely cut off. there is no news of the impact of these disasters there. and the vice president is warning that the death toll could rise into the thousands. from the city of palu we are hearing stories of local teams having to dig through the rubble with their bare hands. last night in one collapsed hotel, they managed to rescue 2a people. the owner of the hotel said he can
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still hear people trapped in the rubble, crying out for help. but they don't have heavy building equipment in order to rescue them. but is a indonesian editor. —— that is our indonesian editor. theresa may is facing a public battle at the conservative party conference with borisjohnson over her plans for leaving the eu. in an interview with the sunday times, the former foreign secretary says mrs may's chequers plan is "deranged". the prime minister says her opponents should stop playing politics with brexit. let's get more detail from our political correspondent chris mason, who is in birmingham where the conference will start later. think you forgetting up so bright and early at the start of another busy week for you. —— thank you for getting. chris, theresa may's under a lot of pressure this morning, isn't she? morning. there really is. the government, the conservatives, as with labour last week, will try to prove that they have other songs in
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their playlist but the fact is one record is rather louder than all of the others and that record is brexit so the others and that record is brexit so you have the prime minister in an interview in the sunday times this morning saying she will put the national interest first, she will ignore the noise, if you like, but comes from elsewhere within her party and plough on with the so—called chequers plan will have compromised trying to get the deal with the european union and boris johnson pops up in the newspaper almost not newsworthy because he seems to pop up the much every day, he had about a500 magnum opus and the daily telegraph the other day. he has given an interview to the sunday times as you say, he reckons the prime minister's plan is to range. the other thing he does and i think we will get a lot of this in the coming days is he offers a broad ca nvas the coming days is he offers a broad canvas of opinion about whether the conservatives should go. we shall get something of a beauty parade by the political equivalent of miss world or the london fashion week is those who may fancy one day taking
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over from theresa may decide to take the world by prafulla told the world what they are about. —— decide to tell the world what they are about. a few little pictures there, and you cannot keep a good man down. doorstepping boris, a busy man as always. a woman in the far east of russia has told the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury novichok attack as a decorated military officer. the bellingcat investigative website this week published what it claims is the true identity of one of the suspects. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning. here's our moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford. in the far east of russia, along its border with china, we went searching for clues to the salisbury poisoning. that journey for clues to the salisbury poisoning. thatjourney led to this tranquil village, almost 5000 miles from moscow. it is where a russian military intelligence officer anatoliy chepiga grew up. this week
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the investigative team at bellingcat suggested that colonel chepiga, seen here, is the true identity of the key suspect in the salisbury attack. british officials have not disputed that. the suspect is now calling himself ruslan boshirov. so our team showed the pictures to residents in colonel chepiga's old village. some did not know him but those who did we re did not know him but those who did were nervous of oui’ did not know him but those who did were nervous of our camera and we agreed they would remain anonymous. translation: it is him but much older. and this woman identified the man wanted by british police as anatoliy chepiga. i know where his pa rents anatoliy chepiga. i know where his parents used to live. he was a military man, an officer. he fought in war zones. then he was in moscow. and when i called the last for another link to his parents, the man who picked up that he was boosbeck. and bought the seine card on the street. the line was then disconnected —— uzbek. just two
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weeks ago president putin himself insisted both of the salisburys suspects were civilians, nothing suspicious, he said, nothing criminal. on friday, his spokesman said the kremlin would discuss what he called in formal investigations into the poisoning any further. —— would not. but the questions over the explanations of russia and the true identity of these men are only mounting. the fbi has approached the second woman to accuse us supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as it begins a fresh inquiry into him. the judge is accused of exposing himself to deborah ramirez when they were students in the 1980s. mr kavanaugh denies any wrongdoing. it comes days after dr christine blasey ford testified to a senate panel, and president donald trump ordered a investigation by the fbi. he isa
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he is a very high—quality person. i would expect it is going to turn out very well for thejudge. there has never been anybody that has been looked at likejudge never been anybody that has been looked at like judge kavanaugh never been anybody that has been looked at likejudge kavanaugh are. i think that it is going to work out very well but the fbi, i believe, is doing a really greatjob. they have been all over it already. the billionaire entrepreneur elon musk has agreed to step down as chairman of the tesla electric car company over a misleading tweet that said he was ready to take the firm private. he's been fined £15 million, as has the company. he'll remain tesla's chief executive, as lebo diseko now reports. he is known for pushing boundaries when it comes to tech innovation, leading the way on electric cars and space exploration. but now, it seems elon musk has pushed too far. in august, he tweeted, saying he would ta ke august, he tweeted, saying he would take a crew won back into private
