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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 3, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at two: music: dancing queen by abba a dancing prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. if we all go off in different directions in pursuit of our own visions of the perfect brexit, we risk ending up with no brexit at all. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost early detection. rescuers are still trying to reach remote areas after indonesia's devastating earthquake and tsunami. the first grenfell tower survivor to give evidence tells the inquiry how he was confronted by thick black smoke outside his front door. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport with will perry. end of an era for english cricket. it is, martine. andrew strauss has
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stepped down as england's director of cricket after three and a half yea rs of cricket after three and a half years in the role. the latest on that. and a huge night in the champions league for tottenham and liverpool. thanks, will. and chris fawkes has all the weather — still rather mild. it's going to be with us for quite a while, this cloudy and mild weather. i'll bring yourfull while, this cloudy and mild weather. i'll bring your full weather prospects here in the uk, but also looking further afield. we know that you like whether and cute animal pictures, so we will pander to both. that, coming up in the next half hour or so. possibly little clue! thanks, chris. also coming up: the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. hello.
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this is afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. theresa may has insisted she will ‘not let the country down‘ over brexit. speaking at the conservative party conference in birmingham, where her eu strategy has been the focus of strong criticism from some in her party, mrs may defended her plans. she said ‘no one wanted a good deal more‘ than her, and she appealed to her critics to unite behind her, even if they didn't always agree with her. the prime minister also announced a new strategy to improve the treatment of cancer, with new diagnostic centres and earlier scans for patients. here's our political correspondent, ben wright. after the coughing calamity of last year, theresa may's speech needed to be polished. the set too had to stay solid. mrs may's task — to sell again her plan for brexit and map out a path for britain's future outside the eu. but nobody expected this... music: dancing queen. as theresa may revived the robot dance first unveiled
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in africa in the summer. can ijust say, you will have to excuse me if i do cough during the speech! i have been up all night supergluing the backdrop. she made a case for decency and civility in politics. let's rise above the abuse. let's make a positive case for our values that will cut through the bitterness and bile, and let's say it loud and clear, conservatives will always stand up for a politics that unites us rather than divides us. before turning to attack the current labour leadership. what has it come to whenjewish families today seriously discuss where they should go ifjeremy corbyn becomes prime minister? when a leading labour mp says his party is institutionally racist?
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when the leader of the labour party is happy to appear on iranian state tv, but attacks our free media here in britain. that is whatjeremy corbyn has done to the labour party. it is our duty in this conservative party to make sure he can never do it to our country. in the 70th year of the nhs, theresa may said cancer survival rates still lagged behind other countries. through our cancer strategy we will increase the early detection raid. increase the early detection ——rate. of course brexit, theresa may said she was prepared to walk away without a deal and said her plan for post brexit trade was right. so this is our proposal, taking back control of our borders, law and money. good forjobs, good for the union,
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it delivers on the referendum, it keeps faith with the british people. it is in the national interest. mrs may swatted away calls for another referendum. they call it a people's vote. but we had a people's vote and the people chose to leave. theresa may enthused about the possibilities she saw from brexit. i believe that our best days lie ahead of us. and that our future is full of promise. mr may promised to remove the cap on the amount councils can borrow to build more houses and said the age of austerity was over. because you made sacrifices, there are better days ahead. so when we have secured a good brexit dealfor britain, at the spending review next year, we will set out our approach for the future. debt as a share of the economy will continue to go down. support for public
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services will go up. because a decade after the financial crash, people need to know that the austerity it led to is over and that their hard work has paid off. a confident speech, and this was, changes little. the outcome of the brexit negotiation matters a lot. that is what will shape her and the party's future. but this leader looks keen to lead it for some time yet. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in birmingham for us now. this speech really felt like a beyond brexit, beyond austerity speech. i think reflecting what i've heard from so many mps and cabinet ministers here this week, that they really are pretty desperate to talk about something other than brexit and the divisions that is causing in the party. there is also some fear,
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they fear thatjeremy corbyn is setting the agenda on domestic policy. this speech, apart from personal elements as well from theresa may, there were policy announcements on the nhs, cancer diagnosis, and pretty significant announcement about housing, which we'll talk about now. i am joined by a member of the housing select committee. councils have been calling for this for years, haven't they? finally, it's going to happen. explain how important you think it is for councils and housing. it really is good news. it is about building houses people can afford, either to rent or to buy, and so councils in the past have been good at that. big house—builders aren't necessarily as at that, so really good news. it means that we'll see a lot more houses built. our target is to build lot more houses built. 0ur target is to build 300,000 homes, lots of those affordable homes, for people. the last time we did that was 1972, when local authorities built 100,000
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homes. it looks like we're going back to those days, but we need to build the right kind of houses, they write design, good houses that people want to build, in the right communities. there have to be checks and balances, but in the round, good news. what has been the reason for the reluctance of government to do it. we have heard councils say four yea rs, it. we have heard councils say four years , we it. we have heard councils say four years, we can sort this out if you allow us to extend borrowing. it is it -- is it allow us to extend borrowing. it is it —— is it because the government does not want the added debt was magellan like the treasury will look very carefully at local authority plans to develop housing. we also have to make sure —— plans to develop housing. we also have to make sure -- the treasury will look. we have to have good, appropriate criteria for development. i think we can do it, andi development. i think we can do it, and i think it's good news for people who want to rent and who want to buy. i think it is also good news for small and medium—sized developers, because it means local
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authorities can work with us, and local, smaller companies who could deliver these houses for the local authority. it really is very good news. a key question: how quickly can it start to make a difference? that has always been the issue, even once this is unlocked, it inevitably ta kes a once this is unlocked, it inevitably takes a long time to have an impact. yes, and we need to see the detail behind the proposal. it could happen very quickly. the councils are in the best place to identify land and get the consents on it. it could happen quickly. within a few months 01’ happen quickly. within a few months ora happen quickly. within a few months 01’ a year 01’ so, we happen quickly. within a few months or a year or so, we could see houses delivered in this way. as some local authorities are already doing. this is about scaling things up. there are already small and medium—sized builders ready to step in and do this work, so it could be quicker than people might expect. looking at the rest of theresa may's speech, she was under tremendous pressure coming into this because of what happened last year and what is going on in the party of brexit, what did you make of what she had to say,
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particularly on brexit, and also saying that austerity is at an end? i thought it was a fantastic speech. it was never going to be an easy conference. there is so much going on, some big challenges, particularly brexit, so to come out and deliver that speech in the way she did, and how she meant it, so authentic, and i, having known theresa may better and better over the last few months and years, she absolutely believes this stuff. it was all about everyone, everyday people, making their lives better, reducing the cost of living, improving people's living standards. that is what it was really about, and it is time to do that now. we have had the tough times in limiting borrowing, and it has been difficult, but hopefully there are sunnier times ahead. hopefully people do start to feel the benefit of all the economic progress we have made. it has been a theme of this conference, particularly on the fringes, but also from cabinet ministers, saying we have to talk about something other than brexit.
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there is trepidation thatjeremy corbyn and labour, even though you don't agree with their policies, is setting the agenda when it comes to domestic policy. argue concerned that the party was not talking to people about things relevant to their lives? always. we have to tell people what we're doing and why. listening to the labour party conference last week, i think we all looked over the edge of the precipice into the abyss, what that would mean to real people. this would mean to real people. this would be nationalising companies, private companies. and that would be a flight of investment abroad. that would jam it —— damagejob prospects, and it would be catastrophic for this country. i think we all looked and thought, we need to work together to make sure we get past this big hump in the road in terms of brexit, on to the time when we can deliver some of our promises to make this world a fairer place. kevin holloway, thank you very much indeed. there really was a theme of unity. that was theresa
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may's message, saying that the party cannot think that it will attract votes or when another general election if it is not united and really fighting for the same thing. thank you very much. the prime minister says her new cancer strategy plans will form a central part of her long—term plan for the nhs. the early detection rate is to be increased from one—in—two to three—in—four by lowering the age of bowel cancer screening from 60 to 50. our health editor hugh pym is here. tell us more about what is planned. theresa may reminded her audience that she had planned this five—year strategy for the nhs in england and awarded the money for that, and in return, she wanted an explanation from the nhs about how they were going to use the money and look beyond. so she asked for a 10—year strategy, which were likely to get in november, but she said today that would involve a new cancer strategy.
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the key new pledge was this detection rate, early detection making a huge difference if you catch them early, stage one or stage two. at the moment, only one into oui’ two. at the moment, only one into our court at that stage. she wants that increased to three out of four —— one in two. there was another pledge as well about bowel cancer screening. currently, screening kits go out to 60 and over in terms of age in england. she wants that reduced to 50 to try to enable more people in their 50s to pick up possible signs early. that's already happening in scotland. that had already been announced by public health england. she has now said it will happen. cancer charities are saying, where will the money and resource come from 7 saying, where will the money and resource come from? how many co nsulta nts resource come from? how many consultants do we need to enable better detection and treatment? there is a shortage of radiologists, and they are key in terms of the
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scans. under testing, you can'tjust produce a new workforce overnight. —— and the testing. you can have strategies and aspirations, and we will get this nhs10—year plan in november, but there is the resource going to come from — that is the key question. the money in england is only for five years. it is already going up to 2028, but if there isn't any indication of where the resources coming from —— the resources coming from —— the resource is coming from, it leaves a question. it is an important strategy and has been welcomed by campaigners and cancer charities, but they would like to see a lot more detail. rescue workers in indonesia say time is running out to find any more survivors after the earthquake and tsunami which struck last week. 11100 people are known to have died, and hundreds of thousands more are in desperate need of aid. emergency teams are still trying to reach remote areas. rebecca henschke sent this report from the island of sulewesi. survivors pick through the ruins
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of their homes in one village. five days after the quake and tsunami, no one has come to help them. translation: we have been here since friday. there hasn't been any rescue operation. we're still looking for the missing people. villages alone. no heavy machinery. hopes of finding people alive are fading. and with huge areas still cut off from power is and clean water, those who survived are struggling. nearly 2,000 homes in one area were swallowed as the violence of earthquake turned the earth to liquid. it is thought hundreds died here. after days of waiting in a village, this family decided they had to walk to get help at the airport. this is the first water they have had since yesterday.
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translation: we walked for ten hours through the mountain from our village. we were that desperate for aid. i was so stressed about the children. with the airport now re—opened, the military‘s cargo planes can bring in aid. they're also taking out traumatised women and children. strong aftershocks continue to be felt here, as families struggle to come to terms with what they have lost. this woman has just got one—year—old fiona to sleep. she has been crying and clinging to her. translation: she says sometimes, where is my mum, i say we're still looking for her. your mum has gone on a long journey. if she hears a loud noise, she get scared. she is traumatised. this is where fiona's home used to be. now, completely submerged with mud.
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this is also where her mother and younger sibling are buried. fiona was in this area when the earthquake hit. triggering mud slides, sinking houses and completely altering the landscape. fiona was saved by her 11—year—old brother, who carried her awayjust in time. it will take months for people to rebuild their houses, but they may never recover from what they have lost. a volcano has erupted on sulawesi, about 400 miles from the area worst affected by the earthquake. the eruption of mount soputan sent an ash cloud miles into the air. there are no reports of casualties or damage but authorities warned people in nearby communities to prepare for volcanic ash fall. you're watching afternoon live.
