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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 2, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 2.00: borisjohnson is given a standing ovation as he attacks theresa may's brexit plan at the conservative conference in birmingham , calling it a ‘constitutional outrage‘: this is the moment to chuck chequers. cheering but the prime minister promises britain will have full control of its immigration policy after brexit. id take back control of our borders, and ensures that freed movement comes to an end once and for all, and we will be deciding who can come into this country. it takes back control of our borders it ensures that free the government will change the law to allow heterosexual couples in england and wales to enter into a civil partnership. couples like us can finally formalise our relationship in the way that we see fit. survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid, including food and water — the death toll is now more than 1,300.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. we are already counting down to the bbc sports personality of the year. i'll be bringing you details of some changes to this year's bbc sports personality of the year, which will return to birmingham in december. but it seems we may have to wait a little longer to find out who's made the shortlist. thanks holly. and alina has all the weather. a story of two hearts. cloudy and males in the south, and unsettled weather in the mediterranean is ongoing. i will tell you all about it in half and. thanks alina. also coming up... re—living a bombing mission over berlin — how a wartime recording by the bbc was brought back to life by virtual reality. hello everyone, this
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is afternoon live. the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has delivered another fierce attack on the prime minister's proposals for a brexit deal during a packed fringe meeting this lunchtime at the conservative party conference in birmingham. he described the so—called chequers deal as humiliating and a constitutional outrage. mrjohnson‘s intervention, which drew large cheers from the audience, threatens to overshadow the announcement of theresa may's new policy on immigration after britain leaves the eu. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young, who's at the conference in birmingham. and there is no doubt there was huge interest and excitement in this
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speech from boris johnson. interest and excitement in this speech from borisjohnson. always a media frenzy will stop b had just seen another pack of photographers and running across the bridge. that much anticipated speech, as you say, talking about brexit, but it was pretty wide—ranging. really trying to ta ke pretty wide—ranging. really trying to take on labour and some of the things we heard last week at their conference. borisjohnson talking about housing, about how people can be helped much more about their everyday lives. the kind of territory that many mps are saying the government needs to get onto, to try and talk about the things that really matter to people. but it is the criticism of the chequers deal, the criticism of the chequers deal, the arrangement that theresa may managed to get a greed by the cabinet, although boris johnson managed to get a greed by the cabinet, although borisjohnson and then resign. no surprise, a large chunk of his speech was dedicated to
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that, and that part of the speech got the most applause. this is a moment to do that, and there is time. this is the moment to chuck chequers. cheering to scrap the commission constitutional and honourable northern ireland backstop. twojuicy otherwise redundant and miserable implementation period to negotiate the free trade agreement, to invest in all the customs and procedures we will need to ensure we can continue frictionless trade, and to prepare
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much more vigorously than had to for coming out on wto thames. and if we get it right... the opportunities are immense. it is notjust that we can do proper trade deals, in so many areas of the 215t—century economy, this country is already light years ahead. technology, data, biosciences, you name it, we are the leaders. and b can use our regular tory freedom to intensify those advantage. and of course, our european friends and partners can see that that might be possible, and thatis see that that might be possible, and that is exactly why they want to constrain us. rapturous ra pturous applause and rapturous applause and a huge reception for boris johnson. rapturous applause and a huge reception for borisjohnson. but not eve ryo ne reception for borisjohnson. but not everyone feels is sent. i spoke to
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one cabinet member who says that he feels people need to get over their own self—importance.” feels people need to get over their own self-importance. i think people are concerned about mrjohnson's behaviour at the moment. reality really critical point in our negotiations. i think it is important that everybody across the political spectrum comes together, baxley prime minister and her attempts to get a deal and a lower us attempts to get a deal and a lower us to exit the eu on the best possible terms. unfortunately, mr johnson seems to be behaving any way that suggests he is only focused on his own self interest, and not in the interests of our country, and i find that very disappointing. seeing it as find that very disappointing. seeing itasa find that very disappointing. seeing it as a challenge to theresa may's authority. it really did feel i cannot tell a tough leader's speech in that hole. let's discuss it more. why did you make of what he had to say? first and foremost, it was
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great to have some optimism injected into the conference. it has been quite flat so far, and i thinking characteristic cell, boris was able to inject energy, and was able to talk on a broad range of issues. not just politicians, but the ordinary public are getting tired of the brexit debate, and all the attention of the government and politicians being on brexit. but there is so much to do on the domestic agenda, housing, for example, ensuring that people can go to good schools, is on ensuring the local authorities have the power they need to include the quality of life for people. we had that from boris today, and it is about intervention. some ministers are single theresa may has to be giving the space to try and get a deal with brussels, because many of them fear that the no deal scenario will be catastrophic for the british economy. sitting borisjohnson be giving her space? i think the
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original concern amongst colleagues and members right here and this co nfe re nce and members right here and this conference hall, if you're that chequers will not deliver on the referendum result. actually, we would be washed off in a chequers and bbb as members of the european union. we could sit quietly, meekly, and say nothing, allow chequers to go through, and a lower us to be in that state of voices vassalage. if we do not stand up and be counted, the policy will never change. our conferences, you can have disagreements, but for silly and fundamentally, we want to be able to change the policy of chequers, because that is an alan national interest. boris johnson has resigned from the cabinet. what more can he do? was this a leadership it? boris
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himself as articulated by chequers is not the right way to deliver brexit, and he was so articulate in that today. but the most important thing is that this is notjust him. lam sure thing is that this is notjust him. i am sure that all ministers will be listening to what the ordinary members are telling them at this co nfe re nce members are telling them at this conference is free, and it cannot be more overwhelming that they wanted the government to chuck chequers. every french event come up with excitement is happening, people are being turned away at the door, because there is a huge interest in this issue, and people want to support boris and others in that endeavour, to change chequers. thank you very much indeed. others i had been speaking to, what you would call former remain tory mps revealed that theresa may is close to getting a deal they think would keep the uk closer to the european union, and thatis closer to the european union, and that is the way they think things
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are going. the prime minister's is focusing on immigration at the moment. tell us about the change in emphasis that we are seeing. this is a significant announcement. a whole new immigration system will be put in place, and the idea behind it is that freedom of movement would end, an that so many people feel is that the rate of that fought to leave, that's brexit fought. and it will be a big change. in the future, immigration will be based on skills rather than the country that people come from. this is what theresa may had to say earlier. the policy we are announcing today, our future immigration policy, delivers on the result of the referendum, takes back control of our borders, it ensures that free movement comes to an end once and for all and we will be deciding who can come into this country but we recognise the point you have made that businesses say that there are skills that they need, that they need to bring into this country, so the new system is going to be based not on where people come
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from but on what they can contribute to our economy. the skills that they have. of course, we are also working as a government to ensure we are building up the skills of young people in the united kingdom but our new policy is crucially going to ensure free movement ends, it won't be... who can come here will be determined by what contribution they can make rather than where they come from. so, those new immigration proposals by discussed last week by the cabinet, and agreed. the argument was put by sajid javid the home secretary that this would help productivity, and there would be some help for the areas who would struggle to fill of those empty pause. —— empty posts. immigration, many felt was at the brit brexit. if this plan going to leave some areas,
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particularly agricultural, hospitality, social care, shorter people to do the it is important we listen to the advice we have received from the committee, and they make the case that high skilled immigration has a very positive benefit to our economy, and it is right that we keep our doors open to ensure that we attract those highly skilled migrants. but in the longer term, those low skilled migration, the contribution from them, is less positive, does not have the same economic benefits, and i think you have right to say that the vote in 2016 demonstrated that the public wanted to see change in this area. they wanted us to take back control, and we are setting out a way in which we can have an immigration syste m which we can have an immigration system that delivers for the uk, and ei'isui'es system that delivers for the uk, and ensures that we are well placed, open, atwood looking, attracting the people that we need. but we are clearly could have to make adjustments to degrade that we
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operate in some bases, and make sure we operate in some bases, and make sure we train our workforce, that we have opportunities that. and that i think isa opportunities that. and that i think is a key part of how the country will change after leaving the european union. turning to the wider point about brexit, and some rumours today that there might be a new offer on the table from the uk government about staying. how much more do you think the government can concede to brussels in order to break what seems to be an impasse here? there is a problem that at the moment seems a bit antagonistic. here? there is a problem that at the moment seems a bit antagonisticm isa moment seems a bit antagonisticm is a negotiation, and any negotiation you go through periods where it looks as though the parties are a long way apart, and both sides need to demonstrate flexibility in order to resolve this. it is completely in horrendous to get a deal with the european union, and it is also an interest of the european union. we set out proposals but the
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chequers plan, and i think it is a very good basis for a final agreement, but clearly they are issues that the european union have. we want to hear what they have this in detail. but i do not think this isa in detail. but i do not think this is a point where i should be saying to you, we should be making these concessions are drying up these red lines. is important is that we engage in negotiations and tried to get a deal that delivers for the british people, delivers the referendum result, and also protects our economy referendum result, and also protects our economy and ensures we can referendum result, and also protects our economy and ensures we can look at worse with trade, and protect the integrity of the united kingdom and does not leave northern ireland any different position from great britain. that is a challenging set of objectives, but i am confident that we can do that. boris johnson saying it is time to chuck chequers and getting a huge trend of applause. what you make of that? boris always attracts lots of attention. now is it time for a credible and serious plan, and
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credible and serious plan, and credible and serious plan, and credible and cd '5 leadership. we had that from theresa may. i think other people may struggle to provide that. thank you very much indeed. borisjohnson, as that. thank you very much indeed. boris johnson, as far as that. thank you very much indeed. borisjohnson, as far as we know, has been in quest of a summer, followed, no doubt, by lots of photographers. how have the immigration plans gone down in brussels? adam fleming is there. we have had a little bit of reaction from the european parliament, which is meeting in strasbourg today. from the brexit coordinator, a fairly well—known name in the brexit debate, he said the eu would not be able to accept a new british immigration system the new arrivals would be discriminated against on the basis of skill orjob type. and thatis the basis of skill orjob type. and that is precisely the centrepiece of theresa may's proposals unveiled today. and previously, the european commission, the organisation that i’u ns commission, the organisation that runs the brexit talks from day to day, they gave a presentation saying
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that if free movement ends for eu nationals going to the uk, then it ends for british citizens moving in the other direction. so instead of free movement, and being able to move and take up a job in the year, british nationals will be faced with the prospect of quarters and work permits. but i think is interesting is that up until now the brexit talks have focused on people who have already made, the rights of eu nationals who had made their home in britain are ready and vice versa. when they get into discussions about a free—trade agreement, which will be coming sometime soon, they will probably be about something slightly different, called mobility, which is about business trips, students and to this. the other traditional migration thing to talk about. but barbie —— what will be fascinating to see is effing featured you end up with the uk and eu immigration
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system, or do they start to merge as deals are done and haggling is done over the trade agreement? for now, we are over the trade agreement? for now, we are still a long way from that. thank you very much, adam faith double —— adam flemington brussels. more than 1,300 people are now known to have died in the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia on friday. more people have been pulled alive from the rubble in the last few hours, but it's feared the number of deaths will rise as rescuers reach remote areas. survivors are growing increasingly desperate for aid supplies, and there are reports of looting. richard lister reports. i'm joined from jakarta by iris van deinse, a spokesperson of the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies. how does the rising number of dead change your work in engine easier? we have a team working in search and i’escue we have a team working in search and rescue right now, and a few minutes
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ago, we had an update from the team that they have found 1a bodies. so, we that they have found 1a bodies. so, we think that there might be a lot of people in the rubble. they concern of course is that the disease can take hold and spread so rapidly in these conditions. what are your priorities in that respect? priorities at the moment as search and rescue, to make sure that we save lives, but also that we evacuate the bodies to the nearest hospital. besides that, we provide water, with water trucks, so people are able to drink good quality water, and first aid. how is access improving? access is a concern. we
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still face difficulties with going to certain areas. in one area, where we to certain areas. in one area, where we have a mobile clinic, we still cannot enter the centre of the area, so we cannot enter the centre of the area, so we wanted to go there but an ambulance, but this was not possible. data is in a lots of rubble and a lot of mud on the roads. we know that the indonesian government as for international help at this time, but have important to you at those local operators? those local partners who really know the country? we work with local volunteers, which is a good thing, because people know the country, people know the habits, and that is very good if you need to help people. and people understand people
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in need. how well organised at the authorities on the ground trying to respond to such a huge catastrophe? yes, it is a huge catastrophe, as you said. it is difficult to read certain areas, so you need to improvise. but we try to do our best. we are shipping in goods, and hopefully we can help as many people as possible. thank you forjoining me is. heterosexual couples are to be allowed to enter into civil partnerships in england and wales, as an alternative to marriage. the government has announced it will change the law, to extend civil partnerships — which were introduced for same sex couples in 2004 — to all adults. rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, a couple from london, brought a legal challenge to be allowed to have a civil partnership; they gave the bbc their reaction to today's announcement. we are delighted with this wonderful news from the government today,
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and we thank the prime minister and the minister for women and equalities for finally announcing that they are committed to ending the current situation and the inequality, and opening civil partnerships to everybody, so that couples like charlie and myself can finally formalised our relationship in a way that we see fit, and have the legal recognition and the financial protections that we seek. our legal correspondent clive coleman is here. how different is a marriage from a civil partnership? in terms of rights and protections, not very different at all, and that is why this is potentially a big story. babies and for that is that that is something like 3.3 million cohabiting couples in the uk. many of them believed that they actually lived in something called a common—law marriage. we know this is a myth. ifi common—law marriage. we know this is a myth. if i had a pound for every timei a myth. if i had a pound for every time i said on the bbc there is no such thing, i would have at least
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£100 by now. but people insist on believing that. the 3.3 million people, we are not suggesting that they will all rush off as soon as they will all rush off as soon as the law changes and enter into a civil partnership, but a sizeable minority of them out, because what tends to happen for its cohabiting couple, you only realise, either on separation or on the dead of —— the death of the partner, that you have far fewer rights in death of the partner, that you have farfewer rights in property, pension, than you would have if you are any civil partnership or married. for years and years, lives have been very much in favour. many people had been in favour in equalising the rights and protections, but there has remained a massive imbalance. this might go some way towards addressing it, and that it will allow some cohabiting couples — well, anyone who wants to— to enter into a civil partnership.