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ownership at a price of $a20 a share. and crucially, he said, he had the funding secured. the stock market regulator said that was false and misleading and so, they charged him. we alleged that he had arrived at the price of $a20 assuming a 20% premium of what tesla's then existing share price and then rounding up to $a20. existing share price and then rounding up to $420. and as we have said before in connection with other matters even celebrity status nor reputation as a technological innovator affright an exemption from the federal securities laws. trailblazer or not, he has tested shareholder patience recently with antics like smoking marijuana in an interview. and he has been sued for libel after making allegations against one of the thai cave rescuers. things could have been much worse for him a regulator had wa nted much worse for him a regulator had wanted to remove him as ceo as well. he will now stay on in that position while stepping down as chairman. but
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with the compa ny‘s while stepping down as chairman. but with the company's image so closely linked to his own, investors may be wondering if that is a good thing. a campaign aimed at reducing the risks of respiratory and lung conditions for construction workers is to be launched from tomorrow. the health and safety executive says it will use measures to ensure firms are doing enough to protect their employees. around 3,500 people die each year across the uk from cancers related to the building trade. the rapper kanye west has announced he's changing his name, to ‘ye'. the star put the news out to his 28 million followers on twitter last night, writing: just could not be bothered typing the first three letters, apparently. the musician has been nicknamed ye for some time, and used it as the title for his eighth album,
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released in june. of course, he's not the first star to change his name — prince famously changed his to an unpronounceable symbol in the early ‘90s, and sean combs became ‘puff daddy‘ and ‘p. diddy‘ before this year, announcing he preferred ‘love' and ‘brother love'. is that a story? i quite like it. i am sure you will all that is what you think about ye this morning. as we've just been hearing, search and rescue teams are still trying to reach the most remote areas hit by the tsunami in indonesia. it's believed many hundreds of people could still be trapped beneath rubble and in desperate need of aid. yenni suryani is from the charity catholic relief services and joins us from jakarta. good morning and thank you for your time. can you tell us what you know of the situation at the moment? hello, good morning. thank you for having me today. from what we heard
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from the field and also from the official information from the government, search and rescue teams are still doing their greatjobs in finding more victims in the effect that area. that will be the priority of the government agencies and also humanitarian workers at this point. so far, there is only little humanitarian groups that can reach the area because the difficulties in finding transportation and also access to donggala and also palu. we have sent to people to the target area and they are still on the way there and could not move on because there and could not move on because the road access to the area —— two people hopefully by the end of today that will reach palu or donggala and can report back to us in more information from the field. we are hearing suggested numbers, we are hearing suggested numbers, we are hearing about a00 people are known to have died and you mentioned
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donggala, around 300,000 people live there and as far as we know there have been no significant arrival of any support teams so far because it is simply too difficult to get there? yes. correct. because the access there? yes. correct. because the a ccess roa ds there? yes. correct. because the access roads to the area is very challenging and the flights cannot get in until today and even the airport reopened in palu but will be prioritised for humanitarian relief aid and military personnel who will be doing search and rescue missions. the government agencies are chipping the relief aid from the from other parts on the island. apra fork shipping. —— shipping. parts on the island. apra fork shipping. -- shipping. people able to access food and water, those who have survived? from what we heard from the government and the footage and other resources , government and the footage and other
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resources, so far government and the footage and other resources, so far they lack water and food as well, but most of all they still live outside of their homes because of the destruction. so they will be needing more support and food and water and also shelter in the coming days. thank you very much indeed for your time this morning. that is the very latest we have at the moment with the situation with the tsunami. it is very difficult for rescue teams to get into that main city where we know there may be many, many more casualties. we will continue to follow that story during the course of the morning. we will also keep you up—to—date with the weather here at home. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. is the son up yet? i haven't looked outside yet. i presumed that is not from this morning. it is not from this morning. we will start to see some nice sunrise pictures coming in from the weather watchers as the morning wears on. a nice start to
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the day. pretty chilly once again. we will see some sunshine, perhaps not as much for some of us as we had yesterday. a scattering of showers. a chilly field. that is being brought about by this weather front. this cold front, a stripe of clouds sinking southwards across the country. behind that, look where the airwill be coming country. behind that, look where the air will be coming from, a long way north. that will never fill particular one. the frontal system is this stripe of cloud. the odd spot of rain and drizzle with that sinking southwards. to the north, sunny spells as we start of the day. we see some showers are blowing in across scotland on this fairly keen north—westerly wind. temperatures 8— nine degrees in aberdeen and glasgow. for northern ireland, dry weather, spells of sunshine. here is the weather front. this area of cloud running through the midlands, parts of wales, into the south—west. to the south—east we have some hazy