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these are our headlines: the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia. aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami then coming up, the duke and duchess of sussex make their first visit to the county since they were given their titles. andrew strauss steps down as director of cricket at the ecb. andy flower, covering for him, will continue in an interim role until a full—time replacement. injury hit tottenham take on barcelona in the champions league, with liverpool the other british side in action, facing napoli. kyle edmund is through to the
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quarterfinals. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack has paid tribute to the ‘great dignity‘ of the victim's families. judge mark lucraft qc said "one of the most iconic areas of london was the site of a deliberate act of terrorism" on the 22nd of march last year. he described khalid masood 5 attack in a rented car, saying, throughout its passage across the bridge, on the roadway, on the pavement, in the cycle lane, and moving between those places, it was driven with a clear, murderous intent. of masood s let's speak to our correspondent richard lister, who is following the inquests for us. thejudge hasjust
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the judge has just started this process , the judge has just started this process, which we expect to take an hour or so. he is about an hour into his conclusions. he started by summarising the evidence that was heard over three weeks or so of this inquest. he began by delivering a tribute to the victims‘ families, and setting up the scene on what happened on the 22nd of march last year. he said that was a life changing day for many, when one of the most iconic areas of london was the most iconic areas of london was the target of a deliberate attack, an attack which he said lastjust 82 seconds, but with terrible consequences for so many seconds, but with terrible consequences for so many people. he said khalid masood had driven his vehicle with clear, murderous intent and that 29 people apart from those who received fatal injuries on the bridge, 29 others have also been seriously injured by his car as he drove it across westminster bridge before crashing it into the railings around the palace of westminster, running through the front gates, and
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then killing pc keep, with knives. that more people did not die, said thejudge, was due to that more people did not die, said the judge, was due to the overwhelming actions of those who responded, both professionals and members of the public. but there we re members of the public. but there were some criticisms, too. he said very pointedly, sadly, some members of the public chose to photograph and film rather than help. he said some of the material that has been posted online has been very distressing for the families, and he asked for it to be removed. he praised the families of those killed, the five people killed, saying they had shown great dignity throughout this inquest process. and asi throughout this inquest process. and as i say, he is expected to speak for another couple of hours before delivering his final verdict. and what will families be listening out for particularly? there are three areas they are most interested in. they will want to know whether he has come to any conclusions about the level of security around the palace of westminster and on westminster bridge. of course, what would be regarded as very high value
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targets by any potential terrorist, and yet there were not bollards or obstacles and yet there were not bollards or o bsta cles o n and yet there were not bollards or obstacles on place on the bridge, and the armed officers in place within the confines of the palace of westminster were not situated right by the gates where khalid masood made his entry into the confines of the palace of westminster, so families will want to know whether the coroner believes that more should have been done and could have been done before the attack to minimise the loss of life. they will also want to know whether he has any views on whether the security services should have played a more active role. khalid masood was known to them, but he wasn‘t an active subject of interest. of course, some will say maybe he should have been, and maybe something more could have been done to prevent this attack. richard, thank you very much. the first survivor of the grenfell tower fire to give evidence at the inquiry has been describing the moment he tried to leave his 10th floor flat after his son had woken him up and told him to get out. antonio roncolato, who‘d lived in the flats for 27 years, said he opened his door
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and was confronted with thick black smoke. it hurt his eyes and he thought it would kill him. so he didn‘t leave. daniella relph reports from the inquiry. you may find some of the images in her report distressing. he was one of the last residents to be rescued. antonio roncolato had remained in his flat for around six hours during the fire. it had been his home for 27 years. i swear by almighty god... the first resident to give evidence, he described how he opened the door to his flat as the fire took hold. and was confronted by overpowering thick black smoke. the moment i opened the door, ifelt i had been hit by a gas as well as smoke. so physically it would stop me from breathing. so i said, you know, you cannot go out there. that is why i closed promptly and my eyes were crying like, you know, it was really horrible. so that is why i closed the door and i went to rinse my eyes in the bathroom. so basically the flames
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were there... using a floor plan of his flat, antonio roncolato explained that he could see the cladding alight and flames spreading on the outside of the tower. his son sent him this distressing photo of grenfell ablaze and phoned him, telling him that he loved him and that he needed to get out. inside the tenth floor flat mr roncolato took his own images of smoke filling the hallway. but he told the enquiry he still decided to stay put as instructed by firefighters. well, very much stay put, somebody is coming to get you. he was very determined in his affirmation, in his words. not to try anything risky, basically. that they were aware that i was there and they would come and get me. this was the day the families started to be heard at the grenfell enquiry. so far the focus has been on the official response to the fire. now it is examining the experience of survivors and those
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who lost family and friends. the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. harry and meghan visited edes house in chichester, where they viewed a rare copy of the american declaration of independence, before opening a university technology centre in bognor regis. our correspondent lauren moss is in brighton for us now. she is at the royal pavilion. they are getting around the county quite well today, lauren. prince harry and meghan have received a warm welcome here in brighton. just a few moments ago, they were greeting the schoolchildren you can see behind me. they are local schoolchildren, who came down specially for the royal visit, and they were very excited. prince harry and meghan we re excited. prince harry and meghan were shaking hands, high—fiving them, and laughing and joking. the
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crowds around me were going wild, really. hundreds of people lined the streets and packed into the gardens at brighton‘s royal pavilion to greet theirjune ten duchess. —— there duke. their physics to sussex todayis there duke. their physics to sussex today is quite a whirlwind, but also a personal tour, because everything he has been very carefully planned. they will have a tour of the pavilion now, and that has a personal resonance with prince harry, because it was bill by his great great grandfather in the 18th century as a holiday home for king george iv, and as far as i‘m aware, it may be his first time visiting here and shelling meghan markle around as well. they started off the day in chichester, and they went to eads halles, wayne —— eads house, where they saw the only english copy of the american declaration of independence. the only other copy of
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thatis independence. the only other copy of that is in the national archives in washington, dc, so quite a personal touch there for meghan markle as well. quite unique that it is here, and also symbolising some of the unique links between sussex and america as well. after they left there, they went to bognor regis, just down the coast in sussex, and opened university of jester‘s just down the coast in sussex, and opened university ofjester‘s new technology and engineering department. that is a £35 million development, very exciting for people there, including more take—up of stem subjects, and apprenticeships in the local community. everything about coming across to east sussex is about being pa rt across to east sussex is about being part of the local community. they are going to visit a charity for survivors of sexual assault and violence. they will go down the coast to meet reduced groups that work with young people, helping with mental health and well—being, so everything about their visit today
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is getting into the community in sussex. lauren, thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. here‘s chris. some early snow some? yes, an early taste of winter. we have already had snow in canada. this is calgary. you do sometimes see snow at this time of year, but normally about four centimetres. as you can see, they have had much more than that this time around, so it is unusually heavy, getting snowed this early in the season. there is an area of high pressure in the arctic, shoving low—pressures across southern canada, and there may be more heavy snow to come in the next few days. other people have been enjoying it as well. this guy could barely believe his luck. 0h, he has gone! let me see if i can get him back. 0h,
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gone! let me see if i can get him back. oh, no! it is still there. don‘t click that clicker just yet! biathlete the snow came down without pause —— biathlete the snow came down without pause -- the snow came down without paws! the snow caused pandemonium! it will be mild arise for a bit, will it? skies like these, pretty drab and grey, are what most of us are seeing through the next few hours. there are a few breaks in the cloud, towards southern counties of england, towards devon, somerset, dorset, isle of wight, hampshire, the favourite parts were seeing a break in the clouds. otherwise, pretty grey. showers pushing into
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orkney and shetland. a lot of low cloud working into the western side of scotland, so it will stay dampier, a few showers into north—west england, but it will be mild. overnight, the cloud will thicken further, so quite a damp night to come across western coasts and hills, with mist and hill fog patching as well. temperatures will stay in double figures from both of us, -- stay in double figures from both of us, —— for most of us. thursday‘s weather, a cold front moving into the north—west of the country, bringing outbreaks of rain with it, and the wind will strengthen as well. further south, is and the wind will strengthen as well. furthersouth, is the and the wind will strengthen as well. further south, is the same old picture, really, a lot of cloudy and mild weather, just a few breaks in the cloud and a few sunny spells coming through. the rain will continue to push into the afternoon across scotland and northern ireland, and as it does, the wind will strengthen. it will be quite blowing through the afternoon. ahead of that, some patches of rain working in from the irish sea into
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the north of wales, maybe the isle of man, north—west england too. the self stays dry and bright with a few sunny spells coming and going. looking at the weather picture as we go on through the rest of the afternoon, we will see things staying pretty mild with temperatures of 17—19dc. we have a cold front moving in, and the front itself on friday will be sat across central portions of the uk, bringing wet weather. there could be fog in the south, but otherwise mild. given the south, but otherwise mild. given the sunshine, 21 celsius is a possibility. for north, 10—12dc in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. the weekend, low— pressure northern england. the weekend, low—pressure for england and wales bringing wet and windy weather, scotla nd bringing wet and windy weather, scotland and northern ireland on saturday having a decent start sunshine. a reversal of fortunes on sundays — the rain reluctant to clear away from the south—east, but most of us having a drier and brighter day with lighter winds, but
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cloud and rain working into the far north—west of the uk. the next few days, it will stay much like that. that‘s your weather. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... music: dancing queen theresa may appeared on stage with a spring in her step to deliver her speech at the conservative conference but then delivered a serious message on brexit to her party and the eu. the first survivor from grenfell tower to give evidence at the inquiry describes the moment he opened his front door on the 10th floor and was confronted by thick black smoke. rescuers are still trying to reach remote areas after last week‘s devastating earthquake and tsunami in indonesia. more than 11100 people are known to have died and the death toll is expected to rise. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack
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has begun delivering his conclusions, starting with a tribute to the great dignity of the victims‘ families. the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived for their first official visit to the country that features in their royal titles. the couple, who married in may, are on a whistle—stop tour of sussex, visiting some of its most well—known sites. sport now on afternoon live with will. and will — 2019 is one of the england cricket teams biggest years and they will have to face it without one of their most prominent off the field leaders. andrew strauss has stepped down as england‘s director of cricket after three and a half years in the role. the former england captain had taken a break in may after his wife entered a new period of treatment for cancer. andy flower was a former head coach.
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he has covered him in the summer. he will continue in an interim role before the full—time replacement is found. he skippered his country for 50 tests, before he steps down. earlier i spoke to our cricket correspondent jonathan agnew and asked him if this news came as a surprise to him does not an enormous surprise, andrew strauss has been on the sidelines, with andy flower stepping in. i suspect that flower will be one of the favourites to take over thejob full—time. he has one of the favourites to take over the job full—time. he has clearly decided he has to give more time to his family. it is a very sad situation. he was trying to juggle the role of work and as carer. as many people listening will understand, that is not a easy thing to do. he has a lot coming up, the winter tours and next summer is enormous, the world cup that we are hosting, followed by the ashes. quite rightly, i think he has taken the view that whoever is director of
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cricket has to be fully focused on thejob in cricket has to be fully focused on the job in hand cricket has to be fully focused on thejob in hand for next summer. a really busy time for england. they have the tour to sri lanka, and then the home soil world cup and ashes series. andrew strauss deciding, understandably, that he wants to be by his wife‘s side. it‘s champions league tonight — a big night for liverpool and spurs? barcelona‘s superstars are in town. lionel messi and luis suarez are set to line up against tottenham at wembley tonight in what promises to be a tough examintation of spurs‘ champions league credentials. mauricio pottchetino‘s side lost their opening tie in the champions league at inter milan — and will be without several key playters tonight. mousa dembele, christian eriksen and dele alli are all injured. barca are on a poor run of form domestically. but of course they have the main man, lionel messi. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and messi is certainly that.
