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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 1, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11:003m: indonesia appeals for international help after the earthquake and tsunami in sulawesi, as sui’vivoi’s run out of food and clean water. now families are camping out in the open like this family overhear that is collecting what they can and are surviving of the food they have. ‘my guardian angel'. praise for the airtraffic controller who guided a jet to safety during the quake, but died when his tower collpased. the chancellor defends theresa may's brexit plan and says business must be at the heart of tory policy making. the parents of a 15 year old girl who died of an allergic reaction to a sandwich, tell the bbc that without action the same thing could happen again. with every minute and every hour that passes the uk is sitting on a
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time bomb of somebody dying yet again. that is how serious it is. team europe have been basking in the success of yesterday's victory over the us in the ryder cup, beating the americans by a seven point margin. good morning. it's monday, october 1st. welcome to bbc newsroom live. desperate attempts are being made to reach people trapped under buildings following the earthquake and tsunami in indonesia. more than eight hundred people are known to have died but rescuers say the final figure could be in the thousands. the country's president has appealed for international help as it struggles to get emergency aid and heavy equipment to central sulawesi. survivors in the city of palu say they're running out
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of clean water and food. jenny kumah has this report. the brutal force of nature. with hundreds dead, mass burials are due to begin to stop the spread of disease. meanwhile, the authorities struggle to dig out the living. dozens of people are thought to be under the rubble of this hotel in the city of palu. it's a race against the clock to respond to the shouts for help. in this case, it came to late. translation: looking at the conditions there, there are still bodies unidentified as well as victims buried under rubble. there are also remote areas yet to be reached by the search and rescue teams. the powerful earthquake struck on friday, crumbling this shopping centre and destroying this road bridge. it also triggered a tsunami, waves ten feet high captured by this mobile phone. there was a warning but there wasn't
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long enough to get to higher ground before the flooding swept in. the government has promised to speed up aid but for some, it's not coming fast enough, with desperate residents taking matters into their own hands. translation: we need to eat. we don't have any other choice, we must get food. translation: we are in a crisis, we have nothing for our basic needs. food, water — we desperately need them. with homes destroyed, survivors take shelter in tents until they can rebuild their lives. jenny kumah, bbc news. an indonesian air traffic controller has been hailed a hero after losing his own life while ensuring a passenger plane escaped the deadly earthquake. 21 one year old anthonius gunawin agung, was at the control tower of palu airport in central sulawesi when the 7.5 magnitude quake struck on friday.
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he waited until the plane was airborne before jumping from the crumbling control tower. he died before he could be transferred to a specialist hospital. the bbc‘s rebecca henshke is one of the first foreign correspondents to reach the city of palu. she's given us a picture of how people are coping with the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. this is what remains of this fishing community. what was tightly packed houses and shops all now reduced to rubble. people here say they only had a few minutes warning after that strong earthquake on friday to flee to higher ground when they saw huge waves coming in. those that could survived did so by clinging onto trees and buildings. now, families are camping out in the open like this family overhear that has
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collected what they can and is surviving of the food they have. there is no power here and very little fresh food or freshwater. people are saying they desperately need to get aid in. this man has been telling me that he needs help. right now we have not received food or materials from our government. we need that. if you don't get it soon, what will happen? i don't know but we hope our president will caiaphas. people here have written on a sign behind me saying pray and a call—out
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for help from the people who are managing to get into this city. rose travel is very difficult. they have been landslides in the hills and the airport remains closed. so the traffic as you can see is bumper—to—bumper. there is now almost no petrol here which is also making rescue efforts difficult. community members hearsay there are bodies still amongst this rubble, people who are still missing, and you can smell decomposing bodies here. but they don't have the energy resources do anything about it. there will be mass burials today of bodies found around this area in an attempt to stop the spread of disease. in the town itself there has been looting today. people desperate for food have has been looting today. people desperate forfood have been raiding shops. a sense of pensioners in the
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air. at the same time people have been incredibly kind, the community coming together. people have been offering us food and water and they have done that to each other. we can cross now to indonesia's capitaljakarta and speak to iris van deinse from the red cross. in terms of your team is getting to where they are needed, how much progress are they making? right now there are hundreds of red cross volunteers in the field, mainly focusing on search and rescue. that is our main priority at the moment. this morning a team reached an area which had not been reached by any other workers before and they found
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34 people that were dead. they helped with evacuation of the bodies to the hospitals. besides that, we provide aid like blankets, sleeping mats, jerry cans. did they find survivors? yes of course. they found survivors? yes of course. they found survivors and if they find survivors first aid is the main priority to help people cope. indonesia is appealing for international help to respond to this crisis. what are the main difficulty is that you can see in terms of getting aid to where it is needed? obviously access is a
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struggle. the roads have been blocked by the rubble and mad. it's very difficult to reach the area i ca rt. very difficult to reach the area i cart. everything needs to come via here. but we are planning to ship some goods to the rear. are you hopeful at this stage of continuing to find survivors? we have reports of people trapped in the landslides. it's very challenging situation but is there a good chance of finding more people alive? hopefully. we will keep going with this work because there is always a chance that you find someone who has survived. so it's very important to keep doing that. thank you very much
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for your time and good luck to your teams. a major conservative party donor has accused the party of losing its way and that the prime minister has let herself down personally by failing to champion business. the comments by michael spencer come ahead of a major speech on the economy by the chancellor, philip hammond. the chancellor has said his speech to the conservative party conference will make the case for "twe nty—fi rst century capitalism". philip hammond is also expected to repeat his backing for theresa may's brexit plan, when he addresses delegates in birmingham. the brexit secretary, dominic raab, has told the conference that the government's willingness to compromise with the eu is "not without limits". our assistant political editor norman smith joins us from birmingham where the conference is being held. listening to you earlier, you're not expecting this conference to resolve
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anything on brexit. no. the honest truth for theresa may is to get through this conference in one piece. say nothing new about brexit and then on the other side you get to the tense last—minute negotiations. we know mrs may has talked about bringing forward new thinking on the northern ireland backstop in an effort to break the logjam. at this conference i would not expect to see any movement when it comes to brexit. listening to the chancellor ‘s this morning, most of his pre—speech interviews are all focused on trying to reset relations between the tory party and business. reshaping of the apprenticeship levy to make it more to the liking of business. when he was asked about brexit philip hammond was confident that the deal would be done. the
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mood is undoubtedly that people want to do mood is undoubtedly that people want todoa mood is undoubtedly that people want to do a deal with the uk. people wa nt to do a deal with the uk. people want to minimise the disruption of the uk's departure from the european union, they were to continue to have a good relationship with us and smooth trading partnerships in the future. that is the message we hear universally from across the 27 member states. we had a similar but more abrasive message from the brexit secretary dominic raab. he is allowed a message for those brexit yea rs allowed a message for those brexit years who have been criticising mrs may and the chequers plan. years who have been criticising mrs may and the chequers planm years who have been criticising mrs may and the chequers plan. if i had to do three years ago that we were going to end free movement, stop the vast annual budget contributions, leave the single market, get out of the customs union, make parliament supreme, protect the union, except the common fisheries policy and
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ditch the common agricultural policy, you are dealt with in my arm. ourambition and pragmatism, thatis arm. ourambition and pragmatism, that is what our proposals will deliver. i said if, if the eu matches our ambition and our pragmatism. joining me now is the treasury ministerjohn glenn. let's start on the brexit stuff. when you talk to leading critics of mrs may they think she will get a deal in brussels. but how on earth that she get that deal through parliament given we know there is a solid block of 50 tory mps were going to vote against anything remotely resembling checkers? we have not seen the deal yet. we are in the final stages of that negotiation so until we see the final deal and the prime minister will be looking carefully at the range of views expressed across the party at the conference. we have
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always had a range of the one europe and she has lacked in the national interest ring everyone together and come up with a deal parliament can endorse. for some conservatives in this conference brexit matters more than anything, more than being in government or conservative party unity. with that mindset it's difficult to see how mrs may can get them on board? the plant -- prime minister has to try and secure the deal that honours the decision made by the place people but also widget sets the economy there for future growth. i am very clear that she will deliver a deal. it will be very difficult to resist because it will be in the national interest. that is what guides the prime minister despite all the noise. why is the government even thinking about now deal given that we have heard from the chancellor in recent weeks warning that the treasury could be
