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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 3, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: the prime minister says she is fighting for hard—working families, as she freezes fuel duty for the ninth year in a row. mounting desperation in indonesia, as survivors of the earthquake and tsunami search for food, fuel and water. here in palu, emotions are running high, as survivors are still struggling to get hold of basic supplies like food and water. can't afford a mortgage, and struggling to pay the rent. the young people at the sharp end of the housing crisis. amazon delivers a pay rise for its lowest—paid workers, but unions warn more still needs to be done to improve working conditions. more boos forjose mourinho. his manchester united side slump to a 0—0 draw with valencia in the champions league. and hollywood actor bradley cooper tells us how working with lady gaga made him feel starstruck, and the perks of directing.
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ijust i just have to ijust have to get you to be as real as possible, and then i'll react off as possible, and then i'll react off a you. so it was really selfish, in a you. so it was really selfish, in a way. i was just allowing myself not to act —— react off of you. and the weather is cool in the east to start the day, mild elsewhere. a fair bit of cloud around with some rain across scotland and northern england. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 3 october. our top story: the prime minister will close the conservative party conference in birmingham today with a speech claiming the uk's future after brexit is full of promise. theresa may will claim millions of people who have never supported the tories are appalled byjeremy corbyn, and she will show everyone the conservatives are what she describes as decent, moderate and patriotic. mrs may will also announce that fuel duty will be frozen for the ninth year in a row.
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from birmingham, our political correspondent chris mason reports. remember this, a year ago? there was the coughing, the security breach, with a prankster handing the prime minister a fake p45, and in this, the conference backdrop falling apart, like an anxiety dream playing out in real life, and excruciating moment. imagine standing on that stage again, a year on from it going so stage again, a year on from it going so horribly wrong, and a day on from borisjohnson down the corridor trashing your central brexit policy, to cheers and applause from activists. today, the prime minister will try to strike and domestic note, and save this country's future is full of promise. here is theresa may working on what she will say later. so what do we know about the
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words on those pages? mrs may well sound up beat about the uk's future. and, she will add... the goliath of brexit has trampled every corridor of this conference, but little has actually changed here. the prime minister persistently deflecting attem pts minister persistently deflecting atte m pts to minister persistently deflecting attempts to encourage her to ditch her plan. instead, today she will try to talk about other stuff, and says the decision to freeze fuel duty again proves her party is on the side of hard—working families. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. at least 1,300 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow.
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it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the city is one of the areas worst affected, asjenny kumah reports. after days without food, the arrival of the aid convoy is desperately welcome sight. the long wait for supply is finally over at this camp in donggala. indonesians have been quick to rally to the cause, donations pouring in from across the country. some volunteers, though, feel frustrated. we need more help from the government, because we are human. we need all the help we can get. more help is coming, slowly. but, in palu, people who spent days with limited food and water have
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been taking matters into their own hands. trying to break into a small supermarket, then driven back by police, who eventually allowed them to help themselves. meanwhile, the massive task of dealing with the dead, lying under the rubble, is becoming more urgent. the heat and forecast rain increasing the risk of disease. the remains of around a0 people are thought to be underneath the roa roa hotel in palu. finding them is slow without much heavy lifting machinery. translation: if the clearer is delayed, there will be an outbreak of disease, so we must clear up the debris as soon as possible. and just how would this hospital in palu cope if an epidemic was to break out? many staff were injured in the quake. the remaining workers are already struggling to ca re workers are already struggling to care for patients, with limited supplies and poor sanitation. and we will talk about that
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throughout the programme. we will talk to our correspondent later. iran has said it is willing to hold talks with the united states to try to overcome president trump's objections to the international nuclear deal. the us has withdrawn from the agreement, and new sanctions on iran are due to come into force next month. the iranian foreign minister, javad zarif, has told bbc news the door is open to negotiations, but he said mr trump would not get a better deal than the current one. sorry, i was very keen to get in there. tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating in what it calls dubious tax schemes to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says the article is misleading. regularly eating procsessed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance of developing the disease.
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the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organization, which also list processed meat as carcinogenic. in around an hour's time we are expecting the half—year results from britain's biggest retailer, tesco. analysts are expecting operating profit to climb, as the royal wedding, world cup and summer heatwave bolstered sales. sean is here to tell us more. don't worry, guys, i've got this. don't worry, guys, i've got thislj don't worry, guys, i've got this.|j will don't worry, guys, i've got this.” will be on at seven a.m.. you say oui’ will be on at seven a.m.. you say our biggest retailer, if you think of all of our supermarket shopping, more than a quarter of it is done in tesco around the country. when they say how they are getting on we can learn a lot from the british consumer, what the rest of our supermarkets might be doing, and we
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know already that the summer has been a great summer. hot weather, world cup, supermarket sales on the whole increasing. tesco have had ten consecutive quarters of increased sales in the uk, so they have had a good run. but the big thing for them will be are they making more money out of us, because that price war in supermarkets has meant lots of supermarkets has meant lots of supermarkets having to reduce prices. will it hit profits more than they would like, are they increasing sales faster than before? that is what we will find out. and you are staying here for the papers. i need to go and get my papers, actually. one of the world's rarest whiskies could break the record for the most expensive bottle ever sold at auction today. the macallan valerio adami 1926 has been aged for 60 years before it was bottled in the ‘80s. it has been described as the holy grail of whisky, and is set to sell for between £700,000 and £900,000 when it goes under the hammer in edinburgh later. £900,000 for a bottle of whiskey?
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that is an expensive wee dram, isn't it? in the planning that goes into that! would you drink... are you a whiskey drinker? i am not a whiskey drinker. if you bought a bottle for £900,000, would you keep it somewhere for special occasions?” wouldn't buy a bottle for £900,000, evenif wouldn't buy a bottle for £900,000, even if i liked whiskey. somebody will, no doubt. here is holly.” thought you were going to use that asa thought you were going to use that as a segue, somebody will, here she is! i dropped a very expensive bottle of medicine once, but it wasn't £900,000. we will investigate further, ladies and gentlemen. somebody who could possibly use a wee dram, right behind you, jose
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mourinho. another day goes past where we have a miserable looking photo ofjose mourinho. where we have a miserable looking photo of jose mourinho. he is not having a great time at the moment. there is a lot of talk about whether oi’ there is a lot of talk about whether or not another defeat would have an impact on his time at old trafford. jose mourinho's troubled week didn't get much better in the champions league. his side played out a dreary 0—0 draw with valencia at old trafford, and they are now without a win at home since august. a few nervy moments for manchester city, but a late david silva strike earned them a 2—1 win at hoffenheim, their first points of this year's champions league. after more than 25 years, a round of tennis's fed cup will be staged in great britain. along with seven other european teams, britain will host the tie at the university of bath in february. and it's all change for the bbc‘s sports personality this year. the shortlist could be shorter, and the public won't found out who is in the running until the night of the awards. there is also going to be a new award for the sports moment of the year.
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ican i can say that is going to be a really difficult one to try and narrow down, as well. i have been trying to think all evening last night about what mine will be, the best sporting moment. we have the run up to mo farah later in the programme. and he talks in his book about all the different bones in his body he has broken. pretty much everything, yes. back to our story on the indonesian earthquake, and we can get more from our reporter mariko oi. she has travelled for days to reach the city of palu. we are obviously having problems with the line, as so many things are going wrong there as well. technical difficulties they are. but we can speak to carol, in brighton.
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and the duke and duchess of sussex will becoming a little bit later on. that's right, and right by the royal pavilion. look at it, isn't it magnificent? it really stands out in the dark, beautifully lit. it is the first visit that the duke and duchess of sussex will make the sussex since they were granted their title on their wedding day by her majesty, the queen. it is whistlestop, they will be visiting chichester, brighton & hove and peacehaven as well, and they will have a walk around the gardens and ta ke have a walk around the gardens and take a good look inside. i am told it is very beautiful and i am hoping to have a peak later on myself. the weather today, if you are in the east this morning it is a chilly start. many of us it is actually quite mild start. the forecast is a fairly cloudy day ahead for of us, with some rain as well, and it will also feel humid, particularly later in the day, when temperatures reach about 20 celsius. yesterday they
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reached 21 in swanage and also london. high pressure is still in charge of our weather, so things are fairly settled. not a lot of movement, but you can see we have a weather front draped across scotland and northern england. that is moving north eastwards, and that will take its rain with it. the southern extent of that rain at the moment is around manchester and also liverpool. we also have some fog around this morning across cornwall and the isles of scilly. that will be slow to lift, the rain continuing to push away, a lot of cloud, drizzly, damp conditions in the west on the coast and hills, but the real emphasis today is that it will be fairly cloudy. light breezes, not as windy as it was yesterday in the north. as we head on through the evening and overnight the rain eventually pushes up into the northern isles. they will still be a lot of cloud around, still some dampness in the air, and we will see some eastern fog forming as well. some dense fog patches quite possible in the south. by the end of
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the night we will see another weather front approaching from the north—west, that will be bringing some more rain. it is not going to bea some more rain. it is not going to be a cold night. so tomorrow we start off with the weather front across the north—west of scotland, producing some heavy rain. that will sink southwards through the course of the day, eventually getting in across all of scotland, northern england and also parts of wales. the fog in the south will be slow to lift and when it does lift it were left in the low cloud. so there will bea left in the low cloud. so there will be a few breaks, but again, most of the day for many of us will be fairly cloudy or wet, depending on where you are. either time we get to friday, well, again we are looking ata friday, well, again we are looking at a fairly cloudy day. there will be rain on the cards at times, dampness around as well, temperatures down a touch and as we head into the weekend we will find that to be the case as well with some rain as the front sink southwards tending to linger. on friday the front will be over the central front of the uk, getting down into the south—east by the tomic to the weekend. we will see
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you in half an hour, thank you very much. sean and wholly with us to look through the papers. —— holly. images of theresa may dominate the papers today ahead of her speech. the daily mail pits her against borisjohnson and says the prime minister turned on the ex—foreign secretary, who the paper says, "staged a public audition for hisjob" with his speech. the daily telegraph says theresa may is under pressure from members of her cabinet to set out a timetable for her departure as prime minister, and claims discussions have begun about when she should be ousted if she refuses to leave before the next general election. melania trump features on the times, visiting a baby clinic in ghana on herfirst solo overseas toui’. and they have a story that says
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a price can be put on doing the household chores — and that price is £12,000 a year. and the sun has a picture of the duchess of cambridge, who's back at work after maternity leave, wearing herfavourite boots. according to royal fashion watchers, she's had the pairfor more than a decade. and the news that the bbc has taken the decision to axe the popular daytime tv show ‘flog it!‘ has not gone down well with fans. many of them have taken to social media to vent their frustration. the auction show first hit screens back in 2002, but after more than 1,000 episodes, it will be removed to modernise the daytime schedule. is that because they have got the new show on in the afternoon? presented by you! do get me in trouble! —— don't. i have only made 20 episodes at. it is very good. available on iplayer. good to know. ijust available on iplayer. good to know. i just gave available on iplayer. good to know. ijust gave him a free kick!” available on iplayer. good to know. ijust gave him a free kick! i have not killed flog it! . another front
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page for you. the front of the financial times, amazon wages —— praises at the minimum wage, as critics telljeff bezos to listen. have ended up putting up their wages that they pay workers in the united states and the uk. they had a lot of criticisms over working conditions, still there, and the fact that their boss, jeff bezos, he is worth, the richest man on the planet. another one to keep an eye out for, posties are set for paper loss after profit warning hits royal mail share price. inafew warning hits royal mail share price. in a few weeks time it will be five yea rs in a few weeks time it will be five years since the royal mail listed on
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the stock exchange and people who took advantage of that share offering at the time will be able to sell them without paying income tax. the share price has taken a big dive because of bad report. if you are looking to do that, you wouldn't make as much money as you would previously and might make a loss. we talked about it loads at the time.” am starting to feel sorry for the headline writers when it comes to jose mourinho. how much more, we are going within some of the back pages. it is more misery. no more. inside the telegraph today, an interesting article, you might enjoy this. talking about fish fans and their sports tourism. talking about the ryder cup sports tourism. talking about the rydercup and sports tourism. talking about the ryder cup and how a lot of the fans we re ryder cup and how a lot of the fans were rather vocal, fair to say, creating posters, songs, they were doing the will grigg song. it is adding a bit of fun but it is far
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removed from what we had associated with the ryder cup. the americans we re with the ryder cup. the americans were a little bit taken aback by the whole thing, quite shocked. this article is talking about that now, the likes of the ryder cup sports organisations are embracing it and getting involved with that video clip of tommy fleetwood and his very close friend. they are starting to embrace it now and are bringing it oi'i embrace it now and are bringing it on board and it seems to be working. people are loving it. the ryder cup and the sea in europe is different to the atmosphere in america. i remember, i watched a programme, to the atmosphere in america. i remember, iwatched a programme, one of them said that when he was walking with his parents, he walked through to one of the first round and people were shouting insults at him. it doesn't really cross that line very frequently in europe, but it does in america. this might make
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you feel a bit ill. dirty money. the mail had done an analysis, taken some coins and notes and it turns out that bank notes, coins, purses and wallets are mostly contaminated i bug is. —— by. these are very dangerous bugs are. why do they do this research? we know that door handles and toilet seats and money. we are using it less and less now. true. imagine your debit card or credit card. it is something i get really paranoid about, every time my husband leaves coins on the kitchen table. you are right, these are nasty. antibiotic resistant drugs. it is like there's meant —— those
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mints at the restaurant. people go to the toilet, don't they? you got to the toilet, don't they? you got to think about these things. music you can use. all lose. -- news. last one. there is a penguin shortage at the zoo. they filled a penguin enclosure with fake penguins. this is in telford, a plastic penguin. buries a reason for this. it sounds awful, but it is because in the last couple of years there was a back case of penguin malaria that swept through the uk. has been a few complaints about the plastic penguins. —— derek has. sorry about that. —— sarah —— there has.