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so yes, he‘s a fantastic player, and i‘m sure we‘ll do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. we need to focus on ourselves, as well. you know, we‘ve got some great players. we need to play with energy in the game, and hopefully if we do that, we can come out on top. liverpool go to napoli tonight and the italian side‘s manager carlo ancelotti has been very flattering about his opposition. he‘s called them "one of the strongest teams in europe" — but the liverpool bossjurgen klopp isn‘t falling for any of that sweet talk. it‘s tactics — it starts already. he is so long in the business, and he wants to try to bring the very nice — the nice fella out of me. and i am here to be ready for a real battle. british number one kyle edmund is through to the quarterfinals of
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the china open after a hard—fought three—set victory against matteo berrettini. both players dominated with their serve in the deciding set. edmund made the vital breakthrough, breaking at 5 games all, but had to save another break point before serving out for victory. he‘ll face another qualifier dusan lajovic in the last eight that‘s all the sport for now. thank you very much, we will see you later. theresa may has closed the conservative conference in birmingham with an appeal to the party to stick together and support her brexit strategy, saying she was standing up for britain. the speech set out to banish memories of last year‘s conference, when she was beset by a cough, a security breach, and a collapsing set. with me is dr andrew blick, director of the centre for british politics and government at king‘s college london thank you for coming in. it
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certainly felt like a more co mforta ble certainly felt like a more comfortable thing to watch this year, comfortable thing to watch this yea r, after comfortable thing to watch this year, after all of the problems of 2017 question none of the onstage disasters, relief will be the word for the prime minister and the people around her, try to make light of that by making some jokes and even some dance moves. she was very brave to do that, i thought, after the criticism. you might as well give them entertainment when you are the prime minister, such a tough time. she also talked a lot about unity. you could only guess who she was aiming at? at a few people, but one person in particular, former foreign secretary boris johnson. person in particular, former foreign secretary borisjohnson. also, a large section of her own party, who are uncomfortable with what actually is her plan for brexit? what is going to happen? no mention of that word, chequers? interesting that particular word was dropped. it may
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be that we are moving towards a climb—down from it. at a climb—down where? she did still refer to trade in goods, so it still appears to be the idea that somehow, which was the key part of chequers, really, that we we re key part of chequers, really, that we were going to try to separate one of what are called the four freedoms of what are called the four freedoms of the eu, have that but not the other ones. that basic idea, which was a problem for the eu, other ones. that basic idea, which was a problem forthe eu, is other ones. that basic idea, which was a problem for the eu, is still in there, it seems, but no mention of the actual c word. a lot of it is about what the 27 members of the eu going to agree to, never mind what the conservative party members think? teeth then deliver a central theme was that the future is in our hands. it is it really? some of it is in the hands of the eu 27, and the extent to which they are willing to make concessions. she went a very long way back in history, when she was making previous leaders of the
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labour party, saying that they wouldn‘t recognise what jeremy corbyn was trying to do to the party now? i thought that was a very interesting part of the speech. i think she mentioned james callaghan, neil kinnock, clement attlee, going back even further, who had interesting things to say about referendums. but you would not expect to see those names being praised at the conservative conference. winston churchill accused attlee of wanting to set up accused attlee of wanting to set up a gestapo in britain. but she was saying that they had values that the current leader doesn't. her key message was, you have to be worried about this, not only cut the labour party takeover if we don't get our act together, it is led by this person that is not sharing our values in a way that other labour leaders have. given that brexit is the preoccupation for everybody at the preoccupation for everybody at the moment, with the exit not far
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away, she was trying to move on from that, and trying to move on from austerity with the announcements on the nhs and housing. of all the things she could have chosen, did that surprise you? there wasn't that much ina that surprise you? there wasn't that much in a way of new content, but i think trying to say the age of austerity is over is an important statement. we waited to see what that actually means in practice. clearly, she was hoping to move things on and get people looking at what can be achieved after. and this cancer strategy, at a time when the conservatives are criticised for the nhs, accused of trying to privatise it, that will be reassuring, you think, to a lot of people, that cancer is a priority? people will think that leading on the nhs is a good idea, a good way of counteracting corbyn and some of the progress he made on domestic policy. that will be seen by her people as a
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good message to send out. we will wait to see how it is received. given that it wields that most weekends there is somebody in the cabinet that seems to be putting a marker down by potential leadership challenge with some lesser or article they have written, how well do you think she has cemented her position as prime minister?|j do you think she has cemented her position as prime minister? i think her position has always been stronger than some people imagine, certainly in the short to medium term. ithink certainly in the short to medium term. i think most of her potential challengers would rather wait until after some of this brexit business is resolved before they take over. for that reason, i could be making a prediction which is proven wrong very shortly, i think she is actually pretty resilient on that count and i think getting rid of her is harder than it might seem. thank you very much for coming in. russian president vladimir putin has called former russian spy sergei skripal a "scumbag" and accused him of betraying his motherland. mr skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned with a nerve agent
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administered by russian intelligence officers in salisbury in march. let‘s speak to our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford. tell us more about what vladimir putin has been saying, where did he make the comments? well, this was at a oiland make the comments? well, this was at a oil and gas conference in moscow, an unusual setting. certainly, the journalist hosting the session specifically to talk about energy, veered away to talk about the script —— sergei skripal case. he basically lashed out at sergei skripal himself. that was the target of the attack in march. he called him a scumbag, said he was a traitor, he said that all traitors were scumbags. it was very strong language and his facial expressions and tone was extremely strong. he also talked about the fact that russia has asked britain to pass on evidence and documents about what
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happened in salisbury, so, as he put it, moscow could see what really took place. but he was careful to underline that russia denies any responsibility for this attack. despite the comments on the language that he used about sergei skripal himself, he said there was no reason for anybody to be poisoned. he said sergei skripal had been a traitor, he had been caught, he served in prison in russia and was swapped to the uk. he said, so what, if he went on consulting with intelligent agents elsewhere, who cares, that was his argument. no reason, as he put it, for russia to be involved in the attack. the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost early detection. help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia.
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aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. speaking at conservative party conference, theresa may may‘s says that "austerity is over" raising the stakes for the chancellor ahead of the budget. we‘ll get reaction from the city in a moment. as we‘ve been hearing, pret a manger will list all ingredients, including allergens, on its freshly made products. this is after the death of a teenager who had an allergic reaction after eating a pret sandwich. shares in the british luxury car—maker aston martin have begun trading on the london stock exchange. they debuted at £19 a share, a price which gives the firm a value of more than £4.3 billion. the company is best known for providing james bond‘s vehicle of choice but is trying to broaden its appeal. a lot of excitement
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in the music business world — created by a firm many people here may never have heard of? yes — i don‘t know what your music listening habits. whatever the teenagers are listening to in the house. i am still downloading albums to my phone. don‘t ask me what the last one was, it is quite embarrassing. meanwhile, of course music streaming apps are of course the big thing. and tencent music — a chinese company — has several including qq music, kugou, and the karaoke app wesing. it‘s just filed a request to list its shares in the us. and this could be one of the biggest initial public offerings by a chinese company in america. the reason it‘s doing so is to raise funds to develop content and new services. hence all the excitement. joining us now is kim gittleson, our north america business correspondent. what more do we know about the potential listing —
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for example, the valuation? we don't, because the way it works in the united states is that a company will file papers at the securities and exchange commission, saying they want to list shares here, they don't have to say if they have chosen the new york stock exchange yet, they put in a placeholder for what they want to raise and reuse that to guess at a valuation. the key thing we know from these documents isjust how much money tencent music has been making. that is £200 million in the first six months of the year, a significant thing, many of the streaming services are probably not yet profitable when they file, so the fact it is already turning a profit should be something that will appeal to investors. the second thing we know is that they have a lot of users, nearly 800 million users, four times the lot of users, nearly 800 million users, fourtimes the number of people that use the other streaming
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service spotify. the concern for investors is that many of the users don't actually pay for the service. unlike spotify, where nearly 50% of users actually pay for the ability to download music and listen to it off—line, when it comes to tencent music, the figure is closer to 4%. we will see if that is denting the appetite of investors. we will see if that is denting the appetite of investorslj we will see if that is denting the appetite of investors. i can hear phones going off around you, there is clearly a lot of excitement about the news. i‘m just wondering, you mentioned spotify, the world market leader in the music streaming services, it listed earlier this year. do we read from this decision by tencent that there is a real appetite among investors for this kind of share? i was here when spotify listed shares and we saw a
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significant pop in that company, share price rising. we are expecting there will be a significant amount of investor appetite, probably due to one thing. there was a lot of excitement on the floor because the dow hit another record high when it opened. that suggests a strong us economy and corporate earnings means that there is a lot of investor appetite to invest in us stocks, to invest in companies that list in the united states. that is certainly one reason why tence nt united states. that is certainly one reason why tencent music has decided to file for a listing in the hopes of raising funds to try to expand the business. thanks very much. we will release you to listen to some music. we heard the prime minister speaking earlier — dancing queen, is that what you are listening to? and that phrase "austerity is over" — what is the business
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world making of that? well, some people will feel that after 8 years of cuts to public spending — it‘s about time. but of course the treasury will feel some pressure from her words. they still want to reach a balance between what‘s coming in and what‘s being spent. they‘ve already promised more for the nhs — but with this freeze on fuel duty, it ties their hands for how to raise more money. and of course the economic risks of a no—deal brexit still loom. we will get some reaction now. isi is i know that theresa may came out of dancing queen, i doubt that the chancellor will come out to money,
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money, money. maybe there will be some tinkering to win some votes, but when it comes to the markets, i doubt there will be anything that moves the needle match. this talk of austerity being over, if potentially puts a bit of political pressure on the treasury to dish out some money? the fiscal policy is now in the safe zone, make no mistake, the uk is not vulnerable to an economic shock in the same way that it was four or five years ago. but there are still probably two or three years left before the government can really be confident to respond to an economic shockin confident to respond to an economic shock in a major way. chances are there will be very little apart from a few things at the margins to try to grab headlines in the budget that could move the economic outlook much. interesting comments about house—building and the cap being lifted on councils. that could help
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the housing sector? it could, on the public side, where building has been weak. but the uk doesn't building of houses each year, and that needs a private sector solution. the uk needs to look at the regulatory environment on the supply side, on land. these things are difficult political questions. especially for the conservative government to deal with. it is more big random number generating stuff than it is real economic policy. 0k, generating stuff than it is real economic policy. ok, thanks very much for your take on that. shall we look at the markets? a look at the markets now — and the ftse 100 is higher. a rise in shares in itv, royal mail and bt giving it a boost. tesco is down nearly 9%, after the latest update. what is strange is that sales and profits were up in
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the period that it was reporting for, but investors were expecting the profits to be even better, that is why they have this disappointment and it has been reflected in the share price. on the other side of the scale, outside the top 100 index, topps tiles doing well after a positive update. keeping an eye on currencies, not moving a huge amount. the pound is up slightly against the euro, and just a shade against the euro, and just a shade against the euro, and just a shade against the dollar. the presenter and dj zoe ball will become the first woman to host bbc radio 2‘s breakfast show when she takes over from chris evans injanuary. with 9 million listeners a week, it‘s the uk‘s most listened—to breakfast show. this morning, zoe ball said she was thrilled but said she didn‘t underestimate the challenge. here‘s our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. your brand—new host of the radio 2 breakfast show is zoe ball! good morning, zoe. hello, chris. this is bonkers! the moment millions of listeners
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found out who will take over one of the biggestjobs in broadcasting. it feels wonderful, i feel so privileged and honoured to be asked and to be the woman that they've asked to do it. i really hope they've given me the job because they think i'm the best one for the job. but, yes, it is exciting all round. there's so much to celebrate. it really is quite wonderful. zoe is a familiar voice to audiences and a familiar successor to chris evans. two decades ago she took over the radio1 breakfast show, nine months after he left the job. it was last month that chris evans revealed that he was leaving the radio 2 breakfast show which he has hosted for eight years. he is one of the biggest paid stars on the bbc at a time when much attention has been focused on the gender pay gap. chris was paid 1.66
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million for the show, are you expecting the same? i'm definitely not expecting the same but we have discussed the fee and i'm very happy with what the bbc are paying me. i mean, if it will come out one day, i'm sure these things tend to, i'm hoping that people will say that that's fair. were you adamant that you wanted a woman to do the show? we were keen to find the best person to do the job and we are fortunate, we are home to some of the biggest music and entertainment stars in the uk. we had a lot of people to look at but we thought zoe was perfect for this role. and the verdict from chris evans? fantastic pick. best person for thejob. zoe says the job is a big challenge and one she‘s looking forward to. liso mzimba, bbc news. the weather continues to look pretty cloudy to the rest of the day, but
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there have been a few spots where there have been a few spots where the cloud has broken up. one of these has been toward south—west england, where we have seen some sunshine coming through, particularly across parts of devon earlier on. as we go through the next few hours, probably the sunniest weather will be across the isle of wight and hampshire. otherwise you can see the extent of the cloud continuing to push in from the cloud continuing to push in from the atlantic. for most of us it stays pretty cloudy. some rain moving from orkney to shetland as we go to the evening, showers following to western scotland. as we go through the night, the cloud will move in across many areas and we will see some drizzle around western coasts and hills. south—westerly wind insuring it will be a mild night. temperatures for most staying in double figures. for thursday, a mild start of the day. we have this weather front approaching the north—west of the country. the cold front will be slowly pushing its way southwards across the uk over the next couple of days. so, thursday‘s forecast, rain moving into scotland, into northern ireland as well as we head into the afternoon. a lot of
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cloud around, occasional sunny spells, to the east of the pennines, but that cloud will continue to bring rain to scotland and northern ireland to the afternoon. a few patches of rain developing ahead of the main weather front, patches of rain developing ahead of the main weatherfront, running at patches of rain developing ahead of the main weather front, running at a northern parts of wales and england as well. it could turn quite damp here. the rain is likely to be patchy, staying dry and bright in the south. temperature wise, most of the south. temperature wise, most of the uk on thursday will be still mild. 1719 degrees fairly widely, starting to turn cooler again in scotland. the weather front will be pushed into northern ireland and wales on friday. outbreaks of rain here. to the north, sunny and cooler, to the south, still a bit of cloud and occasional sunny spells. here, we are still into the warm air. temperatures up to 21 degrees in london and south—east england, compared with much cooler weather in scotland, northern ireland, northern england. temperatures there will be ten or 12 degrees. this weekend, mixed weather fortunes. the
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ten or 12 degrees. this weekend, mixed weatherfortunes. the rain is likely to be heavy and slow moving. scotla nd likely to be heavy and slow moving. scotland and northern ireland, dry and sunny for the most part on saturday. into sunday, the rain easing away from the south—east. writer whether following, but it turns cloudy in the north—west. —— brighter weather. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at three: music: dancing queen by abba a dancing prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative party conference comes to a close. if we all go off in different directions in pursuit of our own visions of the perfect brexit, we risk ending up with no brexit at all. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost early detection rates. rescuers are still trying to reach remote areas after indonesia‘s devastating earthquake and tsunami. the first grenfell tower survivor to give evidence tells
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the inquiry how he was confronted by thick black smoke outside his front door on the 10th floor. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. and news of changes for england cricket. andrew strauss is stepping down as director of cricket after three and a half years in the role. the latest on that, and a huge night in the champions league for totte n ha m in the champions league for tottenham in liverpool. we will hear from brooks koepka after his ball struck a woman, causing her to lose sight at the ryder cup. thank you, well. —— will. and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. chris has all the weather. we will take a look ahead to the weekend weather prospects, where for some of us it will be a wet and windy start to the weekend. also coming up: the duke
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and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. hello. this is afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. theresa may has insisted she will ‘not let the country down‘ over brexit. speaking at the conservative party conference in birmingham, where her eu strategy has been the focus of strong criticism from some in her party, mrs may defended her plans. she said ‘no one wanted a good deal more‘ than her —— and she appealed to her critics to unite behind her, even if they didn‘t always agree with her. the prime minister also announced a new strategy to improve the treatment of cancer, with new diagnostic centres and earlier scans for patients. here‘s our political correspondent, ben wright. after the coughing calamity of last year, theresa may‘s speech needed to be polished. the set too had to stay solid.