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something like £80 billion worse off. how can now deal be in the national interest? we have taken responsible measures across government to take account for all eventualities. the government '5 position is we don't believe now deal is oddly likely but it's something we must have plans for. that is the action of a responsible government. we are working on securing a deal in the national interest. we hear a lot about the conference about non—brexit agenda but where are the big ideas? what are the big policies that this party is proposing that will grab people's attention? the chancellor is about to make his speech and i am looking for him to make some big announcements on the way the party is focused on enabling enterprise to flourish in our country. creating a
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better relationship between big business and all the entrepreneurs who are anxious to grow their businesses despite the difficulties of the political context. it will be interesting to see the reaction the chancellor gets in the hall because he has faced some criticism over brexit. norman smith there in birmingham and we will bring you more from the conservative party conference all day including that speech from the chancellor. the headlines on bbc news: (00v) 00v) indonesia appeals for international help after the earthquake and tsunami in sulawesi — as survivors run out of food and clean water
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(00v) ‘my guardian angel‘ ——praise for the airtraffic controller who guided a jet to safety during the quake — but died when his tower collapsed (00v) the chancellor defends theresa may's brexit plan and says business must be at the heart of tory policy making doctorjohn said more has announced he will retire as archbishop of york. not imminently. june the 7th twe nty20 york. not imminently. june the 7th twenty20 has been announced as the date he will retire as archbishop of york. it's the second most senior position in the church of england and that announcement just position in the church of england and that announcementjust coming. the us and canada have reached a deal to reform the north american free trade agreement after last—minute negotiations. the deal, which governs nearly £800 billion in trade between the two countries and mexico, wil give us dairy producers more access to canada's dairy market,
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and cap canada's car exports to america. dr emilyjones is director of the global economic governance programme at university of oxford. here's her take on the deal. we know there has been intense negotiations the whole weekend and details are scarce. what we've heard so details are scarce. what we've heard so far is that canada has moved ontario as we expected but they would have given nearly as much as the us administration would have wanted and not much more than they had already given. i think all three countries will be relieved to have deal. business in all three countries will be revealed —— revealed —— relieved. they've had some concessions from mexico and
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more restrictive rules of origin which means more of those cars will be made in the united states. but it's not clear whether that will be a dramatic shift in terms ofjobs. hundreds of thousands of independence supporters are expected to demonstrate across the spanish region of catalonia later today. they'll mark exactly a year since the regional government defied madrid by holding an illegal independence referendum that resulted in heavy—handed police action to stop the vote. we now follow two of the characters involved in last year's clashes and reflect on what has changed. let's get the latest from gavin lee. a year since all this began, take stock of what has happened in that time. in central barcelona and in the big cities around catalonia they are suggesting they will be i million independent supporters protesting today. there is a huge
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crowd starting to gather behind me at the university. what's also happening is right now many of the businesses are closing and people are going outside to have an hour to protest. the schools that were open on this day last year as a polling station are gathering outside to extend the protest. this weekend as well, we saw unity supporters. they we re well, we saw unity supporters. they were supporting and praising the actions of the police a year ago today because they were headlines around the world about those illegal voters and illegal referendum and people deciding to go out to vote that day for independence. 90% of those voted. the images that spread around the world of the police firing rubber bullets, the unity to toasters supported those police officers yesterday. speaking to many
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officers yesterday. speaking to many of the politicians are saying today keep pushing and keep going because he is still talking about that path towards independence despite the new spanish government saying there is absolutely out of the question. on friday, the inquest into the death of 15 year old natasha ednan—laperouse — who died after eating a sandwich containing sesame seed — found that the label on its packaging was inadequate. natasha died injuly 2016 after suffering a cardiac arrest during a flight. she suffered an allergic reaction to the pret a manger baguette — containing sesame — which she'd bought at heathrow airport. she had checked the packaging before buying the sandwich, and the ingredient wasn't listed. the victoria derbyshire progremme spoke to natasha's parents, who told us about saying goodbye to their daughter. he called me and he said she is
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going to go in the next minute, you have to say goodbye to her right now. i am have to say goodbye to her right now. iam putting have to say goodbye to her right now. i am putting the phone by here year so she can hear you. if she can hear you she will hear you. that is when i said goodbye to her. as i finished he just when i said goodbye to her. as i finished hejust said when i said goodbye to her. as i finished he just said thank you and hang up to phone her brother who would also get an opportunity to say goodbye to her. i phoned my parents from both my side of the family and tanya's side. our son who was 13 at the time was being looked after by his grandmother. all of them in quick succession had a chance to say
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goodbye but to wait before her heart completely stopped and she flat lined. as natasha was dying in hospital on that sunday i spoke to my mother back in london and said please go and buy the same sandwich from your local store right now and call me back. go and check if there are any allergens in that sandwich. she did and she called me back and told me before natasha was dying that actually she had been to that local sandwich shop and bought exactly the same sandwich, there was no allergy warnings insight, but she we nt no allergy warnings insight, but she went to the counter and asked the
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staff is there anything in this sandwich to be concerned about? might granddaughter has allergies. the staff went back to back room and handed my mother if older and said there is some information in there. when mother looked through it and there was one sheet of paper listing most of the somebody's on one side and if you carefully run your finger across in small writing it highlighted the allergens in each sandwich. my mother noticed sesame seeds were highlighted as a knowledge in the sandwich and when mother was stunned. she said to the staff where are the sesame seeds because they are not even visible to the naked eye and she was told by the naked eye and she was told by
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the staff they are baked into the dough. at which point my mother screamed and said you have murdered my grandchild. you can see a longer clip of that interview before 12 o'clock. it's time for sport now. in safe hands. this is the european team who didn't just conquer one of the strongest ever american sides, they thrashed them. heading into sunday's singles, europe already had a healthy lead but the early defeat for rory mcilroy did little to settle the heart rate. butjon rahm did, beating tiger woods and beating his chest.
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i wonder where he learned that from? oh, yes. look at him go, look at him go! ian poulter is for many mr ryder cup, and when he beat world number one dustin johnson, europe were on the brink. then phil mickelson stuck it in the drink and the ryder cup was staying this side of the pond. they said it couldn't be done but what do you think now? this european team was questioned, people questioned the picks, questioned the quality we had, and i think we showed this week what togetherness we have. rory, rory, rory! and how it worked. for three days outside paris, this was a europe united. ben proud, bbc news. some people say golf is boring. this is certainly not boring. it's been an amazing experience for everyone involved. people i worked so hard
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and they should be very proud of themselves. it seems that europe's captain could not bear to let that shall further is side. he released this photo earlier on this morning. lewis hamilton as taken a big step towards a fifth world championship after a controversial victory at the russian grand prix. mercedes bosses ordered his team—mate to let hamilton go by to boost his chances of beating title rival sebastien vettel. his championship lead is now 15 points with five races remaining. he was a real gentleman to let me go by. here's not fighting for the championship. it's been a great weekend for the team. the team has done an exceptional job
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weekend for the team. the team has done an exceptionaljob to have this advantage over ferrari. i can understand how difficult it was but he did a fantasticjob today. understand how difficult it was but he did a fantastic job today. that's all the sports are now. for more ryder cup reaction head over to the bbc sport website. it's time now for a look at the weather forecast. many of us woke up to some sunshine this morning. for most parts of england and wales it will remain dry into this afternoon. this is the scene at wolverhampton at the moment. not a cloud in the sky. there is more cloud moving across scotla nd there is more cloud moving across scotland and northern ireland. that will move into the far north of england and there will be simpler developing in england and wales this afternoon. rain will moving in the far north—west of scotland. it will be at your leigh day. tonight, we
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continue with that cloud and rain in scotland. patchy drizzle moving southwards. not quite as cold as it was last night. during tuesday much more cloud around compared to today. sumptuously conditions first thing. dry into the afternoon. it will be warmer. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. authorities in indonesia now say over 800 people have died in friday's earthquake and tsunami. almost 50 thousand have been displaced and the country is appealing for international help. but there's praise for one air traffic controller who stayed in his crumbling tower during the eathquake in until a plane was airborne, ultimately losing his life chancellor philip hammond defends the prime minister's brexit plans at their party conference in birmingham — whilst brexit secretary dominic raab warns the uk's willingness to compremise "is not without limits". the archbishop of yorkjohn sentamu,