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thank you for being with us. people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay unaffordable rents in much of britain, according to research carried out by the bbc. housing costs are taking a major bite out of pay packets, which means they're struggling to manage the rest of their finances. our personal finance reporter kevin peachey went to cheltenham where there are concerns young people are being priced out of town. when 25—year—old shop manager morgan moved in with her boyfriend, she knew she had to be particularly nice to her new housemates. myself and my partner are living with his parents at the moment while we are saving for a mortgage. the reason why be decided to do that was because we couldn't possibly rent and save at the same time. my friends definitely struggle, i think a lot of their money is used up injust their struggle, i think a lot of their money is used up in just their rent alone. this is typical of a sort of
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accommodation that is offered for young professionals... those friends can expect to pay more than a0% of their salary on rent to live on their salary on rent to live on their own in central cheltenham. despite this cost, letting agents say young professionals are queueing up say young professionals are queueing upfor say young professionals are queueing up for flats like this. this typical property goes within a8 hours, the demand for it is incredible, especially one that is furnished like this, which suits their needs. but it isn't just like this, which suits their needs. but it isn'tjust be that young people are feeling financial squeeze. housing organisations say spending more than 30% of your salary on rent is unaffordable to that means renting a i—bedroom home in your 20s would be unaffordable in two thirds of written and two people sharing a 2—bedroom place would still find it difficult to manage in more than one in ten areas. one m says to say to build more for this market. new developments like this look perfect for young tenants. new flats right in the centre of
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cheltenham, but it will be leased a0 yea rs before cheltenham, but it will be leased a0 years before they get into something like this because, like so many other newly built property in the town, these are retirement homes. that worries the local council, which wants to attract skilled, young workers to the town. it is planning to borrow £100 million to provide 500 homes. we are going to build them. we are going to buy them, maybe even buy land and build on that. simple as that. this will be rented out in the open market for young people and families that need them. the government says a letting steve bannon and long contracts will help residents in cheltenham and elsewhere, but the trade body for landlords says that mortgage and maintenance cost says that they can't offer rent any cheaper. and if you want to see if rents are judged as unaffordable in your area, you can search our interactive map of britain. head to bbc.co.uk/business. coming up on breakfast, we are going
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to find out how a memorial to young men “— to find out how a memorial to young men —— one man has brought new life toa men —— one man has brought new life to a part age, it is firing loads of young people. —— inspiring. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. it's six months since the metropolitan police's violent crime taskforce was set up in reponse to the surge in violent crime in the capital this year. there are 150 specialist officers in the unit, who have made over 1300 arrests and recovered a0 firearms since april. iam not i am not going to say to you that we have solved the problem. what i can say to you, as you have heard the commission say, we have stabilised some of the issues. knife crime under 25 victims is now going in the right direction, it has stabilised.
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yes we still have a bit of a challenge with homicide but we are getting there. a man was stabbed on a rush hour train in east london last night. it happened on a london overground train into hackney central and the station remained closed all evening. british transport police say the victim was taken to hospital. a man's been arrested. a former england footballer has urged people giving evidence at the grenfell public inquiry to seek help if they feel overwhelmed. les ferdinand grew up in a neighbouring estate to grenfell tower, and has been working with a local nhs trust to support mental health in the wake of the disaster. survivors and bereaved families will give evidence about their experiences on the night of the fire at the inquiry later today. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on tfl rail this morning and the overground is part suspended between
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romford and upmister. onto the roads and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover. traffic is building from day in and into parking. and in silvertown, the connaught bridge remains closed for maintenance work, with traffic for city airport on diversion via woolwich manor way and albert road. now let's get a look at the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another mild start out there this morning. today it is often going to be cloudy, but the cloud will break here and there we will get bright and sunny spells and it is still get to feel quite warm. still quite easy, with the window with a bit lighter than yesterday. when the cloud rakes it really will feel quite pleasant. to temperatures getting potentially up to 20 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight, we are hanging onto this cloud, the mild air, one or two breaks but the cloud falls much lighter and that could mean we get a bit of mist and fog developing by gone tomorrow morning. and patches in places, but that can
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project is mild, 11, 12 celsius as a minimum. misty start on thursday, that will lift, the cloud breaks and sunny spells and damages again into the high teens celsius. warmer on friday really because we get in the way of sunshine, temperatures in the low 20s. as we head into the weekend, we get a bit of a temperature drop and for a time that things could turn rather wet and windy and rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you can keep up to date on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: despite being one of the biggest companies in the world, amazon has long been criticised for paying low wages. but this morning, a senior boss tells us why all staff are getting a raise.
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charlie has been speaking to bradley cooper, whose new movie is a remake of the classic a star is born. he will tell us why his co—star is a star reborn. and dirty cash. we will hear how the money in our pocket could be carrying all sorts of nasty bugs. the things you would rather not go, and that is one of them. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the prime minister says she is fighting for hard—working families, as she freezes fuel duty for the ninth year in a row. the future is bright after brexit. she will call for unity despite divisions over racks it. —— brexit. the authorities in indonesia say
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bulk supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. at least 1,300 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the un says around 200,000 survivors are in urgent need of help. tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating in what it calls dubious tax schemes to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says the article is misleading. regularly eating procsessed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organization, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. for the first
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time in its history, the uk's most senior court will have a majority of female judges when it hears a case in london later today. it is the first time in 600 years that the supreme court has had a mostly female bench. they will hear today's case, which involves the treatment of a boy with asperger‘s syndrome. the united states is no longer granting visas to the partners of gay diplomats unless they are married. previously, those in same—sex relationships were allowed in regardless of marital status. under new guidelines, any diplomats in the us will need to be married in order for their partners to receive a visa. one of the world's rarest whiskies could break the record for the most expensive bottle ever sold at auction today. the macallan valerio adami 1926 has been aged for 60 years before it was bottled in the ‘80s. it has been described as the holy grail of whisky, and is set to sell for between £700,000 and £900,000 when it goes under the hammer in edinburgh later. do you think you would get the case
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as well? i would want the house with it, as well. that is a remarkable amount of money. somebody out there iam sure amount of money. somebody out there i am sure will enjoy that. you wouldn't drink it, would you, for that amount of money. so you've done a bit of gardening and trimmed the hedge, and you need to take the clippings down the tip. you fill your boot and head off. let's hope you haven't tried to cram in this much, though. this man's decision to drive after completely stuffing his car with branches has been described as absolute madness by police. the driver was stopped in stockport, with police saying he risked seriously injuring someone after his visibility and access to the gear stick was blocked. the man, who is in his a0s, was reported for a number of driving offences. do you think special branch are involved in that? special branch,
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anyone? i will put that in your top ten of good jokes. thank you, thank you very much. anyway, don't try that.” anyway, don't try that. i thoroughly enjoyed that, but i wouldn't recommend driving with that many leaves in the car. so maybe that was theissue leaves in the car. so maybe that was the issue which was holding up manchester united last night. they we re manchester united last night. they were late for that match, to begin with, which never starts well. when you are late to work might you a lwa ys you are late to work might you always feel like you're a little bit tired. there was that horrendous traffic. so the bus was late, and the match was put back, and things didn't get much better from their fourjose mourinho. —— there for jose mourinho. jose mourinho said his players tried but that their lacked confidence and quality, as they could only muster a goalless draw
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against valencia in the champions league, doing little to ease the pressure on their beleaguered boss. elsewhere, neighbours city struggled in germany, but did manage a win. ben croucher has the story. well, there is the full—time whistle, and there are boos around the stadium at old trafford. after jose mourinho said manchester united lost their dignity over the weekend, gone were the days of attacking flairand gone were the days of attacking flair and this guy. instead, a team lacking invention and quality. there was effort and energy against valencia, although it took an hour for pogba to really threaten the goal. not for the first time, this was a tough watch. an attack short on confidence, lacking in luck. but they didn't lose, although as mourinho search for answers for united's worse, this effort raised questions. i am pleased with the effort, i am pleased with the commitment, i am effort, i am pleased with the commitment, iam pleased effort, i am pleased with the commitment, i am pleased with the improvement, and i am not pleased, of course, with the results. which
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is not a good result, but is not a bad result. innerhofer home, city had their own questions to answer after losing their opening match thomas are conceding inside the first minute hardly helped against the champions league debutantes. city had the experience with sergio aguero prodding them leveljust a few minutes later. another winless european light, at night looked likely but as the storm clouds gathered, city had their own silva lining, david silva on targetjust in time. what their rivals would have given for a moment like this. tottenham are playing at wembley tonight against the spanish giants barcelona. spurs lost their opening tie in the champions league at inter milan. meanwhile, opponents barca are on a poor run of form domestically. but of course, they have the main man, lionel messi. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and lionel messi is certainly that. so yes, he is a fantastic player, and i
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am sure we will do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. we need to focus on ourselves, as well. you know, we've got some great players. we need to play with energy and the game, and hopefully if we do that we can come out on top. meanwhile, liverpool go to napoli. and the italian side's manager, carlo ancelotti, has been very flattering of the reds. he has called them one of the strongest teams in europe. but the liverpool boss is not falling for any of that sweet talk. don't expect mr nice guy in naples tonight. its tactics. it starts already, he is so long in the business, and he wa nts to is so long in the business, and he wants to try to bring the very nice, the nice fella out of me. and i am here to be ready for a real battle. the england women's manager, phil neville, says he would be willing to coach a team gb football side should it make its return at tokyo 2020. neville's england side can ensure gb qualify for those olympic games if they finish as one of the top
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three european teams at next year's women's world cup, and he says the players won't need any extra motivation. ididn't i didn't probably realise how big an event that was until the players got told, and they were genuinely emotional and excited by it. hopefully we will have the chance to do that. i think it is great news. would it be a job that would interest you, coaching team gb? yes, i think there is a lot of process to go through, but i think it is something anyone wants to go through, the world cup and an olympic games, and it is something that i want to do. and hopefully, in due course, that will happen. the bbc‘s sports personality of the year awards show is returning to birmingham, and it's all change for the extravanganza this time round. the shortlist could be shorter, and the public won't find out who is in the running until the night of the awards. there is also going to be a new award for the sports moment of the year. could fans of the fed cup revive
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those "it's coming home" chants from the summer? great britain will stage a home tie for the time time in over a quarter of a century. the lta has successfully applied to host seven other european countries in february's preliminary stage at bath university. the last home tie took place in nottingham back in 1993, and gb has played in 15 different countries since. 30 years ago this week, the sport of hockey captivated the nation as great britain's men won olympic gold, prompting one of the most famous pieces of commentary in history. southgate. .. and he southgate... and he makes it three. where were the germans? frankly, who ca res ? barry davies with the infamous words. tonight at the olympic park, great britain will commemorate the anniversary of that match by playing germany's neighbours belgium.
