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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 3, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's wednesday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. it is crunch day for theresa may. in one of the most important speeches of her career, the prime minister will try to unite her divided party and convince you that she remains the best person to lead the country out of the eu. she's also going to announce big freeze on fuel duty. it can't be worse than last year, can it? ranchi ragga we've created record numbers ofjobs. applause so... while we will never... excuse me. i'm sure she will have a cough sweets ready busy in case. her speech is live at 11:1i0am and you can watch it on bbc news. the government takes the fight against hiv in the uk right to the heart of the south asian gay community as it emerges that infection rates in this group have barely changed despite new cases overall
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in britain having dropped by a third since 2015. shame is something you don't bring to asian families come you don't bring to their doorstep, to their community. you want to kind of hype that as much as possible. i think that as much as possible. i think thatis that as much as possible. i think that is the biggest barrier, the shame and guilt. —— that kind of thing. the family of that you and your old father of two who died in 2015 while being restrained by police will find out this morning if anyone is going to be prosecuted over his death. this is unacceptable, it happens time and again when it comes to police officers in this country, the length officers in this country, the length of time the family are not looked —— locked up the proceedings, they have no disclosure and they have to fight to get every scrap of evidence and truth and then they are left heartbroken at the end of the proceedings, with lea ks heartbroken at the end of the proceedings, with leaks after leaks intended to criminalise and smear sheku and his family. hello. welcome to the programme. how are you? we are well. thank you
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for joining how are you? we are well. thank you forjoining us. we're live until 11 this morning. later, we will talk about new data which reveals the hardest part of the country for young people to pay red. obviously london is the most expenses but he will be interested to hear where else tops the list. we will talk about that in the second hour. also today, we want to hear from you. what do you want to hear from you. what do you want to hear from theresa may in her conference speech this morning? let me know. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about use the hashtag victoria live. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. theresa may will declare that britain's future outside the eu is "full of promise". closing the conservative party conference, the prime minister will insist the government is on the side of hard—working families. mrs may will announce that fuel duty is to remain frozen for the ninth year in a row. her speech comes after borisjohnson launched a fresh attack on her brexit plan. our political correspondent chris mason reports from birmingham.
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remember this, a year ago? there was the coughing, the security breach, with a prankster handing the prime minister a fake p45, and then this, the conference backdrop falling apart, like an anxiety dream playing out in real life — an excruciating moment. imagine standing on that stage again, a year on from it going so horribly wrong, and a day on from borisjohnson down the corridor trashing your central brexit policy, to cheers and applause from activists. today, the prime minister will try to strike an optimistic note, and say this country's future is full of promise. here is theresa may working on what she will say later. so what do we know about the words on those pages? mrs may will sound upbeat about the uk's future. and, she will add...
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the goliath of brexit has trampled every corridor of this conference, but little has actually changed here, the prime minister persistently deflecting attempts to encourage her to ditch her plan. instead, today she will try to talk about other stuff, and says the decision to freeze fuel duty again proves her party is on the side of " ha rd—working families". chris mason, bbc news, birmingham. our political guru norman smith is there, too, and has been all week. how big day is for theresa may? there, too, and has been all week. how big day is for theresa may7m is huge, victoria. on a personal level, imagine, iguess, is huge, victoria. on a personal level, imagine, i guess, the anxiety she must be allowed to the sort of calamity jane episode at the last
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conference. personally, huge pressure on her, compounded by the fa ct pressure on her, compounded by the fact she leads a deeply divided, truculent, unhappy sort of party. more pressure because we had the sort of borisjohnson one—man extravaga nza sort of borisjohnson one—man extravaganza yesterday, but i want you to have a look at this, have a look down here. this is the the people queueing, gathering for theresa may's speech, nearly three hours before he is due to make it. i am staggered. —— she is due. but clearly, for whatever reason, people feel they've got to come out and show it is notjust borisjohnson who can draw the crowds, that theresa may can also pack them in. i guarantee it won't be as exciting or energetic or humorous but that is pa rt energetic or humorous but that is part of the challenge mrs may faces today. she's got to inject a bit more life into her performance and give the party a sense of belief and
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conviction. she's got to put a bit of light at the end of the tunnel, to break out of this sort of really grim, slow slog towards march the 29th and brexit. i think she will attempt that in some of her rhetoric. the hard part politically is the operation to sell chequers. let's be honest, most of the folk here are either pretty downright sceptical about the chequers plan or totally hostile to it. there is little enthusiasm for chequers. somehow, mrs may has got to sell it. what we have been told is that she's going to pitch it as in a national interest, so her pitch to the party will be, "never mind your reservations, i know it is not as great as you might have hoped, perhaps it isn't all you wanted from brexit but it is as good as we can get and it's in the national i nte rest" . get and it's in the national interest". i suspect what she will hope is she gets a kind of grudging acquiescence, that the party kind of
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says, "ok, it's not brilliant but we understand this is probably the best that it understand this is probably the best thatitis understand this is probably the best that it is going to be", and that they go along with it. and then she can emerge from today without a coughing fit, without the stage falling down, without anyonejumping up falling down, without anyonejumping up and being stupid, with the party a little bit buoyed up and still kind of on—board for chequers, i think she will think that is quite a result. thank you forjoining us. we will talk to some conservative voters in the next half an hour and some floating voters to ask what they would want to hear from theresa may and her party to attract them to potentially support them at the next general election. what do you want to hear from the general election. what do you want to hearfrom the prime minister in her speech this morning, wherever you are in the country, and you will be able to watch the speech live at 11:40am. let's get the rest of this morning's news with joanna. good morning. regularly eating processed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer has found that women who ate high levels had a 9% greater chance
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of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organisation, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. bbc research suggests that people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay unaffordable rents in much of britain. in two thirds of british postcode areas, the median rent for a one bedroom flat is more than 30% of their average income. our personalfinance reporter kevin peachey went to cheltenham where there are concerns young people are being priced out of town. when 25—year—old shop manager morgan moved in with her boyfriend, she knew she had to be particularly nice to her new housemates. myself and my partner are living with his parents at the moment whilst we are saving for a mortgage. the reason why be decided to do that was because we couldn't possibly rent and save at the same time. my friends definitely struggle. i think a lot of their money is used up in just their rent alone. this is typical of a sort
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of accommodation that is offered for young professionals. those friends can expect to pay more than 40% of their salary on rent to live on their own in central cheltenham. despite this cost, letting agents say young professionals are queueing up for flats like this. this particular property goes within 48 hours. the demand for it is incredible, especially one that is furnished like this, itjust suits their needs. but it isn'tjust here that young people are feeling the financial squeeze. housing organisations say spending more than 30% of your salary on rent is unaffordable. that means renting a one—bedroom home in your 20s would be unaffordable in two—thirds of britain and two people sharing a two—bedroom place would still find it difficult to manage in more than one in ten areas. one answer, say housing charities, is to build more for this young market. new developments like this look perfect for young tenants. new flats right in the centre of cheltenham, but it will be
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at least a0 years before they get into something like this because, like so many other newly—built properties in the town, these are retirement homes. that worries the local council, which wants to attract skilled young workers to the town. the private sector is failing to deliver, really. it is planning to borrow £100 million to provide 500 homes. we are going to build them. we are going to buy them, we may even buy land and build on that. it's as simple as that, really. these will be rented out on the open market for young people and families that need them. the government says a lettings fee ban and longer tenancy contracts will help renters in cheltenham and elsewhere, but the trade body for landlords says mortgage and maintenance costs means they can't offer rent any cheaper. kevin peachey, bbc news. tesco has announced another rise in half yearly profits in the uk and ireland. its pre—tax profits climbed to £561; million
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which a rise of 2.2% on the same period last year. the supermarket has faced competition from the like of lidl and aldi recently but last month launched its own budget brand, jack's. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people on the island of sulawesi. at least 11100 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the city is one of the worst affected, as jenny the city is one of the worst affected, asjenny kumar reports. the quake and landslide, met people in palu were stranded for hours. the disrupted region is delaying the delivery of aid. after days without
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food, the arrival of supplies is a desperately welcome sight at this camp in donggala. indonesians have been quick to rally to the cause, donations pouring in from across the country. some volunteers, though, feel frustrated. we need more help from the government, because we are human. we need all the help we can get. more help is coming, slowly. but in palu, people who spent days with limited food and water have been taking matters into their own hands, trying to break into a small supermarket, then driven back by police, who eventually allowed them to help themselves. meanwhile, the massive task of dealing with the dead lying under the rubble, is becoming more urgent, the heat and forecast rain increasing the risk of disease. the remains of around a0 people are thought to be underneath the roa roa hotel in palu. finding them is slow, without much heavy lifting machinery.
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and just how would this hospital in palu cope, if an epidemic was to break out? many staff were injured in the quake. the remaining workers are already struggling to care for patients, with limited supplies and poor sanitation. jenny kumar, bbc news. lawyers for the woman who has accused us supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh of sexual assault say the fbi has yet to interview her about the allegations. christine blasey ford's legal team say it's "inconceivable" that the agency can conduct a thorough investigation without interviewing her. the senate is due to vote on mr kavanaugh's nomination this week. president tom has reiterated his support for the nomination. speaking to reporters that the white house, he said it is a difficult and scary time for young men in the us. well, i say it is time for young men in the us. well, isay it is a time for young men in the us. well, i say it is a very scary time for
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young men in america, when you can be guilty of something that you may not be guilty of. this is a very, very difficult time. what's happening here as much more to do that even the appointment of a supreme courtjustice. that even the appointment of a supreme court justice. it that even the appointment of a supreme courtjustice. it really does. you could be somebody that was perfect your entire life and somebody could accuse you of something. it doesn't necessarily have to be a woman, as everybody is saying, but somebody could accuse you of something and you automatically guilty. but in this run, you are truly guilty until proven innocent. that is one of the very, very bad things that's taking place right now. tax officials in the us state of new york say they are investigating allegations that donald trump helped his family avoid millions of dollars in tax in the 1990s. it follows a report by the new york times which accuses the president of participating what it calls "dubious tax schemes" to hide much of the fortune given to him and his siblings by their parents. the white house says the article is a "misleading attack".