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mrs may‘s task — to sell again her plan for brexit, rally her fractious party and map out a path for britain‘s future outside the eu. but nobody expected this... music: dancing queen. as theresa may revived the robot dance first unveiled in africa over the summer. can ijust say, you will have to excuse me if i do cough during the speech! i have been up all night supergluing the backdrop. mrs may began by making a case for decency and civility in politics. let‘s rise above the abuse. let‘s make a positive case for our values that will cut through the bitterness and bile that is poisoning our politics. and let‘s say it loud and clear, conservatives will always stand up for a politics that unites us
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rather than divides us. before turning to attack the current labour leadership. what has it come to whenjewish families today seriously discuss where they should go ifjeremy corbyn becomes prime minister? when a leading labour mp says his party is institutionally racist? when the leader of the labour party is happy to appear on iranian state tv, but attacks our free media here in britain? that is whatjeremy corbyn has done to the labour party. it is our duty in this conservative party to make sure he can never do it to our country. in the 70th year of the nhs, theresa may said cancer survival rates in the uk still lagged behind other countries and made this pledge. through our cancer strategy
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we will increase the early detection rate from one in two today to three in four by 2028. and then, of course, brexit. theresa may again said she was prepared to walk away without a deal and insisted her plan for post brexit trade was right. so this is our proposal, taking back control of our borders, laws and money. good forjobs, good for the union, it delivers on the referendum, it keeps faith with the british people. it is in the national interest. mrs may then swatted away calls for another referendum. they call it a people‘s vote. but we had the people‘s vote and the people chose to leave. theresa may enthused about the possibilities she saw from brexit. i passionately believe that our best days lie ahead of us. and that our future is full of promise. mrs may promised to remove the cap that limits the amount councils can
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borrow to build more houses and said the age of austerity was over. because you made sacrifices, there are better days ahead. so when we have secured a good brexit dealfor britain, at the spending review next year, we will set out our approach for the future. debt as a share of the economy will continue to go down. support for public services will go up. because a decade after the financial crash, people need to know that the austerity it led to is over and that their hard work has paid off. a confident speech — and this was — changes little. the outcome of the brexit negotiation matters a lot. that is what will shape her party‘s future and the country‘s. but this was a speech by a tory leader who looks keen to lead it for some time yet. ben wright, bbc news. our assistant political editor norman smith is in birmingham for us now.
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probably relief that there were no calamities, and she even dared to dance, norman. what a surprise to her senior aides, who did not know she was learning to dance. and why not? it totally changed the mood in the hall, where everyone initially was pretty tense about any repeat of last year. she was immediately joking about the fact that she had been up all night glueing the set together. this was a very different theresa may, much more confident and assured, quite humorous at times will stop and the tone, very different, much more optimistic, upbeat from mrs may, and deliberately so. trying to get this party a sense that there is life beyond brexit. and so, we did get fairly chunky announcements. there
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was a proposal to end the cap on the amount of cash that local councils can borrow to build houses. now, thatis can borrow to build houses. now, that is a big move. local authorities have been pressing for that for years, but it has the potential to galvanise local authorities into really kick—starting their house—building. not such good news for philip hammond, because the debt will go on his books, as it were. also, a new cancer strategy to improve detection rates stop fuel duty going to be frozen for another year. and perhaps most importantly, a clear commitment that austerity is over after brexit, saying in the next spending round, in the autumn of next year, well, they are going to look, yes, at keeping down public borrowing, but also increasing money for public services. now, that is a major gear change from, frankly, the last eight yea rs or change from, frankly, the last eight years or so. and on brexit itself,
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interesting at two levels. one, we got the familiar pattern, if you like, from mrs may, about how a deal was basically the best in town, but she also delivered it with sort of a steel capped boot in the direction of her critics, saying to them, look, if you insist on hanging out for the perfect brexit, the ideological leap your brexit, you risk ending up with no brexit because of the possibility of our second referendum, or even a jeremy corbyn government. and that seemed to me to be quite blunt warning to them that they ought to be careful in trying to take apart her deal. significant too, though, throughout the whole speech, she didn‘t not —— she did not once mention the word chequers, and that will encourage those who think they may be, even at
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this very late moment, can get mrs may to refine, rebrand and rework original proposal. thank you very much, norman smith. the prime minister says her new cancer strategy plans will form a central part of her long—term plan for the nhs. the early detection rate is to be increased from one—in—two to three—in—four by lowering the age of bowel cancer screening from 60 to 50. investments will be made in rapid diagnostic centres and the latest screening equipment — and mrs may promised these changes would mean that by 2028, 55,000 more people would be alive five years after their diagnosis compared to today. earlier our health editor hugh pym told me more theresa may reminded her audience that she had planned this five—year strategy for the nhs in england and awarded the money for that, and in return, she wanted an explanation from the nhs about how they were going to use the money and look beyond. so she asked for a 10—year
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strategy. we are likely to get that in november. budgie said today that would include a new cancer strategy, and the key new pledge was this detection rate, early detection makes a huge difference if you catch cancers hourly, stage one or stage two. at the moment, only one in two are caught at that stage. she once that increased to three out of four mag over the next ten years, although hasn‘t said precisely how that will happen. there was another pledge as well, that for bowel cancer screening, currently screening kits go out to 60 and over in terms of age in england. she wa nts in terms of age in england. she wants that reduced to 50 to try to enable more people in their 50s to pick up possible signs early. that‘s already happening in scotland. that had already been announced by public health england, and it is a plan, and she has now said it will happen both cancer charities will save where is the money and resource coming from? how much money is
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needed —— how many more staff are needed —— how many more staff are needed to carry this out? there is a shortage of radiologists, and they are shortage of radiologists, and they a re key shortage of radiologists, and they are key in screening. you cannot produce a new workforce overnight. you can have the strategies and aspirations, and we will get this nhs10—year plan in november, but where is the resource going to come from? that where is the resource going to come from ? that is where is the resource going to come from? that is the key question. and the money for the nhs in england is only for five years, said it is all very well going up to 2028, but if there isn‘t any indication of whether resource is coming from, it will leave several questions. but she is clearly very focused on this. it isa she is clearly very focused on this. it is a very important strategy. it has been welcomed by campaigners cancer charities, but they would like to see a lot more detail. rescue workers in indonesia say time is running out to find any more survivors after the earthquake and tsunami which struck last week. 11100 people are known to have died and hundreds of thousands more are in desperate need of aid. emergency teams are still trying
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to reach remote areas. rebecca henschke sent this report from the island of sulewesi. survivors pick through the ruins of their shattered homes in one village in donggala. five days after the quake and tsunami hit, no one has come to help them. translation: we have been here since friday. there hasn‘t been any rescue operation. we‘re still looking for the missing people manually, villagers alone. no heavy machinery. hopes of finding people alive are fading. and with huge areas still cut off from power and clean water, those who survived are struggling. nearly 2,000 homes in one area were swallowed as the violence of the earthquake turned the earth to liquid. it is thought hundreds died here. after days of waiting in her remote village,
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wasila and her family decided they had to walk to get help at palu airport. this is the first water they have had since yesterday. translation: we walked for ten hours through the mountains from our village that was completely destroyed. we were that desperate for aid. i was so stressed about the children. with the airport now re—opened, the military‘s cargo planes are able to bring in much—needed aid. they‘re also taking out traumatised women and children. strong aftershocks continue to be felt here, as families struggle to come to terms with what they have lost. noor hasjust got one—year—old fiona to sleep. she has been crying and clinging to her. translation: she says sometimes, where is my mum, where has my mother gone? i say we‘re still looking for her. your mum has gone on a long journey. if she hears a loud noise or a plane go overhead, she gets very scared.
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she is traumatised. this is where fiona‘s home used to be. now, completely submerged with mud. this is also where her mother and younger sibling are buried. fiona was here in this area when the powerful quake hit, triggering mud slides, sinking houses and completely altering the landscape. fiona was saved by her 11—year—old brother, who carried her awayjust in time. it will take months for people to rebuild their houses, but they may never recover from what they have lost. rebecca henschke, bbc news, palu. a volcano has erupted on sulawesi, about 400 miles from the area worst affected by the earthquake. the eruption of mount soputan sent an ash cloud miles into the air. there are no reports of casualties or damage but authorities warned people in nearby communities
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to prepare for volcanic ash fall. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack is delivering his conclusions in to the deaths of each of the five victims. judge mark lucraft qc started with a tribute to the ‘great dignity‘ of the victims‘ families. he described events on 22nd march last year at "one of the most iconic areas of london" as a "deliberate act of terrorism". our correspondent richard lister spoke to us earlier from outside the old bailey. he started by summarising the evidence that was heard over three weeks or so of this inquest. he began by delivering a tribute to the victims‘ families, and setting up the scene on what happened on the 22nd of march last year. he said that was a life changing day for many, when one of the most iconic areas of london was the target of a deliberate attack, an attack
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which he said lasted just 82 seconds, but with terrible consequences for so many people. he said khalid masood had driven his vehicle with clear, murderous intent and that 29 people apart from those who received fatal injuries on the bridge, 29 others have also been seriously injured by his car as he drove it across westminster bridge before crashing it into the railings around the palace of westminster, running through the front gates, and then killing pc keith palmer with knives. that more people did not die, said the judge, was due to the overwhelming actions of those who responded, both professionals and members of the public. but there were some criticisms, too. he said very pointedly, sadly, some members of the public chose to photograph and film rather than help. he said some of the material that has been posted online has been very distressing for the families, and he asked for it to be removed. he praised the families of those killed, the five people killed, saying they had shown great dignity
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throughout this inquest process. and as i say, he is expected to speak for another couple of hours before delivering his findings. and what will families be listening out for particularly? there are three areas they are most interested in. they will want to know whether he has come to any conclusions about the level of security around the palace of westminster and on westminster bridge. of course, what would be regarded as very high value targets by any potential terrorist, and yet there were not bollards or obstacles in place on the bridge, and the armed officers in place within the confines of the palace of westminster were not situated right by the gates where khalid masood made his entry into the confines of the palace of westminster, so families will want to know whether the coroner believes that more should have been done and could have been done before the attack to minimise the loss of life. they will also want to know whether he has any views on whether the security
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services should have played a more active role. khalid masood was known to them, but he wasn‘t an active subject of interest. of course, some will say maybe he should have been, and maybe something more could have been done to prevent this attack. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost the chances of early detection. help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia. aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami. and coming up: the duke and duchess of sussex make their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. and in sport... andrew strauss steps down from his role as director of cricket at the ecb. andy flower, who‘s covered for him, will continue in an interim role before a full—time replacement is found. an injury—hit tottenham take
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on barcelona at wembley in the champions league later, with liverpool, the other british side in action tonight, they face napoli in italy. and british number one kyle edmund is through to the quarter finals of the china open after beating italian matteo berretini in 3 sets, he‘ll face dusan laiovic in the last 8. i‘ll be back with more on those stores. russian president vladimir putin has called former russian spy sergei skripal a scumbag and accused him of betraying his motherland. mr skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned with a nerve agent administered by russian intelligence officers in salisbury in march. our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford has more details. this was at an oil and gas conference taking place in moscow, an unusual setting, but the journalist hosting the session, specifically to talk about energy,
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veered away to talk about the skripal case. very strong language, the strongest comments he has made yet on the case, and he basically lashed out at sergei skripal himself, the target of the attack in march. he called him a scumbag, said he was a traitor, and said all traders were scumbags. it was strong language, and his facial expression tone were extremely strong also. he also talked about the fact that russia has asked britain to pass on evidence and documents about what happened in salisbury, so, as he put it, moscow could see what really took place. he was also careful to underline that russia denies any responsibility for this attack because despite the comments and a language he used about sergei skripal himself, he said that there was no reason for anyone to be poisoned. he said mr skripal had been a traitor, had been caught, had served five years in prison in russia, was then sent to the uk.