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sunshine. things will probably cloud over as the morning wears on. across the midlands, wales, east anglia, the midlands, wales, east anglia, the south of england, we will have more cloud today than we had yesterday. the northern england we will see spells of sunshine. similar for northern ireland and scotland. he will see some showers blowing in on backing west or north—westerly wind. —— here. the showers will become quite widespread across northern scotland. look at these temperatures. 10— 15 degrees. the best we can expect. as we go through this evening and tonight, this guys will generally be clear. dry weather around. —— the skies. the temperatures are going to fall. even in glasgow, edinburgh, newcastle down to two degrees. some spots in the north—east particularly will get very close to freezing. a touch of frost to take it into tomorrow morning. high pressure to the west, low pressure to the north—east. that feeds in a northerly breeze for some time. to the north—west a frontal
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system approaching. monday, fine and dry weather, spells of sunshine after the chilly start, then things cloud over across northern ireland and western scotland. heavy bursts of rain into the far north—west. the wind speaking up as well. those temperatures, not great, and i degrees at best across parts of eastern scotland, perhaps 1a or 15 further south —— nine degrees. further ahead, the start to recover for a while. could get up to 20 across parts of the south on tuesday. the week ahead will bring a paramount of dry weather, outbreaks of of rain as well. most of that rate to be found across the north and west of the country. —— outbreaks of rain. some sunshine, showers as well. sunny. back to you. thank you. back to you in half an hour. i love this rainbow. love a rainbow. now on breakfast, it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello, and a very warm welcome
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to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, as ever, is mark kermode. hello, mark. hi. what have you been watching? it is a very good week. we have the the wife, which is a drama starring glenn close and jonathan pryce. we have skate kitchen, which is a drama that looks more like a documentary. and black ‘a7, a brooding irish western. the wife — i am so looking forward to hearing about this. i think it is really interesting. adapted from meg wolitzer‘s novel set in the early 90s, jonathan pryce is an acclaimed author, who wakes up to a phone call saying that he has won the nobel prize. glenn close is his wifejoan, who we see supporting him, looking after him, basically making sure that everything is in the right place. she is told very specifically by the nobel committee —
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your husband is going to be besieged by newspapers, do try to keep him one removed from it. and she says — trust me, i will look after him. but there is something behind that, that's a little bit darker. here is a clip. hello, hal. hello, joan. you're looking lovely as always. thank you, hal. that's very sweet. the new york times is here. really? tell her. they're giving your husband the cover of the sunday magazine. they're knocking out a story about bill clinton for him. it's going to be like one of those shots with all the portraiture showing. every brilliant one of them, my friend. laughter. oh, god, this is so unreal. how do i look? you're fine. no crumbs, no tears, all good? nope, nope. all good. 0h, joan. tell me this isn't some great, big, fatjoke. it's all real, darling. breathe.
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ah. joan, come on, we're waiting for you. come on, let's do this. now, that look at the end. glenn close is one of those people who, with a single look can tell a thousand contradictory stories. so what then happens is — they go to stockholm to get the nobel prize and then we flash back to the 19505 when they first met where she was a very promising writer and he was a professor. she has put her writing career on hold in order to service his. perhaps there is something more behind that. it turns out he is a philanderer, he is somebody who is unable to praise their son who is also an aspiring writer. gradually, we start to discover the backstory of this relationship and we start to see the stress lines in the marriage. what i like about this is glenn close's central performance is brilliant the first time i saw this film. the second time, having seen all the things that the narrative uncovers, it's even more impressive because you realise there are so many moments
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in which the camera literallyjust looks at glenn close's face and it's telling you so many different things. yes, she's proud, but there is something else going on behind that. there is some unrevealed story. meanwhile, there's a biographer, played by christian slater, who is scratching at the surface of what he thinks is a underlying malaise of the marriage. it's really, really well—judged. i saw it twice in two days... wow. ..and the second time, i thought, what i thought was a great performance is a really, really great performance. in many ways, it's understatement is the thing that may stop it from getting huge awards and recognition. so much of what glenn close does is show don't tell. but it's very contained, but i think... and the timing, politically, the whole narrative behind that is just so interesting, isn't it? it could not have been better timed. to be honest with you, i think we could have watched this film at any time. there are great performances. jonathan pryce is
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absolutely terrific. it is very well directed. unfussily directed. letting the actors have their space and letting them tell their story. i loved it. and i think you will really, really like it. i cannot wait. good. skate kitchen, from everything i have seen and read i can't work out if this is a drama or a documentary. it is a drama by crystal moselle who made the wolfpack, which was a documentary about the family who were living in the apartment in which they basically had never gone out and learned everything from movies. this is a drama with a documentary edge about a group of skater girls of the lower eastside manhattan streets. many of them are nonprofessionals playing very close to home, although we do have jaden smith who crops up halfway through and, i think, integrates very well with the other actors. what i liked about this, some people said because it has that gritty edge, they have compared it to that film kids. they could not be further apart. kids was this leering, look at all these young kids and these skater kids and look at all the terrible things they are doing. it was described brilliantly by one critic as a "right—wing rabble rousing tell—me—off—a—thon".