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australia is scrapping a controversial tax on female sanitary products, after years of campaigning by women's groups. previously, tampons and sanitary pads had been sold with a 10% goods and services tax because they were categorised as non—essential items. but the government has now agreed to remove the levy. the duke and duchess of sussex will make their firstjoint official visit to the county that inspired their royal titles. the couple, who married in may, will visit chichester, bognor, brighton and peacehaven on their whistle—stop tour. zoe ball is replacing chris evans as the new host of bbc radio 2's breakfast show. the news was announced on the station this morning. zoe ball was the first female breakfast show host on radio 1 and will now repeat the honour on radio 2. it follows chris evans' announcement last month that he is leaving radio 2 and returning to virgin radio. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you, and this news just
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thank you, and this newsjust in, pret a manger has just announced that it dish —— that all of its products will be fully labelled in its shops after the death of a young girl who bought a sammut from one of its outlets. her parents, as you know, were on our programme on one day, calling for amongst other exactly that, full ingredient labelling, including allergens, and pret a manger say this morning that those will be introduced to all products that freshly made in its shop kitchens. more reaction to that to come on the programme. also, todayis to come on the programme. also, today is a big day for theresa may. her speech to the conservative conference is live at 11:a0am on bbc news. i am asking you wherever you are in the country, what you would like to say in the speech. this text says, "i would like to say we will have a peoples vote including the
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remain option". brenda on twitter says," this has got to be a joke, obviously, brenda who when there was told there was another general election last year, she said "are you joking inaudible question —— are you joking? " this one you would like to hear theresa may a general election. roger said he wa nted general election. roger said he wanted acknowledgement of the other land border we have with eu and any similar safeguards in place, of course referring to gibraltar and its frontier with spain. by the way, isaid its frontier with spain. by the way, i said brenda its frontier with spain. by the way, isaid brenda had its frontier with spain. by the way, i said brenda had a fab accent, not a bad accent. do get in touch with us throughout the morning, use the hashtage victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. will perry is at the bbc sport centre. every single day i seem to be thing, more pressure onjose mourinho but it is true today as well, isn't it? it is becausejose mourinho seems like he could be on borrowed time now after manchester united slumped toa now after manchester united slumped to a fourth game without a win in all conditions, drawing 0—0 against valencia last night. united haven't
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won a home game since the opening day of the season in august, they lost 3—1 against west ham on saturday, their worst ever start to a premier league campaign and that was just three days after they went out of the league cup to derby cou nty out of the league cup to derby county the championship. it is not a fun time to be a united fan. club legend paul scholes says mourinho is embarrassing the club and is surprised he hasn't been sacked already as rumours on the former real madrid manager zinedine zidane continued to swell around. it was another bauble formers from united, their best chance late on from marcus rashford clipping the bar with a free kick. but the visitors held on for a deserved draw. united are still in a pretty good position in terms of europe, four points on the opening two champions league games but mourinho has a ready question his players' attitudes on more than one occasion and has now questioned their technical ability. despite being under huge pressure himself, he was not dishing out much blame last night. i'm pleased with the effort. i'm pleased with the commitment. i'm pleased with the
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improvement and... i'm not come i'm not pleased of course with the result which is not a good result but it is not a bad result. all eyes will be manchester united's result, especially on saturday when they ta ke especially on saturday when they take on newcastle in bt time kick—off in the premier league and then after that he's got chelsea, so mourinho going back to chelsea after the international break. could that be the result that potentially sees the end of the mourinho era at old trafford ? the end of the mourinho era at old trafford? and manchester city, are they back on track the champions league? they are, everyone on the other side of manchester will be enjoying united's struggles, city picking up their first win after their opening group game defeat against lyon at home, they won 2—1 at hoffenheim last night after going behind with just 44 seconds on the block. aguero equalising and then david silva scoring late on, here, so city make it four points from
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six. city struggling to match the standards, the hugely high standards they set last season but they are top of the premier league and they picked up what could be a crucial three points away from home. and we have heard from brooks koepka after that awful incident from a spectator at the ryder cup. —— for the spectator. to remind a run, brooks koepka says he's heartbroken that one of his tee shots at the ryder cup on saturday led to a spectator losing the sight in her right eye. it's an awful incident, the american's drive on the sixth real —— veered off course and struck the 49er old woman who travelled from egypt to watch the event. brooks koepka said he spoke to her at the time and now after learning her condition is worse than he first thought, he has contacted her again to offer his sincere and heartfelt sympathy. but of course, it will increase the debate, again raising the debate at the golf because we wa nt to the debate at the golf because we want to get the fans close to the action and the fairways but they are
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300 yards away and if you are shouting 300 yards away, to hear it that far down the course is tricky and it has led to a very rare but horrible incident. thank you for joining us. more sport throughout the morning. good morning, welcome to the programme. theresa may will give her headline speech at the conservative party conference later this morning. in it she'll declare a post brexit britain is full of promise, saying britain's best days are ahead. she'll also say the conservatives are a "party of patriotism but not nationalism." we ve seen some policy announcements this week ranging from an extension to civil partnerships inclusive of mixed—sex couples to a tightening on immigration rules, but it's still brexit that's dominating the agenda. in a moment we'll talk to these voters, but first let's look at the prime ministers journey since she took office navigating one of the most turbulent periods in modern british history. a lot has happened in two years in this country. have a look at this and there are some flashing images in this film. and i will go to parliament
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and propose that the british people decide ourfuture in europe. anyway, have a leaflet. i'm all right, thanks. all right, then. i'm campaigning to remain in the european union, to protect worker's rights and advantages. # i'm coming out # i want the world to know..#. the british people have spoken and the answer is we're out. cheering. # i'm coming out... i do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. what do we want? leadsom as leader. when do we want it? now. # who run the world # girls #. her majesty the queen has asked me to form a new government and i accepted. brexit means brexit. means brexit. means brexit, and we're going to make a success of it.
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# i'm worth it...#. do we have a plan for brexit? we do. # give it to me, i'm worth it...#. there's no reason to pretend that this is a happy day, not in brussels and not in london. it's an enormous decision. i think it's a very exciting one. what has happened today is the biggest diminution in british power and sovereignty in my lifetime. over the moon, happy. i mean, today, for me, after 25 years of campaigning, the impossible dream came true. # look what you made me do...#. i will not allow scotland's interest to be steam—rollered. no one in this country has any idea what deal the prime minister will negotiate with europe. if the people in this country think that they are going to be cheated... parliament alone is sovereign. we will reject any attempt to undo the referendum result. we're not leaving the continent. the uk's leaving the eu, we're not turning our back. where is the government's mandate
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for its negotiations? this country's future should rest with parliament. i'm not going to be calling a snap election. i've been very clear that i think we need that period of time, that stability, to be able to deal with the issues that the country is facing and have that election in 2020. # you've changed. ..#. i have just chaired a meeting of the cabinet where we agreed that the government should call a general election to be held on the 8th ofjune. # you've changed. ..#. general election. you're joking, not another one! i've called an election because of brexit. # oops, i did it again...#. strong. strong and stable leadership.
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strong. to ensure that we have that strong and stable leadership. # i'm not that innocent...#. and what we are saying is, the conservatives are the largest party. note, they don't have an overall majority at this stage. we think it's pretty clear that there is going to be a hung parliament. is this strong and stable, prime minister? music: land of confusion by genesis. you can be sure there will be a deal. we're working for a deal. and i think that to go whistle is entirely appropriate. music continues. in the two years since the referendum, we have had a spirited national debate. for the good of this country and its people, the government needs to get its act together and do it quickly and if it can't, make way for those who can.
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i have been making compromises for two years. music continues. in the last few hours, theresa may has landed in cape town for her first visit to africa as prime minister. healthy african economies are good news for british people as well as for african people. oh, and in case you wondered, it's 200 days to go until brexit. we would face short—term risks and short—term disruption. there is no progress. there is only position
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explained, stand—off. i'm negotiating, i'm negotiating hard in the interest of the british people. everybody shares the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. i have treated the eu with nothing but respect. the uk expects the same. so it's time for a reset, time for a rethink. i think however, it's a mistake to persevere with chequers. what do we want? people's vote. when do we want it? now. go and live there, if you like it so much! our preference would be for a general election and then we can negotiate our future relationship with europe. myjob is to speak up for what i believe in. my message to the labour party is that they should stop playing politics with brexit and start acting in the national interest.