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one of the church's most seniorfigures, has announced he will be stepping down in 2020. the us and canada finally reach a deal to reform the north american free trade agreement — after 13 months of fraught negotiations between the two countries. as we were hearing earlier, the parents of 15—year—old natasha ednan—laperouse — who died after eating a sandwich containing sesame seed — have been speaking to the victoria derbyshire programme following the inquest into her death. let's hear more of that interview now. he called me and he said, she is going to go completely in the next minute, maybe two. you have to say goodbye to her right now. right now, quickly, say goodbye to her. i am
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putting the phone by her ear so she can hear you. if she can hear you, she will hear you. and that's when i said goodbye to her. and as i finished, hejust said said goodbye to her. and as i finished, he just said thank you and hung up, to then call up and speak to her brother, who would also get an opportunity to say goodbye to her. i actually... i her. iactually... i phoned my her. i actually... i phoned my parents, natasha's grandparents read my side of the family and tanya's side. and ourson, of the family and tanya's side. and our son, who was 13 at the time, was just being looked after by his grandmother, while tanya had got to the airport, and all of them, in quick succession, had the chance to say goodbye and just about one minute or two minutes before her heart completely stopped and she flat lined. it is unimaginable that you all have
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to go through that. tanya, you then obviously did go out to nice and u2 we re obviously did go out to nice and u2 were together and had to deal with what had happened to your daughter. how did you cope in those hours and days after that? we were in utter shock. absolute shock. the city is closed down itself because of the killings. there had been a terrorist attack three days before where somebody had driven into the promenade and was a lot of grief in the city already. it was hard to even get to the mortuary to see natasha the next stage. we just were in complete and utter shock. we just didn't know at the time how on earth this could have happened. no dean didst call his mother to go into a prep objet to
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buy the exact same begets natasha had eaten. he knew that was all she had eaten. he knew that was all she had had that morning, which she did. that gave us some indication of what had happened. but it was just such a big thing. we had to get her back, we had to bring her body back and there was so much bureaucracy, read tait, it is actually quite a lengthy process but we managed because he speaks fluent french, luckily. and we just speaks fluent french, luckily. and wejust managed speaks fluent french, luckily. and we just managed to get her back and within the week. and it was only really after we were back that we really after we were back that we really start finding out more about what had happened. and how was it that you found out eventually then that there had been sesame in that they get? do you want to? i can answer that. what happened, as natasha was dying, in hospital, on that sunday. i spoke to my mother back in london and i said, please go and buy the same sandwich from your local press objet
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right now, right now and call me back. and go and check if there are any allergens in that sandwich. speak to them. she did and she called me back and she said, before natasha was dying, as she was dying, that actually, she'd been to that local sandwich shop, pret a manger, and what exactly the same sandwich. there was no allergy warnings in sight at all but she went to the counter and asked the staff where you pay. and she asked, either... is there anything in this irish to be concerned about? my granddaughter has our bodies. staff then went back to somewhere in the back room and handed my mother a folder. the typical folder you would find in any office. and said, there is some information into fair. my mother then looked through it, a lot of loose—leaf information, if you like. there was one sheet that our paper,
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like an excel spreadsheet, listing most of the sandwiches and on one side, and if you carefully put round your finger across and small writing it highlighted the allergens in each damage noticed immediately that sesame seeds were highlighted as allergen in the sandwich. and my mother was stunned. she told me and should be counted. she said the staff, where are the sesame seeds? because they are not even visible to the naked eye. and she was told by the naked eye. and she was told by the staff well, they are baked into the staff well, they are baked into the dough and which buoyed by mother screamed and she said you have murdered my grandchild and that is how she recounted the story to me on the phone as natasha was dying in hospital. when i realised that was why she had died. she had had a full
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allergic reaction to a very, very powerful allergen which is like a poisoned the body for those who are allergic to sesame. and unwittingly she had eaten a huge dose. hundreds of sesame seeds that were baked into the dough, not visible. and that was why she had died. pret a manger have said we are deeply sorry for natasha's death and cannot begin to comprehend the pain herfamily have cannot begin to comprehend the pain her family have gone through and the grief they continue to feel. we have heard everything the coroner and natasha's family have said this week and we are committed to lead the changes required across our industry. we have always acted in accordance with clause related to food labelling. clearly these laws are inadequate for those with severe allergies. the coroner was critical of those laws and has written to the government, to the food standards, the people responsible for food standards and labelling, and also pret a manger. what you think about
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those laws and what needs to happen? do you want to answer that? those laws absolutely have to change. society as a whole has taken much more seriously and it starts with a law stating that anything is pre—packaged it has to have a list of...i pre—packaged it has to have a list of... i mean, there are 14 allergens. there are only 14 allergens. there are only 14 allergens that are listed by the food standards agency. and they have two be easily, easily seen by anybody buying anything that is pre—packaged. that means a sticker on the packaging. this is... it is a legal issue. obviously, there is the schedule five which which has allowed larger companies not to put labelling on but this could be changed tomorrow. it doesn't actually have to be a law change. if there are warnings to your company that people are having allergic reactions to your food, the people
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are being hospitalised because they are being hospitalised because they are eating food that you sell, you don't have to wait for a law change to start putting stickers listing the allergens on the foods that you sell. you can just the allergens on the foods that you sell. you canjust do it because it is the right thing to do. but saying that overall, what we want to do now, what we really are absolutely wanting to be a voice for so many people. families with allergic children, adults who are allergic, there needs to be peace of mind to know that when you buy something you have faith in that product and you know exactly what is in that and if it is dangerous or not to you or your child. you have had to wait two years for this inquest to happen and for there to be this conversation about labelling that we and many others are obviously have been by now. in that time, nothing has changed. audi feel about that, what's been like, knowing what happened daughter and
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knowing what happened daughter and knowing that the packaging was unchanged ? it is unbelievable, actually. and i think the public have also expressed that. for us as a family it is incredible that nothing has really changed. it is a sort of cursory changed. it is a sort of cursory change that someone like pret a manger have done to put allergen information on shelves stickers but not yet on the actual packaging of the sandwich. now, the point here is that someone is allergic and there are hundreds of thousands of people who are allergic in the uk, they need to actually have that information on the packaging, not somewhere else. it must be adhered to the printed packaging. and to still not have done that, not only over two years since our child has died asa over two years since our child has died as a result, but also many more
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years since many people have been hospitalised and it is on record that that is the case, with pret a manger's records of allergic incidents. it is now years and they still actually haven't done it. and i think anyone in their right mind knows it is common sense, it is a matter of responsibility, and a matter of responsibility, and a matter of responsibility, and a matter of trust, as a food operator, to at least have the decency debate the allergens on the packaging and not somewhere else weather could be a disassociation between the product and the label. the chief executive of pret a manger has said that they do want there to be meaningful change and they will make sure it does happen. how important is it to you that there is change? it is extremely important. and i
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think we both have been talking about this, tanya and myself, in the la st about this, tanya and myself, in the last days. it is so important because with every minute of every hour that is passing, the uk sitting ona time hour that is passing, the uk sitting on a time bomb of someone dying yet again. that is how serious it is. i think ask anyone. to be want anyone to die again? no. nobody wants anybody to die, not even pret a manger. so if that is the case do something. not words, but deeds. right now. you must have been, i'm sure, living with so many different emotions since natasha died. obviously devastation, sadness, anger. how would you describe where you are now and how you see things going forward ? two years of not being able to move forward with this was very difficult. i would forward with this was very difficult. iwould pick forward with this was very difficult. i would pick up the paper or on the news there would be a
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story of somebody who had died, young person, quite often. allergies, in the two year since. and it was always such a shock that these things are still happening but it just doesn't seem these things are still happening but itjust doesn't seem to be taken seriously as we felt it should be. and i did make a comment, excuse me. on the last day of... sorry, on the last day of the inquest, that i felt that we were finally on the train. we were going somewhere. we were on a journey. it felt like we had just got on after being stuck in the same place for a long time. itjust feels now we're finally moving slowly and that's something that we're both really, really grateful for and something that we definitely want to ta ke something that we definitely want to take advantage of that we can do this and we can really bring this foreword to happen as quickly as possible. you're watching bbc news.