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this is completely the opposite. this is much more like that french film girlhood. it's about the relationships between these young women in these skater groups. the skating does look horribly real, as much as every time they fall off, it looks like they're really hurting themselves. i thought it was really good. it had a proper gritty filter it, but very tender and very sympathetic towards its heroines. i thought it was really impressive. hm. it's a good week. it's sounding like a good week. take us into film number three. does that make it also a good week? it does, it is a hat trick. i am not giving a thumbs down to anything. this is black ‘a7, which is a drama directed by lance daly, which takes inspiration from an acclaimed short film of 2008. the title is named after the worst year of the great irish famine. and at the beginning we see an ex—ranger deserter who returns home to see his mother has been starved, his brother has been hanged for stabbing a bailiff who was trying to evict them, and he sets off on a path of vengeance. here's a clip.
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i understand that i may further bolster your sense of injustice to blame me for your brother's demise. but i do not call the crops to fail. and i am not responsible for people breaking the law. i am merely a servant of the court. i bid you good day. so on the one hand, it's a drama rooted in history and it has a very, very serious side to it. on the other hand, it's a story told like a western. it has a real western suite to it. he is being pursued by a character
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being played by hugo weaving. the ensemble cast includes jim broadbent, barry keoghan, stephen rea. a really fine ensemble cast. what i liked about it was it takes this very serious and difficult subject and turns it into something cinematic. we get this very cinematic narrative playing out in a landscape that any cinema—goer could understand. the film looks terrific. it is beautifully shot. it has a brooding score by brian byrne. it is fairly low budget and occasionally you can see the edges of the budget. frankly, the flaws are easily outweighed by the things that are right about it. it was sincere, and impressive and gripping. it has a real tone and a mood to it. i love it when a film feels like it is engulfing you in a world. i really thought this did. visually it looks terrific. yeah. it is well documented that i am not good with violence, which you will appreciate makes me slightly nervous about this one. i think you would be fine with this because i think this story,
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the narrative carries it through and the violence isn't in any way gratuitous. it's all part of the narrative. i think you'd be fine with it. hm. you do not trust me an inch, do you? i'm so sorry. i refer you to a conversation about the little stranger. but that is for another time. it wasn't that scary. it was scary. not really a scary film. 0k. anyway. tune into previous editions to see about the little stranger. best out this week. i'm flying the flag for wajib again. this was the palestinian entry for the foreign language film oscar. didn't get nominated, but is really terrific. it is a story about a father and son travelling around nazareth in the run—up to christmas, and they're taking out wedding invitations, but whilst they're in the car together they're bickering and falling apart. and you see the schisms in their relationship. the father and son are played by a real—life father and son. i thought it was terrific. it has a great air of naturalism. it's funny, but also poignant, it's personal and political at the same time. it's a very small film, you have to seek it out. it's not a wide release, but it is well worth finding.
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wajib — i thought it was terrific. dvd to recommend this week? a prayer before dawn. it's a true story of an english boxer in a notorious thailand prison. brilliant performance byjoe cole. this is directed byjean—stephane sauvaire who made a movie i reviewed here on the show a while ago called johnny mad dog. it is one of those films that is all to do with the atmosphere. you feel like you are in this situation with him. you know the things — sometimes you feel that you can almost smell a movie? you can feel the environment? it's a tough watch. i think it is one that you might find hard to watch. i thought it was a very impressive, if rather difficult, film. mm, 0k. what i'm fascinated by this week is what on earth you're going to pick up next week. what a cracking selection. you could choose any of them. how fabulous that we've had a week in which there are this many good and diverse films to choose from. it is lovely. that's the joy of cinema.
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a little stranger is not that scary. i'm sorry, itjust isn't. no, but i was very, very stressed for the whole film. i thought ruth wilson was sensational, but god, i was stressed. a few people have had some sympathy for me on twitter on this one. thank you very much. let's see what you find for me next week. a really cracking week. enjoy your cinema going. all of our previous programmes are on the iplayer. i'm sure you know the address. bbc. co. uk/markkermode. enjoy your cinema going. see you next time. thanks for being with us. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: strong aftershocks have continued to hit the indonesian island of sulawesi, where a major earthquake and tsunami killed at least a00 people.