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said mr bowden, so what? if he went on consulting with intelligence agencies elsewhere, who cares? that was his argument. no reason, as he saw it, for russia to be involved in this attack. the first survivor of the grenfell tower fire to give evidence at the inquiry has been describing the moment he tried to leave his 10th floor flat after his son had woken him up and told him to get out. antonio roncolato, who‘d lived in the flats for 27 years, said he opened his door and was confronted with thick black smoke — it hurt his eyes and he thought it would kill him. so he didn‘t leave. daniella relph reports from the inquiry. you may find some of the images in her report distressing. he was one of the last residents to be rescued. antonio roncolato had remained in his flat for around six hours during the fire. it had been his home for 27 years. i swear by almighty god... the first resident to give evidence, he described how he opened the door to his flat as the fire took hold. and was confronted by overpowering thick black smoke. the moment i opened the door,
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ifelt i had been hit by a gas as well as smoke. so physically it would stop me from breathing. so i said you know, you cannot go out there. that is why i closed promptly and my eyes were crying like, you know, it was really horrible. so that is why i closed the door and i went to rinse my eyes in the bathroom. so basically the flames were there... using a floor plan of his flat, antonio roncolato explained that he could see the cladding alight and flames spreading on the outside of the tower. his son sent him this distressing photo of grenfell ablaze and phoned him, telling him that he loved him and that he needed to get out. inside the tenth floor flat mr roncolato took his own images of smoke filling the hallway. but he told the enquiry he still decided to stay put as instructed by firefighters. well, very much stay put, somebody is coming to get you.
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he was very determined in his affirmation, in his words. not to try anything risky, basically. that they were aware that i was there and they would come and get me. this was the day the families started to be heard at the grenfell enquiry. so far the focus has been on the official response to the fire. now it is examining the experience of survivors and those who lost family and friends. pret a manger has announced that full ingredient labelling, including allergens, will be introduced to all products that are freshly made in its shop kitchens. it follows the case of natasha ednan—laperouse who died after suffering an allergic reaction to a sandwich containing sesame seeds bought from one of its outlets. in a statement pret chief executive clive schlee said he hoped the measures set the compnay ‘on course to drive change in the industry‘. the court of appeal has ruled that the government acted
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unlawfully over its treatment of child refugees. the government agreed to relocate 480 children in britain as part of the so—called dubs amendment. but the court of appeal said some young asylum seekers were given "patently inadequate" reasons for being refused entry. the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. harry and meghan visited edes house in chichester, where they viewed a rare copy of the american declaration of independence, before opening a university technology centre in bognor regis. the royals have now moved on to brighton — our correspondent lauren moss is at brighton‘s royal pavillion, and we can talk to her now. they are packing a lot in today, lauren. yes, and what a beautiful day for it, too. the sun has been shining in brighton, and people have turned out in their hundreds to
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greet the duke and duchess of sussex. it is the first time they have been here since they were married and given their royal official titles, so a big day for eve ryo ne official titles, so a big day for everyone in sussex, and they have turned out to see them as well. just a few minutes ago, they let brighton, heading down the coast towards peacehaven. whilst here, they greeted local schoolchildren. they were high—fiving the children, prince harry down on his knees, cheering with them and laughing and just having a nice time, and eve ryo ne just having a nice time, and everyone was very just having a nice time, and everyone was very excited. all around the royal gardens, people had packed in to greet them, chanting their names. they went inside the royal pavilion, which has close family ties to prince harry. it was his great—great—grandfather, king george iv, who had it built in the 18th century, and it was a summer home for them. prior to being here, they were inches —— in chichester,
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seeing a copy of the american declaration of independence, the only other copy being in washington, dc. then they went down and opened a new building of the university of chichester in bognor regis. and while they were here in brighton, after going to the pavilion, they went to visit the survivors network, a charity based in brighton that supports and offers counselling to victims of sexual violence and abuse. they help people across the county. the trustees were telling me what a significant day this is for them. of course, meghan markle is very outspoken about women‘s rights and gender equality, so this seems to bea and gender equality, so this seems to be a cause very close to her heart. they have had a meeting and met survivors in what was sure to be an emotional time. they have headed off to peacehaven, where they will meet teenagers at a youth club which
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specialises in offering mental health support and coaching children with well—being. they both seem to be causes very close to the hearts of the duke and duchess. the presenter and dj zoe ball will become the first woman to host bbc radio 2‘s breakfast show when she takes over from chris evans injanuary. with 9 million listeners a week, it‘s the uk‘s most listened to breakfast show. this morning, zoe ball said she was thrilled but said she didn‘t underestimate the challenge. here‘s our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. the presenter and dj zoe ball will become the first your brand—new host of the radio 2 breakfast show is zoe ball! good morning, zoe. hello, chris. this is bonkers!
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the moment millions of listeners found out who will take over one of the biggestjobs in broadcasting. it feels wonderful, i feel so privileged and honoured to be asked and to be the woman that they‘ve asked to do it. i really hope they‘ve given me the job because they think i‘m the best one for the job. but, yes, it is exciting all round. there‘s so much to celebrate. it really is quite wonderful. zoe ball is a familiar voice to audiences and a familiar successor to chris evans. two decades ago she took over the radio1 breakfast show, nine months after he left the job. it was last month that chris evans revealed that he was leaving the radio 2 breakfast show which he has hosted for eight years. he is one of the biggest paid stars on the bbc at a time when much attention has been focused on the gender pay gap. chris was paid 1.66 million for the show, are you expecting the same? i‘m definitely not expecting the same but we have discussed the fee and i‘m very happy with what the bbc are paying me. i mean, if it will come out one day, i‘m sure these things tend to, i‘m hoping that people will say that that‘s fair. were you adamant that you wanted a woman to do the show? we were keen to find the best person to do the job and we are fortunate, we are home to some of the biggest music and entertainment
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stars in the uk. we had a lot of people to look at but we thought zoe was perfect for this role. we have discussed these, and i am very happy with what the bbc are paying me. if it will come i hope people will say, that's fair. were you adamant that if possible you wa nted you adamant that if possible you wanted a woman doing the show? we we re wanted a woman doing the show? we were keen to find the best person for thejob. we are were keen to find the best person for the job. we are fortunate because we‘re home to the biggest entertainment stars in the uk. we thought zoe was the person who was perfect for thejob. and the verdict from chris evans? fantastic pick. best person for thejob. zoe says the job is a big challenge and one she‘s looking forward to. liso mzimba, bbc news. now, it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. there have been gaps in the cloud and a few and a bit of sunshine coming through. we have rain moving into orkney and shetland. this evening and overnight, we will see cloud generally thicken again, so outbreaks of light rain and drizzle expected around western coasts and hills, where it will also be breezy.
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it will be a mild night. temperature is the most stay in double figures. on thursday, we have a weather front moving into scotland and northern ireland, so that will bring thicker cloud through the day and outbreaks of rain. largely dry start to the day for england and wales, but we whilst are to see patchy bits and pieces of rain working into the north of wales, and also northern england, through the afternoon. otherwise, dry with occasional bright spells. on the whole, a cloudy day. temperatures reaching a high of 19 celsius. that‘s your weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines... music: dancing queen by abba. theresa may appeared on stage with a spring in her step to deliver her speech at the conservative party conference but then delivered a serious message on brexit to her party and the eu. the first survivor from grenfell tower to give evidence
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at the inquiry describes the moment he opened his front door on the 10th floor and was confronted by thick black smoke. rescuers are still trying to reach remote areas after last week‘s devastating earthquake and tsunami in indonesia. more than 11100 people are known to have died and the death toll is expected to rise. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack has been delivering his conclusions, describing it as a deliberate act of terrorism and paying tribute to the great dignity of the victims‘ families. the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county that features in their royal titles. the couple, who married in may, are on a whistle—stop tour of sussex and met school children at brighton‘s royal pavilion. sport now on afternoon live with will. and we‘ve heard from the golfer who injured a spectator at the ryder cup. a horrible story, this one.
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brooks koepka says he‘s "heartbroken" that one of his tee shots at the ryder cup on friday resulted in a spectator losing the sight in her right eye. it‘s marred what was an incredible weekend in paris. the american‘s drive on the sixth hole veered off course and struck corine remande, a 49—year—old woman who‘d travelled from egypt to watch the golf. koepka says his "stomach sank" on learning she had been blinded. koepka went over to her in between shots to see if she‘s ok and at a news conference today before the alfred dunhill links championship at st andrews, koepka says he heard the news about the extent of the injury after arriving at the course on tuesday i‘m looking forward to speaking with her today or in the next few days, hours, whatever it may be. just having a conversation with her and talking to her. because there‘s
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nobody that feels worse about than i do. it‘s a tragic accident, what happened. i mean, i‘m heartbroken. i am all messed up inside. you‘ve got to feel for him, it was a com plete you‘ve got to feel for him, it was a complete freak accident and it sta rts complete freak accident and it starts the debate again about how close we allow spectators, you want them to get as close as possible to them to get as close as possible to the action, but when somebody hits a taoiseach off —— when some body hits a tee shot, that can happen. mike o‘brien andrew strauss has stepped down from his role with the aim and cricket team? i‘ll andrew strauss has stepped down as england‘s director of cricket after three and a half years in the role. strauss had taken a break in may after his wife ruth entered a new period of treatment for cancer. andy flower, who has covered for him, will continue in an interim role before a full—time
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replacement is found. the former england test captain says 2019 is "potentially the most important the game has had in this country" with the world cup and ashes series on home soil. he went on to say: "it‘s vital that the director of cricket can give consistent guidance and support to england cricket through this period." we will wait to see what they announce. two cracking games involving british side in the champions league tonight. barcelona‘s superstars are in town. lionel messi and luis suarez are set to line up against tottenham at wembley tonight in what promises to be a tough examination of spurs champions league credentials. mauricio pottchetino‘s side lost their opening tie in the champions league at inter milan — and will be without several key playters tonight. mousa dembele, christian eriksen and dele alli are all injured. barca are on a poor run of form domestically. but of course they have the main man lionel messi. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and messi is certainly that.