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the transport secretary chris grayling has said there will be a new one click compensation to be introduced for rail delays and real disruption. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. donald trump is talking about the deal reached with canada and mexico after his huge criticism of nafta. he was the first to tweet, late at night. a deadline... it will bring all three great
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nations closer together and competition... indonesia appeals for international help after the earthquake and tsunami in sulawesi — as survivors run out of food and clean water. ‘my guardian angel‘ — praise for the airtraffic controller who guided a jet to safety during the quake — but died when his tower collapsed. the chancellor defends theresa may's brexit plan and says business must be at the heart of tory policy making. business rates in england
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could be changed to help high street retailers. at a fringe event at the conservtive party conference business secretary greg clark has said the role played by high streets should be recognised and adjusting business rates "will be one way of doing that". retail groups say online shopping and rising business rates have left many high street retailers struggling. tesco bank has been fined £16.4m by the uk financial regulator for failings surrounding a cyber attack on its customers in november 2016.the financial conduct authority said the bank had failed to exercise due skill, care and diligence in protecting its personal current account holders. the fraudsters got away with £2.26m. tesco bank said all the money had been refunded to account holders. and restaurants will be legally barred from keeping tips from staff under plans to be announced
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by theresa may on monday. high street chains will be forced to pass on all service charges to workers. the move follows a public outcry over the practice by some restaurants of skimming off a share of tips. some welcome words from business secretary greg clark for retail buisnesses. he told a fringe event at the tory party conference that the treasury is conducting a review of business rates. some experts believe the rise of online retailing, increasing staff costs and rising business rates have created a "perfect storm" for the high street. joining me now is mike cherry, chairman of the federation of small businesses how they hurt bizniz what do u think of this? we are proposing a 2—year freeze on business rates to provide much welcome relief in challenging times, together with a targeted high streets discount of £1,000 and a reformed appeals process."> there were almost based by the valuation office. once that has been
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set then it is legally required of the local authority to actually collect that rate, even though it may be under appeal that could be wrong. and fsb have in calling for a total reform for a long time so we very much well, the secretary of state's idea over a review but let's look at some specific help that they could give to high—street retailers, particularly those who are struggling at the moment because of a lot of the online retail that we all very much use and well,. in our day—to—day lives. so firstly, we are calling for a freeze on business rates. time limited to the next two yea rs, rates. time limited to the next two years, possibly. and then a further £1000 for those directly impacted in the high street. but the appeals process itself needs to be totally reformed. so that genuine businesses can easily make a proper appeal quickly, they're not paying out on
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something that they can't afford whilst waiting for an appeal to be heard or to actually be put back in place. so we believe that... sorry. go ahead, mike, go ahead. we believe that business rates are regressive taxes, it is past its sell by date and also feel that it has absolutely gone past tipping point now and is having a huge and disproportional impact on our high—street retailers. but it still attacks may the government needs or how else would you suggest the government make that money? well, let's just make the fundamental point behind business rates. it is a tax that is levied that you have to pay out, whether or not you turn over £1 and sales, whether or not you make any profit at all. so it is the only tax on which that is based. whilst we respect the government's need to have that £27 billion in tax, there has to be a much better and much
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fairer way to raise the tax and is not just retailers. fairer way to raise the tax and is notjust retailers. those manufacturers of all other sorts of businesses that are hugely disproportionately affected by this. the business secretary is that the treasury will investigate business rates. what do think that investigation will entail question how realistic is it to expect things to change as drastically as you would do? well, we need to get on with as quickly, so we well, the review but i think some quick announcements, possibly here at party conference, would be very, very well,. and we look forward to there being a total reform where all businesses can be represented, to have an input, to make sure that we are stupid and play something that is fit for purpose in the 21st—century. mike cherry, thank you so much for talking to me this morning. let's ta ke talking to me this morning. let's take a quick look at some of the other business headlines. restaurants will be legally barred from keeping tips from staff under plans to be announced
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by theresa may on monday. the move follows a public outcry in 2015, when it emerged that many high street chains routinely took up to 10% of tips paid by credit and debit card. most chains have since stopped this practice, typically charging a much lower fee of 2.5% on tips paid by card.the hospitality trade body said the fact restaurants had acted voluntarily meant new legislation was unnecessary. ford has offered to refund thousands of pounds to customers whose engines have failed, following a bbc investigation. hundreds of customers have said their cars with ford ecoboost engines have overheated, causing engine failure.0thers have reported their cars with 1.6—litre ecoboost engines have burst into flames while they were driving. many 1—litre drivers had been told they had to pay for repairs, but ford has now said it will cover the cost and refund customers who have already paid. ryanair has warned investors its full—year profits will be lower than expected, partly due to the recent wave of industrial action. the airline said its profits would be 12% lower than previously forecast.
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ryanair said this was due to higher oil prices, higher costs associated with eu flight compensation rules, and weaker fares due to the recent strikes. it warned it may lower forecasts again. shares in the airline opened down 8%. that's all the business news. a senior scientist from a university in italy has given what's been described as a "highly offensive" presentation about the role of women in physics. professor alessandro strumia told a workshop organised was invented and built by men — not by invitation". drjessica wade from imperial college was at the talk, and she told us her thoughts on it. understandably people in the
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audience were very upset. it was a lot audience of majority early career women working in string theory and high—energy physics and even summon senior, with authority, that they were intellectually inferior and had been unnecessarily promoted into senior positions, think is a really difficult thing to hear. i think it is damaging because it tells a whole generation of young scientists who are working in string theory, high—energy physics of the more broadly, that senior people in authority think that women are inferior and should not be trying for these positions and shouldn't be doing it and for these positions and shouldn't be doing itand it for these positions and shouldn't be doing it and it suggested that duty tokenism and it permits this behaviour to continue because this gentleman is in a position of power, training young scientists, elektra, a supervisor, and he's teaching those young scientists that this is 0k those young scientists that this is ok and that these kind of beliefs rok and this is the most frightening thing. the people in the room were the ones who heard them first and we re the ones who heard them first and were horrified and questioning their own ability first but then it
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spread. we have social media now is a drab and scientists all watching this on a live stream, it went out through the website, then also commenting on the slides afterwards, which have been shared so widely. and i think that is the frightening thing that it has now given voice to a whole lot of right—wing scientific thinkers who think this kind of behaviour is ok and should be tolerated. behaviour is ok and should be tolerated. let's get more on this from dr anne—marie imafidon, who's ceo and co—founder of the stemettes. the stemettes is a social initiative which aims to inspire and promote the next generation of young women in the science, technology , engineering and maths sectors. i remember last time i spoke to you, we we re i remember last time i spoke to you, we were talking about the award for a work in physics, really positive role model for women and here we are talking about the comments by a man. we astonished to hear what you have to say? i was surprised that he was given the platform and i think we just heard the doctor talking about
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it in that the whole consequences around gender equality in this space. it was for early career physicists, early career scientists. and so i'm surprised that they gave him the platform at this particular event. although perhaps they were unaware. it is not entirely clear how aware they were. how hostel environments do you think there is the women in stem subjects? there are hostile environments, they do exist. and even though the entire environment might not feel hostile everyday and have episodes like this and incidents like this and it is kind of dial down, microbe questions like this that to happen and do across the space. and so this is one example of one incident will happen for everyone that was in that room, that they can point to, there are examples, we know that this
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professor in particular had expressed these kind of these before. it also helps positions of influence and power. and so you've got to think, what kind of environment is he creating rac providing for those that work around him? and we're just seeing that quote a second ago. physics designed by and for men and not by invitation. the application being that women were progressing because of invitation and not through merit. i mean, has that anyhow —— ever happened to any woman that you know? no. it assumes that the men are also there was well and they're supposed to be there and there is this big assumption that gets played between that hole, you know, you're being invited to the space and you're meant to be in the space and you deserve to be in this space and merits definitely doesn't fit into that equation. do you think that hearing this sort of language is going to discourage
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young women or conversely, can make them even more determined to make strides in these areas? i think it goes both ways. my frustration in one of this is that, you know, we don't need to hear that language. we didn't need to have that in that arena and even though it will embolden some it will turn away others who were ready and waiting for their contribution to physics and particularly this part of science. this will turn away some who should not be. we're out of time but thank you very much for coming on to talk to us. founder of steinmetz. good morning. we have got a dry and sunny day even though many parts of the uk but further north and west of us a little bit more cloud around. it will produce rain as well but for most it seems we have seemed like this. but the north—west scotland, northern ireland, just into the