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rescue teams are still yet to reach some of the worst affected areas. the country's vice president says he fears the number of dead could rise into thousands. theresa may is facing a public battle at the tory party conference with borisjohnson over her strategy for leaving the european union. in his first newspaper interview since stepping down as foreign secretary, he has told the sunday times that her chequers plan is "deranged". mrs may says her opponents should stop playing politics with brexit. a woman in the far east of russia has told the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury novichok attack as a russian military intelligent officer. the bellingcat investigative website this week published what it claims is the true identity of one of the suspects — colonel chepiga. yet he told russian state tv he was ruslan boshirov, a civilian. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning. the fbi has approached the second woman to accuse us supreme court
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nominee brett kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as it begins a fresh inquiry into him. the judge is accused of exposing himself to deborah ramirez when they were students in the 1980s. mr kavanaugh denies any wrongdoing. it comes days after dr christine blasey ford testified to a senate panel, and president donald trump ordered a investigation by the fbi. he's a very high—quality person. i would expect it's going to turn out very well for the judge. there's never been anybody that's been looked at likejudge kavanaugh. i think that it's gonna work out very well but the fbi, i believe, is doing a really greatjob. they have been all over it already. elon musk is to step down as chairman of the electric carmaker tesla as part of a deal with regulators in the us to settle charges of securities fraud. he will also pay a £15 million fine,
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but will remain as chief executive. he was accused of misleading investors by tweeting about financing for his apparent plan to take the firm private. holly's here with the sport. good morning. what can you tell us about the ryder cup action?m good morning. what can you tell us about the ryder cup action? it all seems very much sunshine and rainbows at the minute! i don't want to seem too positive but what a day yesterday! do notjinx it! i do not wa nt to yesterday! do notjinx it! i do not want to but it is remarkably positive. they are doing brilliantly. they are brilliant, tommy fleetwood, francesco molinari there have a bit of a broom at blossoming between them and what i love is we are hearing it off because as well they are good friends —— bromance. that is why they will put together in the first place, a little bit of chemistry
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between them. there definitely is! if they win again, one of them needs to win again in the singles and it will be the first time a european competitor has completed the whitewash, getting 5—0. competitor has completed the whitewash, getting 5-0. something for tommy fleetwood to do in his debut cup. could you imagine? we're looking forward to the taking place today. —— singles. europe lead the united states 10—6 going into today's singles matches. they dominated the morning fourballs yesterday and then shared the spoils in the afternoon. ben croucher reports. the battlecry created in scandinavia, the golf course in france, the rivalry created down the decades, the ryder cup is unmistakable as the usa have found though it is easy to lose yourself and as they found on friday it is easy to lose points too. saturday's fourball is carried on whether friday foursomes finish and his cry created in hollywood, counting down.
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four are's experience and straw hut‘s lack of it, little mattered as europe surged clear in what was becoming alarmingly one—sided event. commentator: what a shot from hatton! molinari and fleetwood won their first hatton! molinari and fleetwood won theirfirst point in hatton! molinari and fleetwood won their first point in as hatton! molinari and fleetwood won theirfirst point in as many matches, sergio garcia found some spanish strength to see off tony finau and brooks koepka... cheering and applause! but just as finau and brooks koepka... cheering and applause! butjust as another european whitewash was on, jordan spieth and justin thomas ensured they were here and heard. still the usa was staring at a heavy deficits owen henrik stenson and justin rose we re owen henrik stenson and justin rose were sent out first in the foursomes and claimed their customary points, the gap we widened. under the circumstances, probably the putt of the day. fleetwood and molinari putt may not have one such accolades but with yet another point, they became europe of the most successful pairing injust two europe of the most successful pairing in just two days. the
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europe of the most successful pairing injust two days. the us we re pairing injust two days. the us were six behind and tiger woods still had not won a match but undaunted by the chasm and the potential pitfalls plaintively at the golf nationale, spieth and thomas is a strangely is a huge mcilroy and ian poulter with pinpoint precision. it was 10—6 headed into sunday's singles, and the twice before has a side come from so far behind to win. the us will have to summon the spirit of brookline 99 if they are to create another piece of ryder cup history. there is nothing one here the singles tomorrow we go again and we go hard and we go with every single player, we go and try to win every point that we can tomorrow because we know it is going to be tough. get the kettle on! so in today's singles matches, rory mcilroy will open againstjustin thomas with paul casey out second against brooks koepka. world number twojustin rose faces webb simpson in the third game out, before jon rahm takes on tiger woods. will he find his form?
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the first match tees off at 11:05 and you can follow all the action on the bbc website and radio 5 live. liverpool's100% winning start to the season may be over but they're still undefeated in the premier league after daniel sturridge's spectacular late goal rescued a 1—1 draw at chelsea. the league's top scorer eden hazard took his tally to six, and chelsea held on to the lead until a minute from time, when sturridge let fly to ensure jurgen klopp's side came away with a point. outstanding finish. daniel had three days ago a similar finish in the last game when he hit the crossbar and so obviously he thought next time when i am in that position, i might do it a bit better and he did. fantastical and might do it a bit better and he did. fa ntastical and so deserve might do it a bit better and he did. fantastical and so deserve to him.