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so yes, he‘s a fantastic player, and i‘m sure we‘ll do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. we need to focus on ourselves, as well. you know, we‘ve got some great players. we need to play with energy, attack the game, and hopefully if we do that, we can come out on top. liverpool go to napoli tonight and the italian side‘s manager carlo ancelotti has been very flattering about his opposition. he‘s called them "one of the strongest teams in europe" — but the liverpool bossjurgen klopp isn‘t falling for any of that sweet talk. it‘s tactics — it starts already. he is so long in the business, and he wants to try to bring the very nice — the nice fella out of me. and i am here to be ready for a real battle. british number one kyle edmund is through to
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the quarter—finals of the china open after a hard —fought three—set victory against matteo berrettini. both players dominated with their serve in the deciding set. edmund made the vital breakthrough, breaking at 5—5, but had to save another break point before serving out for victory. he‘ll face another qualifier dusan lajovic in the last eight that‘s all the sport for now. let‘s get more on our main story. theresa may has closed the conservative conference in birmingham with an appeal to the party to stick together and support her brexit strategy, saying she was standing up for britain. the speech set out to banish memories of last year‘s conference — when she was beset by a cough, a security breach, and a collapsing set. i‘m nowjoined by dr mark garnett, senior politics lecturer at lancaster university and a a conservative party watcher. thank you forjoining us this
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afternoon. how high were the expectations this year for her speech? i think the only real expectation was that the speech would be less disastrous than last year‘s effort. she has an awful lot of very difficult problems on her plate, doing better than last year was relatively simple. and she certainly exceeded them, as you say. but how did she do that, what went well for her, beyond the fact that she didn‘t get presented with a pas and she didn‘t get presented with a pa5 and the letters behind her didn‘t fall down? i think she did relatively well, penny will be divided on her decision to dance onto the stage. in the conference hall it was bound to get the audience feeling sympathetic towards her, and once that was achieved, i think the rest of the speech in a sense wrote itself. the best way to
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rally the troops behind her was to remind them of how much they dislike jeremy corbyn. she could also get some applause by ruling out repeatedly a second referendum. other parts of the speech were clearly going to divert the focus onto the domestic agenda, and here she said some quite interesting things within a rather limited scope. so, really, if you were to walk —— wargame scope. so, really, if you were to walk —— war game the speech, she did that and showed more personality than her speech is actually do. how surprise where you that she didn‘t mention needs c word, chequers, which there has been so much criticism of? there are certain ways of making the party feel more united, mentioning the c word is one way of resolving that sense of unity. she is in the unusual position of being regarded very much
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asa position of being regarded very much as a practical, pragmatic politician, and yet she has come up with a plan for addressing negotiations in the eu which seems to have displeased most people in her party for one reason or another. so, really, that is a subject best to avoid. tojust so, really, that is a subject best to avoid. to just reassure the audience that she is still going to be standing up for britain‘s interests in the negotiations and leaving it at that. she did ask for unity from the party, even when you don‘t agree with me, she said. how well do you think she did to quieten the talk that we seem to hear almost every weekend in the sunday papers about a challenge to her leadership? i think within the party there are a large number of people who regard the, or regarded her, as perhaps with limitations, but indispensable, there is not an alternative in view at the moment. one might say, rather
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surprisingly, that boris johnson at the moment. one might say, rather surprisingly, that borisjohnson may well be her best asset. one thing that this speech did was to underline the sharp contrast between herself and mrjohnson, and those people who think they would rather have a pragmatist who doesn‘t seem to make glaring diplomatic remarks, somebody who is going to be businesslike, rather than playing to the crowd, those people think, would be reassured by the speech and the more certain that she is indispensable. the people who think that she can‘t possibly lead the party to an election victory and that mrjohnson would be a better asset, those people will not be convinced at all. it was getting through the occasion, and i think thatis through the occasion, and i think that is the best she could hope for. she wasn‘t going to change any minds, she can just she wasn‘t going to change any minds, she canjust make the she wasn‘t going to change any minds, she can just make the people who already admire her and want her to stay as leader, they will feel that more strongly after the speech than they did before. thank you very
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much forjoining us. getting on the housing ladder has become increasingly difficult — but now it seems that people in their 20s are also being priced out of renting. a bbc survey suggests that, in most parts of britain, renting a one bedroom home requires a third of the average salary. our personalfinance reporter kevin peachey reports from cheltenham. when 25—year—old shop manager morgan moved in with her boyfriend, she knew she had to be particularly nice to her new housemates. myself and my partner are living with his parents at the moment whilst we are saving for a mortgage. the reason why be decided to do that was because we couldn‘t possibly rent and save at the same time. my friends definitely struggle. i think a lot of their money is used up in just their rent alone. this is typical of a sort of accommodation that is offered for young professionals. those friends can expect to pay more than a0% of their salary on rent to live on their own in central cheltenham. despite this cost, letting agents
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say young professionals are queueing up for flats like this. this particular property goes within 48 hours. the demand for it is incredible, especially one that is furnished like this, it just suits their needs. but it isn‘tjust here that young people are feeling the financial squeeze. housing organisations say spending more than 30% of your salary on rent is unaffordable. that means renting a one—bedroom home in your 20s would be unaffordable in two—thirds of britain and two people sharing a two—bedroom place would still find it difficult to manage in more than one in ten areas. one answer, say housing charities, is to build more for this young market. new developments like this look perfect for young tenants. new flats right in the centre of cheltenham, but it will be at least 40 years before they get into something like this because, like so many other newly—built properties in the town, these are retirement homes. that worries the local council, which wants to attract skilled young
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workers to the town. the private sector is failing to deliver, really. it is planning to borrow £100 million to provide 500 homes. we are going to build them. we are going to buy them, we may even buy land and build on that. it‘s as simple as that, really. these will be rented out on the open market for young people and families that need them. the government says a lettings fee ban and longer tenancy contracts will help renters in cheltenham and elsewhere, but the trade body for landlords says mortgage and maintenance costs means they can‘t offer rent any cheaper. kevin peachey, bbc news. for more on this i‘m now joined by angus hanton, from the intergenerational foundation, a charity focused on promoting the interests of young people and bridging disparities between age brackets. and polly harrold who works for the national housing federation, which represents housing associations in england, and who herself pays just over 45% of her monthly income on private rented accomodation. that is a huge sum of money. angus,
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tell us what this means for the kind of quality of life and the choices over accommodation for people in their 20s. it is very bad for them. with these very high rents they either have a long commute or they have to pay a high percentage of their income on rent. they very often decide to share more than they should, so it leads to overcrowding. and of course it leaves very little money for other things. pretty much no chance of them being able to save. you live in finsbury park, a lovely pa rt save. you live in finsbury park, a lovely part of london, admittedly. but how much does this research resemble your experience? but how much does this research resemble your experience ?|j completely agree with angus. the catchphrase when i was looking for a house last month was that we are going to have to compromise on something. so there would be location, price, a compromise on
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quality of living, but we all accepted very early on in our search, which took two months, that there is one thing we would have to let go of and we would not find a nice house. what did you decide to compromise on? unfortunately we had to compromise on price, because the quality of living in central london, loan 2, some of the rooms, they could hardly get any furniture in, some of the kitchens have not been repaired for years. it was not really acce pta ble repaired for years. it was not really acceptable at a baseline level. generation lee, what young people in their 20s are going through at the moment, it is not what we went through. we were extremely fortunate? we were. houses we re extremely fortunate? we were. houses were so cheap, and it is notjust about housing, it is a bigger picture, it was easier to getjobs, they were better paid in relation to they were better paid in relation to the cost of housing and cost of living. we were able to spend more.
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typically, we were going into a job with a much better pension than polly‘s generation are getting. with a much better pension than polly's generation are getting. what impact is this having on the make—up of communities and how they might vote in elections? the intergenerational foundation have done a surprising study about segregation. we used the same techniques as the americans used to love that racial segregation. we found that the high cost of renting is leading to age segregation, older people are living together in the suburbs, younger people are living in poorer parts of the city and they are not mixing much. so they stopped understanding each other and they can‘t help each other as much. understanding each other and they can't help each other as much. what is the make—up of the community you live in? it is mostly young people. i found when i was looking for my house that, because housing is so competitive nowadays, if somebody finds a house they tend to stay in it. instead of downsizing, moving to a smaller property, they kind of
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just stay. so it is harder to find a house because all of the houses are taken until people can't live there any more. our generation, baby—boomers, we are over consuming, it is too cheap to hold housing. it is squeezing out the younger generation. what does this mean, the cost of renting in london, the plans you might want to be able to make in terms of where you live in the future, and the kind of investment you might want to make? the idea of buying a house for me is quite an alien concept. i earn a buying a house for me is quite an alien concept. learn a lot to live in london and that is about it. i don't see myself moving out of the private rented sector for a very long time. angus, we have heard the prime minister saying in her speech at the party conference today that there will be new measures to build there will be new measures to build the homes this country needs, giving
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councils greater freedom, removing the cap on the level of investment, the cap on the level of investment, the borrowing, that they can make to meet housing needs. how much difference will that make across—the—board, but difference will that make across—the—boa rd, but particularly for people in polly‘s situation? across—the—boa rd, but particularly for people in polly's situation7m will not affect polly directly, it is for social housing. but it is a goodidea is for social housing. but it is a good idea if it happens. but we have had is only politicians talking about increasing housing and has not happened. we need them to build more. but it is notjust about building more, it is about using housing stock better. i hope it will help. if it does work, it will make more supply available, but it will also push down rents in the private sector, which will help polly. thank you both very much for coming the winner of the royal institute of british architects‘ most prestigious award — the riba stirling prize — will be announced next week. the nominations to become britain‘s best new building include a student housing development, a cemetery, and a nursery school. we‘ll look at each building in the shortlist over the next few days and today it‘s the turn of.
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the sultan nazrin shah centre at worcester college in oxford by niall mclaughlin architects, which is a floating auditorium crafted from classic oxford stone and natural oak designed to blend into the established landscape of the college. what the client was looking to achieve was a space for lecturers and performances, where the whole community of the college could come together in one space. and in addition what they wanted to do was to engage with the broader community and the city of oxford and extend the intellectual life of the college. we host the oxford literary festival, where people come from all over the country to hear great writers and speakers. it has this beautiful auditorium in the style of an ancient greek amphitheatre. community spaces available for dance, exercise, play rehearsals. break—out space.
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so it‘s a building all about reaching out and coming together. i think the thing i hope makes the building special and unique is the idea of a theatre in a beautiful garden setting. many lecture theatres are quite closed in. they are quite contained and they‘re permanently blacked out and we tried to design it so that light comes in from different angles. as you are standing in the lecture theatre, the clear windows are giving you light from the skiy and you can see beyond out onto the illuminated cricket pitch, but also into other shady part of the garden which are full of dappled light coming through the trees. previously most of us spent most of our time studying in our bedrooms, which can be a bit dark and boring and also quite lonely. in comparison we can now study in the sultan nazrin shah centre which is a much brighter area and we have a social space.
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it is a nice balance to have. because the sultan nazrin shah centre is in our beautiful historic landscape, sustainability credentials were really important to us. but also resilience against climate change. we‘re on the flood plain but the building is raised up above the flood plain so we are pretty confident it is going to be here for 300 years, just as the college has been in the past. you can find out more about all of the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and watch this year‘s riba stirling prize live here on the bbc news channel next wednesday evening between 8.30 and 9. ben bland is here — in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost the chances of early detection.
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help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia. aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. shares in the british luxury car—maker aston martin have begun trading on the london stock exchange. they debuted at £19 a share a price which gives the firm a value of more than £4.3 billion. the company is best known for providing james bond‘s vehicle of choice but is trying to broaden its appeal. pret a manger will list all ingredients, including allergens, on its freshly made products. this is after the death of a teenager who had an allergic reaction after eating a pret sandwich. as we‘ve been hearing, people in their 20s who want to rent a place for themselves face having to pay out an "unaffordable" amount in two—thirds of britain, according to bbc research out today. pensions — it‘s one of those things that we know we should look
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into and understand — but it can be incredibly confusing. anyone who feels like that is certainly not alone. some research has been done by burges salmon — a law firm. its report suggests that nearly 7 out of 10 people in britain do not understand which pension products they should invest in. there is a danger that you could fall victim to a scam? the report touches on that and asks whether... well, they spoke to financial advisers and asked if the pensions regulator and the financial conduct authority are doing enough to protect people and make them aware of the risks of what they call and regulated investments. the independent financial advisers and trustees of pension schemes they spoke to said no, not enough is
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being done. they also said they felt the government wasn‘t doing enough to support pension provision for people that are self—employed, and those that work in the gig economy. why don‘t people understand? those that work in the gig economy. why don't people understand?‘ variety of reasons, it is hard to access advice, they don‘t understand what is available and they believe workplace pensions simply will not provide enough. joining us now is kari mccormick, head of financial ervices at burges salmon. services at burges salmon. did we have changes recently, the government introduced compulsory workplace pensions and boosted the minimum contributions. what more do the people you spoke to feel needs to be done to support people in that situation? well, i think what we could be doing to support people is going to need to be driven by the government. they are not part of the compulsory scheme that many
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employees belong to. so, some of the proposals that have been suggested include looking at when people do their self assessments, where contributions can be taken at that point. when it comes to people not understanding the pensions products on offer, who do you think the onus rests with? is it on people themselves to educate themselves and find out and do some research, or is it that what is being offered is put into complicated a way? to be honest with you, it is a combination. i think we, as individuals, have a role to play. the government has a role to play. the government has a role to play. the government has a role to play, and so does the financial services industry. there clearly is a need to make provision or product clearer. also, importantly, advice or at least guidance accessible to people when they need it. that is a real potential problem. in many cases,
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those who most need the advice are perhaps those who are least likely to be able to afford to pay a financial adviser? that is right, it is one of the problems. it is known as the advice gap. people with smaller pension pots do find it more difficult to access financial advice. so, we need to be looking at things like increasing automation, which should hopefully drive down the cost of advice, but also, as i've said, giving guidance to people on what might be available to them, and making products easier. the flip side of that is that providers need to be confident that if they are giving guidance they are not going to be held to the same standard by regulators if they were actually providing advice to those clients. 0k, thank you very much. the ftse100 has been hovering above
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that through the afternoon. a rise in shares in itv, royal mail and bt giving it a boost. tesco is down after disappointing profits. time for a look at the weather. here‘s chris fawkes. we have seen some places where there have been gaps in the cloud and sunshine coming through, for the majority of us it will stay cloudy to the rest of the day. weather fronts bringing rain across orkney, moving into shetland as well. as we go to the evening and overnight, we will see the cloud generally thickening again, some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle expected around the western coasts and hills, where it will also be quite breezy. south—westerly wind insuring it will bea mild south—westerly wind insuring it will be a mild night. temperatures for most staying into double figures. looking at the weather picture for thursday, we have weather fronts moving into scotland and northern ireland. that will be bringing thicker cloud through the day and
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outbreaks of rain. a largely dry started the day for england and wales but we will start to see patchy bits and pieces brain working into the north wales and also in northern england, through the afternoon. —— pieces of rain. there will be brighter spells, but on the whole a cloudy day. temperatures reaching a high of up to 19 degrees. that is your weather. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at four: music: dancing queen by abba a dancing prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative party conference comes to a close. if we all go off in different directions in pursuit of her own visions of the perfect brexit, we risk ending up with no brexit at all. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost early detection rates. rescuers are still trying to reach remote areas after indonesia‘s devastating earthquake and tsunami. the first grenfell tower survivor to give evidence tells the inquiry how he was confronted by thick black smoke outside his front door on the 10th floor.