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final section of england there is cloud moving in. that is because we've got this weather front, this weather system with its way and across the north of the west would otherwise have pressure dominating things across england and wales. so things across england and wales. so things like the subtle, really. a dry afternoon and there will be some cloud developing this afternoon and some bright and sunny spells, as i mentioned more cloud and northern parts of england, scotland, northern ireland and with rain moving in and freshening wind coming from the west across scotland. given quite chilly, actually. temperatures up to about 9-11. 13-15 in actually. temperatures up to about 9—11. 13—15 in england actually. temperatures up to about 9—11.13—15in england and actually. temperatures up to about 9—11. 13—15 in england and wales. now, for tonight, this cloud will continue. it brings my picture rain. moving is way southwards with some rain and drizzle pushed his way into southern areas. quite misty and murky conditions around. western coastal hills, not quite as cold as was last night. still start, rather murky start to the day. there will be some brighter skies developing
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particularly towards eastern higher ground up towards north—eastern parts of scotland during tuesday. quite cloudy, still some rain and drizzle of think around western coast and temperatures will be higher than today. 17—24 england and wales, hop into the mid—teens further north. on wednesday this high—pressure system is still with us but we have is weather front and thatis us but we have is weather front and that is the boundary, the dividing line. milder muggy airfrom many of us on wednesday and fresher, cooler air in the far north and east. wednesday morning again about the misty murky start for many of us. studies of rain and drizzle here and there are along the western coast. a bit more in the way of rain in western scotland but into the afternoon on wednesday and will be plenty of dry weather. a few bright sunny spell breaking through. those temperatures up to the mix to hutchings. this is now thursday. more significant rain spreads into scotland, northern ireland, itchiness weight gradually bella
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south—eastwards. otherwise again on thursday for many of us it is a dry day. quite a lot of cloud around. those temperatures getting up into the high teens and 20s. certainly todayis the high teens and 20s. certainly today is going to be the sunniest day for the rest of the week. it does look fairly cloudy. that is all from me. goodbye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday: the chancellor defends theresa may's brexit plan and says business must be at the heart of tory policy making. this is the scene live in birmingham where chief secretary lizz truss is speaking at the moment. we'll bring you phillip hammond's speech in the next few minutes. indonesia appeals for international help after the earthquake and tsunami in sulawesi as survivors run out of food and clean water. this is what remains of this fishing
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community, what was tightly packed houses and shops all now reduced to rubble. the parents of a 15 year old girl who died of an allergic reaction to a sandwich, tell the bbc that without action the same thing could happen again. with every minute and every hour that passes the uk is sitting on a time bomb of someone dying yet again. that is how serious it is. team europe bask in their success in the ryder cup. the team who started off as the underdogs beat the us by seven points. good afternoon. it's monday, october 1st. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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the brexit secretary, dominc raab, has told the conservative conference in birmingham that the government's willingness to compromise with the eu is "not without limits". and in the next few minutes we're expecting the chancellor philip hammond will tell conference that business must be at the heart of tory policy. our assistant political editor norman smith joins us from birmingham where the conference is being held. philip hammond's speech is imminent. he is supporting theresa may and her brexit plan so it will be interesting to see how that speech goes down. it will because philip hammond has become almost a bogeyman for hardline brexit ears who believe he is slowly trying to snarl up brexit because he's never been enthusiastic about it. it will be
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interesting to gauge the reaction in the hall. i doubt he will say anything at all remarkable about brexit because if you were to do so then the potential for it to kick off is exactly what tory strategists don't want. they just want to get through this conference in one piece without an almighty punch up erupting over brexit. it's simply a case of getting through the conference and then mrs may can try and negotiate some sort of compromise. we know the prime minister is looking to bring forward new proposals on the northern ireland backstop in an effort to bridge the divide but she does not wa nt to bridge the divide but she does not want to do that here and she absolutely does not want a row here which is why a suspect philip hammond will probably collide over the thorny issues around brexit. much more of his speech we are told will be about trying to repair relates —— repair laois relations with the business community.
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she talks about the citizens of nowhere, about is this walking by on the other side ignoring their social responsibility and there is a slight sense that mrs may has never really beenin sense that mrs may has never really been in lockstep with the business community. this lunchtime philip hammond will try and reset relations with a deliberately very pro—business speech, talking about how capitalism can be a force for good, how enterprise can drive up living standards and wages, sketching out what 21st—century capitalism should look like. in part thatis capitalism should look like. in part that is an attempt to push back begins to thejeremy corbyn attack on capitalism as greed is good and to make the case for capitalism, but in part it is simply to repair
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relations and that in a way is quite extraordinary. let's hear what philip hammond has to say. thank you for that introduction. and thank you for being such a great chief secretary. my kids think i'm tight with money but they have not met liz truss! ina in a world obsessed with stories of division and rest in whitehall i wa nt division and rest in whitehall i want to hold up my fantastic treasury team as an example of how we can and do work together, supporting each other. liz herself, ministers, john glenn, michael
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bates, craig whitaker and lord young and our pps team, they all do a greatjob and and our pps team, they all do a great job and they deserve a big round of applause. for me it's an honour and a privilege once again to be addressing this conference as chancellor in a conservative government. to be doing so in birmingham, a city which has played a pivotal role in the economic history of our country and in the development of the modern conservative party. the birthplace of the steam engine, a city which launched an entire new age and went on to become the workshop of the
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world paving the way for the prosperity of the victorian era. and which today is reinventing itself yet again as the heart of the midlands edging and a great conservative mayor, andy street. asa sign as a sign of our commit and to the midlands engine! as a sign of our commit and to the midlands engine i want to start today by announcing funding to support the creation of a new locally led development body for the area around the east midlands to attract investment, create jobs and provide opportunities in this area of huge economic potential. my birthday present to the prime minister isa birthday present to the prime minister is a policy which has the wholehearted support of both anna soubry and andrew bridge in. i've
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got some good news for you. this is not going to be a speech all about brexit. but it is a speech about our economy and sol brexit. but it is a speech about our economy and so i am going to have to talk about brexit just a little economy and so i am going to have to talk about brexitjust a little bit. the outcome whatever it is will shape the part of our economy for many years to come and because frankly everyone else is going to. there are a couple of facts which we have to acknowledge and which we cannot change. the first is geographic. whatever the outcome europe will remain firmly anchored just a few miles off the coast of kent so they are not going anywhere. so we will be neighbours and we will have to carry on living with each other. come what may i predict we're going to go on thinking they whine, lying on the beaches or if you are the prime minister perhaps walking in the mountains and they are going
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to carry on speaking our language. the second fact is economic. europe remains! the second fact is economic. europe remains i farour the second fact is economic. europe remains i far our biggest market and after 45 years of membership britain's economy has shaped itself around that fact. complex supply chains crisscross our borders, over 11,000 trucks each day pass through the ports of dover and the channel tunnel alone carrying tens of thousands of tonnes of food, components and finished products in both directions. with no more delay and the rocker c than they were crossing the border from england and wales. our businesses and the workers whose jobs depend on them need that friction free access to continue. that is why i share the prime minister's determination to get the plan agreed. a plan which delivers on the
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decision of the british people in a referendum, avoids hardboard in ireland, preserves our precious union and safeguard britishjobs ireland, preserves our precious union and safeguard british jobs and british businesses. donald tusk says it won't work but that's what people said about the light bulb in 1878. and ourjob now is to prove him wrong. negotiating and preparing for brexit is one of the most complex tasks ever undertaken by is one of the most complex tasks everundertaken bya is one of the most complex tasks ever undertaken by a peacetime government. so over the next few weeks we must stand together behind the pm to get the best possible outcome for britain. while at the
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same time taking the precaution of preparing for the possibility of no deal. i want you to be in no doubt that i will maintain enough fiscal firepower in my locker to support our economy if that happens. but i'm going to stick my neck out today and make a prediction. when the prime minister gets a deal agreed there will be a boost to our economic growth, a deal dividend, which we will share in line with our balanced approach between keeping taxes low, supporting public services, reducing the deficit and investing in britain's future. but there is another reason why we
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must stand together and i want to make a plea to you not as chancellor but as an ordinary member of the conservative party because we'll have views about how to deliver brexit. they are all sincerely held and not if we are totally honest 100% aligned. like everybody in this room i love my country. all of us are patriots. all of a sudden on the same side when it comes to our national interest. —— all of us. the point is this, brexit is important and let me be clear it is going to happen because that is what the country voted for. but when the