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it is really nice. champions manchester city have gone to the top of the table for the first time this season. they're above liverpool on goal difference after raheem sterling and sergio aguero gave them a 2—0 win at home to brighton. and the pressure just keeps building on jose mourinho. manchester united haven't had a worse start to a season for 29 years. their latest defeat came at west ham. they lost 3—1 to finish the day 10th in the table. when the moment is not the best it looks like everything goes against you, looks like everything goes against you , even looks like everything goes against you, even today you could feel exactly that. one goal is an own goal. the first of all is the linesman mistake and second goal is the referee mistake and obviously that you feel, that you feel that negativity. england captain harry kane scored twice as tottenham beat huddersfield. that took spurs up to fourth, but huddersfield are still bottom and still without a win this season. arsenal are on a winning streak, their seventh—straight victory,
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but they left it late — two goals in the last nine minutes to beat watford. an own goal followed two minutes later by one from captain mesut ozil. hearts manager craig levein said his side came through a "test of character", to beat stjohnstone 2—1 and stay five points clear of hibernian at the top of the scottish premiership. and kilmarnock are up to third after they came from a goal down to beat motherwell 3—1. greg stewart with the pick of their goals. killie are level on points with celtic, who beat aberdeen. lewis hamilton said his team—mate valtteri bottas "just did a better job" after he beat him to pole position for today's russian grand prix. bottas broke the track record at sochi, and hamilton might have gone even quicker but for a rare mistake. so the two mercedes share the front row, with sebastian vettel third on the grid. the weather is fantastic, we have a
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great crowd and it was just intense as it always is. my last two laps we re as it always is. my last two laps were not especially great so but you can't always get it right and you know at least we are still in the fight for the race tomorrow but the tea m fight for the race tomorrow but the team did an amazing job. british number onejohanna konta has made another early exit from the latest tour event. after losing her opening match in wuhan on monday, she was knocked out in the first round of the china open by yulia goerges. konta hasn't beaten a top 10 player since her victory over simona halep at wimbledon 1a months ago. in rugby league, london broncos have earned a place in next sunday's million pound game — so—called because it's worth that much to the winners. they came from 12—0 down to beat halifax 23—16 and that left them fifth in the table. they'll take on the side that finishes fourth — either toronto or hull kr — for a place in the super league next season. in rugby union's pro1a, glasgow warriors returned to the top of conference a with victory over the dragons.
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and munster enjoyed a record—breaking win over ulster. and northern ireland'sjonathan rea has become the first rider to win four successive world superbike championships. he's been totally dominant again this season, winning 13 of the 21 races, the latest at magny—cours. only carl fogarty has won as many titles. absolutely incredible. you know, i don't have many words. it is played out cards perfect this week and with one lap here and trying to be faster for the race, but ijust feel so blessed and lucky right now. the opportunities i have, you know? i was just a young kid with a dream from northern ireland and i am here, four times world champion, and it is beyond my wildest dreams. it just keeps getting itjust keeps getting better and better and lastly we said what are amazing season he had and now for successive championship wins. he could do really well and sports
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personality. he was runner-up last year. you would not forget it, we could see it again. holly, thank you. it is 100 years since one of the most decisive gains for the allied troops during world war i, and a ceremony has taken place to mark what has been described as a daring mission. this striking image was taken following the capture of riqueval bridge. a striking image following the ca ptu re a striking image following the capture of riqueval bridge. it was a major turning point for the allies in the fight to break germany's hindenburg line. let's discuss this now with the military historian spencerjones, whojoins us now. just incredible, incredible photograph. i think we have another one behind us. the bridge. how significant a moment was this? this was a moment that had significance beyond the fact that the allies, the british army, has captured an
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important bridge, the only bridge over the canal that could take heavy traffic so artillery tanks and trucks. but the bridge itself doesn't tell the whole story. what it represents is the breaking of the hindenburg line, you may not know but the hindenburg line was constructed by the german arty in 1960 and 70 as the most fortified zone on earth, the most heavily fortified sector of the western front and this line, they were going to sta ke front and this line, they were going to stake their hopes on forgetting any kind of result. for people who do not know or explain what the hindenburg line was, a supply route or what? it was part of the western front, built as sophisticated as possible, deep dugouts to protect the infantry from artillery, barbed wire in place and anti—tank traps, everything that could detect the defenders from the british attackers, most heavily fortified zone on earth. so what happened? we are seeing these modern—day pictures now. what happened and how do they manage it? it was a daring attack undertaken by the a6 north midlands
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division and the key elements that seized the bridge was a ten man unit led by a chap called captain arthur charlton who volunteered at the age of 22 and joined the veterinary corps in 191a and by a tendering —— 19 late in the lead people into action and he burst through the fog 100 years ago to this day, overwhelmed the german machine—gun nest at the western end of the bridge, the allied and, burst onto the bridge, overwhelm the engineers who were trying to detonate the bridge and the storied and charlton himself cut the cord on the explosives and threw them into the river to make sure the bridge fell into allied hands. it is incredible, it is now quarter to seven in the morning saw around this time within this hour 100 years ago this was happening. absolutely. do you think the men who were doing this would have any clue as to how significant this would be? i do think at the time they did, they were more concerned with getting across the bridge and canal and surviving the battle and afterwards there was some reflection by some of the shoulders