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coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. andrew strauss stepping down? the ecb search for a new director of cricket under way after andrew strauss stood down, with a world cup and ashes series due on home side. key games for spurs in liverpool in the champions league tonight. we will see will at half—past. and the weather with chris. at the weekend, it turns wetter. we will be looking further afield as well, looking at some ea rly—season further afield as well, looking at some early—season heavy snow in canada, and how one of calgary‘s rarer residents has been coping with it. thank you, chris. also coming up: the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county, since they were given their royal titles.
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hello. this is afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. theresa may has insisted she will ‘not let the country down‘ over brexit. speaking at the conservative party conference in birmingham, where her eu strategy has been the focus of strong criticism from some in her party, mrs may defended her plans. she said ‘no one wanted a good deal more‘ than her, and she appealed to her critics to unite behind her, even if they didn‘t always agree with her. the prime minister also announced a new strategy to improve the treatment of cancer, with new diagnostic centres and earlier scans for patients. here‘s our political correspondent, ben wright. after the coughing calamity of last year, theresa may‘s speech needed to be polished. the set too had to stay solid. mrs may‘s task — to sell again her plan for brexit,
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rally her fractious party and map out a path for britain‘s future outside the eu. but nobody expected this... music: dancing queen. as theresa may revived the robot dance first unveiled in africa over the summer. can ijust say, you will have to excuse me if i do cough during the speech! i have been up all night supergluing the backdrop. mrs may began by making a case for decency and civility in politics. let‘s rise above the abuse. let‘s make a positive case for our values that will cut through the bitterness and bile that is poisoning our politics. and let‘s say it loud and clear, conservatives will always stand up for a politics that unites us rather than divides us. before turning to attack
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the current labour leadership. what has it come to whenjewish families today seriously discuss where they should go ifjeremy corbyn becomes prime minister? when a leading labour mp says his party is institutionally racist? when the leader of the labour party is happy to appear on iranian state tv, but attacks our free media here in britain? that is whatjeremy corbyn has done to the labour party. it is our duty in this conservative party to make sure he can never do it to our country. in the 70th year of the nhs, theresa may said cancer survival rates in the uk still lagged behind other countries and made this pledge. through our cancer strategy we will increase the early detection rate from one in two today to three in four by 2028.
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and then, of course, brexit. theresa may again said she was prepared to walk away without a deal and insisted her plan for post brexit trade was right. so this is our proposal, taking back control of our borders, laws and money. good forjobs, good for the union, it delivers on the referendum, it keeps faith with the british people. it is in the national interest. mrs may then swatted away calls for another referendum. they call it a people‘s vote. but we had the people‘s vote and the people chose to leave. theresa may enthused about the possibilities she saw from brexit. i passionately believe that our best days lie ahead of us. and that our future is full of promise. mrs may promised to remove the cap that limits the amount councils can borrow to build more houses and said the age of austerity was over.
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because you made sacrifices, there are better days ahead. so when we have secured a good brexit dealfor britain, at the spending review next year, we will set out our approach for the future. debt as a share of the economy will continue to go down. support for public services will go up. because a decade after the financial crash, people need to know that the austerity it led to is over and that their hard work has paid off. a confident speech — and this was — changes little. the outcome of the brexit negotiation matters a lot. that is what will shape her party‘s future and the country‘s. but this was a speech by a tory leader who looks keen to lead it for some time yet. ben wright, bbc news. for assista nt for assistant political editor norman smith watched the speech and
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gave us his assessment of the prime minister‘s address. it was a much more confident and upbeat mrs may there be so today. we got quite meaty, chunky policies, something which this conference has been conspicuously lacking today. we end the cap on cash councils can borrow to build houses. that may have a significant impact on galvanising local authorities into building more. we got the promise of a new cancer strategy with earlier detection rates, new diagnostic
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centres and more scanners. fuel duty to be frozen for another year, and on top of all that, a pledge that after brexit austerity ends, that in the spending review in the autumn of next year, the chancellor will look at increasing cash for public services. lastly, brexit. no surprise, mrs may stuck to her belief that the brexit deal she is proposing is in the national interest and the best in town. but significant i think that she delivered a clear and pretty brutal warning to her brexit critics, namely, if you insist on pursuing the perfect brexit, the ideological a pure, the theologically correct brexit, you could end up with no brexit, you could end up with no brexit because of the divisions it would cause, because of the danger it might pave the way for a further referendum, or even a jeremy corbyn government, and that will give mrs may‘s critics pause for thought. one
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thing that may however give them some hope, the fact that not once during the whole speech did she mention the word chequers. and i think they will believe that gives them a little bit of room to hope that mrs may could still rebrand or even rework her brexit plan. the prime minister says her new cancer strategy plans will form a central part of her long—term plan for the nhs. the early detection rate is to be increased from one—in—two to three—in—four by lowering the age of bowel cancer screening from 60 to 50. investments will be made in rapid diagnostic centres and the latest screening equipment — and mrs may promised these changes would mean that by 2028, 55,000 more people would be alive five years after their diagnosis compared to today. earlier our health editor hugh pym told me more theresa may reminded her audience that she had planned this five—year strategy for the nhs in england and awarded
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the money for that, and in return, she wanted an explanation from the nhs about how they were going to use the money and look beyond. so she asked for a 10—year strategy. we are likely to get that in november. but she said today that would include a new cancer strategy, and the key new pledge was this detection rate, early detection makes a huge difference if you catch cancers early, stage one or stage two. at the moment, only one in two are caught at that stage. she wants that increased to three out of four over the next ten years, although hasn‘t said precisely how that will happen. there was another pledge as well, that for bowel cancer screening, currently screening kits go out to 60 and over in terms of age in england. she wants that reduced to 50 to try to enable more people in their 50s to pick up possible signs early. that‘s already happening in scotland. that had already been announced by public health england, and it is a plan, and she has now said it will happen though cancer charities will say
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where is the money and resource coming from? how many more staff are needed to carry this out? there is a shortage of radiologists, and they are key in screening. you cannot produce a new workforce overnight. you can have the strategies and aspirations, and we will get this nhs10—year plan in november, but where is the resource going to come from? that is the key question. and the money for the nhs in england is only for five years, so it is all very well going up to 2028, but if there isn‘t any indication of where the resource is coming from, it will leave several questions. but she is clearly very focused on this. it is a very important strategy. it has been welcomed by campaigners cancer charities, but they would like to see a lot more detail. rescue workers in indonesia say time is running out to find any
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more survivors after the earthquake and tsunami which struck last week. the indonesian authorities have revised the number of those who have died to more than 1400 people. and hundreds of thousands more are in desperate need of aid. emergency teams are still trying to reach remote areas. rebecca henschke sent this report from the island of sulewesi. survivors pick through the ruins of their shattered homes in one village in donggala. five days after the quake and tsunami hit, no one has come to help them. translation: we have been here since friday. there hasn‘t been any rescue operation. we‘re still looking for the missing people manually, villagers alone. no heavy machinery. hopes of finding people alive are fading. and with huge areas still cut off from power and clean water, those who survived are struggling. nearly 2,000 homes in one area
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were swallowed as the violence of the earthquake turned the earth to liquid. it is thought hundreds died here. after days of waiting in her remote village, wasila and her family decided they had to walk to get help at palu airport. this is the first water they have had since yesterday. translation: we walked for ten hours through the mountains from our village that was completely destroyed. we were that desperate for aid. i was so stressed about the children. with the airport now re—opened, the military‘s cargo planes are able to bring in much—needed aid. they‘re also taking out traumatised women and children. strong aftershocks continue to be felt here, as families struggle to come to terms with what they have lost. noor hasjust got one—year—old fiona to sleep. she has been crying
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and clinging to her. translation: she says sometimes, where is my mum, where has my mother gone? i say we‘re still looking for her. your mum has gone on a long journey. if she hears a loud noise or a plane go overhead, she gets very scared. she is traumatised. this is where fiona‘s home used to be. now, completely submerged with mud. this is also where her mother and younger sibling are buried. fiona was here in this area when the powerful quake hit, triggering mud slides, sinking houses and completely altering the landscape. fiona was saved by her 11—year—old brother, who carried her awayjust in time. it will take months for people to rebuild their houses, but they may never recover from what they have lost. rebecca henschke, bbc news, palu. a volcano has erupted on sulawesi,
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about 400 miles from the area worst affected by the earthquake. the eruption of mount soputan sent an ash cloud miles into the air. there are no reports of casualties or damage but authorities warned people in nearby communities to prepare for volcanic ash fall. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost the chances of early detection. help for the desperate following the destruction in indonesia. aid starts to reach survivors of the earthquake and tsunami. liverpool face napoli in italy
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tonight. more on all those stories at 4:30pm. tonight. more on all those stories at a:30pm.join us tonight. more on all those stories at a:30pm. join us then. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack has been delivering his conclusions into the deaths of each of the five victims. judge mark lucraft qc started with a tribute to the ‘great dignity‘ of the victims‘ families. he described events on 22nd march last year at "one of the most iconic areas of london" as a "deliberate act of terrorism". our correspondent richard lister spoke to us earlier from outside the old bailey. he started by summarising the evidence that was heard over three weeks or so of this inquest.
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he began by delivering a tribute to the victims‘ families, and setting up the scene on what happened on the 22nd of march last year. he said that was a life changing day for many, when one of the most iconic areas of london was the target of a deliberate attack, an attack which he said lasted just 82 seconds, but with terrible consequences for so many people. he said khalid masood had driven his vehicle with clear, murderous intent and that 29 people apart from those who received fatal injuries on the bridge, 29 others have also been seriously injured by his car as he drove it across westminster bridge before crashing it into the railings around the palace of westminster, running through the front gates, and then killing pc keith palmer with knives. that more people did not die, said the judge, was due to the overwhelming actions of those who responded, both professionals and members of the public. but there were some criticisms, too.
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he said very pointedly, sadly, some members of the public chose to photograph and film rather than help. he said some of the material that has been posted online has been very distressing for the families, and he asked for it to be removed. he praised the families of those killed, the five people killed, saying they had shown great dignity throughout this inquest process. and as i say, he is expected to speak for another couple of hours before delivering his findings. and what will families be listening out for particularly? there are three areas they are most interested in. they will want to know whether he has come to any conclusions about the level of security around the palace of westminster and on westminster bridge. of course, what would be regarded as very high value targets by any potential terrorist, and yet there were not bollards or obstacles in place on the bridge, and the armed officers in place within the confines of the palace of westminster were not situated right by the gates where khalid masood made his entry into the confines
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of the palace of westminster, so families will want to know whether the coroner believes that more should have been done and could have been done before the attack to minimise the loss of life. they will also want to know whether he has any views on whether the security services should have played a more active role. khalid masood was known to them, but he wasn‘t an active subject of interest. of course, some will say maybe he should have been, and maybe something more could have been done to prevent this attack. since we heard from richard, the judge at the westminster bridge inquest has gone on to talk about the death of pc keith palmer. he said the attack on pc palmer was ferocious, and that as masood came
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through the gates, pc palmer confronted him. thejudge said, it is clear to me that pc palmer did act bravely and did not shrink from his duty to protect those in the palace of westminster. the judge is due to finished presenting his conclusions at the old bailey within the next half an hour. russian president vladimir putin has called former russian spy sergei skripal a "scumbag" and accused him of betraying his motherland. mr skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned with a nerve agent administered by russian intelligence officers in salisbury in march. translation: i see that some of your collea g u es translation: i see that some of your colleagues are promoting a theory that mr skripal was almost a kind of human rights activist, but he is just a spy. he betrayed his homeland will stop there is a term — traitor.