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my message to my party is let's come together and get the best deal for britain. lets talk now to some conservative voters. roberto weeden sanz, zoe wong, phil sheppard. linda burbridge used to vote ukip but now supports theresa may, and floating voters muyiwa adigun and stephen morris. thank you forjoining us. theresa may boris johnson? origin thank you forjoining us. theresa may borisjohnson? origin of the theresa may. boris johnson. may borisjohnson? origin of the theresa may. borisjohnson. i'm leaning towards boris if he gets it right. none of the above! who do you wa nt to right. none of the above! who do you want to leave the country? anyone but those two. anyone? matilla almost anyone, perhaps not nick clegg, but you know... nick clegg? perhaps not in but anyone but those
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two. why are you still supporting theresa may? i think it is quite clear that she is a grown—up who is doing what is best for britain, which is in short supply in politics right now. she is really working on a deal that works, notjust for the 5296 a deal that works, notjust for the 52% that voted leave but the 48% that voted to remain because i think the government needs to find a copper mines that works for everyone in the country. i think actually, most voters now have a lot of respect for her, after showing the resilience she has shown that it lasted, taking punches from all sides, from her own faction, labour and the eu and still ploughing ahead. you will do well in the conservative party with that kind of answer! you are not a conservative councillor, unlike roberto, but you area councillor, unlike roberto, but you are a conservative supporter and he would provide theresa may to continue leading the party. do you think this week has been about much more than anything apart from her survival? about her survival? i
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think she's doing... i think she's doing the best that you can at the moment. because it is an impossible job? yes. but is she doing the impossiblejob well or job? yes. but is she doing the impossible job well or poorly? job? yes. but is she doing the impossible job well or poorly7m job? yes. but is she doing the impossible job well or poorly? it is difficult to say at this point. is not exactly a ringing endorsement! well, given the circumstances, she is trying to please people, keep everybody happy. and failing, you'd have to say. well, the chequers deal, you know. failing miserably? she's balancing a tightrope that cannot be balanced. the tory party has been riven for years with europe. use of europe in the ring with half a dozen tory mps and you will get 14 different answers. it doesn't work for them and they are costing the country forjune. you two floating voters, is there
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anything the conservative party could say to attract you to vote for them? we have to wait and see. if them? we have to wait and see. if the next general election is in 2020, we want brexit to happen and then see where it goes. nobody knows how it's going to affect the average person on the street. it's all up in the air still. we'll wait and see. what about you ? the air still. we'll wait and see. what about you? i live in luton and yesterday one of the main employers in luton was worried about what brexit is going to do. at the minute i think if you are going to go and buy a house and the surveyor said the roof is leaking and the foundations are thinking, you would think again. i'm guessing you voted remain? i did. linda, you used to support ukip, you now support the conservatives because there's no point supporting them any more now we've had the referendum? it'sjust that the moment, i can't quite see where ukip is going. what is it
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about theresa may? what you said is right, she is the grown up in the room. on the other hand, she really needs to listen, i think, much more to her colleagues telling her that maybe she needs to think again about chequers. i think that she needs to keep on paying attention to the fact the brexit vote was to leave and that meant leave, not leave with all these other things. as borisjohnson said yesterday it we are half in and half out we are nowhere. do you buy the argument that if you make the full move and you're totally out the new split up the uk? i'm not... or you end up with a hard border between ireland and northern ireland. yeah. i did think it will split up the uk because the whole uk will be out, including northern ireland. that issue has to be dealt
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with and i've been trying to figure out what that is. i don't think we break up the uk because we leave. these things that the government can work out. i don't think we ought to have a general election right now because i think that would muddy the waters. that would be crazy, which is probably why i still support theresa may. you said boris johnson would be a better leader. in my opinion he would be, because he's someone opinion he would be, because he's someone who stands up for result. he supports leave, genuinely as the british people voted... he wrote those two articles that the daily telegraph before the vote, won backing remain and won backing leave and that the last minute decided to go for a leader. he read those articles but having read through the remain article it seemed less genuine. that is tortuous defence but fair enough! laughterij genuine. that is tortuous defence but fair enough! laughter i don't think boris is the ideal candidate but he's the best placed candidate to deliver the super canada deal
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which is the brexit fight leave... the prime minister says that will lead to a hard border between ireland and northern ireland. not necessarily, because as the super canada outlines we can have technology... no one seems to think it could work, because it not been done anywhere. we can only experiment. we can only experiment?! it seems like we're going backwards to try and move forward. it feels like we are rushing things, something like this...” like we are rushing things, something like this... i want to ask you about the conference this week. i don't know how much attention you've been giving to it or if you've been giving to it or if you've been giving to it or if you've been listening to the news. we've had an announcement about immigration being changed after exit, obviously. we've had this announcement about waiters getting to keep their tips, the freezing fuel duty. broadly speaking, that's
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it. is that enough? i disagree. part of the reason theresa may was so popular was because voters felt she actually cared and understood about the problems of day—to—day voters. that was before the general election. and since then, brexit has crowded everything out. if you look at her domestic agenda, i think the policies on the nhs, policies on housing, you don't hear... money for the nhs in a few years which will be paid for... she has solutions to the problems day—to—day voters care about. like what? the nhs, providing more funding, housing, solutions for first—time buyers, slashing stamp duty for first—time buyers. first—time buyers, slashing stamp duty forfirst—time buyers. looking at making it easier to build homes. ijust think the at making it easier to build homes. i just think the media doesn't at making it easier to build homes. ijust think the media doesn't pay attention to a lot going on because brexit is obviously far more exciting but that agenda is there.
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the government is paying more attention to those things because brexit consumes... brexit red when brexit consumes... brexit red when brexit is finished theresa may will go back to focusing on the domestic agenda —— when brexit is finished. the tory party, the leaders of the european union had no plan to start with. —— european union had no plan to start with. — — leavers european union had no plan to start with. —— leavers of the eu. be still don't know what their best ideas are because they have no ideas at all. the largest businesses in the country say they will think again. the problem is ministers didn't plan for the vote to leave for the referendum happened. they should have planned. they should have, but they didn't. that's the problem. they've planned it since, obviously. david cameron should have planned it
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and it's the complacency of the remain campaign in 2016 that is one of the reasons why we are in this mess right now. i don't think you can blame the remain campaign. surely we are where we are.|j can blame the remain campaign. surely we are where we are. i think the british people summed it up in 2017 when they told theresa may she no longer has a majority. she should think again before she decimates the tory party. and yet she got a higher percentage than most winning parties in the last few years. if you're back confident, have a people's guide. we've already had a referendum. why have another? we've had the result, that's it. we need to work with this and move forward. you're trying to say what margaret thatcher did in the 1980s can't possibly be changed because we had about in the 80s. 0r
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possibly be changed because we had about in the 80s. or what tony blair did in the 90s can't possibly be changed. that's your argument? are you honestly telling me you're risking the future of the country and you can't change your mind. £350 million a week? i remember it written on a big red bust. let linda responds. i'm not saying you can't change the things in the past. of course you can, but we are in the middle of this right now. the country would laugh at our government going forward four years if we decided to go and vote again. it just wouldn't work, it's ridiculous. the whole of europe is laughing at us now. i think they are scared, actually. if we have another referendum it will be the latest in a long list of referendums dating back from 1992 in denmark which was repeated again because the eu didn't like the result. it would shatter the confidence of democracy with the british people. a lot of young
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people think the system isn't working for them and this will simply be an extension of that. what are you scared of? this viewer says, theresa may please say we are going to use common sense to help small businesses who are the biggest employers in the uk. another viewer says, i'd like the prime minister to get through her speech without stumbling or hesitating. i'd like to sound like a stateswoman with a strong, calm and measured delivery. another viewer wants her to lay out her plans for the future of the uk to alleviate poverty, homelessness, food banks and her plans to fund the nhs. that will be tax rises and maybe the chancellor will say which taxes will rise in his budget in a few weeks' time. another viewer, please have a second referendum. another viewer, i would like to hear theresa may say she will honour the referendum without any further votes or dilutions because if she doesn't deliver it she will make the tories
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unelectable for a generation. what do you think of that? wow. that was quite a lot. if theresa may doesn't deliver on whatjohn said is what he voted for in the eu referendum, it will make the tories unelectable for a generation. as a voter, i mean obviously i'm not... i'm not coming from a political background. but from a political background. but from what i see is she is doing her best to negotiate, and we do have a strong hand, the eu really is at britain's mercy of what kind of deal they are going to get, because we are leaving. it just they are going to get, because we are leaving. itjust depends are they going to be gracious and give them a farewell leaving gift or are we just them a farewell leaving gift or are wejust going to them a farewell leaving gift or are we just going to drop out and let the eu crumble. it'sjust a matter of time, it's how hard and fast it's
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going to go. in the interests of the british people, we... i think we wa nt to british people, we... i think we want to leave on good terms so we don't get the blame for what is coming. from what i understand. are you looking forward to the next six months? i'm praying for it. what are you praying for? i think, maybe a better deal, that the conservative mps and voters would unify, and at least get behind the same principle. if we are divided, then there's going to be a lot of upheaval. so, i think whatever deal she comes up with, yes, we just
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think whatever deal she comes up with, yes, wejust played think whatever deal she comes up with, yes, we just played the strong hand and we can... i think it's... we can recover, whatever happens. i don't think we should worry too much. for the conservative voters, do you accept that divided parties don't win general elections? yes. yes. how do you unite the conservative party? i think the way to united is to have a deal that everyone agrees on. the super canada deal was the best one because a lot of people on the remains side worry about going to wto rules and having tariffs between the uk and the eu. that will solve that but it will also solve brexiteer concerns that chequers ties us to the eu too much. her speeches live at 11:40am so you will be able to watch that on the bbc news channel —— her speech is live at 11:40am. new hiv diagnoses have fallen
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significantly over the past decade especially in men who have sex with men, dropping by 31% since 2015. but that rate is declining more slowly among south asian men. sexual health experts are worried this is due to reluctance amongst them to get tested. today sees the launch of a government funded project, called sholay love which is using bollywood to encourage more south asian men to get tested. asian network's shabnam mahmood reports. i've been with my partner now for 13 years. we met when i was a student in london studying at the london college of fashion. we've been together for that many years and we've got a lovely dog together and we've made our life together here. i walked in the clinic and it was an empty clinic on a wednesday evening,
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really, really late. i was like, great, no one's going to see me here, no one's going to know me. it was in a different borough in london. and i can have my test, and i can quickly slip out, and it will be fine. everything will be ok. living with hiv. five years ago, sham — as he's known for short — was in his 20s when he discovered he had contracted the virus. it was mixed emotions. i was quite relieved to actually know my status in time, but also quite anxious and worried because i didn't really understand what it all fully meant. i kind of rejected any support at the time and decided to bury my head in the sand. so, i only recently told my parents, and i'm very lucky all of them have been very, very supportive — down to the fact that my father did say to me that it doesn't change anything and if i wanted to do anything publicly or talk about it he would be there to support me. i think that is probably one
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of the best reactions you can ever get from a parent. and, as an asian parent, that is the biggest blessing i could ever get. but in many south asian communities across britain, coming out is a taboo — let alone admitting to having hiv, which has its own stigma. as an asian, in our culture and community we don't talk about sex. it's associated with a lot of shameful act, even sinful. i remember even thinking what if this is a sin, maybe i've been really sinful, maybe god is punishing me for something. shame is something you don't bring on asian families, you don't bring it to that doorstep or the community. you want to hide that as as much as possible. so that's the biggest barrier is that shame and guilt. it's these barriers that are stopping many south asian gay men from getting hiv tested. overall, the number of new diagnoses of hiv has fallen by around one third in the white community.