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—— soldiers would this be remembered? as we have is that he now we have proven it was. how crucial was the moment? was it a crucial was the moment? was it a crucial moment in hastening the end of the war, or would already have happened possibly anyway?m of the war, or would already have happened possibly anyway? it was a decisive moment, part of a wider defence that was going on along the line, american, australian, allied troops, british and french troops in action, but when the hindenburg line was broken at the riqueval bridge was broken at the riqueval bridge was crucial. it commits the german high command that the hindenburg line could not be held, they had put all of their hopes on holding the line until winter and getting a negotiated settlement but when it was broken the commanders went to the kaiser and told him the war had to end. this moment is being remembered this weekend? a special ceremony is being held? how important is it that individual moments like this through the war are remembered? very important, especially moment such as these that we re especially moment such as these that were so decisive for the end of the warand
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were so decisive for the end of the war and its easy to think of world wari war and its easy to think of world war i is futility and waste but ultimately it did end in an allied victory, in the liberation of western europe, and without it, the history of europe and geography of europe would be entirely different. i read something you had said, sorry, we are pretty much out of time but it is fascinating, you talk about babies. the fact that they we re about babies. the fact that they were not able to negotiate a settlement, they were forced into the treaty of versailles, that hitler rose to power, history could have been completely different if they had... incredible. we could be looking at a different map of europe and a timeline of history and we could talk about this for hours. spencer, it is properly lovely to talk to do so thank you, incredible images. amazing and you can never forget the bravery and coverage. and ten man! a party of ten man! here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. the last half—hour, it was not a
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sunrise from this morning. if that one from today? you guessed it. this is from today. one of our weather watchers in norfolk. the sun and not quite up yet. on its way. many of us will get to see that sunshine through today. it will be quite a cool day, a chilly start. it will stay cool through the day. a keen breeze. while we will see some sunshine, there will be clouds. you can see this stripe of cloud working its way southwards. this is a weather front, not much rain on it, the odd spot of drizzle. as it moves further south through the gate all of us will get into this very cool north or north—westerly throw. the weather front continuing its journey across parts of the midlands and wales. as pa rt parts of the midlands and wales. as part of drizzle to the south of that, at sunshine. to the north sunshine as well. sunny spells across scotland this morning. temperatures in glasgow around 90 ——
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—— nine degrees. northern england starting the day mostly fine. band of cloud across lincolnshire, northern isles, the odd spot of drizzle to the south—east of that. we start the day with sunshine. things will cloud over across the south—east. across england and wales, particularly from the midlands, wales southwards, it will be cloudy today than yesterday. northern ireland should see spells of sunshine. we will see showers across the north and west of scotland. long in on that keen west or north—west wind. those temperatures, 11 degrees in aberdeen, up to 15 in cardiff and plymouth. that is a lot. through the evening, as the sky is generally clear rows and most of the showers fade away with this cold fili northerly wind, temperatures will do away. —— clears out. some spots up
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to the north—east will dip down to freezing, even in the middle of glasgow, edinburgh, newcastle will be down about two degrees. a chilly start tomorrow. most of us starting the working week with sunshine. things will change across the north—west of the country. cloud thickening across western scotland. out—brake is a very rating lead in the day. more monday, a chilly feeling day. 9— 15. —— outbreaks of rain. dry weather to come through the weekend. some rain at times. much of that was the north and west. mixed prospects. most of us should seek some sunshine. good news. think you very much indeed. we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00. time now for this week's travel show. hello and welcome to the travel show. this time from the heart of central london. this place is known around the world for its red buses,
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red postboxes. and these guys. be humble london red phone box. time could soon be up for these iconic though now fairly little used landmarks for street but in the capital. the red phone box is synonymous with london. when they we re synonymous with london. when they were first introduced in the 1920s they gave many poorer londoners access to the same for the very first time. and after countless appearances in films, tv shows and movie studios, they became something of an icon both here and around the world. you come to london, you see the red telephone box. the first thing that comes into my mind when i think of britain, the queen or the red phone booth. although as more people got access to their own phone at home, the numbers of actual calls being made from them dropped. but it was the arrival of the mobile phone that really sounded the death
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knell for these pieces of london history. now, i can remember when i first came here 20 years ago, using a phone box was a really big event, it was like, "i have arrived in london." i probably took several dozen selfies in one of these things. these days it is just clear it isn't being used much. and frankly it isn't the nicest place to be. the smell is not ideal, either. i might get out of here. even though a lot of these phone boxes are not in the best of shape now, there is a group of londoners who still take pride in them, and the postcard image they portray. i thinkjust because phone boxes are british icons, for them to look scruffy in the photos that are going back around the world with tourists after their holidays, i didn't like that idea. so i thought, why not clean them up? it's only polite. seeing one in a completely sorry state was almost like seeing an elderly relative
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in distress or something. we like to help her, we think it is a worthy cause and we are loyal friends. it looks nice when they are all scrubbed up. emily and her band of volunteers regularly spend their spare time sprucing up phone boxes like these for sightseers. but it looks like even their valiant efforts might not be enough to save them. they are difficult to keep clean and they're not very easy for people with disabilities to use, and we are obliged to have a quite high percentage of payphones which can be used by people with disabilities. over the next couple of years, a new high—tech wi—fi enabled street phone is being unveiled across the streets of london. so how do they compare? well, this does not look like a phone booth. there is no booth!