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and it is a first match in charge for new head coach danny kerry. i remember watching as a 17—year—old that game unfold, very early, around some of my clubmates from pelicans hockey club, way back, watching that game unfold and really thinking one day i want a piece of that olympic stuff. never really made it far enough as a player, and i think it is great that we are acknowledging that side and what they did.” really wouldn't fancy commentating that match, no pressure! it is a bit of gold. it gives you goosebumps every single time. more than five days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami struck the indonesian island of sulawesi, rescue workers are still trying to reach survivors in some remote areas. a convoy of trucks loaded with supplies of food and water has now reached the city of palu, one of the worst—affected areas, but aid operations are being hampered by power cuts and landslides. let's speak to madiha raza from muslim aid, who has been co—ordinating efforts from capital city jakarta. thank you very much for coming on
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this morning. i know you are doing a very busyjob. where exactly are you concentrating your efforts at the moment? so i have a team of collea g u es moment? so i have a team of colleagues heading towards the devastated area at the moment. we will be concentrating mainly on the area of donggala, one of the worst affected areas. access is really difficult at the moment so we will be trying to figure out exactly where we will respond, but donggala will be our main area of response. in terms of actually getting better, is that the main problem? we were hearing in our report early on about some areas where the ground has almost turned to marsh and some villages have almost disappeared entirely and some other houses up to half way have been covered in mud and you don't know whether people are in there or what else you could find —— mush. are in there or what else you could find -- mush. that's exactly it.
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access is very difficult at the moment. roads have been completely destroyed, as have ridges and all other sorts of infrastructure. so it is very difficult to get there. aid is very difficult to get there. aid is trickling in very slowly. that is exactly what the issue is. people are trying their best and ngos are trying their best to get access as easily as possible. people have been trapped under the rubble and the mud, but the government are doing a fantastic job of trying mud, but the government are doing a fantasticjob of trying to clear that out as soon as possible, so that out as soon as possible, so that ngos can get access to give aid. give us an idea of what the reaction has been from some of the people who live there and are struggling at the moment. obviously there is a feeling of desperation, but is their anger as well, a feeling it is taking such a long time to get basics like food and water and clothing and shelter? yes, i think it is quite a lot of pent—up frustration. it has been almost five days since the tsunami struck. a lot of people have gone without food and water for that many days, and so now
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violence has erupted, petty crime, robberies. so there is a lot of frustration, as you can probably imagine. but, you know, as soon as the area has been cleared, we at muslim aid will have full and easy access to distribute what we need to. and at what stage does disease become a real issue, as well? we we re become a real issue, as well? we were hearing early on about mass graves being organised to try and get rid of some of the bodies that we re get rid of some of the bodies that were just lying get rid of some of the bodies that werejust lying on get rid of some of the bodies that were just lying on the streets. that is exactly one of the main challengers. right now they have not been any burials because of complete chaos in the area. 1200 people have died, and right now it is very, very hot. so in terms of disease, i was thinking about exactly that yesterday. cholera, hepatitis, these are all major challenges, if we are not able to respond and co—ordinate the response very, very quickly. thank you very much for your time this morning, and we will continue
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to follow that story this morning. we are hearing quite a lot of planes arrived yesterday at palu. a british aeroplane full of aid arrives later today and the death toll of 1300 and could rise over the next few days as well. carol's in brighton's royal pavillion for us this morning, where a royal visit will be taking place later today. that's absolutely right, good morning. the duke and duchess of sussex are coming here for the first time since they were disturbed that title by her majesty, the queen, on their wedding day. so they are visiting lots of places in sussex, but the royal pavilion is certainly one of them. and look how splendid it looks at this early morning light. it was built, it started out asa light. it was built, it started out as a farmhouse, a long time ago. and thenit as a farmhouse, a long time ago. and then it was built in three stages into the magnificent building it is now. and that was by george, prince
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of wales, as he was then, and this doctors thought it would be a good place for him to come, with the sea airto place for him to come, with the sea air to help place for him to come, with the sea airto help him place for him to come, with the sea air to help him with this gout. by the time the royal pavilion was actually completed in 1823, he was of course king. this morning it is a chilly start to the day in some eastern parts of the uk, but in the west and for the rest of the uk, it is that it milder. we are still in double figures and it is going to be a fairly cloudy day to day. it is also going to be a humid one, especially so later on in the day. what is happening is high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather, so that is keeping things settled. there is not much movement, there is not a lot of wind today, and it will still be quite easy in the north of the country, but not as windy as yesterday. we also have a weather front draped across scotland and northern england. that is heading north eastwards, and it is taking its rain with it. at the moment the southern extent of that rain is around liverpool and manchester area. we also have a lot of low cloud, mist and murk
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adeptness in the west, fog across cornwall and the isles of scilly. that will be slow to lift and foremost it will be a cloudy day with a few brighter breaks developing. in those breaks, we could see temperatures get up to about 20 celsius. and the temperatures will be higher today across scotland and northern ireland and they were yesterday. now, as we head through the evening and overnight our weather front continues to drift north eastwards, taking its rain into the northern isles. behind, still a lot of cloud. we will see some mist and fog patches forming. it it could be dense across southern parts of england, for example, and by the end of the night we will have a front coming across the north—west and introducing some rain. once again it will not be a cold night. so we pick up will not be a cold night. so we pick up that rain tomorrow, heavy initially across northern and western scotland and through the day it will start its descent, moving across the rest of scotland, northern ireland, into northern england and north—west wales. the fog forming overnight will be slow to lift. it is just that time of year now. a lot of it will lift into low cloud. with some drizzle in the
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south—west and wales. in the south—west and wales. in the south—west we could see one or two brighter breaks with high as potentially up to 20 once again. by the time we get to friday that weather front is not moving very quickly. it will be draped across southern scotland, northern england and also parts of wales, producing some cloud and patchy rain. behind it, in scotland and northern ireland, we are looking at sunshine and showers, and ahead of it, once again, any mist and fog will be slow to left, moving into low cloud, and we will see a few spells of sunshine. but it won't be quite as humid oras warm sunshine. but it won't be quite as humid or as warm as it will be in the next couple of days. looks lovely. thank you very much, carol. amazon has announced a pay rise for thousands of its uk workers after lots of criticism of its working practices. sean is here. what can you tell us? controversial, it is people have criticised their working conditions and levels of pay, yet a lot of us will be familiar with those parcels through the door. customers like the prices,
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their delivery service so much that they sell a lot of stuff in the uk. looking at the size of the business. a employee 17,000 people right across the uk. —— they employ. when you look at how much they will be paid now, from £8 per hour to £9 50 outside of london. inside london, at it will go up. unions particularly have criticised amazon over tax, the amount of tax they pay and their working conditions as well. we have heard the gmb union say that a, a couple of 100 of their members who work for amazon and four fifths of them said they might end up working their longships coming out with pain because it is such a stressful shift. amazon has always said that is not the case, on the whole, 17,000 people, we have good working practices. dave clark is head of
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global operations. we are incredibly proud of our team in the uk, they do brilliant workforce our customers every day. i would say for people to come out and ta ke would say for people to come out and take a tourand would say for people to come out and take a tour and look for themselves. we have a great environment, you will see for yourself if you take a look around, they encourage you to do so. we had a walk around and we may well do again if we get an invite. taxes as well. they sold £2 billion worth of stuff in the uk over the last year and when they put out their profits figures, £70 million, their tax figures, that is not very clear. one or £2 million may be. profits and sales were up, but taxes were down. here is what dave has to say about that. we pay all taxes that are due, we played by the same rules everybody else plays by an right now we are trying to take a leadership position in the pay for the citizens of the
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uk. we are excited about that change and what it means for the employers going into the festive season. and what it means for the employers going into the festive seasonm and what it means for the employers going into the festive season. it is interesting. he says they will take alicia position in pay, but in terms of tax, philip hammond has said that he wants to see the big companies taxed more, digital services tax may be on its way, maybe will they start to say we will start paying a more appropriate level of tax that a lot of people think we should be paying? even though what they are doing is within the rules. is an influential company because of the size. tesco has a 300,000 odd and please, in that respect is not the same but in terms of influence in our lives it has had huge growth and really affected how the rest our retailers do business. they are trying to keep up do business. they are trying to keep up with amazon who maybe do not pay " pay up with amazon who maybe do not pay —— pay the tax levels. —— please. did i hear you say last week that it
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is of all online shopping in america is of all online shopping in america is on amazon. they are a beast. —— 55% . is on amazon. they are a beast. —— 5596. the is on amazon. they are a beast. —— 55%. the us is on amazon. they are a beast. —— 5596. the us has is on amazon. they are a beast. —— 55%. the us has walmart and they have got that far into everything they buy. that is what they are looking to do all around the world. actor bradley cooper is one of the biggest names in hollywood, and he's taken on a new challenge for his latest movie, a remake of the romantic classic, ‘a star is born'. as well as playing the leading role, it was also his directoral debut. charlie's been speaking to him about the extra responsibility, as well as having pop—megastar lady gaga alongside him in the film. # tell me something, boy. # about you tryin' to fill that void. you approached stephanie about doing the role, and i'm told that within minutes you were around a piano singing. yes.
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is it right? that's correct. i know. i drove home thinking, did i ask her to sing a song with me? did it a bit of nerve on your part? she is a singer and, with the greatest respect, you were not. of course. but i knew that if i am going to ask this incredible artist to go on this journey i had betterfeel that there was a chemistry that we could sing together. so it was about 20 minutes into meeting her and i said, you know, would you mind singing a song together, because if this doesn't work there is no reason to keep going. well, she is not here to get her account of what you sound like at the beginning on that day, but she has said that you have got a decent voice, and that was on day one. i worked really hard, thank god. but the one thing that i felt... i am not a complete idiot. i did think that if i worked hard, i always feel like it definitely comes from an authentic place. if i could just curate it and cultivate it, maybe i could be ok.
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# baby, it's time to let the old ways die. people will be seeing the trailers and they will be hearing some of you singing. it's quite a stylised voice, isn't it? singing, or talking? the singing and the talking voice. that is not the way that i would sing, me. they are very different. it is easier to sing that voice than to speak it. that was the hardest thing technically by far, was lowering my voice that much. you try to do it and you will never know. that's just the truth. there is one reason we are here is to say something and people want to hear it. talk about mixing acting and directing. people who are outside the business sometimes think, how does that work? you are outside the camera, but you are telling people what to do. it was easier. maybe it is because all i know is being on the field. to me, i had so much more weapons
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at my disposal actually being on the field with the actors. i could manipulate so much more than having to be on the sidelines and stopping and talking. and i didn't have to speak to one of the actors, because i was the actor, so i really could just focus on you. and i could really see what you are doing because i am waiting to receive it. so if i want something else i could be right there with you. what happens, and i am sure it doesn't, what if your performance is slightly under par? who tells you? is that an unrealistic question? no, no, no. i have had an objective eye about my own work and i am very aware if i am not in it. you would be the first to say, let's do it again? i spend a lot of time banking that characters, so i didn't really think about what i was doing. as long as they are doing what they are doing, i am comfortable enough that i will react authentically to it. so, really, i have to get you to be
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as real as possible and then i will react off of you. so it was really selfish, in a way. i was just allowing myself not to act. iam i am really looking forward to seeing that film. other things we are talking about today, sorry if you haven't had your breakfast. and ‘a star is born' is in cinemas from tomorrow. by by the way. if you haven't had your request, we will talk about dirty money. here we have some money. this is all we have got from our brea kfast is all we have got from our breakfast crew this morning. they have researched it and taken money like this and grow the bacteria that appears and they have found that, it is quite shocking, including 19 different bacteria found, including two life—threatening bacteria associated with antibiotic resistant superbugs. two superbugs. anyway, we will be speaking to somebody later about it. which coin is this? i love that you put it in there. if you
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have a robust immune system, obviously you should be fine, but we will talk to an expert later that if you don't, it could cause you serious problems. what are we going to do? i don't know. what are we going to do? start walking around with gloves on all the time.” going to do? start walking around with gloves on all the time. i use my debit card much more often but i suppose that would be dirty. this is something else to talk about this morning. talking about that to an expert at 20 past eight. how do you feel about cutting out clapping? we'll hear about the university students who have banned applause, and replaced it with jazz hands! it is the technet klee —— it is not technically jazz hands. they are concerned about the effect of loud noises on some people, particularly those suffering with autism. quite big response to this. wants as i
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com pletely big response to this. wants as i completely agree, if it helps one person it makes a positive difference. why not? nick says, if a tiny amount set themselves as non— clapping people, then of course others should have two get out of the way. jake says, my worst fears, the way. jake says, my worst fears, the world is over at as i know it. and getting over my child's school having a sports dale —— sports a losers and winners, we are creating a generation of wimps. let us know what you think. —— sports days. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. it's six months since the metropolitan police's violent crime taskforce was set up, to make arrests and remove weapons from areas with the highest levels of crime. there are 150 specialist officers in the unit, who have made over 1300 arrests and recovered a0 firearms since april.