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but that rate of decline is not as high in south asian groups. in fact, some health experts warn the problem could be much worse. i think that the actual numbers are likely to be much higher than those that are recorded, and there are a number of reasons for this. the most significant reason that we know is that south asian gay and bisexual men are less likely to engage with sexual health services than other ethnic minority groups, and indeed than the white british majority. this means that if you're not engaging with sexual health services, we are unable to ascertain a person's hiv status. we are unable to know whether or not they are living with other stis. so, that's one key issue. and the other issue is, again, it relates to awareness. if people don't know that they're engaging with risky practices, that they're engaging in risky practices, they are less likely to seek support, they are less likely to be diagnosed.
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what i've consistently found is that south asians possess the least hiv knowledge of all bme groups. and of course, awareness is key, because if you don't know about hiv you don't know that your behaviour is putting you at risk, and you're unable to access prevention because you won't be thinking about your risk and ways of preventing it. there are many support groups already tackling this issue. one of the longest—running charities providing sexual health services for ethnic minorities is the naz project here in west london. welcome to naz. it provides culturally specific help for hundreds of people. so, a lot of south asian communities don't feel like they can mix their identities if they are lgbt and from a south asian background. that's a kind of persistent problem that happens with people. they feel very isolated, alone. culturally there's a big taboo
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around sexual health and speaking out and accessing support, and getting help when they need it. there's generally just a lot of social issues that aren't addressed. they don't see very many role models like themselves in any campaigns or in any kind of culture really, that really enable them to come forward and access our support. what kind of support to people need? a lot of them often need someone to validate their identity and let them know that it's ok to be who they are. a lot of them need very basic sexual health awareness. so, hiv awareness where they don't know how it is transmitted, they don't know what risk they are at, they don't know how risky their sex is and things like that. all of this kind of forms a cocktail. a lot of the time this affects their mental health as well, sometimes around drugs and alcohol. so there's quite a few things going on usually at one time, which is why our service needs to be very culturally specific. health authorities have told us that those from india,
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bangladesh and pakistan who might be hiv positive avoid testing and even medical care. that's because homosexuality is seen as a taboo in their culture. hi, welcome. nice to meet you. meet makinder chahal. he works for trade sexual health in leicester. it's quite a nice, big social space. he sets up a regular clinic for testing at this leisure centre in the city. showers just there, a dry sauna, steam room and nice jacuzzi. many of the men who come here are not openly gay. many are married. i think it's important to be able to deliver testing within the communities, as opposed to getting people to come and test where we are located. because there's lots of barriers to people accessing testing services, we wanted to eradicate some of those barriers by actually taking the testing to where people are going to be. three, two, one.
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squeeze the blood onto the test strip and add a drop of the solution onto the test strip, which helps to have a look at the strip. ok, so wait 20 minutes and i'll get your result back. thank you. thankfully, he tested negative. some people do feel really open about talking to me as a gay asian man. even if they are in heterosexual marriages or may not even identify as gay or bisexual themselves, they still feel comfortable seeing somebody in a space where there is mutual respect. educating the south asian community is critical. it's why the government has backed the sholay love project by the naz charity. the poster campaign is inspired by a classic bollywood
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film of the same name. this song from the movie is all about friendship and is already popular among some in the south asian gay community. to a lot of south asian people, sholay conjures up very specific images. the word itself means "flames". it is... when we were creating the campaign, it was something that a lot of people felt was something they could identify with in terms of the bollywood imagery. obviously, we are using the bollywood film, but it is that familiarity that we kind of wanted to capture. we are going to put some out in community organisations and partnership organisation groups. things like gps, and some of the images are going to go in places like clubs and bars and saunas, in outreach settings as much as we can, obviously as well as online. anywhere we can get them, really, where we think they might
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have an impact and we think they might reach people. the posters are the kind of images we're hoping people will share and see and start the conversation around it — we're aware it's a start. there's going to be a lot more work around this, you know, and the time is really right now to actually say to south asian gay and bisexual men especially, it's here, we're here, we've got to take control of our sexual health. health professionals say they cannot do enough to encourage people to get tested, and they stress that early intervention is key. there have been enormous strides in treating hiv. medication — such as prep, which is taken once a day — stops hiv from taking hold and spreading throughout the body. so, i'm quite comfortable with my status. i know i'm on treatment, i'm an effective treatment, i can't pass on the virus to anyone,
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i can't pass it my partner whose hiv—negative. and i want to kind of get that education out there that hiv is not a deadly disease, and if you're on effective treatment you will live a long, healthy life. you have to make, obviously, some other lifestyle changes, but generally you can live a normal healthy life, and that's the message i want to get out. more on that in the second hour of the programme. news and sport on the way and the weather but before that... it was the story of an alleged double murder that gripped iceland for decades. 43 years ago, five young people were arrested for the murder of two men. the case was very unusual — no bodies were ever found and there wasn't one scrap of forensic evidence against the five who were accused. in fact, the only evidence used to convict them was their own confessions.
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over the years though, prison custody logs revealed the suspects while being questioned has been held in solitary confinement for long periods of time, were deprived of contact with the outside world, and not allowed to sleep. last week, the five men who were sent to prison for the murders were acquitted after the icelandic supreme court quashed their convictions. we can speak now to tryggvi brynjarsson, whose grandfather trygvvi leifsson was one of those jailed for murder and who died in 2009. thank you very much for talking to our audience. this case is infamous in iceland, almost unknown in the uk. but the most significant element of it is that all these people confessed to the murders. can you explain why? so, there are personal
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circumstances for each and every individual, but the most common thing we see here is psychological manipulation and a half of the police part. they keep them, they ta ke police part. they keep them, they take them out of their everyday lives. in the case of my grandfather he had problems with drugs and alcohol. he was thrown into solitary confinement. they used all sorts of threats, linked the police interrogations and a really stressful a nd interrogations and a really stressful and intense atmosphere, in a horrible prison cell where he was kept, and all these accusations were thrown at him. they told him these people have said this about to you, you have no way out of this. how old was he? he was 24th. and again,
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although his investigatory method is totally questionable, and none of them had access to a solicitor. the list of basic human rights violations just goes on and on. one of them is the fact that they were systematically kept from their attorneys, from bird defence attorneys, from bird defence attorneys by policemen. would you say that, effectively, they experienced torture and that led to them creating false memories? this word for me personally is really a difficult thing to sort of... get your head round? arejust difficult thing to sort of... get your head round? are just too. difficult thing to sort of... get your head round? arejust too. but it's completely commonplace in iceland to refer to their treatment as torture. you heard it multiple times during the supreme court hearings a couple of weeks ago. it's
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something that has been accepted. just because it was psychological and not physical is what makes it sort of less conventional. understood. but it was torture. and after your grandfather confessed, he was released from solitary confinement. did he realise as soon as he came out of solitary that he confessed to something he hadn't done? the specifics of how he came to that realisation, we still don't know exactly when it happened. but what's really unique in my grandfather's case is he wrote diaries few months after this and thenis diaries few months after this and then is completely lucid. he's totally aware of the reality of the situation, that he confessed. eta
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this thing. but it's not —— that he confessed fulsomely to this —— that he confessed wrongly to this. i don't know whether he had false memories or whether he was coerced but he showed a tremendous willingness. he was always saying that he really wanted to help the police solve this case. in terms of those diaries, there were around 12 of them which your mum, his daughter, found when she was a teenager. she kept three of them in her room, he destroyed the rest of them but it was only because of these three diaries that your mother brought forward a few years ago that led to an icelandic forensic psychologist following it up, which led to the quashing of the convictions. yes. it started back then. my grandfather passed away in 2009. he onlyjust a few days before he passed away did my mother tell
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him i've kept your diaries for all this time. she asked him, what do i do? he said, when the time is right you will know what to do with them. she brought them forward, and it became sort of this, i thinkjust a wake—up call for icelanders that these individuals who were taken into this case, it shows tremendous humanity first and foremost. he was deeply... year. —— yeah. and it's com pletely deeply... year. —— yeah. and it's completely the diaries, you know, they were not written with the intent of anyone else reading them. you can tell that he's an innocent man. how do you and your mum react to the fact these convictions
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finally, after four decades including the conviction of your grandfather, that they have now been quashed? we've been waiting for this moment for a really long time. there was no, really no doubt that this was going to be the result. we had grown accustomed to the idea of him being acquitted because that is reopening process has been going on for years —— this reopening process. what is strange is that the state attorney and the defence lawyer both requested acquittal and that was the result. but now that it has all happened and it is done, it is such... it is a giant burden that has been lifted off our chests. just in terms of how we can navigate our daily lives, it has that kind of impact. absolutely. thank you for joining us. we really appreciate
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your time this morning. thank you for telling our audience about your grandfather's story. thanks for having me. news and sport on the way but first, the weather with simon. a cloudy start to the day for many, rather damp and drizzly in places this morning, across north—east wales, north—west and particularly across scotland but a lot of the rain will clear away to the north and east. it will become a bit drier this afternoon. across england and wales, a few holes developing in the clouds to give a bit of brightness here and there but mostly cloudy, really. still quite warm, temperatures of 15 or 16 in northern areas, 17—19 further south. tonight again it will be mostly cloudy with another warm and mild night really. with that, some patches of mist and fog developing, particularly around central southern areas of england, into thursday morning, but those are your overnight and bridges. during thursday, mist and fog across southern areas may be a bit stubborn
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to clear away but eventually it will do. lots of cloud again but some rain pushing its way into scotland and northern ireland. goodbye for now. hello it's wednesday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire... all eyes on theresa may in just over an hour's time — she stands up at the tory conference for one of the most important speeches of her career. for one of the most important the prime minister will appeal to her divided party and try to convince you and them that she's the best person to follow brexit through. it has to go better than last year doesn't it? we've created record numbers of jobs... applause said... while we will... excuse me! theresa may's speech is at 11.40am and you can watch it live on bbc news. new cases of hiv have dropped by a third in the uk since 2015. a massive decline. but one particular group is not part of that success —
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south asian gay men. infection rates in that group have barely changed, but why? shame is something you don't bring into asian families, you don't bring to the doorstep or the community. we wa nt to to the doorstep or the community. we want to kind of hide that as much as possible. i think that's the biggest barrier, that shame and guilt. how affordable is your rent? bbc research reveals that in two—thirds of britain, people in their 20s who want to rent a place for themselves face having to pay out an "unaffordable" amount. you probably already knew that, though! we will talk about this later and wherever you are in the country, if you are trying to rent in your20s, country, if you are trying to rent in your 20s, how much income goes on your rent? let us know. good morning. here'sjoanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. good morning.