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brexit debate is over and difficult as it is today to imagine it, i promise you one day it will be and our work as conservatives will not be because more than ever britain will need strong leadership to see off the threat and to lead the country into post brexit future. leadership only united conservative party ca n leadership only united conservative party can provide. and it's that future that i want to talk about today. i will share with you my vision for our country and i will be frank with you about the challenges we must overcome to deliver it. brexit did not happen in a vacuum. it's a product of something deeper and wider. it
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happened because over the last 20 years are sold as the world has got smaller gap has opened up in britain and in other developed countries between the theory of how a market economy delivers and distributes rising prosperity and the reality experienced by ordinary people. too many people feel that they have lost control, that they are working for the system but the system is not working for them. too many people have experienced years of slow wage growth. too many struggle to make ends meet. they feel less secure in their jobs ends meet. they feel less secure in theirjobs and have seen the housing market spiral beyond their reach. and as they look around them they feel a growing concern that they are falling behind and that when they voiced those concerns the political syste m voiced those concerns the political system does not seem to hear them, doesn't reflect their values or priorities. so our to ensure that
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215t—century capitalism delivers for those people, convinces them that our vision of britain's future can meet their aspirations and that our plan will deliver a better tomorrow for them and plan will deliver a better tomorrow forthem and their plan will deliver a better tomorrow for them and their families. but the world is changing so it isn'tjust about what people have experienced over the last 20 years but about their hopes and their fears for the future. technological change is transforming not only our economy but our society and our politics at a rate that none of us in this hall have seen in our lifetime. and in response we as a party have two data change to, not by abandoning our enduring values and principles, but
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by applying them to the challenges of the future. when the history books of this period come to be written i can promise you that it will be this technological transformation and how we manage it, not brexit, that will define the future of our country and our party. despite what you may think or you may even have read in certain newspapers, i'm an optimist. i've heard some call me glass half full fill. i'm an enthusiast for the change that is coming in for the benefits it will bring to society. and i am committed to preparing britain for it. in the next decade of soap artificial intelligence, self—driving cars, personalised
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medicine, virtual reality, advanced robotics and many other cutting—edge developments will all begin to transform our lives. a future where ca rs transform our lives. a future where cars don't pollute and we have all but eliminated traffic accidents. where you are able to order and 3—d printed product that home rather than waiting for it to be delivered. where cancer is tamed so that fewer of us have to go through the heartache of losing a loved one to this cruel disease. all of this is science fact not fiction. all of it already taking shape now not in the distant future and most importantly all of it happening here in the uk. in our world leading universities, our research institutes and in thousands of dynamic and innovative businesses in towns and cities across the length and breadth of
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britain. but i understand that my enthusiasm for driverless cars may not be so readily shared by someone who earns their living driving a cab. and that home 3—d printing may look more of a threat than an opportunity to someone who works for a parcel delivery firm. so we have to take our people with us, the open with about the scale nature of the change that is coming about the disruption that change on this scale will inevitably bring. set out clearly the benefits that individuals and families will see from the digital age and how we will help them to prepare for it and to deal with the consequences of it. reassure the very many who will worry about what new technologies mean for theirjob security, worry that the games will be made by the few and that they will be left
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behind. show them that crucially the change that technology is trifling will address their concerns are not make them worse. and we will do this by harnessing the power of the market economy. taking a model which has evolved continuously down the ages so that the capitalism of the 215t—century ages so that the capitalism of the 215t—ce ntury love nothing remotely like that of the 19th and adapting it once again to address the challenges and speak to the values ofa challenges and speak to the values of a new generation. because those challenges can only be ove rco m e by because those challenges can only be overcome by harnessing the power of the market. that is the only way to deliver our social, economic and environmental goals to build a better britain for our children. and
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conference, this mission is urgent because if we cannot make that case convincingly, if we cannot demonstrate our commitment to making that evolution happen, if we look for one moment like the party of no change, then we should not be surprised that some will be tempted by the dangerous populism of our opponents. it's clear from what we heard last week from labour that this country now faces a choice. a choice between the seductive simplicity of the brave new world of jeremy corbyn's populism and our pragmatism, a pragmatism which is sceptical of idealism and which starts with the world we live in and 60 make it better. a pragmatism that
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recognises there are no short cuts and no free lunches on the road to a better britain, that no wealth is created without work, no gain without sacrifice, no reward without effort. the rules of the game have changed. we have got a shadow chancellor of fixture whose declared aim in life is for —— lamenting the overthrow of capitalism. that really isa overthrow of capitalism. that really is a disgrace. the model that has delivered 200 years of economic growth, that has seen living standards in this country or than double in my lifetime, that is lifted countless
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hundreds of millions out of poverty around the world and has secured our precious freedoms and our liberties down the ages is rejected out of hand by jeremy corbyn down the ages is rejected out of hand byjeremy corbyn and mcdonald in favour of the failed ideologies of socialism. not because they believe they would enhance economic growth but because they don't care about economic growth. because they are more interested in redistributing wealth than in creating more of it. they value political ideology above real—world solutions for real people. all they have to do if you are a socialist is look it up in the socialist manual. railways? nationalise them. wealth? confiscated. run out of money? borrow some more. answers from a discredited ideology that will never solve real—world problems. a
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backward looking party intellectually and equipped to tackle the complex challenges of the 215t—century and tackle the complex challenges of the 215t—ce ntury and totally tackle the complex challenges of the 215t—century and totally unfit to govern this country. jeremy corbyn boasts that labour are a government in waiting. i say let's keep him waiting this year, next year and every. let me be clear about one thing, while labour's cancers will solve nothing their questions deserve a response. we
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must answer the challenges with our own conservative solutions based on realism not populism. delivery not rhetoric. it's what we conservatives have always done and it's what we will do again, showing ourselves worthy of the privilege of governing post—brexit britain. harnessing the power of the market economy, focusing on the long—term and structural not the quick and the superficial because we know that you can't get long—term change on amazon prime. order today and deliver tomorrow. as our party renews its mandate for the next generation, this is the ground on which we must fight. margaret thatcher as so often put it beautifully. she said we are in the business of planting trees for our children and our grandchildren or we have no business
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being in politics at all. we will not outbid jeremy corbyn with short—term gimmicks that cause long—term damage. we will not out spending with reckless rowing. we will not promise the utopia he offers because as those who have tried it have shown time and again it is based on a lie and it always ends in tears. but no one should mistake our belief in evolution over revolution for a lack of passion or commitment to change. because throughout history conservative governments have delivered momentous change, drawing on our values that
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stood the test of time. the importance of family and community. the strength of our nation united by history, culture and identity. standing strong as a force for good in the world. the insight that economic freedom goes hand—in—hand with political freedom and above all the belief in the power of enterprise as the route to unleash tale nt enterprise as the route to unleash talent and to improve lives. that is why we back business. we back business as the cornerstone of a successful economy, as a force for goodin successful economy, as a force for good in our society and as an essential expression of our values. sojust in case anyone essential expression of our values. so just in case anyone anywhere essential expression of our values. sojust in case anyone anywhere in the world was in any doubt at all, let me say it loud and clear, the conservative party is and always will be the party of business.
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that means we listen to business and we have listened and we've heard the concerns about how the apprenticeship levies working so today we have set out a series of measures to allow firms more flexibility in how the levy is spent. but we know we may need to do more to ensure the levy supports the development of the skilled workforce our economy needs so in addition to these new flexibility is we will engage with business on our plans for the long—term operation of the levy. government working hand—in—hand with employers to ensure that every young person can
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fulfil their potential and achieve their dreams. and working alongside be the business we will provide £30 million of support for a business led initiative to get the companies to mental small companies so that they can develop their management and leadership skills to make the most of their potential. strengthening the backbone of our economy from the ground up. enterprise, freedom, stability, family, community, nation. these are our conservative values. they have served us well over the centuries past and they will serve us well in the years ahead. values do not change. the task before us now is to
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apply these values to the challenges of the 215t century. we have made a start. ten years on from the financial crisis conservative leadership has delivered britain a stronger and more resilient economy. we have rebuilt our financial system, forcing the banks to operate with greater responsibility, protecting savers, insisting that our financial markets must serve our country and not the other way round. we've got labour's deficit which raised —— reached thomas 10% of gdp down to less than 2%. and this year.. and this year thanks to the difficult decisions we have taken and the hard work of the british people we will at last see our national debt starting its first sustained fall in a generation.