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we are used to seeing a quality the other route round, and it is a real irony in the way in which equality rights developed in relation to same—sex couples in the last 15 yea rs same—sex couples in the last 15 years or so. same—sex couples in the last 15 years oi’ so. same-sex same—sex couples in the last 15 years or so. same-sex marriage had the effect of giving same—sex couples the effect of giving same—sex cou ples two the effect of giving same—sex couples two options when they wanted to formalise their relationship, they could get married or enter into a same—sex partnership. but because it only allows people of the same gender, edmund that had a sexual couples only had one tries, they could get married. thank you very much. the final funeral for someone who died at grenfell tower has taken place — more than a year after the fire
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which killed 72 people. raymond bernard, who was known as moses, was called a hero by his sister bernadette at the start of the public inquiry. he died sheltering six people in his top floor flat as they tried to escape the flames. our correspondent sophie long reports. # when you're weary...#. he was just a wonderful, inspirational man. he played such a schedule for people in the team unity. everybody loved him. everybody that came into contact with ray, everybody loved him. of course, everybody calls him moses. a family and a community gathered at the base of the grenfell tower to celebrate the life of raymond bernard. he came to london from trinidad as a 15—year—old boy.
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he died at 63, respected by so many in the team unity which he lived in the decade since. there had been a long wait for this, the final farewell to the last of the final farewell to the last of the fire's victims. a 72 second silence to remember each of those who died, and prayers for those that survive. ray was in his flat on the 23rd for as the building began to burn. as they fled from the flames, they would have found ray, or moses, as he was known to them. knowing ray, he would have been very camp, because that is the person he was. i am sure he would have been extremely anxious, but he would not have allowed anybody to see that, so i think his cameras would have definitely helped the others. we we i’e definitely helped the others. we were out looking for him. just hoping that he had got out. but it
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wasn't meant to be. the remains of 11 people were found in ray's flat. he would have been the last to pass, according to the coroner. today, g re nfell according to the coroner. today, grenfell fire's final date was laid to rest. tomorrow, the will start hearing evidence from those who survive. those who did make it out of the terror that night. time for a look at the weather. here's alina jenkins. it is not a part of the world that we it is not a part of the world that we think about flooding, but morocco has seen torrential rain recently. you can see the extent of the flooding. we do expect rain in this pa rt flooding. we do expect rain in this part of the world, but not so much
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in the short and time. because it is so dry and added, the water has nowhere to go, so we see so dry and added, the water has nowhere to go, so we see some sevei’e flooding nowhere to go, so we see some sevei’e flooding and morocco. a few days ago we we i’e flooding and morocco. a few days ago we were talking about another system. this system is hanging around. if we look at the forecast chart, we can see this area of low pi’essui’e. chart, we can see this area of low pressure. to the north, an area of high pressure, to the east, an area of high pressure. that keeps it blocked in. once again, sardinia, corsica, into tennessee, further heavy showers and thunderstorms as well. —— 20 tunisia. for much of england, wales and northern ireland it is cloudy but mel. for northern england and scotland, plenty of sunshine, at cooler and 20 as well. you can see the squeeze in the
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isobars across scotland and northern england. and the weakening called find is the dividing line between the conditions in the north and the milder conditions in the south. further east, edible to contain and prick, but the best of the sunshine across eastern and northern england, and a few showers for the northern and a few showers for the northern and western isles. this is where we will see strong winds in the afternoon. we could see gusts up to 50 or 60 mils per hour. perhaps even 65 miles per across orkney. head further south, 15 to 20 celsius. the best of the sunshine getting up to perhaps 21 inside east anglia. we will see clear skies for a time across eastern scotland, where temperatures get close to freezing,
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so we temperatures get close to freezing, so we cannot rule out frost here. further west, we will see cloud arriving into scotland, northern ireland and northern england. eventually, it will bring being in the early hours of the morning. through tomorrow morning, it is a cloudy after across much of scotland and northern england. further south, the cloud will and brick. that is all from me. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is given a standing ovation at a fringe meeting at the conservative party conference after branding theresa may's brexit plan a "cheat". do not believe that we can somehow get it wrong now — bodge it now and fix it later. get out properly next year, or the year after. applause. that is a total fantasy! meanwhile the prime minister promises that immigration will fall after brexit — and there will be no preferential treatment for migrants coming from the european union.
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the number of people known to have died in friday's earthquake and tsunami in indonesia rises to more than 1,300. the government's announces it's changing the law so that heterosexual couples can enter a civil partnership in england and wales. campaigners welcome the news. couples like charlie and myself can finally formalise our relationship in a way we see fit, and have the legal recognition and financial protections that we seek. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. it's only october but we're looking ahead to bbc sports personality of the year with some big changes being introduced this year. what can you tell us? that's the first thing i thought earlier on, it feels like the countdown to christmas. it gets to the point where we start speculating a bit about who might make that
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shortlist. usually we get a few weeks to mull it over and think of some of those names that might be on the list. not this year, we now have to wait until the night itself to find out the names of the nominees. it will be staged once again in birmingham. you might remember that was the venue in 2016 when andy murray won that title. he was over in miami at the time. we normally see in miami at the time. we normally see about 12 people on the shortlist. organisers have suggested the number of nominees could be cut down and it will still be up to the public to decide. this year they will also get to vote for another award as well for moment of the year. that will be a very difficult one to choose this year. tonight, more champions league. two english clu bs more champions league. two english clubs playing and feeling the pi’essui’e. clubs playing and feeling the pressure. absolutely. both manchester teams are in action this evening. we've been talking a lot
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about the pressure on manchester united and particularly jose mourinho who faced valencia at home. before that its manchester city who ta ke before that its manchester city who take on the hockenheim. good news for pep guardiola with kevin deploying back following his knee injury sooner than expected. he injured his right knee six weeks ago and is unlikely to play tonight. after their last to lyon last time out, pep guardiola knows a winter night is vital. last two seasons when i am here we qualified quite comfortably. maybe you'll have to realise how complicated, to realise to make a step forward in the knockout games. if we aren't going to do that it's because we aren't good enough. the las vegas police department has reopened an investigation into a report of the
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alleged rape of a woman who say she was attacked by five—time world footballer of the year cristiano ronaldo. i sports correspondent joins me now from central london. what is the latest? an american woman claims cristiano ronaldo raped her ina woman claims cristiano ronaldo raped her in a hotel room in las vegas in 2009. he has dismissed the claims as fa ke 2009. he has dismissed the claims as fake news. his representatives say they will take legal action against they will take legal action against the magazine. they say a report was filed a day after the alleged incident but the victim did not provide the location nor did she give a description of the suspect. in 2010 kathryn mayorga reportedly reached an out—of—court settlement with cristiano ronaldo in agreement for not going public with the allegations. her lawyers are seeking to overturn that agreement and last night las vegas police said they had
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reopened a sexual assault investigation. they are said to be following up with information they received from the victim. there are five new call ups for new zealand, wayne bennett has called up tom johnston and centre rhys lynn while st helens prop luke thompson is also a new pic. all three burgess brothers have been picked for the series beginning in hull. a group of mothers has gone to the high court, to challenge surrey county council's proposed cut to its special needs and disability budget. the women have disabled children, and theirjudicial review contends that they should have been consulted on the planned £21 million cut. surrey county council says its focus is to make sure children get the support they need. lauren moss reports. taking the fight for their children's education
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to the high court. these parents are challenging surrey county council plans to cut £21 million from its special educational needs budget. plans they say will hit theirfamilies hard. children who need support like speech and language therapy in school, who need one—to—one learning support assistants just in order to be at school, to access and education. and that kind of support is really essential for our children to develop their skills, their communication, to achieve their potential in life. how many people here have been to tribunal once? sarah's not alone. and twice? alicia mccoll‘s 14—year—old son kian has autism, adhd and speech and language difficulties. he goes to a specialist school, but they say they're not sure what will happen. just taking away a child's future, kind of, because it's taking away the opportunity to give them support and things that will actually help them learn. potentially, if they cut budgets we could lose speech and language,
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we could lose occupational therapy just like anybody else could. but the biggest thing for me would be transport. if he lost his transport i would have to give up myjob because i'm a single parent. catriona ferris's15—year—old son dominic has asperger‘s and needs support at school with severe anxiety. he is preparing to sit his gcses next year and says those who have made the funding decision don't realise the consequences. if they went round my school or any schools that receive sen funding, and they saw the help that the kids get and what that help would be like if they didn't have it, then realistically they wouldn't be looking at trying that because it just doesn't logistically work—out. thejudicial review will look at the legality of surrey county council plans to make these savings. the parents, who crowd funded to pay for their representation, are arguing that they weren't consulted and that the council didn't examine the impact is the cuts would have. it comes after parents in bristol
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won a legal challenge there against the authority's decision to cut £5 million from the special budget. we are asking the court to quash this decision, which would mean it would be as if the decision had never been taken and the cuts would have to be reinstated. surrey could go on to consult in the future and look at making the decision again but we would be hopeful that if there was proper consultation and surrey looked at the impact this sort of decision would have, then they would think again. surrey cou nty they would think again. surrey county council needs to make significant savings, and initial statement the authority says it is defending itself but the main focus is making sure children get the support they need. the high court hearing will conclude tomorrow. lauren moss, bbc news. let's get more now on the conservative conference, and the plans unveiled by the prime minister and sajid
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javid on immigration, after brexit. i'm nowjoined by professor thom brooks, dean & chair in law and government at durham university. thank you forjoining us. what are the merits in your view of this idea of putting the emphasis more on high skills than nationality? the idea around higher skills is around the idea that immigrants who have postgraduate qualifications or bring technical expertise that is missing in the uk not only tend to fill strategic gaps but are rough and wealth creators, often help create jobs and bring greater overall economic benefit to the uk than those in low skilled jobs —— but are greater wealth creators. on the other hand those the government identify as having low skilled and
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therefore went to be given any extra boost to come into the country are identified as earning under £31,000. anyone earning under £31,000 is low skilled but more importantly it doesn't look at economic need that the country has and it isn't clear where the country will get people doing the kinds of work currently done by migrants if this cut were to come into place. we know the government has tried to bring down immigration, hasn't met the target is itself for its soul. how would this change in emphasis enable them to meet the targets set —— the targets it set for it self. if the government wanted to meet its 100,000 net migration target we could do it now. we could stop giving visas to non—eu citizens. if it did that right now, there are under 100,000 eu citizens who currently come here and it would meet the target today. that would be based again and nationality rather than high skill, wouldn't it? sure,
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if they had some kind of barrier like that. my point is if they really wa nted like that. my point is if they really wanted to meet that target they could have done so and they've chosen not to do it for many years. if they go into this other move right now, this current plan the prime minister announced today, i think it's very unlikely that still she will meet that target for a number of reasons. it's not clear any number of reasons. it's not clear a ny syste m number of reasons. it's not clear any system could be in place even if it was agreed. the home secretary said a few days ago that it would ta ke said a few days ago that it would take at least two years extending free movement forward two years in order to have a plan, the infrastructure, the people to police it to have any type of plan in place, to have anything functioning at all. there are family unification rules that a lot of eu families would be able to qualify and. it's not clear that eu citizens will be
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treated differently. then there is this matter of a points—based system, that many politicians have been calling for but has actually been calling for but has actually beenin been calling for but has actually been in place for ten years that also a lot of eu folks might be able to come into as well. again, irrespective of nationality. i'm not sui’e irrespective of nationality. i'm not sure that going the skills route would make much of a change to this, and a lot of this seems to be more rhetoric than hard fact to. but they're also the social and cultural impacts of large—scale immigration. communities in this country which said they've changed beyond all recognition in a short period of time, that the health service in places is under strain, that there's a housing and also there aren't enough school places to go around. surely a change in the immigration system like this that might bring the target down would alleviate a lot of those pressures. you're right there's a lot of different types of impacts that migration, whether it
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be migrants from outside the uk or whether it would be british citizens coming back, will have a changing population in this country. one of the problems with the migration advisory committee is its only a small group of economists that only do an economic impact assessment, and it needs to be wider than that. one thing to say about regression immigration, it is thought that if there were fewer immigrants here that housing would be better, actually migrants are more likely to be in a&e as doctors and nurses rather than as patients and migrants help build the houses. it's not clear that the housing shortage will be changed. one thing i welcome about the things announced today is the home secretary announced that the home secretary announced that the citizenship test is to be changed. after i took that test in 2009 i said it was like a bad pub quiz and needed to change, and i'm
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pleased to see there will be some action on that. whether it impacts any of the numbers of migrants coming forward or backward is unclear. thank you very much for joining us. an unarmed police officer who tried to tackle the westminster attacker khalid masood has told an inquest he had no doubt that masood was "was coming to kill police". khalid masood drove his car into pedestrians on westminster bridge in march last year, before fatally stabbing pc keith palmer outside the houses of parliament. five people were killed in total, and 50 wounded. our correspondent helena lee is following the inquest at the old bailey. tell us more about today's test to many. this is the first time we've heard from pc nick carlile. he was on duty with pc palmer on the day of the attack. they were on duty outside the gates. he came to court today to describe how he heard a loud bang. he thought it was a road
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traffic accident at first, then he looked over and saw khalid masood's four by four vehicle crashed into the railings. he saw smoke coming through the fence. then he said next he saw and heard people screaming and running towards parliament square. he said he saw a man in a suit shouting men with denied stabbing people, men with knives. pc nick carlisle said he backed away, he then saw pc palmer. his colleague had been caught by khalid masood. he told the court, i ran forward intending to issue a rugby tackle. he came at me with knives. the court then heard police officers shot khalid masood. he went over to handcuff him because he feared he could have been wearing a suicide
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vest. he was asked, did you have any doubt that khalid masood, what his intentions were? pc carlisle said, none whatsoever. he looked me directly in the eye, he was coming through a crowd of people, he wasn't interested in members of the public, he was coming to kill police officers. at the end of his evidence the barrister representing pc palmer's family thanked him for his bravery and help on the day of the attack. the evidence now has finished here at the old bailey and we are finished here at the old bailey and we are expecting the coroner said deliver his conclusions into these inquests at some point tomorrow. thank you. jamie is here — in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. borisjohnson is given a standing ovation as he attacks theresa may's brexit plan at the conservative conference in birmingham. the government will change the law to allow heterosexual couples in england and wales