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i am not going to say to you that we have solved the problem. but what i can say to you, as you have heard the commissioner say, we have actually stabilised some of the issues. knife crime under 25 victims is now going in the right direction, that's stabilised. yes we still have a bit of a challenge with homicide, but we are getting there. a man was stabbed on a rush hour train in east london last night. it happened on a london overground train into hackney central and the station remained closed all evening. british transport police say the victim was taken to hospital. a man's been arrested. tottenham meet 5—time european champions barcelona in the champions league at wembley tonight. spurs striker harry kane, believes the team will relish the chance to test themselves against 5—time world player of the year lionel messi. it isa
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it is a great test. as players you wa nt to it is a great test. as players you want to play against the best players in the world and lionel messi is certainly that. he is a fantastic player and i am sure we will do our best to stop him. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on tfl rail this morning and the overground is part suspended between romford and upmister. onto the roads and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover. now let's get a look at the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another mild start out there this morning. today it is often going to be cloudy, but the cloud will break here and there and we will get some bright and sunny spells. and it is still going to feel quite warm. still quite breezy out there, with the wind a little bit lighter than yesterday. when the cloud breaks it really
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will feel quite pleasant. temperatures getting up to potentially 20 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight, we are still hanging onto this cloud, the mild air as well, one or two breaks, but the cloud falls much lighter and that could mean we get a bit of mist and fog developing by dawn tomorrow morning. some quite dense patches in places, but the temperature mild, 11,12 celsius as a minimum. so quite a misty, murky start first thing on thursday, but that will lift, the cloud breaks and we'll get some sunny spells and temperatures again into the high teens celsius. warmer day for friday really because we get more in the way of sunshine, temperatures again in the low 20s. as we head into the weekend however, we get a bit of a temperature drop and for a time things could turn rather wet and windy and rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you can keep up to date on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: theresa may confronts her critics,
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telling the tory conference the uk's future is bright after brexit, and freezes fuel duty for the ninth year in a row. theresa may confronts her critics, telling the tory conference that the uk's best days lie ahead, after its departure from the eu. mounting desperation in indonesia, as survivors of the earthquake and tsunami wait for aid. here in palu, emotions are running high, as survivors are still struggling to get hold of basic supplies like food and water. can tesco be a jack of all trades? we will find out in a few moments, as our biggest retailer releases its latest results, two weeks after launching its budget stores. more boos forjose mourinho. his manchester united side slump to a 0—0 draw with valencia in the champions league. and hollywood actor bradley cooper tells us how working with lady gaga made him feel starstruck, and the perks of directing. ijust have to get you to be as real as possible, and then i'll react off of you. so it was really selfish, in a way. i was just allowing myself not to act.
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good myself not to act. morning from the royal pavilion good morning from the royal pavilion in brighton. we are here this morning ahead of the duke and duchess of sussex's royal visit later on today. whether, a chilly start in the east, fairly mild elsewhere and it will be a particular cloudy day to day with some rain across scotland and northern england. i will have more details and 15 minutes. it is wednesday 3 october. our top story: theresa may will urge conservatives to demonstrate they are a party that is decent, moderate and patriotic, at the end of a conference that has underlined deep divisions over brexit. in a speech, the prime minister will declare that britain's future outside the eu is full of promise. mrs may will also announce that fuel duty is to remain frozen for the ninth year in a row. our political correspondent chris mason reports from birmingham. remember this, a year ago? there was the coughing,
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the security breach, with a prankster handing the prime minister a fake pa5, and then this, the conference backdrop falling apart, like an anxiety dream playing out in real life — an excruciating moment. imagine standing on that stage again, a year on from it going so horribly wrong, and a day on from borisjohnson down the corridor trashing your central brexit policy, to cheers and applause from activists. today, the prime minister will try to strike an optimistic note, and say this country's future is full of promise. here is theresa may working on what she will say later. so what do we know about the words on those pages? mrs may will sound upbeat about the uk's future. and, she will add... the goliath of brexit has trampled
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every corridor of this conference, but little has actually changed here, the prime minister persistently deflecting attempts to encourage her to ditch her plan. instead, today she will try to talk about other stuff, and says the decision to freeze fuel duty again proves her party is on the side of " ha rd—working families". our assistant political editor norman smith joins us live from the conservative conference in birmingham. what is the challenge for mrs may today? we also know that borisjohnson was on the fringe yesterday, reports of people queueing up for hours to get in to listen to what he had to say. how does this play out for the prime minister? well, there will be read
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across. people will be looking at johnson's hoopla event yesterday which generated huge excitement and energy, and that will put some pressure on the prime minister to inject a bit more of an optimistic, upbeat note to her conference speech. we will hear plenty rhetorically about how best days are ahead of us. we get that sort of political pick me up promise of another freeze in fuel duty, political pick me up promise of anotherfreeze in fuel duty, because there is a need, let's be honest, to sketch out that there is some sort of future beyond the long, slow, attritional slog towards brexit. and on that, mrs may will face the challenge of selling her chequers plant to a party which, let's be honest, many members here are openly sceptical about chequers, others are downright hostile. what we will hear from mrs may is the iq meant that can her view chequers is in the national interest, it is the only deal on the table, it is the only deal on the table, it is the only deal which will protect business because it will ensure frictionless
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trade and will guarantee the union by avoiding a hard border in northern ireland. if she can come out of this speech with at least the sort of grudging acquiescence and a cce pta nce sort of grudging acquiescence and acceptance of chequers by her party members, then i expect she will view that as a result. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. at least 1,300 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. let's get more from our reporter mariko oi, who has travelled for days to reach the area. this clearly used to be a mosque, where the local community gather to pray. it was destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami on friday evening. and you can still see so many items that were inside the mosque at the time, and each item
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tells a story. a book that people used to read. cars that were parked outside. and this isjust one used to read. cars that were parked outside. and this is just one of many destructions caused by the natural disasters on friday evening, which killed thousands of people. and survivors are continuing to look for their loved ones, who might still be buried underneath some of the collapsed buildings. and they are also getting rather desperate forfood are also getting rather desperate for food and water. aid agencies have been trying really hard to get them sent into the city, but even as we experienced, it is quite a journey. we drove for 30 hours. the commercialflights journey. we drove for 30 hours. the commercial flights are still not being accepted at the local airport, and people are getting rather desperate. and it has been quite a challenging task for the local government and aid agencies to keep sending those supplies. donald trump has mocked the woman who claimed she was sexually assaulted by the president's supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh, decades ago. a campaign rally audience
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in mississippi laughed as mr trump ran through a list of what he described as holes in dr christine blasey ford's testimony before the us senate judiciary committee. mr kavanaugh has denied ms ford's allegations. how did he get home? i don't remember. how did you get there? i don't remember. where is the place? i don't remember. how many years ago was a? i don't know. what neighbourhood was it in? i don't know. where is the house ‘s i don't know. where is the house ‘s i don't know. upstairs, downstairs? i don't know. upstairs, downstairs? i don't know. but i had one beer, that is the only thing i remember. and a man's life is in tatters, a man's life is shattered. tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating in what it calls dubious tax schemes to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says
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the article is misleading. tesco has been updating people on how its finances are doing. sean has been looking at the results for us. sean. i will be honest, i haven't looked through all of the papers, but you can see that tesco have had good sales, and actually an increase in sales, and actually an increase in sales for the year. we have seen sales for the year. we have seen sales up for the 11th consecutive quarter in a row, and if you think thatis quarter in a row, and if you think that is 11 consecutive periods of three months, that is pretty strong. you might remember tesco had a tough time of it a few years ago with lots of controversies around the business. so sales they will be happy with. when it comes to profits, across the whole group, profits, across the whole group, profits are up a bit, 2%. tesco have a presence in places around the world as well but it has been the uk
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that they say has really led their sales growth, despite all the issues of food prices rising and the fact we have seen our average weekly shop, effectively, when it comes to official figures, shop, effectively, when it comes to officialfigures, go shop, effectively, when it comes to official figures, go up shop, effectively, when it comes to officialfigures, go up month on month at the moment. so they have battled that seemed to come through that. but it is a tough time in what they say a lot in these results is it has been a big yearfor them. they bought a huge food wholesaler which has helped contribute to an increase in profits. and we haven't seen the effect of this yet, but that store jack‘s is something that people will be watching closely to see if that will rival the likes of aldi and lidl. will that actually make any difference to the way they are making money and how much money they are making? have you been to one yet? i have not popped into the one yet? i have not popped into the one which is open, no. but i have seen lots of pictures. one picture has been doing the rounds, retell week highlighted the fact that some of the tesco products have been actually, accidentally appearing in jack‘s, pretty much like for like, but different branding. it shows the
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issues they are having to deal with, more expensive than a tesco store, but just the jack‘s branding more expensive than a tesco store, butjust the jack‘s branding in the discount store. that is the way it works. i will let you read the rest of the 160 pages, thank you. regularly eating procsessed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organization, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. for the first time in its history, the uk's most senior court will have a majority of female judges when it hears a case in london later today. it is the first time in 600 years that the supreme court has had a mostly female bench. they will hear today's case, which involves the treatment of a boy with asperger‘s syndrome. you're watching breakfast from the bbc. it will be one of the most important speeches of her political career. theresa may will close the conservative party conference in birmingham today claiming
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the uk's future after brexit is full of promise and that our best days lie ahead. the prime minister suffered what some described as a car crash conference speech last year, when she was served with a pa5 by a prankster, the party slogan fell apart behind her, and she endured a coughing fit. so will things go better for her this year? cabinet office minister david lidingtonjoins us now from birmingham. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. it will come on to the prime minister's speech in a moment, but boris johnson to the prime minister's speech in a moment, but borisjohnson was there yesterday. did you hear his speech? no, ididn't. i yesterday. did you hear his speech? no, i didn't. iwas yesterday. did you hear his speech? no, i didn't. i was in other meetings at the time. i have read some accounts of it. it all sounded pretty predictable. some good jokes, but not really any new ideas and i think a bit nostalgic intoned. not really coming up with the answers to some of the hard questions that have been put to him in recent days. 0k,
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the prime minister also didn't hear the prime minister also didn't hear the speech but she had this reaction to it. there were one or two making is that boris said that i am cross about. he wanted to taupo guaranteed to the people of northern ireland. northern ireland as part of the united kingdom. we are all, he and i, all members here, are members of the conservative and unionist party. that is because we believe in the union of the united kingdom. northern ireland as part of that union, and we have a guarantee for the people of northern ireland, and we are upholding that. our checkers plan does that. it is the only plan on the table at the moment that does. so she said she was cross about some of the things he said. what about what borisjohnson things he said. what about what boris johnson appears to things he said. what about what borisjohnson appears to be doing? well, it is no shame for anybody to have an ambition to be prime minister one day, but i do think that what the country is actually expecting of us at the moment as the government, faced with the really
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difficult, complex challenge of negotiating a new agreement with the european union 27, is the everybody to be thinking of the national interest first. and that i think is what i find when i knock on doors people admire about theresa may. whether they are tories or whether they are not, you know, they actually know that there is a woman here who put the country's interest first and is working really hard every hour she gets. let's talk about the chequers deal, because she has been absolutely clear that there is no deviation from the chequers deal. what is itjust doesn't get through parliament? what then? well, i think that assuming we get a good dealfor the uk i think that assuming we get a good deal for the uk at the end of negotiations, as i am hopeful we will, then i think we have a new political dynamic at work, because we would then have an agreed withdrawal treaty and a political declaration on the future partnership we are aiming for, that won't just be partnership we are aiming for, that won'tjust be something that the british government says they want. it will have been formally signed up
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to by all 27 other governments around europe, governments of ce ntre—left, around europe, governments of centre—left, centre—right, liberal, conservative, socialist. so i think it will have a very strong weight of opinion behind it, and i think and i hope that mps from all parties will consider very carefully before they plunge this country into the sort of uncertainty that would arise for business and forjobs as a result of rejecting such an agreement. and i am confident we will get an agreement that works really well to every pa rt agreement that works really well to every part of the united kingdom. labour have responded already, they have said it needs to meet the six objectives, otherwise they won't vote for it. so you think something is going to happen, do you, that is going to change things? well, the offer we have put on the table, and which we are negotiating on, is the only package that so far anybody has produced that both ensures that you continue to have frictionless trade between the uk and the european