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we have delivered eight years of economic roath since 2010 creating over 3 million more jobs and taking unemployment to a 43 year low. we've announced an unprecedented £84 billion real terms funding boost for the nhs. what the nhs says it needs. and more than labour promised at the la st and more than labour promised at the last election. showing our commitment to britain's most vital public service. we have maintained britain as the world's fifth—largest economy and london as the world's financial capital. we have delivered tax cuts the 31 million people and our national living wage has lifted
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the wages of the lowest paid in our society by £2000 a year since 2016. that means that income inequality is lower this year under a conservative government that it was in every single year of the last labour government. that's a remarkable record of achievement and we should be justifiably proud of it. after the years of hard work to rebuild our economy and our public finances, there was light at the end of the tunnel. but our pride and achievement does not lead us to complacency. we must now apply the same approach to renew the mandate for the market economy in the 215t century and with it, the mandate of the modern conservative party to
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govern. a focus on what is in the long—term interests of our country and our people. so that when those children and grandchildren, of whom margaret thatcher spoke so eloquently, ask us what our generation is doing for them, we can look them in the eye and tell them how we are building the better britain we wanted to bequeath to them. we can tell them about how we have raised public investment of the highest level in generations, building and upgrading the roads and railways that connect country and the digital infrastructure that will enable the future. we can tell them how reforms are unlocking billions of pounds of much—needed investment in high—growth businesses and about how our northern powerhouse and midlands engine and devolution in city and growth deals are beginning at last to readdress the regional imbalances in our economy. we can
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tell them about how modern industrial strategy is preparing for the future by putting britain at the cutting edge of technology revolution which will deliver improve the lives of people across the world. it will be the bedrock on which our future prosperity is built, creating millions of new better paid jobs for british workers. we can tell them how we are building more homes than any government since the 19805 and are on course to reach 300,000 additional homes a year. about the 5upport additional homes a year. about the support that helps to buy in stamp duty abolition of already delivered to hundreds of thousands of home buyers. all key steps on the road to re5toring buyers. all key steps on the road to restoring the conservative dream of home ownership for millions of young people the length and breadth of our country. applause
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. and we can tell them how we're making sure that working people have the support they need to navigate the support they need to navigate the challenge of automation to a higher wage future with the new 5y5te m higher wage future with the new system of key level vocational training, million5 system of key level vocational training, millions of high quality apprenticeships and a world first national retraining scheme and today ican national retraining scheme and today i can announce £100 million government funding as an initial commitment contribution to deliver this scheme in partnership with the cbi and the tuc. applause and we can tell our children above determination to update our market economy for the digital age. adam smith taught us that the key to the power of the market to deliver for the good of society is competition.
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and just as in the late 19th century america, concerns about the near monopoly of standard oil on the railroad cartels led to the introduction of the world's first antimonopoly legislation, so today the expansion of the global tech giants and digital platforms, while of course pretty huge benefits to consumers, raises new questions about whether too much power is being concentrated into few global technology businesses. that's why i've asked president obama's former chief economist to lead an expert panel to review the uk's competition regime to ensure that it is that the digitalera. regime to ensure that it is that the digital era. and it is notjust competition policy that needs updating. we can tell our children how we have led the debate on reforming the international tax
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5y5te m reforming the international tax system for the digital economy. in insisting that the global internet giants must contribute fairly to funding our public services and i wa nt funding our public services and i want to be crystal clear today. the best way to tax international companies is through international agreements. but the time for talking is coming to an end and the stalling has to stop. so if we cannot reach agreement, the uk will go it alone with the digital services tax of its own. applause conference, i have set out my argument for the renewal of our economic read to secure for britain the benefit of the market economy for the years to come. to ensure it can respond to and meet the aspirations of the next generation
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because corbyn's plan offers no future for britain. and it is our duty to provide a better answer. to make the case for the long term over the short term. further substantial over the superficial. evolution of a revolution. our duty is to agitate constantly, restless to improve the lives of ordinary families across this country. looking beyond brexit into our future. map out the path to britain's continued success. conference, i have three children. and i want for your children and grandchildren what i want for mine. for them to live in a country that's built on secure foundations, with its best days still to come. and ready to capitalise on the untold promise of the century that lies before us. so we need to have the courage now to regenerate capitalism
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once again, to pass on something worthwhile to the next generation. that is what being a conservative is all about. applause and to those who will say that the mission message of evolution will be drowned out by the shrill voices of the demagogues of the populists, i say, put our trust in the common—sense of british people and they will put their trust in us. and to those who will ask of the conservative party has the stomach for this fight i say, conference, i know this party and i know that we do. i know we have the wisdom to put
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the differences of today behind us. i know we have the reserves in the energy to focus on the challenges still to come. i know that we have the resolve to fight for our children's future. for a sustainable better britain. in britain with a world leading nhs, with first—class education and training, a welfare 5y5te m education and training, a welfare system that is focused on work, an environment that we believe in a better state than we found it. streets that are safe, homes for the next generation. armed forces that a respected around the world. a britain with an economy that creates opportunities for all. a beacon to the world. a land of entrepreneurs, of creators, designers, doers, thinkers, makers. if civilised, tolerant, successful nation. respected and admired the world over. that is the britain that i wa nt over. that is the britain that i want to build. so that when our children ask us what we did with the
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privilege of our time in office we can tell them, with our heads held high, we built a better britain for you. thank you. applause a standing ovation there for the chancellor philip hammond as he concludes his speech to the conservative party conference, focusing on his main message of regenerating capitalism, he called for a renewal of the conservatives economic creed. the business was the cornerstone of the economy and let's get a reaction to that speech from our chief political correspondent, vicky young, the conference in
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birmingham. he didn't strayed too much into controversial areas of though he did, early on in his speech, said his birthday presents to theresa may today is a policy that has the support of both annus duberry and andrew bridge in my younger brother different views on brexit buddha the division a party at the beginning of the speech. it was interesting that he didn't spend a lovely long time. we're in a situation now just spend a lovely long time. we're in a situation nowjust waiting for the next move from either side. brussels or the next move from either side. brussels orthe uk next move from either side. brussels or the uk government, in those crucial talks, as we head towards a couple of incredibly important european summits. interesting that he had tried folk some other things with a bubbling about making the case for capitalism actually saying that people shouldn't be fooled by jeremy corbyn and what he's offering. in the figure was interesting you were trying to look to the longer term. trying to think of the time after brexit which, at
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this moment my things incredibly difficult for people deeper focus on, you know, criticism of course that so much time of government, civil servants, ministers, is that so much time of government, civilservants, ministers, is taking up civilservants, ministers, is taking up trying to sort out this disentanglement from the eu after so many decades. what he's saying is that we have to look longer term as well. when we come through this we then have to think about what the conservatives are going to offer the country. what are they going to offer future generations? so country. what are they going to offerfuture generations? so it country. what are they going to offer future generations? so it was talking about the technological revolution which interestingly, he said, that and have a country deals with that is going to it, in the end, be more important than brexit. the impact caused that will happen workers. so lots of things there. trying to force the body to look beyond what it was pretty upset with at the moment, brexit. it inevitably, those divisions. and we will give soggy, another plea for unity saying that after brexit people will only turn to the conservatives if they are a united party. thank you very much.
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let's get more now on the aftermath of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami — which killed more that 840 people. this morning some survivors of the natural disaster , which hit the island of sulawesi, have been airlifted out of the area. that figure includes 46,000 children are many elderly indonesians. many of them beyond urban areas that are the focus of government recovery efforts. it is the latest coming in from the united nations. well, this morning, some survivors of the disaster, which hit the island have been airlifted out of the area. the
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bbc is one of the first correspondence to reach the city and she's been given a picture of how people are coping with the aftermath. this is what remains of this fishing community, tightly packed houses and shops now reduced to rubble. people here say they only had a few minutes warning after that strong quake on friday. to flee to higher ground when they saw huge waves coming in. those that could survive did so by clinging onto trees and buildings. now, families are camping out in the open like this family ever hear that has collected what they can and are surviving of the food they have. there is no power here and very little fresh food or freshwater. so people are saying that they desperately need to get aid in. this
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man has been telling me that he needs help. right now we have not received them food materials from our government. yes. so we need that. we really need that. if you don't get it sooner what will happen? i don't know, you. but we hope our president to care for us. and people here have written s bind me saying pray. i hashtag there. a call—out for help with people who are managing to get into the city, road travel is very difficult. there has been landslides in the hills appear. the airport remains closed.