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to enter into a civil partnership. survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid — the death toll is now more than 1300. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. online retailing giant amazon is raising pay for hundreds of thousands of workers in the us and the uk. in the uk, workers will see a rise from £8.20 an hour in london to £10.50. outside london the rate rises from £8 an hour to £9.50. the owner of vauxhall has warned of "dramatic consequences" for its uk plants if there is a no—deal brexit, hours after toyota motor europe said it would affect its investment decisions. speaking to the bbc, carlos tavares said the carmaker‘s "number one" request of brexit talks was free trade. a budget airline that began offering long—haul flights from uk airports earlier this year, including sta nsted to
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the us, has collapsed. flights to washington and new york due to leave stansted on monday night were grounded and passengers have been told not to go to the airport on tuesday. everyone at amazon getting a raise? the big thing is in the united states, they are going up to $15 an hour. not everyone is that pleased, a few people are carping. the gmb, the union do well commit obviously but they say given their owner is the richest man in the world you would think he could see fit to dig a little deeper. and also, they say it isa a little deeper. and also, they say it is a start. now they are paying the living wage, maybe amazon could pay their taxes to and do something
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to improve the horrendous working conditions in their warehouses. it seems there's more they would require. the interesting thing is what it's going to do to amazon as a country. joining us now is samira hussain, our north america business correspondent. what is it going to do to amazon as far as investors are concerned? clearly a lot of efforts were made by groups in the united states, by the fight for 15 movement something we've covered on this programme a lot. if you look at the overall us economy, we are seeing lot. if you look at the overall us economy, we are seeing that the unemployment rate is below 4%. that means there's not a lot of workers around. if amazon wants to be able to fill those jobs, particularly in those fulfilment centres around the holiday period, they are going to have to start paying people a better wage. we are seeing that they are buckling under some of that pi’essui’e. buckling under some of that pressure. also, if you look at some of the companies amazon has acquired
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lately, one of them is an upscale grace reid chain, whole foods. the workers there were trying to organise a union to push for better wages —— upscale grocery chain. amazon say they are going to pay people better wages and also going to lobby the federal government to start doing the same. let's talk about inflation. amazon, 250,000 workers, but if you get other companies doing the same thing that feeds into a big inflation picture and it feeds into higher interest rates as well. is that a plausible scenario? sure, it's plausible but if you look at it from a business perspective for amazon itself, there are other big multinational companies here in the united states that have also started making pledges to stop paying their workers better wages. we've heard walmart is
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going to pay their workers $11 an hour, target is also increasing to $11 an hourand hour, target is also increasing to $11 an hour and their goal is to get it to $15 an hour by 2020. for amazon, the reality on the ground for them is trying to get workers and with an unemployment rate that is so low, when there's not a lot of workers around, the challenge of courses going to be to try and get people to work. laughter are those people to work. laughter are those people deliberately getting in your way?! things never change here! thank you. we were talking about rising prices. look at oil. it's not by about $5 in the last week and a half. that will feed into petrol prices everything. rising prices all around the place
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which means in the states that will mean definitely higher interest rates and possibly here as well. it depends how long it goes on for. it's to do with sanctions being imposed on iran in about a month and people noticing that oil coming out of iran is slowing down. there is much less oil around and at this point the prices are going up. supply and demand. thank you. in 1943, the bbc correspondent wynford vaughan thomas and his engineer made one of the most famous audio recordings of the second world war. joining the crew of a lancaster bomber on a raid over berlin, they detailed the drama of flying at night over occupied europe to attack the nazi capital. now using virual reality, it is possible to experience the mission visually as well — as robert hall reports. this is the story of lancaster f freddie —
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a famous wartime broadcast and a blend of history and technology which can take all of us into the dangerous skies above germany. among those preparing for take off on the evening of september 3rd 1943, were two civilians. bbc correspondent wynford vaughan—thomas and his engineer reg pidsley, joined f freddie's crew to record their bombing mission over berlin. recording: is it ok now? yes, cutting. this is the disk recording equipment that would have been used, bbc type c. the cutter head actually cut a groove into that disk, recording the sound. reg pidsley, the recording engineer, had to keep the blank disks inside his flying jacket to make sure they were warm enough to cut. recording: they've left that other bomber and they‘ re moving now slowly... i was just aware of this fantastic piece of recording that wynford vaughan—thomas had done in 1943 and, having worked with vr, i could see it was potentially
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a really, really good fit. recording: they seem to splay out at first like the tentacles of an octopus, waiting to catch you. because the audio is an actual recording of what happened, itjust makes the cg! undeniably real. recording: ok when you are. f freddie's bomb aimer was bill bray. he never told his granddaughter about his wartime service. recording: hello, skipper. will you turn on to 081? right, 081, navigator. 0k. wow. what did you think? i thought it was incredible, it was amazing. it's just surreal listening because we've heard the audio before so many times, but to actually hear the audio alongside everything they would have experienced that evening was emotional and incredible. there it goes, our first sight of england, just a little light from a beacon,
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flashing up to us from the darkness below. i've known this story all my life, of father's being in the lancaster but to be there and to see it and to experience it, and to just see how brave all those young, young men wei’e. robert hall, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. broadly speaking there are two types of weather across the uk. this was the scene earlier this morning. across northern england and into scotla nd across northern england and into scotland we have some spells of sunshine and also one or two showers and the strongest of the winds. we can see and the strongest of the winds. we can see this squeeze in the isobars across scotland and northern
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england. some strong winds through the afternoon. this weakening cold front is a dividing line between cooler conditions to the north, cloudy and mild to the south. a large swathe of cloud stretching into wales and much of england, northern england seeing some spells of sunshine and a speckling effect across scotland indicating a few showers. these are average speeds but the costs could touch 50 or 60 mph across parts of scotland but temperatures won't get much higher up temperatures won't get much higher up than11 or12. temperatures won't get much higher up than 11 or 12. further south, despite more in the way of cloud, 16-20dc. that despite more in the way of cloud, 16—20dc. that cloud will tend to break up so we'll see some clear skies. the front i mentioned earlier sta rts skies. the front i mentioned earlier starts to move back north and east introducing more cloud into western scotland, some outbreaks of rain. still some clearer skies further east where in shelter we could get temperatures close to freezing. through wednesday that front continues to move north and east
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woods, bringing a fair amount of cloud and outbreaks of rain. elsewhere across england, wales and northern ireland, a fair amount of dry and cloudy weather but it wore thin and break to give bright and sunny spells. the winds will be lighter and temperatures range from 13 to 19 celsius. this area of high pressure is still with us on wednesday. a fairly dominant feature but the front is still with us as well. it will bring some more persistent rain across northern and western scotland, down into northern ireland and parts of north—west england, maybe across north west wales as well. elsewhere we should see some wales as well. elsewhere we should see some spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon, pitting korean central and eastern england. we'll see the highest temperatures 19 or 20 celsius —— particularly in central and eastern england. drier by sunday. hello, you're watching afternoon live.
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today at three: borisjohnson is given a standing ovation as he attacks theresa may's brexit plan at the conservative party conference in birmingham, he called it a ‘constitutional outrage‘. do not believe that we can somehow get it wrong now. budget now and fix it later. that is a total fantasy! cheering but the prime minister promises a new immigration system and says britain will have full control of that policy after brexit. it takes back control of our borders, it ensures that free movement comes to an end once and for all and we will be deciding who comes into this country. the government is to change the law to allow heterosexual couples in england and wales to enter into a civil partnership couples like charlie and myself can finally formalise our relationship in a way we see fit, and have the legal recognition and financial protections that we seek.
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survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid, including food and water — coming up on afternoon live all the sport — holly hamilton. lets go straight to the conservative party conference. i love the nhs and i wanted to talk today about what we are going to do to make sure it is a lwa ys are going to do to make sure it is always there for you and your family, anyway it has always been there for mine. as you, my sister emily had a nearfatal brain injury. her life was saved by the nhs at southmead hospital in bristol. last month, i had the chance to go back with her two sides meet and to say thank you. they two gloves into the helipad where she had been taken off the airambulance, and helipad where she had been taken off the air ambulance, and then they took us in to a and a bully had
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stabilised her, and then into the intensive care unit. and as we walked in, standing there directly opposite her, was the consultant who has looked after her. and until that moment, she could not remember anything about it. but when she saw him, she knew exactly who he was, and she went over and gave him a great big hug. it was an incredible moment. and when she thanked him, his supply will always stick with me. he said, it wasn‘tjust me, it was the whole team. and that sums up our nhs. now, i love my sister, and the nhs saved her life, so when i say i love the nhs, i really mean it. ‘s. applause mac. but the truth
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is, they would have done this for anyone, from my sister rogers. and what an honour to be in the position to be able to say thank you. my heartfelt thanks is notjust from one brother to one doctor, orfrom one brother to one doctor, orfrom one family to one hospital. no, the nhs is therefore us all, and i want to see this from everyone in this nation to every person who works in the nhs, we salute you. we value value, and from the bottom of our hearts, thank you. i am very proud of the nhs from what it is delivering today. cancer survival rates are dirty record high. strokes are down by a third. deaths from heart drug you down by a quarter. the nhs is doing more than ever
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before. that in a thousand more clinicians looking after patients than in 2010, 12,000 clinicians looking after patients than in 2010,12,000 more nurses are in ourawards, than in 2010,12,000 more nurses are in our awards, 14,000 more doctors. 1 million more seen by cancer specialists every year. 2 million more operations, 3 million more treated in accident and emergency. the results of this, at every stage in life, people are healthier than evei’ in life, people are healthier than ever before. that is what our nhs is living under this conservative government. applause. but anyone who knows the nhs also knows there are serious pressures, because the population is ageing and we are getting more people than ever before. it is clear to everyone that social care is under pressure too. i know the pressures, and we had gone to address them, because i want us to address them, because i want us to make the nhs the bell health
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service in the world. today type wa nt to service in the world. today type want to talk about high. first of all, it cannot be done without more money. the prime minister has committed an extra 20 billion over the next five years. £20 billion. it is the largest, longest financial settle m e nt is the largest, longest financial settlement in the entire history of the nhs, and it will underpin the nhs for the long time. and when people ask that we spell out her domestic agenda, you go and tell them this— we have taken this decision, we have made our choice. we have responded to the public mood and the clear need to have a service with boldness. let me say this, this policy is not without cost. i know that, and i know that it is audacious, but i profoundly believe it to be read, and i am proud to sei’ve a it to be read, and i am proud to serve a prime minister who believes the two great too. applause. and this money comes on stream next
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year, but i want to help the nhs... i have already provided extra funding for hospitals to make up buildings to help deal with pressures this winter, and i can announce today that omitting an extra £240 million available to make social care packages available this winter to support our nhs. applause. we will use the money to get people who don‘t need to be in hospital but who don‘t need to be in hospital but who needs care back home, back in their communities so we can free up those vital hospital bed and help people who really needed get the hospital care they deserve but i know that money alone is not enough. we need to make sure that money is well spent by reforming the nhs and the social care system too, to make sure that it is always there for you and your family. sure that it is always there for you and yourfamily. so, along with sure that it is always there for you
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and your family. so, along with the nhs themselves, we are writing a long—term plan to guarantee its future. i am long—term plan to guarantee its future. iam hugely long—term plan to guarantee its future. i am hugely grateful to my departmental team who are working together with me on these reforms. steve barclay, caroline di needs, steve barclay, caroline di needs, steve brine, james o‘shaughnessy, wendy morton... it is good working as part of this team all pulling together. thank you. applause. and i will tell you this about pulling together, we have got to pull together, we have got to pull together too, because we saw with lebanon last week at a frightening prospect for our country if we don‘t. —— with labour last week. they have got nothing new, and every time that programme has tried it has felt dieback misery upon millions, and it is our duty to the sugar does not happen again. applause. one of
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the major reforms we need to see is bringing new technology across the health and care system, and obviously, i have been able to consult widely about that in the last few days, because gchq has given everyone my phone number! laughter .0f laughter . of course, introducing new technology can be bumpy, as we all know, but the benefits are huge. i say this to people who say that technology is not always perfect. of course it is not, but that is not a reason to reject new technology, thatis reason to reject new technology, that is a reason to improve new technology and keep making sure we get the best use of that. but the nhs is still the biggest buyer of fax machines in the country. maybe even the world. and this is putting a greater pressure on our nhs staff, and in some hospitals, a nurse to go signed with the clipboard to find out where beds are in use and where
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they are empty. it does not have to be this way. any hospital on plymouth, when i was on night shift last week, we have developed an error has programmed so that eve ryo ne error has programmed so that everyone knows what the empty beds are all the time. patients get better treatment, and it is so much easierfor better treatment, and it is so much easier for staff. better treatment, and it is so much easierfor staff. so, we are going to sort out the technology of the nhs, because our nhs deserves better. applause. applause. it is not just about sorting out the it, it is also about seizing the huge opportunities. let‘s take one example. today, it takes an average of over five years to diagnose rare diseases. five years. with endless tests a nd diseases. five years. with endless tests and trial treatments. but thanks to the hundred thousand gene isa thanks to the hundred thousand gene is a project, now, by combining your only gene sequence of machine
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learning on others, you can be diagnosed in days. and what is more, from just a swab of saliva, dear is the potential to design a drug specifically to treat should you —— your unique biological code. in this city, this hospital is growing rapidly as of people‘s cancer is any laboratory to test individual tracks to csv destroy the cancer before subjecting the patient into that trap. this increases the chances of the cure and reduces the acne of u nsuccessful the cure and reduces the acne of unsuccessful treatments. it is unbelievable technology, and it is happening in birmingham. iam unbelievable technology, and it is happening in birmingham. i am so proud that it is thanks to a decision by david cameron and this conservative government that this is happening at all. applause. so, i wa nt to happening at all. applause. so, i want to go further, and today, i can announce that we are expanding our 100,000 gene is project, sold 1
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million whole gene owns will now be sequence, million whole gene owns will now be sequence, along with a long—term vision 5 million. i want to make it available to all. and what this means in practice for you and family is this— from today, our brand—new nhs medicine servers will roll out access to genomic testing, so for eve ryo ne access to genomic testing, so for everyone with a rare cancer, and for all seriously ill children, it will be available on the nhs. so, we will have tailor—made treatments and drugs that are the best fit for a placement and snotty best guess. we are leading the world, and i am incredibly excited about this technology, just because of its potential to change lives for the better. it is just one example, but it‘s also kind of reforming need to make sure the nhs is the best health service in the world applause but
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the law that new technology is not enough to make the health and social ca re system enough to make the health and social care system sustainable. we need other refunds too. we have got to do from the system so we spend more time on prevention and is not secure. with more integration between health and social care and more treatment closer to home, and what i mean by this, is that the era of moving all activity into fewer and fewer larger hospitals and blindly at closing community hospitals — that user is over. applause. i want more services. i want more services closer to the communities they serve, and i want to empower people to have more control over their own health too, whether it is their own health too, whether it is the rising risk of obesity are the sort of gambling addiction. the growing challenge of mental illness.