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theresa may will declare that britain's future outside the eu is "full of promise" during her closing speech to the conservative party conference. the prime minister will also call for unity despite deep divisions over brexit. theresa may is also expected to announce that fuel duty is to remain frozen for the ninth year in a row. and you can watch the prime minister's speech on the bbc news channel at 11:40am. in the last half an hour pret a manger has announced that full ingredient labelling, including allergens, will be introduced to all products that are freshly made in its shop kitchens. it follows the case of natasha ednan—laperouse who died after suffering an allergic reaction to a sandwich containing sesame seeds bought from one of its outlets. in a statement, pret chief executive clive schlee said he hoped the measures set the company "on course to drive change in the industry". speaking to this me on this programme on monday, natasha's mother tanya said it was something she was campaigning for. you know, if there are warnings to your company that people are having
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allergic reactions to your food, that people are being hospitalised because they are eating food that you sell, you don't have to wait for a law change to start putting stickers listing the allergens on the foods that you sell. you can just do it because it's the right thing to do. regularly eating processed meats like bacon and sausages may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to new research. the internationaljournal of cancer found that women who eat high levels of processed meats have a 9% greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this latest study back up previous findings from the world health organisation, which also lists processed meat as carcinogenic. can't afford a mortgage and struggling to pay the rent — are you at the sharp end of the housing crisis? bbc research suggests that people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay an unaffordable level of rent in two—thirds of the uk. researchers say that young people in insecurejobs face housing costs that put a strain on their finances, prompting calls for house—building specifically for this market.
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tesco has announced another rise in half—yearly profits in the uk and ireland. its pre—tax profits climbed to £564 million, which is a rise of 2.2% on the same period last year. the supermarket has faced competition from the like of lidl and aldi recently but last month launched its own budget brand, jack's. the authorities in indonesia say bulk supplies of urgently—needed food and water have begun to reach people on the stricken island of sulawesi. more than 1400 people are now known to have died in last friday's earthquake and tsunami. a british aircraft filled with aid is due to arrive tomorrow. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the un says around 200,000 survivors are in urgent need of help australia is scrapping a controversial tax on tampons and other period products, after years of campaigning by women's groups. previously, they'd been sold with a 10% goods and services tax because they were categorised as nonessential items. but the government has now
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agreed to remove the levy. zoe ball is replacing chris evans as the new host of bbc radio 2's breakfast show. the news was announced on the station this morning. zoe ball was the first female breakfast show host on radio 1, and will now repeat the honour on radio 2. it follows chris evans' announcement last month that he is leaving radio 2 and returning to virgin radio. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thanks for your messages on what you would like theresa may to say in her conference speech today. sarah says, "i would like theresa may to address the nhs and social care system and the nhs and social care system and the impact of the post—brexit immigration policy". this one says, "please explain to me why we can't leave the eu without a deal? i voted to leave and i can't understand why we had to negotiate rules and regulations with the eu. surely we can trade with countries outside the eu?" this text says, "i would like
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theresa may to say that the democratic vote was leave and that is that those quote. we will talk to some conservative politicians just before 11 about what they want to live on their prime minister this morning. if you're getting in touch, send us an e—mail, and message us on twitter and facebook and you can text as well. let's get some sport now... will perry is at the bbc sport centre. there is mounting pressure onjose mourinho to keep hisjob there is mounting pressure onjose mourinho to keep his job as manchester united manager after watching his side struggled to a goalless draw against valencia in the champions league. former united midfielder paul scholes says mourinho is embarrassing the club. neighbours manchester city picked up their first neighbours manchester city picked up theirfirst win in europe neighbours manchester city picked up their first win in europe this season thanks to a late david silva strike. ben croucher has the story. there is the full—time whistle and there are blues around the stadium at old trafford. afterjose mourinho said manchester united lost their dignity at the weekend, it's their identity that went missing last night. gone are the days of attacking flair and double at this
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quy- attacking flair and double at this guy. instead, a team lacking invention and quality. there was effort and energy against valencia, although it took an hour for pol pot but really threaten the goal. not for the first time, this was a tough watch. an attack short on confidence lacking luck. but hey, they didn't lose although as mourinho's search for a nswers lose although as mourinho's search for answers to united's woes continues, this performance raised more questions. i'm pleased with the effort and commitment. i'm pleased with the improvement and... i'm not pleased, of course, with the result which is not a good result, but it is not a bad result. in hoffenheim, city had their own questions to a nswer after city had their own questions to answer after losing their opening match so conceding inside the first minute hardly helped against the champions league debutantes. city had the experience with sergio aguero prodding them level a few minutes later. another winless
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european night looked unlikely but as the storm clouds gathered, city had their own silver lining, david silva on target, just in time. what their rivals would have given for a moment like this. ben croucher, bbc news. britain's number one kyle edmund is currently on court in beijing in his second man matching the china open tennis, playing his first competitive event since the us open first round defeat he suffered in august, he's up against matteo berra deeney, edmund has won the opening set but lost the second on a tie—break and is currently 5—4 to the italian on serve in the final set. good fans of the fed cup revive those "it's coming home" jobs from the summer as britain stages a home tie for the first time in over a quarter of a century. britain and poland will share hosting duties for the round robin event in the top division. the lta has successfully applied to host seven other european countries in the preliminary stage
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at bath university. the last home tie took place in nottingham in 1993. great britain have played in 15 different countries since then. 30 years ago this week, the sport of hockey captivated the nation as great britain's ben won olympic gold, prompting one of the most famous pieces of commentary in history. southgate and they make it three! where were the germans? frankly, who cares? barry davies with those words which have become iconic. tonight at beulah big part, great britain will commemorate the anniversary of the match by playing germany's neighbours belgium, in a first game in charge to their new head coach, danny kerry.|j first game in charge to their new head coach, danny kerry. i remember watching as a 17—year—old that game u nfold watching as a 17—year—old that game unfold very early, around some of my clubmates from pelicans hockey club way back, watching the game unfold and thinking that one day, i want a
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piece of that olympic stuff. i never really made it far enough as a player and i think it is great that we are acknowledging that said and what they did. that is all the sport for now. the headlines at 10:30am. in recent years. here in recent years there has been significant success in tackling hiv in the uk, particularly amongst gay men — where new cases have dropped by a third since 2015. but one particular group is not part of that success — south asian gay men. infection rates in that group have barely changed. sexual health experts say there is a genuine reluctance amongst the south asian community to come out, much less talk about safe sex practices. now they are taking the fight to the heart of the community with a new government—funded project which launches today — and uses images from bollywood to encourage more south asian men to get tested. we brought you the asian network's shabnam mahmood's full report earlier, but here's a short extract before we have a conversation about this. overall, the number of new diagnoses of hiv has fallen by around one third in the white community.