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it looks like a smartphone, actually. all right, how does this work? just pop in my number. there is no receiver. hello? hello, it is me. i'm at a fancy new phone booth. can you hear me? yes, i can hear you. excellent. all right, see you later. well, it's not very private, but it is free, so that's good. so the question is, what's going to happen to the old red phone boxes we've all come to know and love? some have been put up for sale, and some are being offered to local communities to turn into things like public libraries. others are already being rented out to businesses who see the beauty in keeping things small, like fouad, who now repairs phones inside a phone box. closed, locked, secure. i am not claustrophobic at all.
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other businesses that have cropped up include cafes, coffee bars, and souvenir shops, all crammed inside a square metre of floor space. you think of all the conversations these four walls must have overheard, and declarations of love, cries of emergency or whispers of espionage. these walls have heard it all, every type of conversation. and i think it is sad to see they are now empty. as yet, there is no set date for when the last of the red phone boxes will be removed from the streets of london, but i for one really hope they remain part of the cityscape, even if it is just for the tourists to take selfies with.
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and finally, we are in gurugram in india, where cat moh gets to grips with the country's first natural horsemanship course, and learns about the native marawi horses that can only be seen in this part of the world. horses have played a vital part in indian culture — from helping labourers in the field, to being part of ceremonial activities, such as weddings. but this is stable is the only place in the country that runs a natural horsemanship course, also known as horse whispering. and i'm here to find out exactly what that is. hi! hi. i'm cat. when you find the sweet spot of the horse... yes...
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manjeev and charlotte are a husband and wife team that have a special interest in the marawi breed, characterised by their curved pointy ears. it is rare to see them outside of india because they are banned from export. natural horsemanship is a way where we understand psychology of the horses. 0k. enjoy yourfreedom. wait, what you doing to make her turn? i'm crossing her shoulders in. yeah. so that creates a barrier the horse. right. if i stay behind, i increase her speed. oh, interesting. but the moment i block her, here — so that's how they understand in the wild. the alpha male works according to these formulas. so you have established yourself as the alpha. yes. they are a herd animal. they need one leader. 0k. either you become leader or they become leader. right. this horse was rescued from a brick factory two weeks ago. its leg was injured and the owner
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was struggling to take care of her. manjeev and charlotte have been looking after her using this method. looking good. my turn now. she is questioning the authority. just a little bit more. she turned! 0k. stay in the circle. manjeev says their courses have become popular with companies from delhi sending their employees here for team—building exercises. in the office, you won't see what team member has what kind of potential. but when they come across the horses, horses try and pinch all your nerves. they don't let you clot, because they don't give you time to think about it. you will see out of ten people one will become a natural leader. or one who is just trying to control everybody. so you can see what kind of personality every team member has, which makes it easier on a day—to—day basis to run your business. ok, to her back.
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keep her in view. you don't want the horse to run you over. sorry i was not quite the fearless leader. laughter. most of their foreign visitors come from the uk, switzerland, and dubai — mainly travellers looking to learn more about the special breed, and also about natural horsemanship, staying from two hours to two weeks. so it is lunchtime for the horses. yummy, yummy. lunch is served. dozens of horses live at these stables, located at la pegasus polo centre by the aravalli hills. it is a big operation with lots of people involved. most are polo ponies. it is hoped that these marawi horses will be up to play polo too. their gentle temperament is suited for beginners.
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for decades, it was only feasible to play polo if you belonged to the army. but in recent years it has become more accessible to civilians in india. this polo centre is one of the biggest in the country. tarun sirohi, who runs it, learnt to play in the army and captained india forfour years, but he wants to promote the sport outside of army circles. so are you trying to equestrian sports more popular? because at the moment everyone is so obsessed with cricket here. absolutely right. it has become a religion here. everyone eats, sleeps, breathes cricket. so what's the strategy for getting more people interested ? the idea is that la pegasus becomes a place where anyone who wants to come and learn the sport can come and do that. we have a variety of memberships from kids to adults.
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i have 1a, 15, 16—year—old kids learning. but on the other side, i also have a lot of a0—year—olds learning, when they're trying to rediscover their lives when a midlife crisis hits. it's never too late. yes, i keep saying when the midlife crisis hits, it is time to either get a new girlfriend or learn polo. the marawi horses manjeev and charlotte are training aren't quite ready to play. and people still prefer to use thoroughbreds, but they're hoping to find a place of on the field. they also plan to open a groom school to train up more people in the way of natural horsemanship as equestrian sport in india increases in popularity. good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. our headlines today:
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devastation in indonesia as strong aftershocks continue to hit, amid fears thousands of people may have died after the earthquake and tsunami. on the opening day of the conservative conference, theresa may accuses critics of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. a woman in the far east of russia tells the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury attack as a military intelligence officer. good morning. can teamwork make the dream work? after another great day for europe at the ryder cup, they take a 10—6 lead over the united states into the final day's singles. another chilly start this morning with some spells of sunshine

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