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union, it is really important for things like car makers, where widgets inside car bonnets travel back and forth across the channel more than once during car manufacturing processes, or the agriculture, where actually getting welsh lamb, scottish beef and shellfish into european markets without being held up at the port is hugely important for businesses that do that. so that chequers proposals do that. so that chequers proposals do that, and to preserve frictionless trade, and maintain the integrity of the united kingdom by not requiring any hard water on the island of ireland, and no customs barriers on the irish sea between great britain and northern ireland. the prime minister is talking today and we will think let's talk about other things at the sides brexit. what is the big idea? what is it that you are going to do that will reach out to members of the public? what we have heard from different speeches at the conference today,
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this week, his proposals from a party that is focused upon the economic and social policy challenges facing this country. there are a lot of people who are fea rful of there are a lot of people who are fearful of the impact of new technology, we cannot discontent that. but as philip hammond set out in his speech, we can embrace the opportunities that new technology gives us to help the sectors that thrive, create jobs on the basis of new technology. —— disinvent. as with the announcement on apprenticeships this week, do a lot more to retrain people and encourage both the business and small businesses to take on apprentices so that we have got the young people and the people who need a career, who have the skills that we are going to need in a rapidly changing global as well as national economy. there is a message of opportunity, the message of a country that is flexible, adapting to the challenges we face in the future. can i ask you
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one more thing. you are cabinet of the office minister, close to theresa may. the front page saying this point that the cabinet is demeaning that she set a date to quit. is that the case? when i talk to my cabinet colleagues, what i find is that every man and woman amongst them is focused upon the responsibilities they have around the cabinet table. we have got to carry through this very complex negotiation with the eu, but then we have also got to make sure that our economy is fit for global competition, for the challenge that digital technology poses to us. we have got to make sure that we get even more kids into good and outstanding schools. we have got to make sure that we modernise the health services, as well as giving it extra money and develop a sustainable, long—term solution for social care. these are huge social challenges, on top of which the pm is committed to doing on gender equality, opportunities for
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different ethnic backgrounds, there isa different ethnic backgrounds, there is a mass opportunity for social and economic reforms. that is what my collea g u es economic reforms. that is what my colleagues are focused on doing. the interest of this country to come forced —— to come first. carol's in brighton for the weather for us this morning, where the duke and duchess of sussex will visit later today. i can't help but notice, have you especially chosen your neck wear for us especially chosen your neck wear for us this morning? at i certainly have. i have to say it is not mine, it along is to alex from the commuter cash and steam in brighton and she is over there, she definitely wants it back. as you rightly said, we are here this morning because the duke and duchess of sussex are visiting for the first time since her majesty the queen bestowed that title on them on their wedding day. is a bit of a whistlestop tour, we will visit brighton hove, and was taken. would
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they will also have a walk around they will also have a walk around the pavilion gardens. behind me it has an indian influence outside, but inside, which they will also visit, has more of a chinese influence. this morning if you'rejust has more of a chinese influence. this morning if you're just stepping out in the east, it is a chilly start, but for most of us it is not so cold, most of us in temperatures in double figures of. that will lead us in double figures of. that will lead us into quite the human days. it was quite warm yesterday across england and wales. —— humid day. today scotla nd and wales. —— humid day. today scotland and northern ireland will warm up. we have a weatherfront across scotland and northern england moving north—east would, taking its reign with it. first thing this morning there is also some fog across cornwall and the isles of scilly, took which will slowly lift. for many of us today, it is currently cloudy in the westhills, it will be dead as well, but we will see a little bit of practice here and there. lb exception rather than the rule as the rain continues to move out of northern england and
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across scotland heading north—east was. “— across scotland heading north—east was. —— that will be. britches raging from ten in the north to possibly 21 in the south. yesterday the london hit 21.1, making it the warmest part of the uk. as we head to the evening and overnight, the red cross and pushes into the northern isles, a cloudy night with one or two breaks, this and fog patches forming, possibly dense fog also across southern parts of england. at the end of the night we will have a weather front coming in from northwest scotland introducing rain there. it would be a cold night. tomorrow we start off the rain across northern scotland, some of it heavy and through the day it moves of it heavy and through the day it m oves a cross of it heavy and through the day it moves across all of scotland, northern ireland into northwest england and also northwest wales. ahead of that, don't forget we have got the fog, that will be slow to clear, it lifts into low cloud, one or two break breaks here again and just like breezes. temperatures
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again up to around 19 celsius. by the time we get to friday, the weather will be resting somewhere across southern scotland, northern england, north wales and north midlands. in scotland and northern ireland, brighter spells and showers, ahead of the rain still a fair bit of cloud around, missed and fog to lift. it won't be as humid as it is going to be in the next couple of days. thank you very much, i like that necklace, you should try to do that whenever you go to a location, something that resembles what is happening behind you. thank you. the pressure! thank you. -- no pressure. that have a look at some of the front pages this morning. —— let's have images of theresa may dominate the papers today ahead of her speech. the daily mail pits her against borisjohnson and says the prime minister turned on the ex—foreign secretary, who the paper says, "staged a public audition for hisjob"
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with his speech. the daily telegraph says theresa may is under pressure from members of her cabinet to set out a timetable for her departure as prime minister, and claims discussions have begun about when she should be ousted if she refuses to leave before the next general election. melania trump features on the times, visiting a baby clinic in ghana on her first solo overseas tour. and they have a story that says a price can be put on doing the household chores, and that price is £12,000 a year. and the sun has a picture of the duchess of cambridge who's back at work after maternity leave, wearing herfavourite boots. according to royal fashion watchers, she's had the pairfor more than a decade. you don't need to change your boots, do you close back also some of the
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papers are talking about someone we are talking about later, about how dirty our money is here. i have got some money, we put it in the cup. jane says, what about handles and push bars on supermarket trolleys? orcake push bars on supermarket trolleys? or cake shops? lorna, as a family, my sister—in—law ‘s father collected money he found as a dustbin man. the children counter the money from a jarand children counter the money from a jar and caught the disease which was passed on to my family and my brother ‘s family. passed on to my family and my brother 's family. had they know it was from the money? the doctor confirmed it was likely to be from dirty money. gill says i worked at a bank asa dirty money. gill says i worked at a bank as a cashier in 1986 and used a thoroughly wash my hands, but money is no dirty now than it was then. i have made it to 60 years of age but i still live. it won't kill you u nfortu nately, i still live. it won't kill you unfortunately,. will stick to a microbiologist who will talk to us about it. —— we will
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speak to. people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay unaffordable rents in much of britain, according to research carried out by the bbc. housing costs are taking a major bite out of pay packets, which means they're struggling to manage the rest of their finances. our personal finance reporter kevin peachey went to cheltenham where there are concerns young people are being priced out of town. when 25—year—old shop manager morgan moved in with her boyfriend, she knew she had to be particularly nice to her new housemates. myself and my partner are living with his parents at the moment whilst we are saving for a mortgage. the reason why be decided to do that was because we couldn't possibly rent and save at the same time. my friends definitely struggle, i think a lot of their money is used up in just their rent alone. this is typical of a sort of accommodation that is offered for young professionals... those friends can expect to pay more than a0% of their salary on rent to live on their own in central cheltenham.
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despite this cost, letting agents say young professionals are queueing up for flats like this. this typical property goes within a8 hours. the demand for it is incredible, especially one that is furnished like this, itjust suits their needs. but it isn'tjust here that young people are feeling the financial squeeze. housing organisations say spending more than 30% of your salary on rent is unaffordable. that means renting a 1—bedroom home in your 20s would be unaffordable in two thirds of britain and two people sharing a 2—bedroom place would still find it difficult to manage in more than one in ten areas. one answer, say housing charities, is to build more for this young market. new developments like this look perfect for young tenants. new flats right in the centre of cheltenham, but it will be at least a0 years before they get into something like this because, like so many other newly built properties in the town, these are retirement homes. that worries the local council,
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which wants to attract skilled, young workers to the town. the private sector is failing to deliver, really... it is planning to borrow £100 million to provide 500 homes. we are going to build them. we are going to buy them, we may even buy land and build on that. it's as simple as that, really. these will be rented out in the open market for young people and families that need them. the government says a letting's fee ban and longer tenancy contracts will help residents in cheltenham and elsewhere, but the trade body for landlords says mortgage and maintenance costs means they can't offer rent any cheaper. kevin peachey, bbc news. and if you want to see if rents are judged as unaffordable in yourarea, you can search our interactive map of britain — head to bbc.co.uk/business. loads more to come, talking dirty
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money. charlie is with bradley cooper and we will talk tojonathan ray, four—time world superbike champion. just missed out on sportsperson of the year last year. he will be with us after 8am morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. it's six months since the metropolitan police's violent crime taskforce was set up, to make arrests and remove weapons from areas with the highest levels of crime. there are 150 specialist officers in the unit, who have made over 13 hundred arrests and recovered a0 firearms since april. "1300. i am not going to say to you that we have solved the problem. but what i can say to you, as you have heard the commissioner say, we have actually stabilised some of the issues. knife crime under 25 victims is now going in the right direction, that's stabilised. yes we still have a bit of a challenge with homicide, but we are getting there.
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a man was stabbed on a rush hour train in east london last night. it happened on a london overground train into hackney central and the station remained closed all evening. british transport police say the victim was taken to hospital. a man's been arrested. tottenham meet 5—time european champions barcelona in the cham—pions league at wembley tonight. spurs striker harry kane, believes the team will relish the chance to test themselves against 5—time world player of the year lionel messi. it isa it is a great test. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and messi is certainly that. so yes, he's a fantastic player, and i'm sure we'll do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. we need to focus on ourselves, as well. you know, we've got some great players. let's take a look at the travel situation now. tfl rail services between liverpool street and shenfield are running
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with severe delays — it's also affecting greater anglia services. and the overground is part suspended between romford and upmister. onto the roads and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover. traffic on the a13 is building westbound from dagenham into barking. and in silvertown, the connaught bridge remains closed for maintenance work — with traffic for city airport on diversion via woolwich manor way and albert road. and westbound traffic on the a2 is building heading out of eltham towards kidbrooke. now let's get a look at the weather with kate kinsella. for good morning. it's another mild start out there this morning. today it is often going to be cloudy, but the cloud will break here and there and we will get some bright and sunny spells. and it is still going to feel quite warm. still quite breezy out there, with the wind a little bit lighter than yesterday. when the cloud breaks it really will feel quite pleasant. temperatures getting up to potentially 20 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight, we are still hanging onto this cloud, the mild air as well, one or two breaks, but the cloud falls much lighter and that could mean we get a bit of mist and fog developing by dawn tomorrow morning. some quite dense patches in places, but the temperature mild, 11,12 celsius as a minimum.
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so quite a misty, murky start first thing on thursday, but that will lift, the cloud breaks and we'll get some sunny spells and temperatures again into the high teens celsius. warmer day for friday really because we get more in the way of sunshine, temperatures again in the low 20s. as we head into the weekend however, we get a bit of a temperature drop and for a time things could turn rather wet and windy and rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you can keep up to date on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: theresa may will urge conservatives to demonstrate they are a party that is decent, moderate and patriotic, at the end of a conference that has underlined deep divisions over brexit. in a speech the prime minister will declare that britain's future outside the eu is full of promise. mrs may will also announce that fuel
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duty is to remain frozen for the ninth year in a row. it's no shame for anybody to have an ambition to be prime minister one day, but i do think that what the country is actually expecting of us at the moment as a —— is a government faced with the really difficult, compaq ‘s challenge of negotiating a new agreement with the european union 27, is for everybody to be thinking of the national interest first. and that i think is what i find when i knock on doors people admire about theresa may. whether they are tories or whether they are not, you know, they actually know that there is a woman here who puts the country's interests first, and is working really ha rd at interests first, and is working really hard at that everyday, every she gets. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. at least 1,300 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami.