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these problems, and the increasing demands dimata on our health system, they can only truly be solved by prevention as much as cure. we cannot go on treating them like medical problems, we need to look after people as people, notjust patients. and fostered a culture thatis patients. and fostered a culture that is less popping pills and prozac, more prevention and perspiration. that includes writing a new evidence to support people with obesity and other conditions, whether it be through prescribing exercise, the arts or nutritional advice, rather than get more drugs and medical interventions were stuck in the language i prefer to use, just common sense. applause. these are forms of social care and needed too. to make that sustainable for the long—term. so people do not
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have to fear the risk of losing everything there for newbies and outside of their control they need to ca re outside of their control they need to care when they are old. reform of social care is long overdue, and we will publish a paper later this year setting out the progress that we can make to give new people confidence and dignity in old age. and of course we cannot do any of these reforms without gps. our gps are the bedrock of the nhs. they are everyone‘s first port of call. applause. and because our gps are the bedrock of the nhs, we need more of them, better supported, better equipped. prevention of ill health is nothing without primary care, so we backed our nation‘s gps every step of the way. applause. now, i believe that this
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need for reform does not simply live with the nhs or our social care system. we too as a party must be driven by the imperative to the farm. we have always been at her best when we have been reforming, when we look to the future. who abolished slavery in the 19th century? who delivered equalforce for women in the 20th? who delivered equal managing the 21st? not the liberals are the labour party, it was the conservative party, and throughout history we have shown that we are at our best when we act in favour of the future, not fixated on the past. but it is more than that. we cannot just on the past. but it is more than that. we cannotjust be comfortable with modern britain, we have got to be the champions of modern britain, pro—jobs, pro—business, brought prosperity. helping out everyone who wa nts to prosperity. helping out everyone who wants to achieve to achieve their potential. we cannot fear the future, we have got to invest in future. we embrace the future, and we embrace defeat. the conservative
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party is the party that is always understood the spirit of this great nation, and that‘s by the today calls for opportunity for all, without fear or favour, calls for opportunity for all, without fear orfavour, no more calls for opportunity for all, without fear or favour, no more than ever, we have got to give it all we have got, because our opponents are not resting either. so, let us denied together, that us embrace our nhs, impressive form, and give it everything we have got and serve this great nation that we love. applause. thank you. matt hancox speaking to the conservative party conference in birmingham, starting by speaking about his affection for the nhs and haveit about his affection for the nhs and have it saved his sister ‘s life. he
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also talked about 20 billions extra pounds for its funding for the nhs over the next five years, which sta rts over the next five years, which starts to kick in next year. he also taught, as we know he has a great interest in technology, having been the ministerfor interest in technology, having been the minister for culture, media interest in technology, having been the ministerfor culture, media and sport previously to this particular breed. the one sympathetic knowledge in the nhs. why are they start using so in the nhs. why are they start using so many fax machines, he asked. and also the idea of focusing on prevention rather than sheer and integrating the health and social ca re integrating the health and social care services integrating the health and social ca re services so integrating the health and social care services so that people can be treated closer to home. also recognising that more gps are necessary if prevention is going to happen. he recognises them as the bedrock of the nhs. he says they need to be better supported. we will get more reaction to this speech and has priorities then a short while here on bbc news. meanwhile, the foreign foreign secretary boris johnson has delivered another fierce
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attack on the prime minister‘s proposals for a brexit deal he described the so—called checker still as a constitutional outrage. it is not taking back control, it is forfeiting control. and by the way, they ignore it. do not be fooled by they ignore it. do not be fooled by the suggestion that you will ultimately reject these proposals, because what they want above all is to demonstrate to any other country that might dream of following suit that might dream of following suit that you cannot leave the eu without suffering adverse political and economic consequences. and what the chequers proposals shall there the united kingdom, for all its power and mightand united kingdom, for all its power and might and network of influences around the world, for all its federal parliamentary history, was an able, ultimately, to take back control. and instead of reasserting
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our ability to make our laws, the geeky will be effectively paraded in manacles. this is the moment to chapter chequers. cheering to scrap the commission‘s constitutionally possible northern ireland backstop. cheering .to cheering . to use the otherwise redundant and miserable implementation period until the end of 2020 to negotiate the free trade agreement. to invest
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in the customs procedures that we will need to ensure continued frictionless trade, and prepared much more vigorously than for coming out on wto terms. and if you get it right... cheering .if cheering . if we get it right, the opportunities argument. it is not just that we can do proper fill factor trade deals, and so many areas of the 21st century, this country is already light years ahead. technology, biosciences, you name it, we are the leaders. and we can choose our regulatory freedom to entrench and intensify those advantages. and of course, our european friends and partners can see that that might be possible, and thatis see that that might be possible, and that is exactly why they want to constrain us. her policy delivers on the results
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of the referendum, it takes back control of our borders, ensures that free movement comes to an end once and for all, and we will be deciding who can come into this country. we recognise the point that you have made, that there are skills that businesses need to bring into this country, so the new system will be based not on the people come from, but in what they can contribute to our economy, but in what they can contribute to our economy, the skills that they have. we're also working as a government to ensure we are building up government to ensure we are building up the skills of young people in the uk, but our new immigration policy is to ensure free movement ends. they can come here will be determined by their contribution to our economy, determined by their contribution to our economy, not by come from. there has been some reaction in the
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european parliament. brussels correspondent says the proposals have been heavily criticised by some. from the parliament's brexit watta na, some. from the parliament's brexit wattana, a fairly well—known name in the brexit debate, he said the european union would not be able to accept a new immigration system when arrivals were discriminated against on the basis of skill orjob type. and that is precisely the centrepiece of the proposals unveiled today. previously, the european commission that once a brexit doc stated it gave a presentation to eu officials and diplomats saying that every movement ends for eu nationals going to the uk, it ends for british citizens gone on the other direction. instead of being able to take up a job anywhere in the eu, practice nurses will be at schools faced with the prospect of quarters and work permits. up until now, the brexit
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docs are focused on people who have already moved, the rate of eu nationals who have made their home in britain already and vice versa. the trade talks, which will be coming sometime soon, they will probably be about something slightly different, called mobility, which is about things like business people‘s traps, students and. they are the traditional things you talk about any free trade agreement. it will be fascinating to see if in future you end up with the uk immigration system and the eu immigration system, order the two start to emerge as deals are done and haggling is done over the trade agreement. for now, we are still quite a long way from that. adam fleming in brussels. the government is to change the law to allow heterosexual couples heterosexual couples
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are to be allowed to enter into civil partnerships in england and wales, as an alternative to marriage. the government has announced it will change the law, to extend civil partnerships — which were introduced for same sex couples in 2004 — to all adults. rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, a couple from london, brought a legal challenge to be allowed to have a civil partnership; they gave the bbc their reaction to today‘s announcement. we are delighted with this wonderful news from the government today, and we thank the prime minister and the minister for women and equalities for finally announcing that they are committed to ending the current situation and the inequality, and opening civil partnerships to everybody, so that couples like charlie and myself can finally formalised our relationship in a way that we see fit, and have the legal recognition and the financial protections that we seek. a little earlier i spoke to our legal correspondent clive coleman, and i began by asking him what the legal distinction is between a marriage and a civil partnership. there is something like 3.3 million cohabiting couples in the uk. many of them believe that the actually live in something called a common—law marriage. we know this is a breath. ifi common—law marriage. we know this is a breath. if i had a pound for every timei a breath. if i had a pound for every time i have said on the bbc there is
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no such thing, i would have at least £100. but people insist on believing that. now, those 3.3 million, we are not suggesting for a moment that all of them will rush off as soon as the law changes and enter into a civil partnerships, but a sizeable minority might, because what tends to happen for a cohabiting couple, is that you only realise either on separating or on the death of a partner that you have far, far fewer rights in relation to property, inheritance, pension that schools than you would have any civil partnership or malice. for years and yea rs, lawyers have partnership or malice. for years and years, lawyers have been very much in favour. many people have been in favour of equalising the rights and protections of cohabiting unmarried couples, but it has remained a massive imbalance, this might go some way to addressing it in that will allow some schools cohabiting
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couples to enter into a civil partnership and get better protection. we are used to seeing the other way around. there is a real irony in the end which equality rights developed in relation to same—sex couples in the last 15 yea rs, same—sex couples in the last 15 years, because first came several partnerships, and then same—sex marriage, and that had the effect of giving same—sex couples two options when they wanted to formalise their relationship. they could either get married on enter into a civil partnership. but because the civil partnership. but because the civil partnership that only allows civil partnerships between people of the same agendas, admit that married couples could schools only had one tries. more than 1,300 people are now known to have died in the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia on friday. more people have been pulled alive from the rubble in the last few hours, but it‘s feared the number of deaths will rise as rescuers reach remote areas. survivors are growing increasingly desperate for aid supplies, and there are reports of looting.
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this desert of mud and rubble was once a bustling network of streets and houses. they were overwhelmed in a matter of minutes by an earthquake and then a tidal wave. four days on, people here are still wondering how they will survive. one by one, survivors are still being rescued. this man was buried in the ruins of an office building. he was pulled out injured but alive, but no one knows how many others are still trapped in these ruins. translation: we remain optimistic that they are alive but after this amount of time and after such an event as this, the body‘s ability to endure is minimal. tens of thousands of people have been displaced but the aid they need has been slow to arrive. when it does, look what happens here. these people are desperate for food and don‘t know when the next delivery will come.