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so the traffic, as you can see, is bumper—to—bumper with people who can get in. there is now almost no petrol in the city which is making rescue efforts difficult. community members here say that there are bodies still amongst this rubble. people who are still missing and you can smell decomposing bodies here but they don't have the energy of the resources to do anything about it there will be burials, mass burials to dale bodies found around this area in an attempt to stop the spread of disease. in the town itself there has been looting today. people desperate for food have been raiding shops in the sense of tensions in the air. at the same time people have been incredibly kind. community coming together, people have been offering us food and water and they have been doing that to each other under these difficult circumstances. we have just received some images
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from palu up hundreds of people getting on flights out of the area as we heard from rebecca. road travel is very difficult, we also heard that from the red cross in ja ka rta heard that from the red cross in jakarta earlier today who have lots of volu nteers jakarta earlier today who have lots of volunteers on the ground, in the worst hit areas like palu. and elsewhere. saying that really, air travel is the only way to move easily at the moment. hundreds of people here trying to escape the area worst affected by that earthquake and tsunami as indonesia calls for help from international partners to cope with the aftermath. which is going to return to
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birmingham to the conservative party conference which has just heard from the chancellor, philip hammond. let's get some more reaction with vicky young. it was interesting philip hammond saying that some people used to accuse him of being gloomy and he's really trying to say that he is not at all and actually, trying to get the party to look beyond the brexit, which of course at this moment, this time in the negotiations, feels like a difficult thing to do. but saying to the party, you're going to have to the party, you're going to have to come up with a long—term vision, something that will appeal to voters, discuss this little bit more. i'm joined by robert. voters, discuss this little bit more. i'mjoined by robert. brexit taking upa more. i'mjoined by robert. brexit taking up a lot of time for ministers. it seems to be all—encompassing. what can the party did to appeal to voters beyond that subject? you have some of the policies we are developing in philip hammond's speech which was very optimistic. it was acknowledging the hard work of the british public in bringing down the british public in bringing down the debt over the last eight years
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from the crisis that we have inherited from the labour party. talking about the tremendous job that we have done as a in creating newjobs. employment that we have done as a in creating new jobs. employment is that we have done as a in creating newjobs. employment is at the highest levels it has been for 40 yea rs, highest levels it has been for 40 years, unemployment at the lowest levels. a lot of positive things going on but philip hammond was acknowledging today that if we want to keep winning the battle of ideas with the general public, persuading people that the only way to move the country people that the only way to move the cou ntry forward people that the only way to move the country forward is through our "free enterprise, capitalist model, then we do need to change the times. we need to help people to adopt new technologies, which we are investing in. we need to help working people who might be concerned that some of the occupations that therein might be under threat as automation transforms the world of work and that we are creating the skills and education that they will need. we need to update our infrastructure, roads and railways. and at times they are a bit creaky and out of date. and so he has tonnes of earth is putting more money into our
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national infrastructure than at any time since the early 1970s these ways we are building a plan to build on what we have achieved in the past but take the economy forward positively into the future. he also talked about how the party would have to be unified at the end of this process if voters are going to turn a game to the conservative party is that remotely possible given the arguments that you hear hear? he acknowledged there are divisions over brexit and that is a huge problem for the conservative party, doesn't it? it isa party, doesn't it? it is a challenge but it is absolutely possible. you know, we as absolutely possible. you know, we as a party have a historic mission. this is what he was saying today. to be the party of business. to be the party that creates jobs, the back small businesses, entrepreneurs, people want to get a life. to be the party of and aspiration once we've set of the brexit debate we hope that will land a good deal this autumn, then all of us need to
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strain every sinew to move the party onwards so we can keep doing that and we knew it, you know, the younger generation coming in, to make sure the party has a modern, compassionate approach which can say to the public that we have the ideas and the energy to take the country forward beyond brexit. thank you very much indeed. that is the kind of vision that many here are wanting to hear about but of course everyone does know that before that time there is that tricky issue of getting a deal from the european union. part of many people's memories was hearing that geoffrey hayes. he was best known as the host of
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rainbow and for his betrayal of detective constable sketch of in the tv series. newsjust detective constable sketch of in the tv series. news just coming in that geoffrey hayes has died aged 76. as we were hearing earlier, the parents of 15 year old natasha ednan—laperouse — who died after eating a sandwich containing sesame seed — have been speaking to the victoria derbyshire programme following the inquest into her death. let's hear more of that interview now. he called me and he said, she is going to go completely in the next minute. maybe two. you have to say goodbye to her right now. right now, quickly, say goodbye to her. i'm putting the phone by her ear so she can hear you. if she can hear she will hear you. and that's when i said goodbye to her. and as i finished, hejust said said goodbye to her. and as i finished, he just said thank you and
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hung up to then call up and speak to her brother who would also get an opportunity to say goodbye to her. i actually, i opportunity to say goodbye to her. iactually, i phoned my opportunity to say goodbye to her. i actually, i phoned my parents, natasha bosma grandparents are both my side of the family and tanya's side. and our son, who was 13 at the time, wasjust being looked after by his grandmother while tanya got to the airport, and all of them in quick succession had a chance to say goodbye. just about one minute, two minutes before her heart completely stopped and she flat lined. as natasha was dying in hospital, on that sunday, i spoke to my mother backin that sunday, i spoke to my mother back in london and i said, please go and buy the same sandwich from your local pret a manger right now. right
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now. i'd call me back. and go and check if there are any allergens in the sandwich. speak to them. she did and she called me back and she told me, before natasha was dying, as she was dying, that actually shipping to the local sandwich shop, pret a manger, but exactly the same sandwich. there was no allergy warnings in sight at all. but she we nt warnings in sight at all. but she went to the counter and asked the staff where you pay. and she said, is there anything in the sandwich to be concerned about? my granddaughter has allergies. the staff then went back to somewhere in the back room and handed my mother a folder. the typical folder you would find in any office. and said, there is some information in there. my mother then looked through it, a lot of several loose—leaf information if you like,
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there was one sheet of paper like an excel spreadsheet listing most of the savages and one side and if you carefully ran your finger across, very small biting comment highlighted the allergens in each language. and my mother noticed there immediately sesame seeds were highlighted as allergen in this amateur. and my mother was stunned. she told me. and she recounted and said to the staff, where are the sesame seeds? because they're not even visible to the naked eye. and she was told by the staff there, well, they're baked into the dough. and at which point my mother screamed and she said, you've murdered my grandchild. and that was natasha's parents speaking about the death of their daughter. october kicked off in a dry, bright extra ct october kicked off in a dry, bright extract the chilly night for many.
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weather watchers have been sending in the photos of the weather near them. this gorgeous photos sent in from warwickshire early today. plenty of blue sky here but had a little bit further north and we have got more in the way of cloud. this day to sent in by weather watcher in cuba. clad in outbreaks of rain will gradually work the way south—east. their courtesy of this weather front in the north—west but high pressure across the south means it will stay mostly dry with a little bit more in the way of cloud developing but still some sunny spells. temperatures cooler than we would expect from the time of year. a maximum of 14 or 15. as we go through this evening and overnight the rain across scotland will gradually work its way south and ease, becoming increasingly bright and patchy. and windy night across scotland. because the gusts of up to 45 mph. a little bit misty and murky for wales in south—west england and patches of mist and fog developing.
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temperatures are little warmer than they were last night. we start the day with more cloud around for central and southern england and wales. some outbreaks of light and patchy rain but becoming drier. some bright intervals developing and temperatures will respond in the south—east. temperatures could creep up. variable amounts of cloud, perhaps by two intervals at times the top one or two showers pdm from the top one or two showers pdm from the north. temperatures here a little bit to the between ten and 15. tuesday and wednesday we will see that were fun begin to push its way back towards the north and east. it will bring some cloud in outbreaks of rain but it will also mean that the warmer air across the south. to work its way further north, spreading across the country. as we start the day on wednesday a bit of a cloudy start. i think wales in south—west england will see more in the way of cloud but it will become brighter. a dry bright side for central and eastern england from
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northern ireland, scotland, the far north of england, cloudy skies with the outbreaks of rain the north—west. a little warmer in the north. highs are between ten and 16. slightly fresher in the south—east but not bad. high of 19 celsius. indonesia appeals for international help after the earthquake and tsunami that's killed hundreds of people. entire towns have been devastated. it's feared the final death toll could be several thousand. frantic rescue efforts are continuing to find survivors trapped in the rubble. this is what remains of this fishing community, what was tightly packed houses and shops all now reduced to rubble. we'll have the very latest from our correspondent in palu, where people are running out of food, clean water and power. also this lunchtime.
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the chancellor tells the conservative party conference there will be an agreement on brexit with the eu. when the prime minister gets a deal agreed, there will be a boost to our economic growth, a deal dividend.
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