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a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the un says around 200,000 survivors are in urgent need of help. tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating in what it calls dubious tax schemes to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says the article is misleading. regularly eating processed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organization, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. tesco says it has a good start
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to the year and is on track to deliver its current targets. the uk's biggest retailer says sales in this country went up byjust over 2% in the first half of the year, helping the group deliver profits of nearly £570 million. the supermarket has faced competition from the like of lidl and aldi recently, but last month launched its own budget brand, jack‘s. for the first time in its history, the uk's most senior court will have a majority of female judges when it hears a case in london later today. it is the first time in 600 years that the supreme court has had a mostly female bench. they will hear today's case, which involves the treatment of a boy with asperger‘s syndrome. so, you've done a bit of gardening and trimmed the hedge, and you need to take the clippings down the tip. you fill your boot and head off. let's hope you haven't tried to cram in this much, though. this man's decision to drive
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after completely stuffing his car with branches has been described as absolute madness by police. the driver was stopped in stockport, with police saying he risked seriously injuring someone after his visibility and access to the gear stick was blocked. the man, who is in his a0s, was reported for a number of driving offences. it looks daft, and it puts a smile on yourface, but it looks daft, and it puts a smile on your face, but don't drive with a car full of bushes. in a few moments, carol will have the weather. she is in beautiful brighton this morning. and holly is here to tell us about jose mourinho. how do you sit in a bunch of leaves like thatjamming in the u? i am afraid you don't, you get stopped by the police. some people saying this morning maybe it is time forjose mourinho to leave manchester united. it was another
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bad results, iam manchester united. it was another bad results, i am afraid. they didn't lose their champions league tie with valencia, but they didn't win either. jose mourinho said his players tried, but that their lacked confidence and quality, as they could only muster a goalless draw against valencia in the champions league, doing little to ease the pressure on their beleaguered boss. elsewhere, neighbours city struggled in germany, but did manage a win. ben croucher has the story. well, there's the full—time whistle, and there are boos around the stadium at old trafford. afterjose mourinho said manchester united lost their dignity over the weekend, gone were the days of attacking flair, and this guy. instead, a team lacking invention and quality. there was effort and energy against valencia, although it took an hourfor paul pogba to really threaten the goal. not for the first time,
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this was a tough watch — an attack short on confidence, lacking in luck. but they didn't lose, although as mourinho search for answers for united's woes, this effort raised questions. i am pleased with the effort, i am pleased with the commitment, i am pleased with the improvement. and i am not pleased, of course, with the result, which is not a good result, but is not a bad result. in hoffenheim, city had their own questions to answer, after losing their opening match. conceding inside the first minute hardly helped against the champions league debutantes. city had the experience, with sergio aguero prodding them leveljust a few minutes later. another winless european night looked likely, but as the storm clouds gathered, city had their own silva lining — david silva on targetjust in time. what their rivals would have given for a moment like this. the england women's manager, phil neville, says he would be
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willing to coach a team gb football side, should it make its return at the tokyo olympics in 2020. neville's england side can ensure gb qualify for those games if they finish as one of the top three european teams at next year's women's world cup, and he says the players won't need any extra motivation. i didn't probably realise how big an event that was, until the players got told, and they were genuinely emotional and excited by it. hopefully we will have the chance to do that. i think it's great news. would it be a job that would interest you, coaching team gb? yeah, it would be a job. i think there's a lot of process to go through, but i think it's something anyone wants to go through, the world cup and an olympic games, and it's something that i want to do. and hopefully, in due course, that'll happen. could fans of the fed cup revive those "it's coming home" chants from the summer? great britain will stage a home tie for the first time in over a quarter of a century. the lta has successfully applied to host seven other european countries in february's preliminary
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stage at bath university. the last home tie took place in nottingham back in 1993, and gb has played in 15 different countries since. 30 years ago this week, the sport of hockey captivated the nation, as great britain's men won olympic gold, prompting one of the most famous pieces of commentary in history. southgate. .. and he makes it three. where were the germans? but frankly, who cares? barry davies with the infamous words. tonight at the olympic park, great britain will commemorate the anniversary of that match by playing germany's neighbours belgium. and it is a first match in charge for new head coach danny kerry. i remember watching, as a 17—year—old that game unfold very early, around some of my clubmates from pelicans hockey club, way back watching that game unfold, and really thinking, one day i want a piece of that olympic stuff. never really made it far enough as a player, and i think it's great that we're acknowledging that side and what they did.
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the bbc‘s sports personality of the year awards show is returning to birmingham, and it's all change for the extravanganza this time round. the shortlist could be shorter, and the public won't find out who is in the running until the night of the awards.there is also going to be a new award for the sports moment of the year. we have all been talking about what our sport moment of the year has been. for me it is the end that net all squad's commonwealth games gold medal. mine is the ryder cup. we expected nothing less! is there a moment? just the whole thing. and we are talking about something slightly different about the ryder cup. a spectator at the ryder cup is considering taking legal action against the tournament's organisers after she was hit by a golf ball and seriously injured.
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corine remande, who travelled to the competition from egypt, says she has lost the sight in her right eye after being struck by a wayward tee shot from the american brooks koepka. we are joined now by former professional golfer andrew murray, and also philip reid, golf correspondent for the irish times, who is in dublin. good morning, thank you very much for joining good morning, thank you very much forjoining us. i think you saw the aftermath of this. tell us what happened, as far as you could see?” was actually following the match behind, which involved rory mcilroy. when i arrived the paramedics were quite frantically looking for extra help, and the lady was lying on the ground with a silk screen, and her
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family were with her and very concerned and anxious. i didn't realise at the time that she had been hit by a brooks koepka in the match ahead, the sixth hole was a short parfour. match ahead, the sixth hole was a short par four. there is a sort of ongoing discussion in golf about this, because they used to be a time where if somebody hit the ball off the line, they would shout fore, left or right, and when brooks koepka hit that shot, he pointed his clu b to koepka hit that shot, he pointed his club to the left to indicate it was going left, but this woman would have been 300 yards away or more. certainly it is a trait in professional golf where the players or the caddies signal to the left or the right, and that is assuming that all spectators down there are in fa ct all spectators down there are in fact watching you or your caddie and signalling, and that is not enough. there has been a big debate over the last year or so about players not shouting fore instantaneously, and when i played, it was always done.
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asa when i played, it was always done. as a matter of course this will frighten a number of people. there has been more of a move to be diligent about that, and there were shouts of fore in this instance as well, but the noise and racket around thousands of people, you are not likely to hear some of it. and also, you may not have seen the shot yourself, so presumably as a spectator you may not know in which direction it was going. no, but once the caddie or the player goes left with his arm like that, you assume it is down the left—hand side. but you could duck, or anything else, and by the time brooks koepka has had the ball 300 yards, and by the time it has signalled and gone through the air, it is on the ground and has hit you. it is a terrifying thing and! and has hit you. it is a terrifying thing and i think it will frighten a lot of the players into being a bit more diligent and a bit more vocal about the shout, to be honest. and you were hit by a ball at the opened. it is worth saying if you
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look on the back of your ticket there is normally a disclaimer, which you sort of accept by being at the event, isn't that? yes, to point out that you are turning up at the golf tournament at your own risk. at the situation is, every week onto someone is being hit by a golf ball. players, as andrew was saying, are now hitting the ball 300 yards, and is really ha rd now hitting the ball 300 yards, and is really hard to control where the ball is going. obviously they want to try and get it in the middle of the fairway, but more often than not it could be 20 or 20 yards right or left of where they wanted be. there was a situation in wentworth this year where rory mcilroy hit three spectators in one round. and from my own point of view, it was a big deal last year at the open, i was standing 20 yards right of the green, and dustinjohnson's ball, i didn't see it coming, there was no shout of fore, but i don't think i would have heard it anyway. and the first time i knew that someone was
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being hit, i didn't realise it was myself. i heard it crack into my cheekbone, and it was seconds later before i realised that actually hit me. and it is a frightening experience, and i consider myself extremely lucky, because an inch to the left, right or upwards and i think i was in serious trouble. before you go, obviously this is an intense game, you don't want to ruin it, but what you do to it safer?” do think you can do much more other than players being more diligent and shouting louder. everybody wants to be where the players are their second shot wrong, so they are in the landing zone. you cannot stop spectators being in the landing area where the ball may or may not be. this is such a freak accident. i know it is amazing that something like this hasn't happened before, it is tragic and i noticed that brooks
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yesterday went on to social media and offered his condolences and he will do all he can to try and pacify and support the lady. 0r will do all he can to try and pacify and support the lady. or the place and support the lady. or the place and the authorities are doing all they can. —— all the players are. and the authorities are doing all they can. -- all the players are. a ryder cup spokesman has confirmed that brooks said four many times, but they will do everything to help that spectator as much as they can. carol is at brighton's royal pavillion for us this morning, where a royal visit will be taking place later today. good morning. this morning, it is not a bad start the day at all. we have come around to the other side of the pavilion now. you consider front entrance you would take if you are visiting, still very much with the indian influence as well. the royal pavilion is actually a wedding
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venue. it hosted the first run of same—sex marriages in the music room. today, the duke and duchess of sussex are visiting here, they will look around the gardens and also inside the royal pavilion in their visit. there will be greeted by some fine weather. for many of us, the forecast is a human one. yesterday it was you had across parts of england and wales, today northern ireland and scotland willjoin in. quite a lot of cloud around today. high—pressure still firmly in charge of the weather, keeping things fairly static. lot of cloud not shifting much and we have a weather front draped across scotland and northern england producing rain. through the day, that is going to be venting north eastwards, clearing northern england and pushing north eastwards a cross northern england and pushing north eastwards across the rest scotland. we've also got early—morning fog across the isles of scilly and cornwall. that will lift into low
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crowd —— low cloud and for many of us crowd —— low cloud and for many of us it will be a cloudy day with one or two exceptions as we have here in brighton, here we will see the highest averages in the sunshine up to around 20. a few stuck under the cloud in the west, especially in hills it will be debt. as the head onto the evening and overnight, what we will find is that the weather front will continue across north—east scotland, into the northern isles, a cloudy night as well, more missed and fog patches forming, which could be dense in southern england and by the end of the night will also have a weather front coming across north—west scotla nd front coming across north—west scotland introducing more rain. not a particularly cold night, most of us a particularly cold night, most of us being in double figures of. was the tomorrow with a weather front across the north of scotland with heavy rains to be through the day it will move across all the scotland into northern ireland, north—west england and northwest wales. ahead of that, the fog will be slow to clear and when it lists a lot of it will lift into low cloud, again some depths coming out of that. one or
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two brighter breaks here and there and some sunshine coming through. again, the exception rather than the rule with temperatures up to around 1920. at 19 or 20. rule with temperatures up to around 1920. m19 or20. by rule with temperatures up to around 1920. at 19 or 20. by friday, that weather front will have progressed further south, in no great rush, resting across southern scotland, northern england, parts of northern ireland and also wales and the north midlands. here, the cloud will be thick, providing spots of rain. behind it we are looking at sunshine and showers and ahead of it, still a fair bit of cloud around, fog slow to lift but again one or two bright breaks. but not as high temperature is as we are looking at in the next couple of days. thank you very much carol, see you at the later. an interesting question. do you ever think you're actually overqualified for your job? sean's been looking into some new research which suggests many of us actually are. it isa it is a big issue, whether they are overqualified or in the wrong job, it seems like it is a bit of a
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problem. the government saying that after brexit you will be workers skills that matter, not where they come from. there's been a survey of nearly 4,000 workers in the uk, almost half said they were in jobs they were either under, or overskilled for. it's a big problem for graduates in particular. and it comesjust as people are questioning whether we have the right skills. lizzie crowley is from the chartered institute of personnel and development which conducted this survey. shejoins me now. good morning. is it really that case that half of us across the country are in the wrong job? our research is suggesting that 37% of people feel they are over skilled for their job and they could cope with more demeaning duties. also graduates, around about the quarter, think they are overqualified for theirjobs. if you take the example of a state agent, for instance, our previous research has found that a0% of the state agent agrees. we see in this
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picture, nightshirt, whether it is call centres, working at a desk, wherever that might be. who should be doing thosejobs wherever that might be. who should be doing those jobs if people feel they are in the wrong job?m be doing those jobs if people feel they are in the wrong job? it is really important that we rethink our skills policy. the government is really focused on getting loads of people into higher education and we have been hugely successful of that. a296 have been hugely successful of that. a2% of our populace and hold degrees, one of the highest figures of. is that too many? does that say if there are so many people in the wrong job and have degrees that too many are getting degrees they don't need? would many are getting degrees they don't need ? would need many are getting degrees they don't need? would need about better and higher quality vocational education, types of routes are. people have got to do thesejobs. types of routes are. people have got to do these jobs. these jobs that people go into that they feel overqualified for have a really low unemployment rate in the uk. who is supposed to fill that gap?” unemployment rate in the uk. who is supposed to fill that gap? i think it is really important that people are probably matched with their jobs. the people out there who are
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getting turned down from these jobs because of employer filtering practices. they are using lazy ways to signal capability by asking people who have degrees forjobs that don't need degrees to do that job effectively. and from this announcement on the government, in terms of employers being done are treating eu citizens the same as those from around the world, does that effect british workers and their skills? the announcement this week highlights the fact that many employers who relied on eu migrants to fill their roles i don't find it difficult to do so in future, however our research shows that the huge amount of capacity within the existing british workforce. i think employers really need to think that carefully about how they harness the skills that already exist. thank you. it might be that you do not need to recruit, just use the stuff you have got better. —— staff.