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a chicken will feed a family for a few days. but the aid isn‘t getting through everywhere yet. translation: there has not been any aid, there‘s no food and no water in this area at all. others aren‘t waiting for help to arrive. they take whatever they can, wherever they can and little is being done to stop them. fuel is in particularly short supply. in a town with no electricity, it can power generators and the vehicles needed to leave the disaster zone. translation: i need this so i can search for supplies on my motorbike, because getting supplies around here is tough. thousands of people are trying to get flights out of the area. the main airport was damaged but still functions. the priority is to evacuate the injured. the disaster brought down hospitals and clinics and treating people for their injuries has become a major priority. but in the hills above palu,
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they are burying people as fast as they can in mass graves. this is just one of the communities affected. rescuers are still trying to get to others, cut off by the quake. the full scale of this disaster has yet to be revealed. richard lister, bbc news. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. some bright sunny spells breaking through, particularly for northern england and into scotland, though scattered showers for northern and western else. these are average speeds for the bones, but the gas could reach 60 miles powers. head further south, we are looking at 19 celsius. this evening and overnight, most will be dry. clear the skies for a time before marco pcs in from the bus, affecting parts of north
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wales, north—west england. outbreaks of rain to end the night here. we could see temperatures getting closer to freezing, otherwise six to 12 censures overnight. on wednesday, it will be cloudy. sunny spells across england and wales, but outbreaks of rain pushing north and eastwards a cross outbreaks of rain pushing north and eastwards across scotland. here, temperatures 12 to 14 celsius. further south, a little bit milder. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: boris johnson is given a standing ovation at a fringe meeting at the conservative party conference after branding theresa may‘s brexit plan a "cheat" and a "constitutional outrage". chequers provides the perfect logic and argument for those who want britain to return to the eu, and
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thatis britain to return to the eu, and that is a recipe for continued acrimony. meanwhile the prime minister promises that immigration will fall after brexit, and there will be no preferential treatment for migrants coming from the european union. the government announces it‘s changing the law so that heterosexual couples can enter a civil partnership in england and wales. campaigners welcome the news. the number of people known to have died in friday‘s earthquake and tsunami in indonesia rises to more than 1300. the finalfuneral for someone who died at grenfell tower has taken place, more than a year after the fire which killed 72 people. sport now on afternoon live. manchester city back in champions league action tonight — it‘s not been smooth sailing for city so far, though, has it? both manchester teams in action this evening. and while there‘s been much talk
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of the pressure on manchester united who face valencia at home later — injust over two hours — it‘s manchester city away to hoffenheim. and pep guardiola knows there‘ll be no margin for error this evening after that shock defeat to lyon last month. city had been the favourites in this competition so many had assumed qualifying for the knockout stages would be smooth sailing. well guardiola has said perhaps it‘s better that they have some difficult moments. and he‘s refusing to underestimate their german opponents this evening — saying "it doesn t matter how big the town is — it s about how you play on the pitch. the last two seasons, when i‘m here, we qualified quite comfortable. and maybe we will have to realise how complicated is the competition, to realise, to step forward. and if we‘re not able to do that, it‘s because we‘re not good enough.
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that game kicks off at five to six — while united are at home to valencia, kicking off at 8 o‘clock at old trafford. it‘s only october but we‘re looking ahead to bbc sports personality of the year, with some big changes being introduced this year. what can you tell us? it gets to this point in the year when we start speculating who might be on that shortlist. and usually we get a few weeks to mull over some of the names on the shortlist. well, not this year. we‘ll have to wait now until the night itself to find out the names of the nominees. it‘ll be staged once again in birmingham. you might remember it was the venue in 2016 when andy murray won the title. although he was in miami at the time. we normally see at least 12 on that shortlist. organisers have suggested the number of nominees could be cut down as well. as always, the public will decide who wins — and this year there‘s also
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the addition of a new accolade for greatest sporting moment — celebrating the standout moment of 2018. the las vegas metropolitan police department has reopened an investigation into a report of the alleged rape of a woman, who says she was attacked by the five—time world footballer of the year cristiano ronaldo. our sports correspondent richard conwayjoins me now, richard what s the latest? an american woman claims that cristiano ronaldo raped her in a hotel room in las vegas in 2009. ronaldo has dismissed the claims, reported first in germany, as fake news. his team say they will take legal action against the magazine. in 2010, the woman wrote norman ——
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the woman reportedly reached an out—of—court settlement, an agreement for not going public with the allegations. the lawyers are seeking to overturn that nondisclosure agreement, and last night, las vegas police said they have reopened a sexual assault investigation from 2009. they are said to be following up with information they have received from the victim. there are five new call—ups for the england squad to face new zealand in a tri—series starting later this month. head coach wayne bennett has called up wakefield winger tom johnstone and centre reece lyne, while st helens prop luke thompson is also a new pick. all three burgess brothers have been picked for the three match series which begins against the kiwis in hull on the 27th of october. that‘s all the sport for now. back to you. now more from the conservative party
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conference. the tories have been talking about housing and taking on labour on their policy agenda, something that many mps here think the government needs to do more effectively. to discuss this more, i am joined by andrea jenkins. i think it is fairto am joined by andrea jenkins. i think it is fair to say you‘re a supporter of borisjohnson. it is fair to say you‘re a supporter of boris johnson. what it is fair to say you‘re a supporter of borisjohnson. what did you make of borisjohnson. what did you make of this speech quits maclj of borisjohnson. what did you make of this speech quits mac i thought it was fantastic. one thing i thought it was fantastic. one thing about boris, he unites the party members. he still had that —— he connects with the party members. it was filled to the rafters with activists who work all year round. very positive, a great vision for britain, talking about housing,
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people owning their own home. i thought it was fantastic. when it comes to the deal that theresa may is trying to get, borisjohnson is saying it is time to chuck chequers. members are very concerned about the option of no deal. and there are ministers here saying, no, we have to give theresa may this space to get that deal done and that is what borisjohnson should be doing. get that deal done and that is what boris johnson should be doing. as he touched on in his speech, people are frustrated and want the prime minister to get on with the job. but the prime minister has had two years to do that. we all got behind her lancaster house speech, but chequers is not that. boris is in tune with the brexiteers across the country. she must chuck chequers, i agree. she must chuck chequers, i agree. she is sticking with something that only 10% of the public support. our party members don‘t support it. the
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eu is already saying they are rejecting it, and even the opposition won‘t vote for it. she must chuck chequers and listen to the people. boris johnson has said these things before. really, there‘s not much more he can do. unless he challenges her for the leadership, where does it go from here? would you like him to do that? do you think he should be the next leader, the prime minister? lets face it, boris is the crown jewel of our party. as the mayor of london, he has the ability to reach out in these labour areas. in my own constituency, constituents said to me they love boris. when hejoined the leave campaign, that really gave it prominence. i think the fact that he is there, speaking up for us brexiteers, and those around the country, that is fantastic. that is what we really should be listening to. the prime minister should start
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listening to the public, as boris does. if she doesn't, should boris challenge her as leader?” does. if she doesn't, should boris challenge her as leader? i think it is down to us as mps to put our letters in. she is prime minister at the moment, but as i have said since backin the moment, but as i have said since back injune, if prime ministers keep their word, they keep their jobs. thank you. lots of people giving borisjohnson a rapturous reception, others saying it should be not about personality and the prime minister should get the backing of all those in her party. our chief political correspondent, vicky young. an unarmed police officer who tried to tackle the westminster attacker khalid masood has told an inquest he had no doubt that masood was "was coming to kill police". khalid masood drove his car into pedestrians on westminster bridge in march last year, before fatally stabbing pc keith palmer outside the houses of parliament. five people were killed in total, and 50 wounded. our correspondent helena lee is following the inquest at the old bailey.
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this is the first time we have heard from pc nick carlyle, who was on duty with pc palmer on the day of the attack. they were outside the gates. he came to court today to describe how he first heard a loud bang. he thought it was a road traffic accident at first. then he looked over, saw khalid massod‘s four by four vehicle crash into the railings. he then saw smoke coming through the fence, about 30 metres away from where he was standing, then he said next he saw and heard people screaming and running towards parliament square. then he said to the court, he saw a man in a suit, who were shouting, men with knives stabbing people. men with knives. pc carlyle said he then backed away will stop he then saw his colleague
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pc palmer had been caught by khalid massod, and he told the court, i ran forward , massod, and he told the court, i ran forward, intending to issue a rugby tackle. he came at me with a knife. the court then heard that police officers shot khalid massod. he went to handcuff him because he feared he could be wearing a suicide vest. then he was asked, did you have any doubt as to what khalid masood‘s intentions were? he said to the court, none whatsoever. he looked at me directly in the eye, he was coming through a crowd of people. he wasn‘t interested in members of the public. he was coming to kill police officers. at the end of his evidence, the barrister representing pc palmer‘s family thanked him for his bravery, for his help on the day of the attack. martine, the evidence now is finished here at the old bailey, and we expect the coroner to
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deliver his conclusions into these inquests at some point tomorrow. the finalfuneral for someone who died at grenfell tower has taken place, more than a year after the fire which killed 72 people. raymond bernard, who was known as moses, was called a hero by his sister bernadette at the start of the public inquiry. he died sheltering six people in his top floor flat as they tried to escape the flames. our correspondent sophie long reports. # when you‘re weary...# he was just a wonderful, inspirational man. notjust to his family but also to his friends. he played such a huge role in my life, my children‘s lives, their children‘s lives. children within the community, people within the community. everybody loved him, everybody that came into contact with ray loved him. aka moses, of course. everybody calls him moses. a family and a community gathered
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at the base of grenfell tower to celebrate the life of raymond bernard. he came to london at 15, he died here at 63, respected by so many in the community where he lived in the decades since. there was a long wait for this, the final farewell to the last of the fire‘s victims. a 72—second silence to remember each of those who died, and prayers for the survivors. ray was in his flat on the 23rd floor when the building began to burn. as people, petrified, fled from the flames, they were forced upwards. when they got to the top, they would have found raymond — or moses as he was known to them. knowing ray he would have been very calm, that was the person he was. i‘m sure he would have
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been extremely anxious, but he would not have allowed anybody to see that. i think his calmness would definitely have helped the others. we were out looking for him, just hoping he had got out. but it wasn‘t meant to be, so... the remains of 11 people were found in ray‘s flat. he, the coroner said, would have been the last to pass. today grenfell fire‘s final victim was laid to rest. tomorrow, the inquiry will start hearing evidence from those who survived, those who did make it out of the tower that night. sophie long, bbc news, north kensington. in a moment we‘ll find out
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what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. borisjohnson is given a standing ovation as he brands theresa may‘s brexit plan a constitutional outrage at the conservative conference in birmingham. the government will change the law to allow heterosexual couples in england and wales to enter into a civil partnership. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: online retailing giant amazon is raising pay for hundreds of thousands of workers in the us and the uk. in the uk, workers will see a rise from £8.20 an hour in london to £10.50. outside london, the rate rises from £8 an hour to £9.50. the owner of vauxhall has warned of "dramatic consequences" for its uk plants if there is a no—deal brexit, hours after toyota motor europe said it would affect its investment decisions. speaking to the bbc,
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carlos tavares said the carmaker‘s "number one" request of brexit talks was free trade. a budget airline that began offering long—haul flights from uk airports earlier this year, including sta nsted to the us, has collapsed. flights to washington and new york due to leave stansted on monday night were grounded and passengers have been told not to go to the airport on tuesday. there is a bit of fuss over ikea putting "the last plastic straw" on display. they are trying to make everything they do recyclable and to get rid of single use plastics by 2020 in everything they make. the other part which is interesting is the way they are trying to educate consumers and trying to get it so that everything
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they make is oriented towards a circular economy, so it works not just in terms of them using recycled products and renewable energy, it hopes to include the customers. this is what they are aiming for. and we talked to veiga soren kjeldsen —— hagar sorjensen. kjeldsen —— hagar sorjensenm kjeldsen -- hagar sorjensen. it is the week that we stop providing stores across uk and ireland. it is pa rt stores across uk and ireland. it is part of our commitment to be what we call planet positive. it is about how we support customers to be sustainable in their day—to—day, as
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a big global retailer, it is about how we can be as responsible as we can be. we plan to get rid of all the single use plastics by 2020, only a year and a few months away, so only a year and a few months away, so fast moving ambition. plastic will continue to have a role within our range. it is a versatile, cheap product to use, but the key here is the value of the material and closing the loop on plastics, which should never end up in the oceans, impeding the health of animals or human health. the last straw is just the beginning, the first action of many towards phasing out all single use plastics. it is notjust plastics but disposable materials in general. we take plastics seriously and we innovate in how we use them. it will continue to be a material we use, but that is critical to close the loop on plastics. it is part of
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how we value materials, how we work with customers, and moving towards a circular business model. the car industry has been talking alot about brexit. what have they been saying? we have had toyota and peugeot — citroen talking about it. they are all talking about the same thing: frictionless trade. it‘s not so much about tariffs. those are obviously important, but it is about being able to most of the cross borders quickly without having checks. it could hold up thejust—in—time deliveries. that process has been
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developed down to a fine art, the way in which components, notjust for cars but for a lot of industries, are delivered just in time to go on to the finished product. they say that if something sta rts product. they say that if something starts to upset that... there was an interesting story. remember when the channel tunnel had a fire? they actually had some of the car companies sending a private jets to pick up spare parts within the european union to get them to the factory on time, because that was how important it was to them. it is a really important thing is that they have got to get it sorted, and they have got to get it sorted, and they say if stuff starts to get held up, if they have to start building warehouse is to hold things in, they will have larger inventory is, is able start to affect how much they
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invest in this country. over the first of this year, we saw investment in the car industry cut in half. and that is to with uncertainty. how was the sentiment on the markets? a bit up and down, isn‘t it? yes. doyle is the interesting one at the moment. —— oil. it has been above $85 but come down a little bit today. it is very strong, and i think at the moment there is no sign it will turn sell. it is to do with supply and demand, which were telling me about earlier. well, i did a year of economics at university. it was time well spent. really? you are easily impressed, i think we can all agree! the winner of the royal institute of british architects‘
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most prestigious award — the riba stirling prize — will be announced on wednesday 10th october. the nominations to become britain‘s best new building 2018 includes student housing, an office building, cemetery, art gallery, lecture theatre and a nursery school. today, we look at bloomberg in central london by foster & partners — a highly—innovative new workplace in the city, which pushes architectural boundaries and seeks to enhance the neighbouring public realm. bloomberg is a globalfinancial information company. in 2008, we realised we were running out of space. our population in london was growing dramatically and so we commissioned ourown building. the building is thought to be the largest stone project in the city of london since st paul‘s cathedral. mike bloomberg felt very strongly that he wanted the outside and the interior to be completely contrasting so the outside would be restrained and elegant and the interior would be dynamic and open.