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but that rate of decline is not as high in south asian groups. in fact, some health experts warn the problem could be much worse. i think that the actual numbers are likely to be much higher than those that are recorded, and there are a number of reasons for this. the most significant reason is that we know that south asian gay and bisexual men are less likely to engage with sexual health services than other ethnic minority groups, and indeed than the white british majority. this means that if you're not engaging with sexual health services we're unable to ascertain a person's hiv status, we're unable to know whether or not they're living with other stis. so, that's one key issue. and the other issue is, again, it relates to awareness. if people don't know that they're engaging with risky practices, that they're engaging in risky practices, they're less likely to seek support,
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they're less likely to be diagnosed. what i've consistently found is that south asians possess the least hiv knowledge of all bme groups. and of course, awareness is key, because if you don't know about hiv you don't know that your behaviours are putting you at risk, and you're unable to access prevention because you won't be thinking about your risk and ways of preventing it. there are many support groups already tackling this issue. one of the longest—running charities providing sexual health services for ethnic minorities is the naz project here in west london. welcome to naz. it provides culturally—specific help for hundreds of people. so, a lot of south asian communities don't feel like they can mix their identities if they are lgbt and from a south asian background. that's a kind of persistent problem that happens with people. they feel very isolated, alone. culturally there's a big taboo around sexual health and speaking out and accessing support,
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and getting help when they need it. there's generally just a lot of social issues that aren't addressed. they don't see very many role models like themselves in any campaigns or in any kind of culture really, that really enable them to come forward and access our support. what kind of support do people need? a lot of them often need someone to validate their identity and let them know that it's ok to be who they are. a lot of them need very basic sexual health awareness. so, hiv awareness where they don't know how it's transmitted, they don't know what risks they're at, they don't know how risky their sex is and things like that. all of this kind of forms a cocktail. a lot of the time, this affects their mental health as well, sometimes around drugs and alcohol. so there's quite a few things going on usually at one time, which is why our service needs to be very culturally specific. let's talk to dr rageshri dhairyawan a sexual health consultant from the british hiv association,
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fraser cook from the naz project, one of the oldest and longest running sexual health charities in london and ryan lanji, who runs hungama — a bollywood night event for lgbtq asians. thank you forjoining us. what can it be like coming out as an asian man? as a south asian man from it can be quite terrifying. as a young kid, you are bred to be a certain way and conditioned to think a certain weight and when you identify that you are different in the family that you are different in the family thatis that you are different in the family that is bringing you up and you are deviating from what they want you to be, you can go through a very difficult depression. you don't have the answers provided to you. how did yourfamily react? the answers provided to you. how did your family react? they were traumatised, they were understanding and very quiet but you could tell that their projection of the future had changed for me and i was desperately trying to show them that i was still the same person. they
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couldn't provide answers for me so our relationships completely changed. right, traumatised? wow. added that manifest itself?” changed. right, traumatised? wow. added that manifest itself? i told them and then immediately figured out a way to leave home. i ran away, effectively and i moved here! and then i started trying to find a place to belong and ended up in east london, naturally, when you are lonely, you experiment with things like alcohol, parties, trying to find your tribe. it wasn't until five or six years that i had been in london that i realised i wanted to bring the south asian aspect back into my life and provide a voice for my community. how common is hiv among the south asian community? we know that 45%, almost half of people attending our hiv care in the uk are from bme backgrounds and a large proportion of that from south asia. i have worked in east london for the la st i have worked in east london for the last day at bart 's health trust and we see a large proportion of south asian people living with hiv so
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probably more common than the community realise. and if you get diagnosed late, what impact does that have, what does that mean for your body? if you get diagnosed late, it means you have been leaving with the virus from what and it's had time to impact on your immune syste m had time to impact on your immune system — — had time to impact on your immune system —— are living with the virus. your immune system won't work so well. we know late diagnosis is the most important factor associated with ill— health with most important factor associated with ill—health with hiv. the earlier people get diagnosed and the more quickly they go on treatment, the less likely they are to suffer from ill—health. the less likely they are to suffer from ill— health. we the less likely they are to suffer from ill—health. we also know that when people don't know that they have hiv, so they haven't been tested, they are more likely to pass on the virus to others so if they know and they are tested early and started on treatment early, they will not pass the virus to others and they might stay healthy. -- and they will stay healthy. why do you think not enough south asian gay men are coming forward to be tested? what we see is a kind of reluctance and they shame and stigma around
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coming to sexual health services and we also see that people are balancing their religious and cultural, their family, touching on what you said earlier, around the fa ct what you said earlier, around the fact that the culture and the family, you tell the whole family about your status. that is why i think it's really important that we start to provide representation and show people they are not alone, they are not the only ones so they can be familiar with other people like themselves and find answers. practising safe sex in any community is imported. yeah. is that talked about? no, it's not, i mean, generally it is but it is making sure it is talked about in the south asian diaspora, it is important that we talk about it with them. why isn't safe sex talked about? that the to—do about talking about sex generally and certainly from patients i talk to, there is a taboo about talking about sexuality in general and sex. sometimes premarital sex, for example, can be seen as
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premarital sex, for example, can be seen as being prohibited so there is lots of stigma and shame about talking about sex. people aren't talking, they don't know if they need to get a sexual health screening, where they can get help from. as you said, the stigma is there. tell us about your campaign. the campaign is funded by public health england, in collaboration with all of our communities, using bollywood imagery to represent safe sex between men, gay and bisexual men, to encourage more people to have rapid hiv testing, regular screenings. we see that there is a lack of sexual health literacy and we are concerned with the increase people singing our services, with people singing our services, with people living with hiv in the south asian community so we felt it was important to do a campaign launch. the incentive is, please come and get tested because we can help you and you can potentially not infect other people? sexual health is important for everyone and we noticed there were no campaigns for
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south asian men. there's a lot of work around, they might be identified but in very small parts, this is a dedicated campaign for south asian men to go out and get regular screening and separate the culture at the same time. will a post to be enough? we use a light -- utilising social media videos and there has not been a community specific project before, it takes a lot of community effort and we can't do it alone. we need more public campaigns, more investment around everything, really. it is starting a conversation, the poster isjust like a movie cover, a bigger story that will unfold. i think it's important we start to raise our hands and say we are here, we want to provide knowledge, we want to ask isa to provide knowledge, we want to ask is a question and give you answers. —— we want you to ask us questions. we wa nt —— we want you to ask us questions. we want to be united. you have been tested for hiv, do you want to tell me what it was like? i mean, i remember when i was coming out of the closet as a homosexual, even
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going to an lgbt community where on—campus at university, it was terrifying to me so thinking about walking into a social health clinic as the only salvation person or someone as the only salvation person or someone who doesn't know the landscape, i was shaking with fear but i did it and when i found out i was negative, i was happy and it is one of those things that i want to protect so i go regularly, every few months, i understand exactly the risks and how to practice safe sex andi risks and how to practice safe sex and i also understand exactly how to protect my community as well and spread the knowledge. the process is not that invasive. it is actually really reaffirming when you know you are not at risk. what would you say to encourage people to be hiv tested ? to encourage people to be hiv tested? it is always better to know your status, whether you are positive. it is easy to get tested and it doesn't take long and we recommend testing once a year if you are sexually active, at least. it's definitely better to know and if you know, you can stop treatment. thank you forjoining us. coming up before
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11am, we will speak to incentive mps ahead of theresa may's keynote speech at the party conference. tinchy stryder has shared his experience of giving blood with the bbc. a decision is due later this morning on whether any police officers will be prosecuted after the death of a father of two in custody. sheku bayoh, who was 31 when he died, lost consciousness after being restrained by officers in kirkcaldy in scotland in may 2015. the family have said it will call for a public inquiry if it is decided officers should not face prosecution. earlier this year our reporter jim reed brought us the story. everything that we should have had together is now gone. there's no doubt about it,
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if shek had not come into contact with the police he would still be here. if shek had not met the police or had not come into contact with the police on that day, would he be alive or would he still be dead? i believe he would still be alive. it's one of the most controversial cases in recent scottish history. a 31—year—old father of two with no record of violence dead after being arrested by police in a small scottish town. sheku bayoh came to the uk from sierra leone as a child. he lived with his family in kirkcaldy on the east coast, working for scottishpower training to be an engineer. being around him sometimes was like being around a force of nature. he was such an animated, and, er... i don't ever recall being unhappy around him. at 7am on a sunday in 2015, police were called to this
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quiet housing estate. there were reports of a man acting erratically and carrying a knife. cs spray and hand ties were used, and sheku bayoh was brought to the ground face down — with up to six officers involved in the restraint. the family's lawyer, aamer anwar, told me sheku's family had faced a long hard struggle and were locked out of proceedings throughout the case. i think it's important to start by saying the family wants to pay tribute to always, who was a loving father, son, and brother. it is now three years and five months later that the lord advocate, the senior prosecutor in the country, will provide the family is with a decision on whether officers will face committal proceedings or not. it has been a long, hard struggle for the family, for those who love
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always, they want justice for the family, for those who love always, they wantjustice but they have been fighting for treatment because they know without truth they will never get justice. as you know, it has already been reported in one newspaper that no charges will result from this report that we are expecting officially this morning. no charges will be brought against any of the police officers. if that we re any of the police officers. if that were to be the case, how would you react? i think first of all, the very fa ct react? i think first of all, the very fact this was leaked from somebody within the criminaljustice system was a shocking betrayal and the family were left heartbroken that they had to pick up newspapers and then have journalists turning up outside a front door unexpectedly. they were promised by the lord advocate they would be the first to be told. the second issue is that if the report turned out to be true, then i suspect the family would consider this to be a shocking betrayal of the word justice. no offices will face charges. there will be no justice as far as the family is concerned. —— of this service will face. there are a host of charges that police officers good base and the family would say,
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they've always said that sheku was acting out of character and if he broke the law, the police officers had a right to intervene. they had the right to defend themselves. but any faults they used had to be reasonable, it had to be proportionate and legitimate. —— any fa u lts proportionate and legitimate. —— any faults they used. the family have been asking the question for over three and a half years is whether police officers in this country are above the law. we've had this time and again when it comes to police officers in this country, the length officers in this country, the length of time the family are locked out of the proceedings, they have no real disclosure, they have to fight to get every scrap of evidence and scrap of truth and then they left heartbroken at the end of proceedings with leaks which have attempted to smear and criminalise sheku and his family in order to justify his death. and if there are not any prosecutions, what will you do then? we will seek a review of the lord advocate's decision within one month of today's decision. the crown will have 20 days to respond. we will consider whether this is a case that merits taking this as a
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breach of the family's european convention of human rights, article two writes in terms of failures by the lord advocate to properly investigate and represent the family. secondly, we are meeting with the justice minister in scotla nd with the justice minister in scotland today. we will give him —— leave him in no uncertain terms of the demand of the family, which is frightful public inquiry because a fatal accident in quarry, the equivalent of an inquest in england, is the bare minimum, a public inquiry is required and thirdly there is a pending civil action against the chief constable and police scotland, holding them responsible for temper macro dying in police custody. and the report is out this morning and you will be able to hear the outcome on bbc news. coming up before 11am, we will hear from news. coming up before 11am, we will hearfrom a news. coming up before 11am, we will hear from a charity which took legal action against the government in relation to a limit to be placed on the number of unaccompanied migrant children being allowed into the uk. and we will hear from two
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conservative politicians ahead of theresa may's keynote speech at a party conference. time for the latest news — here'sjoanna. theresa may will the —— the prime minister will call for unity despite deep divisions over brexit. she is also expected to announce fuel duty is to remain frozen. you can watch the prime minister's speech on the bbc news channel at 11:40am. pret has announced full ingredient labelling including allergens will be introduced. it follows the case of natasha ednan—laperouse to died after an allergic reaction to a sandwich bought from one of its outlet. in a statement the chief executive said he hoped the measures set the company on course to drive change in the industry. readily
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eating processed meats may increase the risk of breast cancer according to new research. international journal of cancer found women who eat high levels of processed meat have a greater chance of developing the disease. the results of this study back—up previous findings from the world health organization which also listed processed meat as carcinogenic. can't afford a mortgage and struggling to pay the rent? are you at the sharp end of the housing crisis? bbc research suggests people in their 20s who wa nt to suggests people in their 20s who want to live on their own are having to pay an affordable of rent in two thirds of the uk. researchers say young people face housing costs that put a strain on their finances, ponting calls for house house—building for this market. the authorities in indonesia years says bob supplies of urgently needed food and water have begun to reach people. more than 1400 people are known to have died in friday's earthquake and tsunami. it follows
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seven cargo earthquake and tsunami. it follows seven cargo planes earthquake and tsunami. it follows seven cargo planes that landed at palu airport this morning. the un says 200,000 survivors are in urgent need of help. zoe ball is replacing chris evans as the new host of bbc radio two's breakfast show. zoe ball was the first female breakfast show host on radio one and will repeat the honour on radio two. it follows chris evans's the honour on radio two. it follows chris eva ns's announcement the honour on radio two. it follows chris evans's announcement he is leaving and returning to virgin radio. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. mounting pressure onjose mourinho as manchester united are booed off after a goalless d raw against valencia in the champions league. former united midfielder paul scholes says mourinho is embarassing the club and is surprised he hasn't been sacked. united are without a win in four games, with mourinho questioning his players technical ability. united's neighbours manchester city got their first champions league win of the campaign winning 2—1 at hoffenheim. david silva scored a late winner for pep guardiola's side after they were behind with just 44 seconds on the clock.