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how many times have you wandered past a bench dedicated to somebody and wondered about the person whose life is being remembered? when elizabeth gomm lost her partner mike foster to cancer after 25 years together, she wanted people to share their own happy moments on mike's bench. so she invited people to send photos of themselves enjoying his memorial seat, and she was inundated. jayne mccubbin's been to meet her. like almost every park, black pool‘s sta nley like almost every park, black pool‘s stanley park is full of memorial benches. nice to meet you! -- blackpool. elizabeth wanted mike's bench to be different. you want people to know a bit more about mike that you wanted to know a bit more about people who have sat as well.” made this little sign, put it on the
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bench saying a little bit about mike, but also saying please send in your pictures. she had expected maybe 30, hundreds arrived. families, selfie is, dogs, lovers, children, teddies, day by day, week by week moora arrived. —— more. what did this giddy in those days and weeks and months after? it gave me focused. also, it connected me with all these people. i have shared that moment of their time with them. —— focus. that is like being, just embraced in a huge comfort blanket of love. among the very many lives, mike's bench has touched is that of the malone sisters. they came here as children with their mum who told them stanley park was their parts. this is what she told you. she told this this was —— she told us this was our garden. and we were letting
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the other children play on it. their park was where they came on the day that their mother was diagnosed with lung cancer, taking this picture on mike's bench. they returned eight months later, not realising this picture together would be their last picture together would be their last picture together. it was that afternoon, that very afternoon, she was admitted to hospital. so, for us, this was our last memory. and on this bench. elizabeth inspired us to get our own bench. we cannot thank her enough. it is a beautiful park and everybody should come and see it. even though it is yours. we don't mind sharing it! an exhibition of the year at in the life of mike's bench opens in stanley park this week, it in it, a third picture from the malone family, the day after their mums funeral. because it they felt it was the place they need to
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be. how special is that? and these pictures, taken by the nursing staff who cared for mike and his final weeks. on the anniversary of his death, which i haven't mentioned to them, they went and found mike's bench. what would mike think? mike would just literally be shaking his head. he would be bemused, but then at the same time, there were just be that sneaky bit of pride. he would have preferred a barstool, he would. he that kind of old—fashioned, you know? that is lovely, isn't it? such a lovely idea. i do stop everytime i see a bench, i stopped and as well. —— stop and read. see a bench, i stopped and as well. -- stop and read. you can go see the exhibition for in stanley park. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will be back here at eight.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. it's six months since the metropolitan police's violent crime taskforce was set up, to make arrests and remove weapons from areas with the highest levels of crime. there are 150 specialist officers in the unit, who have made over 1300 arrests and recovered a0 firearms since april. i am not going to say to you that we have solved the problem. but what i can say to you, as you have heard the commissioner say, we have actually stabilised some of the issues. knife crime under 25 victims is now going in the right direction, that's stabilised. yes we still have a bit of a challenge with homicide, but we are getting there. a man was stabbed on a rush hour train in east london last night. it happened on a london overground train into hackney central and the station remained closed all evening. british transport police say the victim was taken to hospital. a man's been arrested.
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tottenham meet 5—time european champions barcelona in the champions league at wembley tonight. spurs striker harry kane, believes the team will relish the chance to test themselves against 5—time world player of the year lionel messi. it is a great test. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and messi is certainly that. so yes, he's a fantastic player, and i'm sure we'll do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. let's take a look at the travel situation now. tfl rail services between liverpool street and shenfield are running with severe delays, it's also affecting greater anglia services. and the overground is part suspended between romford and upmister. now let's get a look at the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it's another mild start out there this morning. today it is often going to be cloudy, but the cloud will break here and there and we will get some bright and sunny spells. and it is still going to feel quite warm. still quite breezy out there, with the wind a little bit lighter than yesterday. when the cloud breaks it really will feel quite pleasant. temperatures getting up to potentially 20 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight, we are still hanging onto this cloud, the mild air as well, one or two breaks, but the cloud falls much lighter and that could mean we get a bit of mist and fog developing by dawn tomorrow morning. some quite dense patches in places, but the temperature mild, 11,12 celsius as a minimum. so quite a misty, murky start first thing on thursday, but that will lift, the cloud breaks and we'll get some sunny spells and temperatures again into the high teens celsius. warmer day for friday really because we get more in the way of sunshine, temperatures again in the low 20s. as we head into the weekend however, we get a bit of a temperature drop and for a time things could turn rather wet and windy
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and rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you can keep up to date on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. theresa may confronts her critics — telling the tory conference the uk's future is bright after brexit, and freezes fuel duty for the ninth year in a row. mounting desperation in indonesia — as survivors of the earthquake and tsunami wait for aid. here in palu, emotions are running high, as survivors are still struggling to get hold of basic supplies like food and water. and we'll hear abuot the killer bugs lurking in your wallet. tesco's turnaround continues.
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the uk's biggest retailer reports an 11th successive quarter of rising sales. more boos forjose mourinho — his manchester united side slump to a 0—0 draw with valencia in the champions league. hollywood actor bradley cooper tells us how working with lady gaga made him feel starstruck and the perks of directing. ijust have to get you to be as real as possible, and then i'll react off of you. so it was really selfish, in a way. i was just allowing myself not to act. and i'm in the royal pavilion in brighton where later today, the duke and duchess of sussex will be visiting for the first time since the queen bestowed that title on them on their wedding day. the weather is set fair for some of us. a lot of cloud around today and some sunshine and rain across scotland and northern england. more in 15
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minutes. it's wednesday the 3rd of october. our top story. theresa may will urge conservatives to demonstrate they are a party that is "decent, moderate and patriotic" at the end of a conference that has underlined deep divisions over brexit. in a speech, the prime minister will declare that britain's future outside the eu is "full of promise." mrs may will also announce that fuel duty is to remain frozen for the ninth year in a row. our political correspondent chris mason reports from birmingham. remember this, a year ago? there was the coughing, the security breach, with a prankster handing the prime minister a fake pa5, and then this, the conference backdrop falling apart, like an anxiety dream playing out in real life — an excruciating moment. imagine standing on that stage again, a year on from it going so horribly wrong, and a day on from borisjohnson down the corridor trashing your central
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brexit policy, to cheers and applause from activists. today, the prime minister will try to strike an optimistic note, and say this country's future is full of promise. here is theresa may working on what she will say later. so what do we know about the words on those pages? mrs may will sound upbeat about the uk's future. and, she will add... the goliath of brexit has trampled every corridor of this conference, but little has actually changed here, the prime minister persistently deflecting attempts to encourage her to ditch her plan. instead, today she will try to talk about other stuff, and says the decision to freeze fuel duty again proves her party is on the side of
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" ha rd—working families". chris mason, bbc news, birmingham. our assistant political editor norman smith joins us live from the conservative conference in birmingham. i suppose, just give us an assessment, how important is it for the prime minister to get the speech right today? it is hugely important, not least to banish memories of last yea r‘s not least to banish memories of last year's calamity not least to banish memories of last yea r‘s calamity jane episode not least to banish memories of last year's calamity jane episode but also to give this party a bit of liftoff because the conference has been flat as a pancake, frankly, with the exception of the boris johnson event yesterday, which did generate some excitement and energy. so there will be a read across to mrs may's speech today. there is pressure on her to inject a bit of optimism and a bit of hope and a sense that there are some lit up and
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is beyond the storm clouds of brexit. —— sunlit uplands. we will get the rhetoric about how our best days are still ahead of us as a nation and political pick me up with the promise of a freeze in fuel duty again, for the ninth year in a row. but the hard yards will be about selling the chequers plan a party thatis, selling the chequers plan a party that is, you know, either deeply sceptical or downright hostile to the proposals. there, she faces an enormous task. i suspect that probably the best she can hope for is that there will be a sort of grudging acquiescence, that her approach is perhaps the best that can be expected. in that sense, we arrived at this conference with all sorts of dire predictions about how there would be an uprising among party activists against mrs may. who knows, they might have proved her and there could have been further resignations but none of that has happened. —— they might have booed her. mrs may emerges, still intact
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and it seems with a cabinet for now still behind her and the chequers plan. thank you, norman smith, there. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently—needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. this morning, the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has risen to more than 1a00. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. our reporter mariko oi, who has travelled for days to reach the area, sent this report. this clearly used to be a mosque, where the local community gathered to pray. it was destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami on friday evening. and you can still see so many items that were inside the mosque at the time, and each item tells a story. a book that people used to read. cars that were parked outside. and this is just one of many destructions caused by the natural disasters on friday evening, which killed thousands of people.
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survivors are continuing to look for their loved ones, who might still be buried underneath some of the collapsed buildings, and they are also getting rather desperate for food and water. aid agencies have been trying really hard to get them sent into the city, but even as we experienced, it is quite a journey. we drove for 30 hours. the commercial flights are still not being accepted at the local airport, and people are getting rather desperate. and it has been quite a challenging task for the local government and aid agencies to keep sending those supplies. donald trump has mocked the woman who claimed she was sexually assaulted by the president's supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh decades ago. a campaign rally audience in mississippi laughed as mr trump ran through a list of what he described as holes in dr christine blasey ford's testimony before the us senate judiciary committee.