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unlike most offices, instead of a big central core with all of the elevator and staircases, we pushed them to the outside and actually made the people the core of the building. when you first come to our building, you will come to our discreet entrance, through which you will flow into the vortex, take the glass lift up to the sixth floor and come out in the pantry, which is the heart of all of our bloomberg buildings. you get a stunning view of saint paul‘s. and then they can flow through this on an architectural masterpiece ramp. foster‘s really think outside the box. they were really creative in responding to our functional business needs. we developed the multifunctional ceiling. it deals with the acoustics and delivers cooling and also reflects the light around the space. i am really proud to work for a company that has invested
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so much in our working environment. it really embodies the spirit of transparency, collaboration, innovation, that is so fundamental to bloomberg's ethos. you can find out more about all five nominated buildings on the bbc arts website, and watch this year‘s riba stirling prize live here on the bbc news next wednesday evening between 8.30 and 9pm. time for a look at the weather. broadly speaking, there are two types of weather across the uk today. first, cloudy, mild with patchy light rain and drizzle. across northern england, into scotland, we have spells of sunshine. one or two showers and the strongest of the wins. we can see this squeeze in the isobars, so
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strong winds here in the afternoon. this weakening cold front is a dividing line between the sunnier, cool conditions, mild and cloudy to the south. cloud stretching from northern ireland into wales, northern england. this speckling across scotland indicates a few showers, particularly for the northern and western isles, where we will see the strongest winds. gusts will see the strongest winds. gusts will touch 60 miles per across parts of scotland. temperature is no higher than 12 celsius. further south, despite the cloud, 20 celsius. ——16—20dc. more clout comes into western scotland overnight, outbreaks of rain. clearer skies further east, where in shelter we could see temperatures close to freezing. generally 6—11dc overnight. through wednesday, the front continues to push north and
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east, bringing a fair amount of cloud, outbreaks of rain into northern and western scotland. across england, wales and northern ireland, drive cloudy weather but it will thin and break to give sunny spells. winds will be lighter and temperatures range from 13 to 19 celsius. high pressure still with us on wednesday, fairly dominant. this front is still with us as well and it starts to pep up a bit. it brings rain across northern and western scotland, into northern ireland and north—west england, maybe later across north west wales as well—stocked elsewhere, after a misty and foggy start, we should see some spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon, particularly percent rural and eastern england, where we will see the highest temperatures, 19, 20 celsius. through the end of the week and into the weekend, a foggy day on friday, and wet and windy for a time to start the weekend. by sunday. ——
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drier by sunday. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at four: borisjohnson is given a standing ovation as he attacks theresa may‘s brexit plan at the conservative party conference in birmingham, he called it a "constitutional outrage". do not believe that we can somehow get it wrong now, budget now and fix it later. cheering that is a total fantasy! the prime minister announces a new immigration system, saying eu migants can‘t expect special treatment after brexit. it takes back control of our borders, it ensures that free movement comes to an end once and for all and we will be deciding who comes into this country. the government is to change the law to allow heterosexual couples in england and wales to enter into a civil partnership. couples like us can finally formalise our relationship in the way that we see fit.
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and have the legal recognition and financial protections. survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid, including food and water. the death toll is now more than 1300. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly. attention already turning to bbc sports personality of the year? some changes for that competition and we will be looking at tonight‘s champions league games with both manchester clubs in action. thanks holly, and alina has all the weather. this is scotland behind me, but today we‘ve had some sunshine, tomorrow it will be cloudy. wary
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that the cloud today, we will see some sunshine tomorrow. more in half an hour. thanks alina. also coming up.. re—living a bombing mission over berlin: how a wartime recording by the bbc was brought back to life by virtual reality. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. it isjust after 4pm. the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has delivered another fierce attack on the prime minister‘s proposals for a brexit deal during a packed fringe meeting at the conservative party conference in birmingham. mrjohnson described the so—called chequers deal as "humiliating" and a "constitutional outrage", and said theresa may must abandon it. his intervention, which drew large cheers from the audience, threatened to overshadow the announcement of mrs may‘s
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new policy on immigration after britain leaves the eu. the plans will mean eu migrants will no longer get special treatment. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young, who‘s at the conference in birmingham. for half a day only, the former foreign secretary descended on this conference centre and as you might expect, he made quite an impact. the haul was almost as big as the main conference centre. of course, he is no longer in government, so this was described as a fringe event, but it didn‘t feel like that. there were hundreds of people listening to every he had to say. it wasn‘tjust about brexit, of course the issue which forced him to resign, this was a wide ranging speech, taking on the labour party and their agenda, speaking about also to the issues which he feels the government should pursue. it was of course the issue
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of brexit that got the loudest cheers. the government and the prime minister was launching her own policy today after many months of waiting. we now have the outline of the new immigration system which will be limited in the uk after brexit. it's a political and adds that the prime minister wouldn‘t leave to her home secretary. she personally pledged that free movement would end after brett said. this is the biggest shake—up in the immigration system and in the future, it will be more difficult to come to britain to own anything. our future immigration policy delivers on the result of the referendum, it ta kes on the result of the referendum, it takes back control of our borders, it ensures that free movement comes to an end once and for all. we can decide who comes into this country.
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so what would this looked like? skilled workers would need a minimum salary, bringing to sign a members only if they were sponsored by their employer. agricultural employees skills have already been announced. there would be a light touch system for tourists. it is said that it is unfair as bankers are prioritised over nurses. there are still some concerns, looking at sectors like hospitality, relying on lower skilled workers. we have to look at salary threshold, why is it so hard to stop people coming in? also, immigration surcharge, which businesses would be able to afford. the official message todayit able to afford. the official message today it was supposed to be about immigration and integration. but then, the invasion. not on the official agenda, boris then, the invasion. not on the officialagenda, borisjohnson breezed in, coming not to praise
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theresa may, but he wanted to change a policy rather than her leadership. if we bottle brexit now, believe me, the people of this country will find it hard to forgave. if you remain half in and half out, we will protra ct half in and half out, we will protract this toxic, tedious business that is frankly so off—putting to sensible middle of the road people, who want to get on with their domestic priorities. raisings by collision of the extent of his own vision, he brought into this beyond brexit, urging his body to build more homes, cut my taxes and bea to build more homes, cut my taxes and be a bit more conservative. we must not follow corbin and treat couplers as a blue word. we should
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restate the truth, that there is simply no other system that is so miraculously successful in satisfying human wants and needs. we should set our taxes at the optimum rate to similar investment and growth and we should not be co nsta ntly growth and we should not be constantly aiming to increase, but rather to cut taxes. the slogan at this conference is opportunity, but unity? that is stretching things more than a little. plenty of issues to discuss, i am nowjoined by plenty of issues to discuss, i am now joined by the plenty of issues to discuss, i am nowjoined by the conservative mp. it is fairto nowjoined by the conservative mp. it is fair to say that you don‘t agree with borisjohnson on the eu and europe? what did you make of what he did today?|j and europe? what did you make of what he did today? i think a lot of people will take away today, there are more than 1000 people there, is that we‘ve heard it all before. they
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told us that this would be a game changing moment, but the reality is that we heard the same thing, to chuck the chequers deal. the solution that we didn‘t have is something that has been dismissed. boris‘ point is that we‘re not leaving the eu, we will be so close on the rule book for goods and we actually get the worst of all worlds? it would be any surprise that i think we would have done better to stay in the eu, but we are leaving. but what we should be doing is leaving the political institutions, leaving the court of justice, but also making sure that we would leave anyway that is protective of our country. if we don‘t have the eu rule book, we will need it from somewhere else. we need some international standards, whether we make these ourselves or not. it is now getting very close to the date when we leave and we need to have a credible, canonic deal. what the prime minister has done
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today with her statement on immigration and a way to unblock the northern ireland impasse, in terms of the backstop, i think boris needs to think carefully about what the people want. we talked that there has been speculation about his breakthrough. what they seem to be proposing and which is not definite yet, is something closer to a customs union are continuing. that will not please allot of eurosceptics in your party? there is something to that, as and when a different type of deal or the new technology which they tell everyone is going to work on coming, then the extension or a temporary extension, it is only speculation. it looks like an informed leak in the papers today. they should be happy that
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potentially, this is not forever. but it is really sensible, we have to have ways that we can trade with the eu and with the rest of the world. this extension to the customs union, which seems to be the proposal, we haven‘t seen in fine detail, would seem to be a sensible and pragmatic solution. turning to immigration, no special treatment for eu citizens according to theresa may. it will be based on skills, rather than the country of origin. do you think this is important in some economic sectors? people are concerned that no school workers are needed as well. " workers are needed as well and we will have to think carefully about the distinction between skills and no skills. it is also clear that as we do free trade deals, particularly with the eu, we
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will look to put potential clauses in that will allow access for the sort of skills and employment we need and talent we need from across the uk and other places. i think we have to be very careful about saying we will stop anyone coming in, i did think that is the intent. it is properly worth saying that boris johnson has left the building. heterosexual couples are to be allowed to enter into civil partnerships in england and wales, as an alternative to marriage. the government has announced it will change the law, to extend civil partnerships — which were introduced for same sex couples in 2004 — to all adults. rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, a couple from london, brought a legal challenge to be allowed to have a civil partnership; they gave the bbc their reaction to today‘s announcement. we are delighted with this wonderful news from the government today, and we thank the prime minister and the minister for women
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and equalities for finally announcing that they are committed to ending the current situation and the inequality, and opening civil partnerships to everybody, so that couples like charlie and myself can finally formalised our relationship in a way that we see fit, and have the legal recognition and the financial protections that we seek. a little earlier i spoke to our legal correspondent clive coleman, and i began by asking him what the legal distinction is between a marriage and a civil partnership. there is something like 3.3 million cohabiting couples in the uk. many of them believed that they actually lived in something called a common—law marriage. we know this is a myth. if i had a pound for every time i said on the bbc there is no such thing, i would have at least £100 by now. but people insist on believing that. the 3.3 million people, we are not suggesting that they will all rush off as soon as the law changes and enter into a
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civil partnership, but a sizeable minority of them out, because what tends to happen for its cohabiting couple, you only realise, either on separation or on the death of the partner, that you have farfewer rights in property, pension, than you would have if you are in a civil partnership or married. for years and years, lawyers have been very much in favour. many people had been in favour in equalising the rights and protections, but there has remained a massive imbalance. this might go some way towards addressing it, and that it will allow some cohabiting couples — well, anyone who wants to— to enter into a civil partnership. we are used to seeing a quality the other route round, and it is a real irony in the way in which equality rights developed in relation to same—sex couples in the last 15 years or so. same—sex marriage had
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the effect of giving same—sex couples two options when they wanted to formalise their relationship, they could get married or enter into a same—sex partnership. -- a civil —— a civil partnership. but because it only allows people of the same gender, heterosexual couples only had one tries, they could get married. thank you very much. boris johnson attacks theresa may‘s brexit plans at the conservative conference in birmingham, calling them a constitutional outrage. the government says heterosexual couples in england and wales will be able to choose to enter into a civil partnership if they wish, rather than get married. survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid — the death toll is now more than 1300. in sport, the las vegas metropolitan
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police department has reopened the investigation of the alleged rape of a woman, who says she was attacked by this footballer. manchester city are back in champions league action for their second clash, they are away tonight. the bbc sports personality of the year will all change in birmingham in december. the names of the nominees would be released until the night of the competition. i‘ll be back with more on those stories at 4:30pm. more than 1,300 people are now known to have died in the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia on friday. more people have been pulled alive from the rubble in the last few hours, but it‘s feared the number of deaths will rise as rescuers reach remote areas. survivors are growing increasingly desperate for aid supplies,
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and there are reports of looting. this desert of mud and rubble was once a bustling network of streets and houses. they were overwhelmed in a matter of minutes by an earthquake and then a tidal wave. four days on, people here are still wondering how they will survive. one by one, survivors are still being rescued. this man was buried in the ruins of an office building. he was pulled out injured but alive, but no one knows how many others are still trapped in these ruins. translation: we remain optimistic that they are alive but after this amount of time and after such an event as this, the body‘s ability to endure is minimal. tens of thousands of people have been displaced but the aid they need has been slow to arrive. when it does, look what happens here. these people are desperate for food and don‘t know
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when the next delivery will come. a chicken will feed a family for a few days. but the aid isn‘t getting through everywhere yet. translation: there has not been any aid, there's no food and no water in this area at all. others aren‘t waiting for help to arrive. they take whatever they can, wherever they can and little is being done to stop them. fuel is in particularly short supply. in a town with no electricity, it can power generators and the vehicles needed to leave the disaster zone. translation: i need this so i can search for supplies on my motorbike, because getting supplies around here is tough. thousands of people are trying to get flights out of the area. the main airport was damaged but still functions. the priority is to evacuate the injured. the disaster brought down hospitals and clinics and treating people for their injuries has become
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a major priority. but in the hills above palu, they are burying people as fast as they can in mass graves. this is just one of the communities affected. rescuers are still trying to get to others, cut off by the quake. the full scale of this disaster has yet to be revealed. richard lister, bbc news. our correspondent, mariko oi has travelled to palu and described how difficult it was to get to the affected area. we just wejust got here we just got here from the city in the south of the island. we thought it would take is 18 hours, but it took us 30 hours. the last 200 kilometres in two this time, we had to be escorted because of reports of ca rs to be escorted because of reports of cars coming into the city being looted. i am cars coming into the city being looted. iam not cars coming into the city being looted. i am not sure if it is fair to say they are looting, because
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they are desperate for food and water, which they haven‘t had access to all weekend. if anything, we were struck by the generosity of the people along the way, people offering water as we came. as we came closer to palu, we could really see the damage of the salami from friday evening. there were reports that the police and local residents we re that the police and local residents were having clashes earlier in the day, but as we drove in, it was quite calm. i should properly emphasise that even though it is dark, it is ok, but during the day, it gets unbearably hot. after possibly losing your loved ones, looking for food and water in this heat, it is quite understandable that people might get irritable. an extra £240 million of emergency funding will be spent on the social care system to ease pressure on the nhs this winter. health secretary matt hancock will tell the conservative party conference he hopes the money
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will free up hospital beds by helping older people get home more quickly when they‘re medically ready to leave. the local government association welcomed the extra money but said short term funding solutions weren‘t the answer. we can now speak to george mcnamara, director of policy at the older people‘s charity independent age. thank you forjoining us. how far will this injection of £240 million go in alleviating the worst of the pressure on the social care system? it will be welcomed by local authorities, given that they are living hand to mouth in social care. £16 are being cut from their budgets since 2010. that is £2 million per day. so, this will not make a huge difference. in the future, he said he wants to see a greater integration between the health care system and the social care system. we shouldn‘t think of them as two
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different tracks. how much better with that be for us over all? that would be hugely betterfor older people in particular. what we have at the moment is an nhs which is free at the point of need, and a social care system which needs to be paid for. in many cases, people with dementia and other farmers paid for. in many cases, people with dementia and otherfarmers have to sell their homes and go into debt. that is unfair and unacceptable. it is not the care that older people deserve. how likely is it that at some point, because of the ageing population and the strains put on the health service, that we will have two means test people? that is one option, but the reality is that the government needs to do a lot more to change the way in which we respond to the challenge of the ageing ablation. people are now living longer and contributing more to society, but we also need to change the way in which policies, the nhs, social care, local services respond to that. that is where there
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has been a neglect, but really, the government needs to take the bill by the horns. there has been royal commissions, numerous consultations, green and white papers, various things. the reality is that the tough decisions have been delayed and this is why we are facing the crisis. 1.4 million older people are now not receiving the care they would have received in 2010. how do you then look after older people in their homes? what is the answer to ca re their homes? what is the answer to care homes closing? integration of the two sectors is one answer. but we are also calling for free care. the basic tasks such as getting out of bed, washing, dressing, those basic tasks can make a huge offence to the quality of care. it‘s a policy that was it ended in scotland 15 years ago and is still going strong. affordable, sustainable, popular, and people want it. and it is affordable because it does a
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number of things, it reduces pressure on the nhs because people are staying in their homes that little bit longer. older people aren‘t in hospitals, because the ca re aren‘t in hospitals, because the care is there in the community. at the moment, under current policy, the moment, under current policy, the care is being withdrawn and so older people are staying in hospital ata high older people are staying in hospital at a high cost to the nhs, they have at a high cost to the nhs, they have a worse quality of life and well—being. the nobel prize in physics has been awarded to a woman for the first time in 55 years. donna strickland, from canada, is only the third woman to win the award. along with gerard mourou, dr strickland developed a way of generating very small high intensity laser pulses, a technique now used in millions of eye operations each year. they share the prize this year with arthur ashkin for his work using high powered light to move objects. a senior italian scientist who said the field of physics "was invented and built by men", has been suspended from working with the european nuclear research centre, cern.