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british number one kyle edmund is into the quarter—finals of the china open after beating italian matteo berretini in three sets, it's his first tournamnent since getting knocked out in the first round of the us open in august. and the gb men's hockey team host belgium tonight in a match celebrating 30 years since their historic gold medal at the seoul olympics in 1988. the team is now coached by the former gb women's head coach danny kerry. that's all the sport for now. theresa may probably putting the finishing touches to her speech at the conservative party conference and will be at the podium at about 11:45am. let's speak to robert halfon and molly giles, a conservative councillor. welcome.
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molly giles, fuel duty is going to be frozen again. the party has also announced a new immigration system and that waiters can keep all their tips. is that it? i would be inclined to agree with you, they are all great things and things we need to keep our attention on but it rather avoids the elephant in the room. frankly, until we have sorted out what we are doing in relation to brexit and we've come up with the best deal possible for the british people, it's difficult to focus on the other things. robert halfon, it's not exactly a bold vision that you're offering the voters of britain, is it? well, it's good that we are freezing fuel duty, that will save motorists significant amount of money, millions of motorists across the country in terms of the cost of living. but i wa nt terms of the cost of living. but i want this to be a conference speech
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of theresa may 2016, helping those who are struggling, dealing with burning injustices, helping with cutting the cost of living. it should be a speech about housing, skills and helping the lower paid. if you put brexit to one side, and we will come to it in a moment, what is the tories' big idea?” we will come to it in a moment, what is the tories' big idea? i think we have to be cutting the cost of living, we have to go back to what the prime minister first said when she stood on the steps of downing street, that she's going to help those just about managing and dealing with burning injustices. i think fuel duty is important but we've got to have affordable housing. we need to offer skills, guarantee an apprenticeship for any young person who wants one. those are the kind of things the british people want us to do. molly giles, do you agree with borisjohnson that it's time to chuck chequers?
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absolutely, and i have to say it's the overwhelming view that i've had from grassroots members, activists and councillors that i'd spoken to at conference this week. they don't feel it is a policy which reflects the ambition that theresa may set out in her lank house speech. robert halfon, do you agree it's time to chuck chequers? the european union have chopped chequers in fact. although i voted remain i believe we've got to leave and leave properly because of the vote of the british people. in my constituency 68% of people voted to leave and we've got to follow the democratic wishes of the people. the eu have chucked chequers and i suspect we are moving to a canada type agreement. if your suspicions are true, that means there's going to be some kind of border between ireland
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and northern ireland.” some kind of border between ireland and northern ireland. i suspect there will be some kind of agreement made to deal with the northern ireland border. we don't know what thatis ireland border. we don't know what that is yet. i'm sure if canada can sort out a free trade agreement with the eu,i sort out a free trade agreement with the eu, i can't see why we can't do it with the uk's. is this going to be mrs may's last conference speech? i certainly know there is a mood that if brexit isn't delivered properly and we aren't hearing the right things in short order, speaking from the point of view of a member and activist a deep unhappiness because one of the issuesis unhappiness because one of the issues is about trust. it's very disquieting for members to hear that the brexit department was sidelined, that a white paper came out of nowhere, that there was no consultation with cabinet on. that
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makes members very fearful about what is going on at the top. do you wa nt to what is going on at the top. do you want to mrs may to set a date for her own departure at some point?” think the focus at the moment as has been said is about getting brexit right. that's what people are focused on. it's not about the leadership styles, it is about what is going to happen in the next four months. anything that ignores what is going on right now, that is silly. we have to focus on what is going on right now. the most urgent issue at hand. you are being a bit disingenuous. of course amongst delegates it's about leadership styles. we saw borisjohnson yesterday. those conversations are going on, are they not? to be honest it's not disingenuous, it could be mother teresa or theresa may in leadership unless we change other
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party, unless we be a true workers party, unless we be a true workers party for the uk, party, unless we be a true workers party forthe uk, we party, unless we be a true workers party for the uk, we express we giving people a land of opportunity to climb up and getjob security giving people a land of opportunity to climb up and get job security at the top of that ladder. theresa may has got to be the theresa may of 2016, standing up for workers, socialjustice, standing 2016, standing up for workers, social justice, standing up 2016, standing up for workers, socialjustice, standing up to cut the cost of living for millions of people struggling across our country. thank you both for talking to us. robert halfon, conservative mp and conservative councillor for stratford—upon—avon molly giles. thank you your messages. one viewer said, i live in northern ireland and i voted leave. we should've said no dealfrom the beginning and i voted leave. we should've said no deal from the beginning and there should be a border in northern ireland. when we leave the eu will operate a border, it's already planning to do that and there's no possible issues regarding the troubles, it's about how they want
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to acquire goods that travel through the uk, hence it's the eu's problem. another viewer says, the country is divided. you may please 52% of people but you will make 48% of people but you will make 48% of people unhappy and worried. theresa may will never be able to create a united kingdom whatever the outcome. my united kingdom whatever the outcome. my big worry is what if it goes wrong in years to come while the uk is standing on its own? who will ta ke is standing on its own? who will take the blame and who does the prime minister think will bail out the uk if a future scenario develops like in breaking news. it is to do with the case that a charity brought to the court of appeal against the government. it is the help refugees charity and they have won a ruling against the government's decision to cap the number of child refugees allowed into the uk at 480. originally the charity lost that,
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they appealed and the court of appeal says the charity is right, that the decision to cap the number of unaccompanied child refugees allowed into the uk at 480 is not right. we will talk to the charity before 11am. the first survivor to speak at the grand phil enquiry tried to escape —— grenfell enquiry. he was left in a coma. ahead of giving his evidence, antonio spoke to our reporter greg mckenzie. the last 15 months have been quite challenging. we went through a lot, in terms of dealing with pains and sorrow because of their lost loved ones. at
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the end of this tunnel i've been assigned with a flat which i'm looking forward to moving to. in terms of today, i guess you've been thinking about what you're going to say today and how important it is to get your message across. this shouldn't have happened. absolutely, this shouldn't have happened but i would be prepared to answer all the questions the qc would have for me and to give him as many details as possible and to hold people to their responsibility for what happened at g re nfell tower. responsibility for what happened at grenfell tower. it was 15 months ago, today do you feel that for you, speaking today i wouldn't say closure but will it help in terms of putting this behind you if you can? absolutely, it will help and we have to all play our part and give out what we have inside. we have to help the enquiry and police
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investigation. after that it will be up investigation. after that it will be up to the police investigation to nail the people responsible for this. in terms of 15 months is a long time, i know a lot of residents have wa nted long time, i know a lot of residents have wanted to speak earlier. is this the first time you are getting the chance to speak or did some of you speak at the beginning? we as residents all spoke throughout these 15 months but now it's our chance. we have to let everything out and give evidence of what went on that night in as much detail as possible in order to find out the truth, and for the police to nail the people responsible for this. lastly, what do you want to come from this? what is the outcome you want to hear and do you want people prosecuted, jailed for what happened and what shouldn't have happened ? jailed for what happened and what shouldn't have happened? this is the least that can happen. once you find out the truth you find out what has
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happened and the cause behind it, and the negligence and responsibility of who was in charge of this. obviously, this is the ultimate outcome. don't forget that so ultimate outcome. don't forget that so many people died and so many lives have been wrecked forever. justice must come. that was greg mckenzie talking to antonio roncolato, the first resident of g re nfell tower roncolato, the first resident of grenfell tower who will give evidence at the enquiry. an issue that will surprise none of you. the struggle many young people had in affording to rent. in many regions of the uk millennial is really badly squeezed. the bbc has carried out some interesting research into the depths of this financial strain based on the national housing federation assessment that if you are spending more than 30% of your salary or income on rent, that is
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unaffordable. our data shows that across two thirds of the uk, if you're in your 20s and you want to rent a one—bedroom home it is unaffordable. we already knew that. across 12% of the uk, if you want to rent a two—bedroom home it is still unaffordable. you would need to earn... putting that into numbers — you'd need to earn £24,800 for the average one—bedroom rental flat in england, while in wales it would be £17,600, and in scotland — £20,700. and here we can see some of the seriously crunch areas, the cities where it's really tough for renters. most of these are across england, that's clear, but glasgow is in there too. lets talk to our personal finance reporter. we knew this, but really
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the data confirms it for all of us and it's quite depressing. the data confirms it for all of us and it's quite depressingm the data confirms it for all of us and it's quite depressing. it is depressing, for people in their 20s many of whom end up living at home with their parents. they say they like the roast dinner but it's not quite the lifestyle they are expecting in their 20s. the reason is because we've plotted local salaries with local rent levels and seemed that for a number is unaffordable, and two thirds of which is postcode areas if they want to live on their own in their 20s. give us some of those areas, eve ryo ne give us some of those areas, everyone knows about london and the south—east. where else might we be surprised if unaffordable? london is the obvious case, you need a salary of £50,000 or more to have an affordable place to live on your own in your 20s. we've got other areas as well. aberdeen for example, bath, cambridge, 40, 50, 60% even of salary going on rent. clearly, it's