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mr kavanaugh has denied ms ford's allegations. how did you get home? i don't remember. how did you get there? i don't remember. where is the place? i don't remember. how many years ago was it? i don't know. what neighbourhood was it in? i don't know. where is the house? i don't know. upstairs, downstairs? i don't know. but i had one beer. that's the only thing i remember. and a man's life is in tatters. a man's life is shattered. meanwhile, tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating in what it calls "dubious tax schemes" to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says the article is misleading. tesco has reported another rise in sales in its latest set of financial results. sean's been digging into the detail. it came out about an hour ago and
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you have had that time to digestive. i have minimised it into a tweet, thatis i have minimised it into a tweet, that is basically myjob in a nutshell, going through 60 pages, looking at how tesco have been getting on a busy time for the supermarket sector, their sales are produced only, 2.3%, in the industry, like—for—like sales, stores that were open year ago, so you can't keep the figure is bit by opening new stores and selling more. they will be happy with that, it was better—than—expected asians. profits not up as much as many expected that thatis not up as much as many expected that that is why the share price is down by 5% at the minute, because they we re by 5% at the minute, because they were not making as much money as people thought they might be. looking at the growth, they say the uk business has been particularly strong because they have business run wild. general merchandise, though, the non—food stuff, like tesco direct, which closed this summer, all the various non—food
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items that you see when you go into one of their bigger stores, sales there are down nearly 5%. they are trying to make big changes in that, it's a very competitive part of the market for supermarkets, whether it is children's close, casserole dishes, that kind of stuff. people still want to get that sort of thing from supermarket but sales are down. just a reminder of how big tesco is, tesco bank, a £60 million settlement this week because of various issues it has had with the regulator. the regulator has made it £60 million and more ppi claims than expected revealed today. lots going on at tesco. regularly eating processed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organization, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. for the first time in its history, the uk's most senior court
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will have a majority of female judges when it hears a case in london later today. it's the first time in 600 years that the supreme court has had a mostly female bench. they'll hear today's case, which involves the treatment of a boy with asperger‘s syndrome. it is 8:11am. people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay unaffordable rents in much of britain, according to research carried out by the bbc. housing costs are taking a major bite out of pay packets, which means they're struggling to manage the rest of their finances. the bbc has been to cheltenham where there are concerns young people are being priced out of town. myself and my partner are living with his parents at the moment whilst we are saving for a mortgage. the reason why we decided to do that was because we couldn't possibly rent and save at the same time. it was just... we'd never have enough money to do that, and we would, i think, end up getting sucked into that renting situation where we couldn't
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get out of it once we were in. so moving in with parents is definitely the easiest and more sensible option for us in the long run. it is causing real difficulties for people. we're joined now by lawrence bowles, a property research analyst at the estate agents savills, and hilary burkitt, head of research for shelter. thank you forjoining us. from shelter‘s perspective, how difficult, what sort of people is it making it difficult for? certainly, it's not surprising that so many young people are struggling now. we have seen rents outstripping wages across the country. if private renting is not working for young people come it begs the question who is it working for because young people are the people we expect to be living in a private rented sector but increasingly weird thing a large number of families having to live in the private rented sector, one in four children are growing up in renting, and not having the security
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about where they will live long term. and increasing numbers of older people are stuck renting, paying housing costs in older age and not having security in their later yea rs and not having security in their later years either. it is not working for young people, families or older people, nor across the country. we really need some change. 11 million people are living in the private rented sector now and something has to change. you mentioned 11 million, one other statistic for you, the average rent for a one—bedroom home eats up more than 30% of a typical salary and 65% of british postcode areas. —— in 65%. what sort of health is the rented market in at the moment? 65%. what sort of health is the rented market in at the moment7m isa rented market in at the moment7m is a mixed market, absolutely, as we have heard rents have outstripped wage growth of gross —— across the country in the last five years, rents have grown by 9.2% say wages have only grown by 3.a% which stretches people's finances across the country. that's very different in the most recent months, rents have fallen over the last 12 months by 0.3%, showing that we are
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reaching the limit of how far we can stretch affordability. where are the particular problem areas where private rent is really high?m particularly tends to be those areas where you have a very strong and highly skilled employment market, so obviously london springs to mind but also regional cities like bristol, cambridge and manchester are struggling with attracting a lot of highly skilled workers who are competing for those homes and we are not building a home is for them to live in. you talked about the fact it is not just live in. you talked about the fact it is notjust young people being affected. owning a home is becoming increasingly difficult. there's a lot of older people who... i don't wa nt to lot of older people who... i don't want to say they are forced into renting but they have to look at the option. yes and increasingly people don't have choices. we are finding that people can't afford to get into home ownership and social housing is another genuinely affordable option isn't there for people so we absolutely need more social housing to give people an alternative to living in the private rented sector, where it is an affordable and they
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don't have stability. social housing absolutely needs to be there. what sort of things, we have talked this morning about having to move further away but what about how many people are living in a house or a flat, is that changing? absolutely, what we have seen in the last few years is fewer and fewer households forming because people are staying with their parents for longer, sharing with more people in order to split the costs between more renters, in particular in less affordable locations. good landlords play a role in this or are they under pressure themselves? in many cases yes but what we are seeing which is encouraging is an influx of the professional, large—scale landlords, like get living and legal and general, who enter the sector in a big way and build lots of times and they are not insisting on a big upfront deposit from residents in many cases, they make it clear in advance what any rental increases might be and they are offering longer term tenancies would give residents more flexibility and more security longer term. many times on
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this programme we have spoken to members of the government, talking about building more homes and there isa about building more homes and there is a statement today, "we realise there needs to be more affordable properties as well which is why we are investing £9 billion in affordable housing across the country, and an additional £2 billion from 2022 to deliver more social homes in england". do you think this will change for the better in the future if that happens? well, we are seeing some good actions from the government but they absolutely need to go further, they absolutely need to go further, they need a bold plan on social housing. we need to see them thinking about improving things for the people stuck in the private rented sector and have longer term tenancies and go further on that as well. thank you forjoining us. i'm sure that resonate with many of our viewers to breakfast. and if you want to see if rents are judged as "unaffordable" in your area, you can search our interactive map of britain. head to the bbc news website. you are watching bbc breakfast.
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some breaking news. zoe ball has been announced as the new presenter of the bbc radio 2 breakfast show. she'll replace chris evans who announced last month that he's quitting the show after eight years. he's moving to virgin radio. zoe ball will take over injanuary. congratulations to zoe ball. she already has worked on radio two for several years. she has her own show at the weekend. she had been hotly tipped as one of the people who might take over the show but it has been confirmed in the last few moments, zoe ball will be taking over on chris evans on the bbc radio two breakfast show. welcome to the brea kfast two breakfast show. welcome to the breakfast family! idid the breakfast family! i did the breakfast show with her a few years ago. and she was amazing. she will be brilliant. it was a tough battle between her and sara cox. lots of people saying both of them will be brilliant and i'm sure
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thatis them will be brilliant and i'm sure that is the case but zoe has got the job. as we said, she will start in january and on georgiou will love that. orange rag first question, what time are you going to wake up? probably a bit after us. we will be speaking about that with colin paterson later. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines. theresa may will give her speech to the conservative party conference later today and is expected to declare britain's post—brexit future is "full of promise". the number of people known to have died in friday's earthquake and tsunami in indonesia has risen to more than 1300, according to disaster response officials. 8:18am, high time we got the weather. let's find out what is happening in brighton, where carol is. good morning! good morning, and look at the garden, a very natural garden at the
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royal pavilion and it is said to be the only fully restored regency garden in the uk. the garden is maintained with organic methods only, nothing chemical going on, and it's got foxgloves, peonies, chrysanthemums it's got foxgloves, peonies, chrysa nthemums and it's got foxgloves, peonies, chrysanthemums and some exotic ones as well rather like this from china. you can see it's got lots of lovely little chinese lanterns on it. a beautiful job little chinese lanterns on it. a beautifuljob maintaining these gardens, i was speaking to one of the gardeners earlier and he is very proud of it and rightly so. the sun is beating down in brighton ahead of the duke and duchess of sussex's first visit to brighton. they are visiting other parts of the south as well today, and it is the first time they've been done in this particular area since the queen bestowed that title on them on their wedding day. nice weather to greet them first thing this morning if they are arriving early. the sun is out and the temperature is rising and the
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forecast for everyone today is humid. yesterday, the top temperature in swanage and london reached 21. we will see similar as we go through the course of today. for scotland and northern ireland, where it wasn't as hot yesterday, it will be a bit warmer today. there's a lot of cloud around today as well, high pressure firmly in charge of the weather so things are not moving around too quickly and we have a weather front across scotland and northern england which is producing some rain. it continues to age north—eastwards, clearing northern england through the course of the morning or early afternoon at the latest. behind it, still a lot of cloud and fog. first thing, fog across cornwall, and the isles of scilly which will slowly lift into some low cloud. we will see some brighter breaks here and there but they will be fairly limited. in the west, where we have got thicker cloud, expect a bit of dampness, especially in close and hills. temperatures up to 19 or 20 celsius today. this evening and overnight, a
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weather front moving north—east across scotland clearing mainland scotla nd across scotland clearing mainland scotland and the rest of the northern isles. behind it for the uk asa northern isles. behind it for the uk as a whole, a fair bit of cloud, one to two breaks once again, patchy mist and fog forming, some of which will be dense across southern england and then by the end of the night, a new front coming in across the north west of scotland to introduce some rain. once again, it's not going to be a cold night. tomorrow we start off with a weather front draped across north—west scotla nd front draped across north—west scotland introducing heavy rain and through the day it will move across the rest of scotland and northern ireland, north—west england and also north—west wales. ahead of it, mist and fog patches that will lift slowly during the day into low cloud. again, seeing one or two brea ks cloud. again, seeing one or two breaks here and there. by the time we get to friday, the weather front won't have made a lot of progress out. it will be resting across southern scotland, northern england, north west wales, and the southern parts of northern ireland and also the north midlands, producing some patchy rain. behind it, for the rest
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of northern ireland and scotland, bright stars, sunshine and showers. ahead of it, a fair bit of cloud with some brighter breaks which we lose in the morning mist and fog. —— when we lose. temperatures will not be as high, though and as we head into the weekend, for some it will be wet and windy. it feels a bit topsy—turvy to me at the moment, the weather. it certainly is. it is so messy to describe as well. it makes it really difficult. it's much easier when it's one thing or the other! but it didn't sound messy! banks, carol. she delivers it beautifully. fewer and fewer of us are using cash these days, with the ease of contactless cards and online payments. but there could be an extra incentive to avoid paying with coins and notes. most of the money we handle is covered in harmful bacteria and potentially even superbugs, according to new research. we'rejoined from london by professor paul matewele. he has been taking a good look at
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this and i conceive got microscope that all sorts of equipment behind you. give us an idea of how surprised you were by what you found on the coins and notes. what did you find? we've found that there were pathogenic microorganisms in both the coins and the notes. i suppose what really surprised us is that the pathogenic microorganisms were on the coins because normally, you would expect to see many fewer microorganisms on metals as opposed to on the note. he found 19 different bacteria of the coins including two life—threatening bacteria associated with antibiotic resista nt bacteria associated with antibiotic resistant superbugs. if people are watching this this morning and hearing before the first time, should we be worried about it is it
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—— worried about it or is it sort of normal? the first thing if they've a lwa ys normal? the first thing if they've always been around, probably, but it is likely that people have developed immunity to these microorganisms. however, there are some bacteria that are really of concern, those that are really of concern, those that produce toxins, such as toxigenic e. coli, which in very small doses can lead to very serious publications. that is where the worry is and of course, these that are antibiotic resistant, if they are antibiotic resistant, if they are circulating around and transferring their antibiotic resista nce transferring their antibiotic resistance to other bacteria, that might bea resistance to other bacteria, that might be a problem. is there a difference between coins and notes as to what kind of attracts more bacteria? in theory, we would have
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expected to see fewer bacteria on the coins but to our surprise, there we re the coins but to our surprise, there were no differences and what also surprised us is that the new notes, you know, the £5 and £10 notes which are sort of plastic, we were hoping we would see less bacteria there but there were no differences with the old notes. like the £20 note, which are the same. do we need to worry, is ita are the same. do we need to worry, is it a case of, if you are concerned you can use antibacterial wipes or whatever it might be or do we just wipes or whatever it might be or do wejust get on wipes or whatever it might be or do we just get on with it and embrace the germs? i would have thought that it might probably be helpful if we tried to move away from the use of money and more into the use of cards
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for payments, just to reduce the circulation of pathogenic bacteria as well as those that will impact antibiotic resistance on to other bacteria. the main concern also is in places like hospitals, where you have got vulnerable patients. if there is money circulating around, then you can have these microorganisms circulating and the consequences are not yet fully study. —— studied. consequences are not yet fully study. -- studied. much to think about. thank you forjoining us. one of the researchers that has been checking out the coins. i'm looking at all these coins in a completely different way now. they can just stay in there and i will watch the cup later! lots of people saying that coins used to be made of copper and silver, both of which are inherently antibacterial. that is what you said! jon stead on the same subject, what about handles on
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supermarket trolleys? don't start thinking about that. i've been wearing gloves while pushing trolleys about the store. is that a step too far? but we still need money at the moment. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... record breaking world superbike championjonathan rea is here. he'll tell us how his road to success has been anything but straight forward. do you think that was straightforward? imagine the number of health and safety for that had to be filled out for that at sports personality of the year last year where he finished second. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. another cloudy start
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to the day with temperatures in double figures across the uk. we've got this area of high pressure and a warm front moving north—east would. that's given us this warm condition. it's cloudy, mild and a bit damp in places as well particularly across scotland, parts of north—west england, north east wales. much of that rain in scotland will clear away but for many of us it will be a dry afternoon. a few breaks with the cloud developing across england and wales. maximum temperatures getting up wales. maximum temperatures getting up to 16—21. tonight will continue with this cloudy theme. some rain and drizzle moving into northern and western scotland. we are going to see some mist and fog developing across southern parts on thursday morning, and another mild night with those temperatures staying in double figures at 12—13. on thursday, any mist and fog in the south will clear away. there will be some breaks in the cloud to give a few bright sunny
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spells. rain spreads into the far north—west of scotland and north west of ireland. temperatures staying up into the mid to high teens, perhaps low 20s. those warmer conditions eroded from the north. the cold front is going to stall across northern areas where you will have some outbreaks of rain throughout friday. parts of the isle of man and northern england. to the north of that it will be dry with sunny spells but chilly here. you can see on the temperature map the greens and yellows but in the south we hold onto those warmer conditions. those temperatures once again with sunshine getting up to 20, perhaps even 21. a real contrast in temperatures as we go into friday. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc
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news with maryam moshiri and sally bundock. on top of brexit and potential us tariffs, the motor industry faces tough new emissions caps. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday third october the european parliament will vote on proposals to cut co2 emissions by as much as a5% by 2030, pitting the interests of the motor industry against efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. also in the programme. china's tencent music applies to list its shares in the us, in what could be one of the biggest us initial public offerings by a chinese company.
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