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professor alessa nd ro strumia made the remarks during a presentation to a group of mainly female physicists in geneva, claiming the industry now looked more favourably on women than men. cern has said his presentation was "unacceptable", while professor strumia has stood by his remarks, which he says are backed up by simple research. an unarmed police officer who tried to tackle the westminster attacker khalid masood has told an inquest he had no doubt that masood was "was coming to kill police". khalid masood drove his car into pedestrians on westminster bridge in march last year, before fatally stabbing pc keith palmer outside the houses of parliament. five people were killed in total, and 50 wounded. our correspondent helena lee is following the inquest at the old bailey: this is the first time we‘ve heard
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from the pc, who was on duty with the pc that was murdered on the day of the attacks will stop they were on duty outside the gates and he came to court today to describe how he first heard a loud bang, he thought it was a road traffic accident at first. then he looked over and saw khalid masood‘s vehicle crashed into the railings, he then saw smoke coming through the fence, 30 metres from where he was standing. he then saw and heard people screaming and running towards parliament square. he then said to the court that he saw a man in a suit, who was shouting, men with knives starving people, men with knives! he then said he backed away and saul pc keith palmer, his colleague, had been caught by khalid masood and he told the court, i ran forward , masood and he told the court, i ran forward, intending to issue a rugby tackle. he came at me with knives.
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the court then heard that police officers shot khalid masood, he then went over to handcuff him, because he feared he may have been wearing a suicide vest. he was then asked in court, did you have any doubt that khalid masood, what his intentions were? he replied to the court, none whatsoever. he looked at me in the eye, he was coming through a crowd of people, he wasn‘t interested in members of the public, he was coming to kill police officers. at the end of his evidence, the barrister who was representing pc keith palmer‘s family thanked him for his bravery and help on the day of the attack. the evidence has now finished here and we are expecting the coroner to deliver his conclusions into these inquests at some point tomorrow. time for a look at the weather. there are floods in morocco?
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it is not a part of the world that we think about flooding, but morocco has seen torrential rain recently. you can see the extent of the flooding. we do expect rain in this part of the world, but not so much in the short and time. because it is so dry and added, the water has nowhere to go, so we see some severe flooding and morocco. the other week, it was in parts of tunisia. and this is a different system to what we had last week, but is it is a simple setup. to the north, an area of high pressure, to the east, an area of high pressure. that keeps it blocked in. once again, sardinia, corsica, into tennessee, further heavy showers and thunderstorms as well. -- tunisia. the system could hang around for a
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few more days. let‘s head closer to home, where it is a little quieter. we have this north and south split, much more cloud and much milder. further north, a good deal of sunshine. some strong winds and it has been feeling much cooler. we have this squeeze in the isobars, gusty winds across scotland and northern england. this is the dividing line between the sunshine and colder conditions. we can see on this satellite picture, that the cloud is starting to think and break. they dispose of sunshine across central and eastern england, earlier where there was cloud. some strong winds into this evening, across northern england and into scotland. we have seen gusts up to 50 or 60 mph. these are average
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strengths as we go into the evening, but the gusts will be even higher. top temperatures just shy of 22 celsius in the south. some clear skies for many, cloud will push its way north and east with overnight. that will raise the temperatures, but the touch of frost across northern england tonight, before the temperatures rise. into tomorrow, the cold front is returning, introducing more cloud and outbreaks of rain to northern and western scotland. more cloud around today, across southern and central london. some bright and clear skies. the winds will be much lighter tomorrow, especially across northern scotland. in 2000, the high pressure starts to
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drift eastwards and the frontal slide south and eastwards. by this stage, there will be more persistent rain in the northern and western scotland, into northern ireland and perhaps later in the day into night england and wales. further south, we will see more sunshine with the temperatures into the high teens. with lighter winds into friday, we will see some dense fog and foremost, a quiet day on friday. it will turn wet and windy attention a on sunday. but that should all clear away and by sunday, it is looking dry and bright. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. boris johnson is given a standing ovation at a fringe meeting at the conservative party conference after branding theresa may‘s brexit plan a "cheat" and a "constitutional outrage". chequers provides the perfect logic
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and argument for those who want britain to return to the eu and is therefore a recipe for continued acrimony. the prime minister announces plans for a new immigration system, promising numbers will fall after brexit, and saying there will be no preferential treatment for migrants coming from the european union. the government announces it‘s changing the law so that heterosexual couples can enter a civil partnership in england and wales. campaigners welcome the news. the number of people known to have died in friday‘s earthquake and tsunami in indonesia rises to more than 1300. a group of mothers mount a high court challenge to surrey county council‘s proposal to cut its special needs and disability budgets by twenty one million pounds. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. manchester city back in champions league action tonight — it‘s not been smooth sailing for city so far, though, has it? not really. when city started their
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champions league campaign last month, many were hailing them as the favourites, then what happened? they were beaten 2—1 by lyon. so the pressure is on pep guardiola tonight when they kick off against hoffenheim in just over an hour‘s time. pep guardiola knows there‘ll be no margin for error. and he‘s refusing to underestimate their german opponents this evening, saying, "it doesn t matter how big the town is ? it s about how you play on the pitch. he‘s described the route to quaification as facing five finals . and about that shock defeat to lyon? well, he says perhaps it‘s better that they have some difficult moments. the last two seasons, when i‘m here, we qualified quite comfortable. the last two seasons, when i'm here, we qualified quite comfortable.
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and maybe we will have to realise how complicated is the competition, to realise, to step forward. and if we're not able to do that, it's because we're not good enough. to realise, to step forward. and if we're not able to do that, it's because we're not good enough. so that game kicks offjust before six o‘clock and after that all eyes will be on old trafford and jose mourinho. he has been facing questions about his future at manchester united, and another test for him tonight. the focus has been very much on him. his relationship with the players — that disagreement with paul pogba isn‘t going away. and then another defeat to west ham at the weekend. that means the club‘s now endured their worst start to a season for 29 years. well, tonight mourinho‘s men take on valencia and many feel that another defeat would make his position untenable. however, they are top of group h after beating young boys in their opening match but have not won any of their three matches since in all competitions. (wipe gfx) the game kicks off at 6pm. before
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those games, it is manchester cityed clash with hoffman heim. —— manchester city‘s clash. the las vegas metropolitan police department has reopened an investigation into a report of the alleged rape of a woman, who says she was attacked by the five time world footballer of the year cristiano ronaldo. here‘s our sports correspondent richard conway. an american woman claims that cristiano ronaldo raped her in a hotel room in las vegas in 2009. ronaldo has dismissed the claims, reported first by a german publication, as fake news. his representatives say they will take legal action against the magazine. the magazine says a report was filed with the las vegas police a day after the alleged incident, but the victim did not provide a location, nor did she give a description of the suspect. in 2010, the woman
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reportedly reached an out—of—court settle m e nt reportedly reached an out—of—court settlement with ronaldo for £288,000, and that was an agreement for not going public with the allegations. her lawyers are now seeking to overturn that nondisclosure agreement, and last night, las vegas police said they have reopened a sexual assault investigation from 2009. they are said to be following up with information they have received from the victim. rugby league now, and there are five new call—ups for the england squad to face new zealand in a tri—series starting later this month. head coach wayne bennett has called up wakefield winger tom johnstone and centre reece lyne, while st helens prop luke thompson is also a new pick. all three burgess brothers have been picked for the three match series which begins against the kiwis in hull on the 27th of october. and it might only be october but we‘re looking ahead to this year‘s bbc sports personality of the year — with some changes to the format being implemented for this year‘s award. it‘ll be staged once again in birmingham —
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which was the venue in 2016 when andy murray lsat won the title. although he was in miami at the time. organisers have revealed we‘ll have to wait until the night itself to find out the names of the nominees this year. along with the addition of a new accolade for greatest sporting moment — celebrating the standout moment of 2018. you are up—to—date with the sport. goodbye for now. more now on the conservative party conference. the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has attacked the prime minister‘s proposals for a brexit deal. he described the chequers plan as a constitutional outrage. vicki young is at the conference and has some reaction to borisjohnson‘s speech. a busy day here, notjust the arrival of borisjohnson, a busy day here, notjust the arrival of boris johnson, even a busy day here, notjust the arrival of borisjohnson, even if it was just for arrival of borisjohnson, even if it wasjust for a arrival of borisjohnson, even if it was just for a few hours, but also an announcement of an immigration policy, how that will look after the uk leaves the european union. let‘s
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discuss it and see how it has gone down with some of the journalists who are here. i am joined by pippa and jack. it has two b said you have spent a lot of your career following borisjohnson spent a lot of your career following boris johnson around — spent a lot of your career following borisjohnson around — what did you make up—to—date‘s performance? borisjohnson around — what did you make up—to—date's performance ?m borisjohnson around — what did you make up-to-date's performance? it is what everyone waiting here, some more enthusiastic with another‘s. boris swanned into town forjust a few hours, and the conference hall was packed. there were queues all the way round the entrance to get into his event earlier, and he came and delivered. the tory party faithful absolutely loved it. there we re faithful absolutely loved it. there were about 1500 people, lots of standing ovations and cheers as he stood up and restated his message about chequers, suggesting it would be devastating to the country and could lead to a second referendum, which would be problematic for democracy. as well as the brexit message we have heard so many times,
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he set out more robust all of his own domestic agenda, his own vision for what a post—brexit britain might look like. he is keenly aware that once brexit is delivered, if it is delivered, people can start looking to the future, and he has had his eye on the leadership for a long time and wants to be able to be recognised by the as someone by the party grassroots and by the public on something other than just brexit. was this a moment where everyone will see it as a leadership it? yes. if you don't come to these conferences often, which most people would never dream of doing, it is ha rd would never dream of doing, it is hard to explain. in most events, you get a room of 30, 5100 people to listen to a politician speak. to join the crowds like boris did, where they were queueing for hours down the street to pack into this chamber of 1500 people, and probably could have been more, ithink chamber of 1500 people, and probably could have been more, i think is hardly another politician in the
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country, maybe jeremy corbyn, who could do that, and it speaks to how he is able to speak to the tory grassroots in a way that no one else can, certainly not theresa may. he loves to play on that, and that is why numberten are loves to play on that, and that is why number ten are not impressed. theresa may has her speech tomorrow, of course. they are such different personalities. how do you neutralise the borisjohnson personalities. how do you neutralise the boris johnson factor? personalities. how do you neutralise the borisjohnson factor? are likely make the most of the fact that they have different personalities. there area have different personalities. there are a lot of people who don‘t think borisjohnson has what it takes to be leader. he might have the ideas but he is not able to follow through with delivery of policy and doesn‘t have such a good grasp of detail. theresa may can say she has a proven track record, having been in downing street through turbulent times, and she is hoping in a couple of weeks to be able to turn around and say, we delivered brexit, which is the big prize she will have been able to say she has delivered on. at that
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point, the narrative shifts, because instead of her being seen as co nsta ntly instead of her being seen as constantly under pressure from backbenchers to move on her brexit strategy, and under pressure from the grassroots, she can say, i have a deal signed by 27 leaders. emmanuel macron and angela merkel‘s names are on this. she is suddenly ina much names are on this. she is suddenly in a much stronger position. they are trying to see the long game and trying to persuade people that boris might have been here for the day and had a flash in the pan moment of great adulation with the tory grassroots, and he has made an impact, for sure, but longer term, she will be trying to say that she can deliver the stability of the country needs. that is an issue for borisjohnson, isn‘t it? he has made these criticisms before, most of them, and if he can‘t change theresa may‘s mind on chucking chequers, there will be people saying that he should challenge for the leadership if that is what he wants. how many times