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not that people won't pay, it's that it puts a considerable strain on the rest of their finances, their bills, their living costs become particularly difficult to pay and clearly they are struggling as a result. it's not just clearly they are struggling as a result. it's notjust bad news, though. there are some areas in which it is affordable. generally more northern england, some of scotland, argyll and bute, we are looking at 15% of your salary on rent. there are areas where rent isn't completely out of reach. thank you very much. let's speak to ben who is 30 and lives in a two—bedroom flat with his partner and herfriend. lives in a two—bedroom flat with his partner and her friend. he lives in a two—bedroom flat with his partner and herfriend. he says it causes arguments and they want their own space. also vicky who was in this situation for years and is now researching renting issues for a book she is doing called tenants. then, what is your living situation
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and what would you like it to be? we are currently living with me, my girlfriend and a friend of ours. ideally we would want to live in our own place but at the moment we've had to share with one of our friends. obviously that's been a bit harder. whereabouts in the country are you? we are in manchester, slightly near the centre. it doesn't surprise me that it's pretty pricey there, what about if you moved out? if we go to somewhere else, most of the time if we wanted to get our own place, a one bed usually costs almost the same as a two bed, because the two beds... a one bed is about £100 less so it wouldn't make sense for us to about £100 less so it wouldn't make sense for us to move about £100 less so it wouldn't make sense for us to move into our own place, we wouldn't be able to afford it. vicky, you were in this
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situation for the last ten years living in london. how much of your salary was going on rent? at least half for the last decade since i graduated from university, in every different flat but i lived in. it was completely unaffordable and incredibly stressful. the toll it took on my mental health was great. explain more about the link.” took on my mental health was great. explain more about the link. i think when you're paying so much of what you earn every month and you see it disappear, you know it's going to a landlord and you're aware that your re nt landlord and you're aware that your rent might go up next year, you don't know where you're going to live, it takes a great toll. that level of instability, you can't plan ahead. it's incredibly difficult. we've got a couple of messages, one viewer says between myself and my partner we earn approximately £2000 a month, the rent alone is 900 quid a month, the rent alone is 900 quid a month. we want to save for a mortgage deposit but that seems
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far—fetched given our other monthly expenses which also holds us back. another viewer says, there must be a duty of care put in place by employers or government because most of these young people have to move away from home to get the best career opportunities. vicky, did you need to stay in london because that's where you were working? absolutely, this is where myjob is, i'm from london. if at some point i wanted to have kids, i need to be near my mum and my sister because childcare is really expensive as well. there are all of these factors. if you're having to look at moving to argyll and bute where rent is only 15% of your salary, what if your work and your family is not there? there are so many other considerations. then, what are you going to do? what's the plan? we're not sure. we'll have to see how it goes. the time being, maybe move a
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bit further out. a lot of people in manchester are getting pushed further and further into the suburbs. it might be a case of moving further out and taking the longer commute so we can moving further out and taking the longer commute so we can save a mortgage. what is the atmosphere like in the house with your girlfriend and her friend? it's fine, but it can be stressful. sharing with anybody is stressful. it's the same unique living in halls, sharing with other people can be stressful. you're on top of each other and stuff like that. i think... we'lljust have to see for the future. another viewer says, the rental market is hard for all ages. i'm nearly 50 going through a marriage breakdown and i'm looking for a property to rent alone. although i'm in full—time employment, the letting agents will only reference to certain amount for rent. this is not even enough for a one—bedroom property in the town where i live so i'll have to find a
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newjob ina where i live so i'll have to find a newjob in a cheaper town away from my daughter and her family. newjob in a cheaper town away from my daughter and herfamily. vicky, presumably as you research your book these are the kind of stories you come across. absolutely. it's heartbreaking. the projection is that by 202011 in four households in this country will be renting, and that's notjust in this country will be renting, and that's not just young in this country will be renting, and that's notjust young millennial is, that's notjust young millennial is, that's people with families, people going through marriage breakdowns. we are seeing an increase in older renters. people's incomes and rising to meet where rents are. the solutions are built more houses, because at the moment demand outstrips supply. would you go down the route that labour is suggesting of rent controls? i think it's time for that. i think we need something more thanjust for that. i think we need something more than just building for that. i think we need something more thanjust building more houses, it takes time and at the moment landlords can charge whatever they want. it's not that people want to
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pay these high costs, they have no choice. otherwise they won't have anywhere to live, and i think it's time to regulate that. thank you both. i appreciate your time. if you go to the website you will be able to see the data about affordable rent and to see the data about affordable rentand an to see the data about affordable rent and an affordable rent in two thirds of britain. you can put in the postcode and compare where you are to all around the rest of the uk. really, really interesting and slightly depressing. the court of appeal has ruled that the government was wrong to put a limit on the number of unaccompanied migrant children being allowed into the uk. the charity helping refugees launched legal action saying it felt the government having consulted local authorities properly on a cap of 480 child refugees. the campaign has been led by lord dubs, himself a
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former child migrant who fled persecution from the nazis. we can get reaction to this from jeff mills from the charity helping refugees, and also rose curling who represented the charity. festival, your reaction. it's very much a mixed verdict. on one point we essentially have lost our claim that the consultation process was unlawful, that it was so flawed that it was unlawful. that part we haven't won which is disappointing, because we know from the continual conversations we are having with local authorities that there is a real willingness from local authorities and capacity that hasn't been fulfilled by the government at all. on that point it is
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disappointing and we ask... what have you won? we have won and reasons. this is a hugely significant win for us. now, a child whose application is rejected, we have to have detailed reasoning and if the grounds for that rejection are deemed unfair or unlawful that child can access a legal remedy. soap, rosa curling, there's nothing wrong with this cap according to the court of appeal? yes, the court of appeal has found the consultation process wasn't unlawful but very disappointingly the specified number of 480, which i know help refugees feel is woefully inadequate given the crisis, but that remains. but what is important is that these
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children will now have their procedural safeguards respected and protected. so, those who have been rejected will now have to have proper reasons for their decisions and that will allow them to appeal and that will allow them to appeal and try and challenge that refusal. it's so important to remember that this is a life changing decision for these incredibly bonne double children. it's incredibly important they have the right to appeal a refusal because mistakes happen and it is important there is a proper review when refusals are given to these children. ultimately, presumably you believe this figure of 480 should be much higher.” think it should be higherfor lots of different reasons. definitely in the conversations we continue to have with local authorities, it doesn't reflect the willingness of local authorities and the detailed capacity that local authorities have. has britain taken 480
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unaccompanied migrant children? no, we've taken just over 200. so, there are still nearly 200 places, sorry, that haven't been filled. what's the hold—up? that haven't been filled. what's the hold-up? exactly. it big part of the problem is lack of political will to see this commitment through. it's something we have been working on tirelessly for the last two and a half years. tirelessly for the last two and a half yea rs. to tirelessly for the last two and a half years. to try and hold the government to their commitment. at this point where we have lost and consultation, we ask that the government honour the commitment they have made to relocate, to fulfil those 200 places as a matter of urgency. we are talking about children who are possibly some of the most vulnerable children on the planet, children as young as eight, some of whom are facing their fourth winter in the crisis alone. we would like to expedite the process for those children. thank you very much,
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jeff mills and rosa curling. we will be back tomorrow at 9am. have a good day. we will be bringing you coverage of theresa may's speech at the tory party conference in the next hour. good morning. rather cloudy with some rain and drizzle is well affecting many northern parts of england and across scotland. for many of us it's quite mild out there despite all of this cloud. even where you've got some cloud you may start to see some breaks developing to give a few bright sunny spells. so far this morning we've some sunshine across southern areas of england, continuing into the afternoon. the rain and drizzle continuing. it's pretty mild out
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there with temperatures getting into there with temperatures getting into the mid to high teens. perhaps the low 20s across the south—east. tonight against staying fairly cloudy with misty and murky conditions. there will be some mist and fog developing in southern parts as well. you can see those temperatures will stay in double figures. not a particularly cold night. during thursday rain spreads into scotland, northern ireland. any mist and fog clearing away. staying cloudy but dry. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11:00am: theresa may confronts her critics.
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she's set to tell the conservative conference the uk's future is bright after brexit. here in birmingham theresa may will seek to sell her controversial checkers brexit plan by telling party members it's in the national interest. pret—a—manger is to list all ingredients on its freshly made products following the death of 15—year—old natasha ednan—laperouse from an allergic reaction. help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia. aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami, but the death tolls has risen above 1,400. survivors start giving evidence at the grenfell tower inquiry. former resident antonio roncolato says he hopes to bring those
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