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does he keep repeating the criticism? the reason we have not seen the challenges that they would first have to have a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister, and that would mean more than half of tory mps voting against her, and they don't have those numbers. they have just... to do that now would be seen bya have just... to do that now would be seen by a lot of people in the country as a pretty dangerous thing to do. what we're seeing from boris todayis to do. what we're seeing from boris today is not an imminent leadership bid. he is putting himself in the position, putting his name on the map. look at what i can do, i can turn up here, make a rousing speech, the grassroots lobby. when theresa may does step down or get shoved aside, probably sometime next year, he will be one of the people in the conversation about who takes over. he will be able to turn round and go, i told you so, this isn't what i wanted, i would go, i told you so, this isn't what i wanted, iwould have go, i told you so, this isn't what i wanted, i would have done it better, and if you need a new leader, maybe
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you should look at me. obviously, theresa may has her big moment tomorrow, and you can‘t help but think that she must be thinking about last year, where everything that could go wrong did go wrong. how does she approach this, apart from giving a very short speech? she has sent out her team to make sure that the letters are firmly hammered onto the backdrop and don‘t fall down. the conservative party claiming they have stepped up security this year in terms of making sure they don‘t have comedians sneaking into invade the stage and hand her her p 45. at the end of labour party conference last week, there were a lot of conservative ministers and mps expressing concern that labour had set out a real vision, though the didn‘t agree with some of the a nswe rs , didn‘t agree with some of the answers, they recognised that the questions asked were the right ones. philip hammond alluded to it in his
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speech this week. their biggest problem is that if they are able to move on from brexit and say, this is our domestic agenda vision, and this is what the country could look like in the future under theresa may, they need to convince people that they need to convince people that they can deliver, because they haven‘t done after eight years so far. what is so different now? that is the challenge. people are looking for something big, big domestic announcement, probably on housing, something notjust announcement, probably on housing, something not just tweaking around the edges orjust a watered—down version of what jeremy corbyn is promising, but something new and conservative. it is what people here are crying out for. the problem and the danger is that she is so taken up the danger is that she is so taken up with brexit, the negotiations are ata up with brexit, the negotiations are at a crucial stage, we have a big eu council summit ina at a crucial stage, we have a big eu council summit in a couple of weeks and we need a breakthrough, there is probably not the space capacity in downing street to come up with that strategy at the moment. the risk is that you come up with something that isa
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that you come up with something that is a little bit more steady as she goes and you don't improve the party position in the country. thank you both very much indeed. we‘re not saying theresa may doesn‘t want to be here, but she might be quite grateful to get through the day tomorrow. jamie robertson is here. he will give us all of the business news in just he will give us all of the business news injust a moment. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: boris johnson attacks theresa may‘s brexit plans at the conservative conference in birmingham, calling them a constitutional outrage. the government says heterosexual couples in england and wales will be able to choose to enter into a civil partnership if they wish, rather than get married. survivors of the indonesian earthquake and tsunami are increasingly desperate for aid — the death toll is now more than 1300. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. online retailing giant amazon is raising pay for hundreds of thousands of workers in the us and the uk.
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in the uk, workers will see a rise from £8.20 an hour in london to £10.50. outside london the rate rises from £8 an hour to £9.50. between four and five thousand passengers may be stranded overseas after primera budget airline collapsed according to the civil aviation authority. flights to washington and new york due to leave stansted on monday night were grounded and passengers have been told not to go to the airport on tuesday. the accuracy of mobile phone coverage claims are to be investigated by the uk telecoms regulator. vodafone and ee have apologised and said they may have been inadvertently wrongly reporting coverage. what happened to primera?
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it went under. it started doing le nval it went under. it started doing lenval flights, it went under. it started doing lenvalflights, which it went under. it started doing lenval flights, which seems to have been a disaster, and consequently the airline is grounded. this —— long haulflights. the airline is grounded. this —— long haul flights. unlike the airline is grounded. this —— long haulflights. unlike when monarch went on the last year, there was a system to get them all gloom, there is no organised way of getting them home. that is because primera is not a british company, not covered by the civil aviation authority or any kind of uk system of repatriation for those people. the best bet for those people is to get in touch with their insurer, particularly if they paid by credit card. also, if they booked through some kind of agency or booked the flights as part of a package, they
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may have some kind of coverage which may have some kind of coverage which may be able to get them back. but it is not a pretty situation, and i have to say those people are going to have to make their own way home somehow, because there is no battle protection scheme covering them as it only covers people booked on a package flight. it could be very expensive per people to try to get home. and pay rises at amazon? up rises at amazon? up to £10.50 in london and £9.50 outside london. one of the pressures whichjeff outside london. one of the pressures which jeff bezos outside london. one of the pressures whichjeff bezos of amazon... bernie sanders introduced, try to introduce, a bill, knowing it
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wouldn‘t get through, so it was more a political statement than a practical act. but he was trying to push through an act which would force jeff bezos to push through an act which would forcejeff bezos to put up wages. he seems to have done involuntarily, and bernie sanders has said credit where credit is due. he has done the right thing, which is nice. we can talk to kathleen brooks, who is researched director for capital index. is there a wider significance here, perhaps about the pressures of high employment levels, the pressures on companies to attract people, and also inflationary pressures which will come as a result of this if it gets taken by lots of companies? absolutely. i don‘t think amazon are doing this to boost their moral capital. they are doing on the basis of economics. the unemployment rate in the us it‘s never been lower, and they are creating lots of jobs never been lower, and they are creating lots ofjobs every month.
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wages have to rise, it is simple economics. with haven‘tjust seen this in amazon. costco, target, wool mum “— this in amazon. costco, target, wool mum —— walmart have all had to put up mum —— walmart have all had to put up their wages recently as well. amazon have said they want to lead on this, so there could be further wage pressures to come, which could put the federal reserve in an interesting position because if inflation pressures rise in the us on the back of higher wages, we could see higher interest rates too. primera is an extraordinary story. to have so many people stranded overseas and no system to get them back, it is everyone for themselves, u nless back, it is everyone for themselves, unless you have insurance coverage. it isa unless you have insurance coverage. it is a very small airline, so in terms of passenger numbers, even though it is 4000 5000 people, it is quite small. it is a real sign of the broader problem facing budget airlines, especially those trying to go transatlantic. primera had to
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spend £10 million on repairing aircraft because of corrosion. they had delays of receiving aircraft, meaning £20 million of bills to hire other aircraft, which may seem like small bills in the scheme of things, but that was enough to turn primera under, another case of pure economics. these airlines, it is getting incredibly hard. we saw a profit warning from ryanair.. getting incredibly hard. we saw a profit warning from ryanair. a quick word on the car industry, because we have seen increasing calls from various people, boxall today, owned by peugeot— citron —— fox hall foxhall dart—mac foxhall dart- mac they foxhall dart-mac they run just—in—time production lines. they require a big production line and a big supply chain. customs barriers
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are toxic, so they will fight that and threaten to leave the uk if we don‘t get the customs deal with the eu. magellan as far as leaving, not just not to invest quite as much? jan ash —— just not to invest quite as much? jan ash -- go as far as leaving... they may think it is worth just trying to sell cars into the uk and paying one lot of customs duties rather than duties on all the individual parts as well. it will be a key pa rt individual parts as well. it will be a key part of the negotiation, which hasn‘t been touched on. the heads of those companies will hope that things are being done behind the scenes at downing street and in brussels. thank you very much. shall we look at the markets? yes. brent crude is back—up. we were talking about inflationary pressures because of higher wages. nice for
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the people concerned, and nice for oil companies. but it means higher prices for everybody. thank you so much, jamie. i will leave you with that. i will leave you with that. i will ponder it all evening! i‘m sure! in 1943, the bbc correspondent wynford vaughan thomas and his engineer made one of the most famous audio recordings of the second world war. joining the crew of a lancaster bomber on a raid over berlin, they detailed the drama of flying at night over occupied europe to attack the nazi capital. now, using virtual reality, it is possible to experience the mission visually as well, as robert hall reports. this is the story of lancaster f freddie — a famous wartime broadcast and a blend of history and technology which can take all of us into the dangerous skies above germany. among those preparing for take—off on the evening
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of september 3rd 1943, were two civilians. bbc correspondent wynford vaughan—thomas and his engineer mission over berlin. recording: is it ok now? yes, cutting. this is the disk recording equipment that would have been used, bbc type c. the cutter head actually cut a groove into that disk, recording the sound. reg pidsley, the recording engineer, had to keep the blank disks inside his flying jacket to make sure they were warm enough to cut. recording: they've left that other bomber and they're moving now slowly towards us. i was just aware of this fantastic piece of recording that wynford vaughan—thomas had done in 1943 and, having worked with vr, i could see it was potentially a really, really good fit. recording: they seem to splay out at first like the tentacles of an octopus, waiting to catch you. because the audio is an actual recording of what happened, itjust
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makes the cg! undeniably real. recording: ok when you are. f freddie‘s bomb aimer was bill bray. he never told his granddaughter about his wartime service. recording: hello, skipper. will you turn on to 081? right, 081, navigator. don't all speak at once, now. keep quiet, it's ok. wow. what did you think? i thought it was incredible, it was amazing. it‘s just surreal listening because we‘ve heard the audio before so many times, but to actually hear the audio alongside everything they would have experienced that evening was emotional and incredible. recording: there it goes, ourfirst sight of england, just a little light from a beacon, flashing up to us from the darkness below. i‘ve known this story all my life, of father‘s being in the lancaster but to be there and to see it and to experience it,
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and to just see how brave all those young, young men were. robert hall, bbc news. berlin blitz is available to watch on selected dates at the imperial war museum in london. that‘s it from afternoon live. next, the bbc news at five with huw edwards. time for a look at the weather. here‘s alina jenkins. broadly speaking, there are two types of weather across the uk today. first, cloudy, mild with patchy light rain and drizzle. across northern england, into scotland, we have spells of sunshine, also one or two showers and the strongest of the winds. you can see the squeeze in the eyes of art, particularly across scotland and northern england, strong winds here in the afternoon. is cold front
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is the dividing line between the sunny, cool conditions to the north, cloudy and mile to the south. a large swathes of cloud stretching from northern ireland, northern wales and northern england. this speckled effect in scotland indicating showers, particularly from the northern and western isles. gusts of wind could touch 60 mph across scotland, but temperatures won‘t get higher than 12 celsius. further south, despite the cloud, 16-20dc. but further south, despite the cloud, 16—20dc. but cloud this evening will tend to break up, so we see clearer skies. the front i mentioned starts to push its way back to the north and east overnight, introducing more cloud into western scotland, and al bla kes of cloud into western scotland, and al blakes of rain. —— outbreaks of rain. through wednesday, that front continues to push north and east, bringing afairamount continues to push north and east, bringing a fair amount of cloud and
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outbreaks of rain into northern and western scotland. across england, wales and northern ireland, a fair amount of dry if cloudy weather, but it will thin and break to give bright and sunny spells. the winds will be lighter and temperatures will be lighter and temperatures will be lighter and temperatures will be 13—19dc. this area of high pressure is still with us on wednesday, a fairly dominant feature. this front is still with us as well, and it starts to pep up a bit, bringing more persistent rain across northern and western scotland, into northern ireland and north—west england, and maybe later across north west wales as well. elsewhere, after a misty and foggy start, spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon, particularly across central and eastern england, where we will see the highest temperatures, 19, 20 celsius. through the end of the week and into the weekend, a foggy day on friday, and wet and windy for a time to start the weekend, dryer by sunday. today at 5, the prime minister declares that britain will have full control of its immigration policy after brexit.
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theresa may says a new system will focus on the skills people bring, not where they come from. we will be able to decide the basis on which people come to the uk, that hasn‘t been possible for many years. for people coming from the eu that will change. huge crowds as borisjohnson addresses the conference, he called theresa may‘s brexit plan a ‘constitutional outrage‘ there is time, this is the moment to check trekkers. we‘ll have the latest from the conference in birmingham, and we‘ll be talking to conservative chairman — brandon lewis, later in the programme. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. rescue workers in indonesia reach some of the worst affected
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