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he is one of them. imagine, all of a sudden, you meet a man who betrayed his country. what would you say to him? to anyone? he isjust riffraff, that‘s it. him? to anyone? he isjust riffraff, that's it. our moscow correspondent now has some context to mr putin‘s remarks. this was at an oil and gas conference taking place in moscow, an unusual setting, but certainly the journalist hosting this session to talk about energy veered away to talk about the skripal case. mr putin comments were extraordinary, very strong language, his strongest comments yet on the case. he lashed out at sergei skripal himself, the target of the attack in march. he called him a scumbag and said he was a traitor. he said that all traitors
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we re a traitor. he said that all traitors were scumbags. it was very strong language, and his facial expressions and his tone were also extremely strong. he also talked about the fa ct strong. he also talked about the fact that russia has asked britain to pass on evidence and documents about what happened in salisbury so, as he put it, moscow could see what really took place. but he was careful as well to underline that russia denies any responsibility for this attack, because despite the comments and the language he used about sergei skripal himself, he said that there was no reason for anyone to be poison. he said mr skripal had been a traitor, had been caught and had served five years in prison in russia, he was then swapped and sent to the uk. mr putin said, so what? if he went on consulting with intelligence agents elsewhere, who cares? that was his argument. so, no reason, as he put it, for russia to be involved in this attack. the first survivor of the grenfell tower fire to give
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evidence at the inquiry has been describing the moment he tried to leave his 10th floor flat after his son had woken him up and told him to get out. antonio roncolato, who‘d lived in the flats for 27 years, said he opened his door and was confronted with thick black smoke — it hurt his eyes and he thought it would kill him. so he didn‘t leave. daniella relph reports from the inquiry. you may find some of the images in her report distressing. he was one of the last residents to be rescued. antonio roncolato had remained in his flat for around six hours during the fire. it had been his home for 27 years. i swear by almighty god... the first resident to give evidence, he described how he opened the door to his flat as the fire took hold. and was confronted by overpowering thick black smoke. the moment i opened the door, ifelt i had been hit by a gas as well as smoke. so physically it would stop me from breathing. so i said you know, you cannot go out there. that is why i closed promptly and my eyes were crying like, you know, it was really horrible. so that is why i closed the door and i went to rinse my
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eyes in the bathroom. so basically the flames were there... using a floor plan of his flat, antonio roncolato explained that he could see the cladding alight and flames spreading on the outside of the tower. his son sent him this distressing photo of grenfell ablaze and phoned him, telling him that he loved him and that he needed to get out. inside the tenth floor flat mr roncolato took his own images of smoke filling the hallway. but he told the enquiry he still decided to stay put as instructed by firefighters. well, very much stay put, somebody is coming to get you. he was very determined in his affirmation, in his words. not to try anything risky, basically. that they were aware that i was there and they would come and get me. this was the day the families started to be heard at the grenfell enquiry. so far the focus has been on the official
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response to the fire. now it is examining the experience of survivors and those who lost family and friends. the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county since they were given their royal titles. harry and meghan visited edes house in chichester, where they viewed a rare copy of the american declaration of independence, before opening a university technology centre in bognor regis. lauren moss has been following the royal couple‘s tour. earlier she told me about their packed schedule, which also included brighton. the sun has been shining here in brighton, and people have turned out in their hundreds to greet the duke and duchess of sussex. it is the first time they have been here since they were married in may and given their official royal titles. it is a big day for everyone in sussex, and they have turned out to see them as well. just a few minutes ago, they
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left brighton and headed down the coast towards peacehaven, but while they were here, they greeted local schoolchildren just behind they were here, they greeted local schoolchildrenjust behind me, they we re schoolchildrenjust behind me, they were high—fiving the children, prince harry down on his knees high—fiving them, cheering with them, laughing and having a really nice chat with them. everyone was very excited, and all around the gardens at the royal pavilion, people had packed in, cheering and chanting their names. they went inside the royal pavilion, which has close family ties for prince harry. it was his great—great—grandfather, king george iv, who had it built in the 18th century, and it was a summer home for him in brighton. prior to arriving here, they had beenin prior to arriving here, they had been in chichester, seeing a rare copy of the american independence declaration. the only other copy is in washington, dc. then they went down and opened the new building at the university of chichester in bognor regis, so a big day for
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stu d e nts bognor regis, so a big day for students there too. whilst here in brighton, after going to the pavilion, they went to visit the survivors network, a charity based in brighton that supports and offers counselling to victims of sexual violence and abuse. and they help people across the county. i spoke to the trustees there yesterday, and they were telling me what a significant day this is for them, and of course, meghan markle is very outspoken about women‘s rights and gender equality, so this seems to be a cause close to her heart. they had a cause close to her heart. they had a meeting there and met survivors in what was sure to be an emotional time. now they have headed to peacehaven, where they will meet groups of teenagers at a youth club there which specialises in offering mental health support and coaching children with well—being, so they both seem to be causes very close to the hearts of the duke and duchess of sussex. time for a look at the weather with chris, who comes armed
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with quite a few puns. it has been cold. we have had heavy snow in canada. it is not unusual to get snowfall in canada will stop they normally get a few centimetres but they have had record—breaking snow in calgary, with over 30 centimetres. forecasters say it is a new record for the city. it has been very snowy. some of the rarer residents have been bearly able to believe how much snow has fallen. it did cause some panda—monium in the city, many traffic accidents. iam sad city, many traffic accidents. i am sad that simon mccoy is not here, because he loves a panda story and can cope with your puns better than me. we still have milder weather to come? for most of the uk, skies have
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looked grey and drab. there have been a few sunny breaks, particularly across southern england. you can see those in devon, dorset, hampshire, the isle of wight, and working into the south west midlands as well. brighter spells elsewhere, but by and large through the evening, the cloud will continue to thicken. wet weather from orkney and shetland. low cloud and drum whether —— damp weather. the south—westerly winds will ensure it is another mild night with temperatures from most staying in double figures. 10—12dc fairly widely. tomorrow, we have a weather front, a cold front, approaching the uk. that will ultimately bring outbreaks of rain to the north and west. ahead of that, a lot of quiet but cloudy weather to come once again. we have a cloudy start to the day, damp and drizzly and places,
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and outbreaks of rain will spread into scotland and northern ireland, particularly in the afternoon. the rain will get heavier and the winds will pick up in strength. ahead of the main weather front for northern ireland and scotland, there will be a few patches of rain working into north wales and northern england, so cloudy and dampier as well. further south, bright and limited sunny spells are possible, but even without much sunshine, it will still be mild, temperatures between 17 and 19 celsius, turning a little cooler across the far north—west of scotland. the cold front pushes south thursday night and into friday, slow moving across northern england and north wales, so a wet day coming up here. colder weather in scotland and northern ireland with sunshine, further south, fog patches. it will be mild, with temperatures up to 21 celsius. for the north, 10 celsius lower, temperatures of 12 celsius at best. on the weekend, on saturday, wet
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weather for england and wales, scotla nd weather for england and wales, scotland and northern ireland having the best conditions, with sunshine. most of the rain will leave southern england by sunday and will be slow to clear the south—east. sunny conditions elsewhere, but the breeze freshens in northern scotland, with outbreaks of rain pushing in on sunday afternoon. a mixed picture throughout the weekend, but before we get there, tomorrow is another mild but cloudy day. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: music: dancing queen by abba theresa may appeared on stage with a spring in her step to deliver her speech at the conservative party conference. she delivered a serious message on brexit to her party and the eu and declared that austerity was now over. the first survivor from grenfell tower to give evidence at the inquiry describes the moment he opened his front door on the 10th floor and was confronted by thick black smoke. rescuers are still trying to reach
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remote areas after last week‘s devastating earthquake and tsunami in indonesia. more than 14 hundred people are known to have died and the death toll is expected to rise. the coroner at the inquest into the westminster bridge attack has been delivering his conclusions, describing it as a deliberate act of terrorism and paying tribute to the great dignity of the victims‘ families. the duke and duchess of sussex are making their first official visit to the county that features in their royal titles. the couple, who married in may, are on a whistle—stop tour of sussex and met school children at brighton‘s royal pavilion. coming up — we look at the life of geoff emerick — the award winning studio engineer who worked on numerous of the beatles biggest albums, he has died at the age of 72. sport now on afternoon live with will. and andrew strauss will leave a big hole to fill in english cricket according to the team‘s coach.
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yes, trevor bayliss has been speaking about how much his england team will miss the influence of andrew strauss who‘s stepped down as england‘s director of cricket after three and a half years in the role. strauss had taken a break in may after his wife ruth entered a new period of treatment for cancer. andy flower, who has covered for him, will continue in an interim role before a full—time replacement is found. the former england test captain says 2019 is "potentially the most important the game has had in this country" with the world cup and ashes series on home soil. we all understand why he is going. yeah, it could be a big hole to fill. one of his strengths is that he is very knowledgeable on the game, number one. you know, and educated guy who can listen to people, and come back and put all of those things together in a very understandable way. you know, his
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ability to plan, and help us plan, going forward, has been first class. that has given us the management, the coaching of the team, it has given us a great help. his replacement should be in place before the tour of the west indies. but andrew strauss clearly has priorities elsewhere. as you can understand. and we have been hearing from the gulf are involved in the freak incident at the ryder cup, which resulted in a life changing injury for a woman in the crowd? brooks koepka says he‘s "heartbroken" that one of his tee shots at the ryder cup on friday resulted in a spectator losing the sight in her right eye. it‘s marred what was an incredible weekend in paris. the american‘s drive on the sixth hole veered off course and struck corine remande, a 49—year—old woman who‘d travelled from egypt to watch the golf. koepka says his "stomach sank" on learning she had been blinded. koepka went over to her in between shots to see if she‘s ok and at a news conference today before the alfred dunhill links championship at st andrews,
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koepka says he heard the news about the extent of the injury after arriving at the course on tuesday i‘m looking forward to speaking with her today or in the next few days, hours, whatever it may be. just having a conversation with her and talking to her. because there‘s nobody that feels worse about than i do. it‘s a tragic accident, what happened. i mean, i‘m heartbroken. i am all messed up inside. two cracking games involving british side in the champions league tonight. barcelona‘s superstars are in town, lionel messi and luis suarez are set to line up against tottenham at wembley tonight in what promises to be a tough examination of spurs champions league credentials. mauricio pottchetino‘s side lost their opening tie in the champions league at inter milan — and will be
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without several key players tonight. mousa dembele, christian eriksen and dele alli are all injured. barca are on a poor run of form domestically. but of course they have the main man, lionel messi. as players, you want to play against the best players in the world, and messi is certainly that. so yes, he‘s a fantastic player, and i‘m sure we‘ll do our best to stop him from adding to that record in england. we need to focus on ourselves, as well. you know, we‘ve got some great players. we need to play with energy in the game, and hopefully if we do that, we can come out on top. liverpool go to napoli tonight and the italian side‘s manager carlo ancelotti has been very flattering about his opposition. he‘s called them "one of the strongest teams in europe" — but the liverpool bossjurgen klopp isn‘t falling for any of that sweet talk.
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it‘s tactics — it starts already. he is so long in the business, and he wants to try to bring the very nice — the nice fella out of me. and i am here to be ready for a real battle. those matches should be brilliant this evening. we will have more for you this evening. breaking news from the inquests into the westminster bridge terror attack. the chief coroner has concluded that all five victims of that deliberate act of terrorism, as he described it, were unlawfully killed by khalid masood. he has asked that some of the graphic material of the incident‘s
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aftermath that has been posted online should be removed from the internet. he said that sadly some people, for whatever reason, have posted this material on the internet. some of it has been very distressing to the families. i would encourage that it be removed. he also went on to talk about the dignity with which the victims‘ families have behaved during the time that he has been holding these inquests. daniel sandford has this background report. the last calm moments of the day. an american tourist, leslie rhodes returning from hospital, a woman texting her husband on the way to get the kids from school. a tourist from romania and pc keith palmer, manning the main gates to parliament. but in 82 seconds of
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terror, it all changed. by the end of the day, three of them were dead. the other two, dying of fatal injuries. the first people to be hit on the bridge were melissa and kurt cochran. she survived, but he was killed. the inquest heard he had saved her life by pushing her out of the way of the killer‘s car. saved her life by pushing her out of the way of the killer's car. knowing that he saved me sure makes me want to make him proud. and recover the best i can, just go on and do what i can for my family and myself. ayes ha‘s can for my family and myself. ayesha‘s death left two children without a mother. her husband told me that things have to change in the world of counterterrorism. the one thing i absolutely want to
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do is to ensure that no other family goes through the horrendous pain that myself and my family have gone through. she lost her life, it could have been prevented. the killer was khalid masood, who hired a hyundai 4x4 to run down pedestrians on the bridge and bought large knives to finish off his attack. he was recorded laughing with a hotel receptionist as he made his final preparations. both the police and mis had been aware he was an extremely violent man before 2003. in 2004, his phone number was found on the mobile of a member of al-qaeda bomb plot, he had links with another suspect until 2009, and in 2010 he was listed as a known
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extremist. for six years he had contact with al—muhajiroun, and m15 heard he had celebrated the 911 attacks in 2013. he was briefly an official subject of interest for mis in 2010, but was downgraded and dropped off the radar. john thinks that the mis systems are out of date. it's obvious that even known subjects of interest were still able to carry out atrocities. frankly, that isn‘t good enough. to carry out atrocities. frankly, that isn't good enough. khalid masood drove his car onto the pavement on westminster bridge at just after 2.14, and almost immediately hit kurt cochran, knocking him onto the embankment five metres below. he then drove at speed into leslie rhodes and aysha frade. then he knocked andreea cristea into the thames, before
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running around to carriage gates. he stabbed keith palmer just running around to carriage gates. he stabbed keith palmerjust inside the gates before being shot by a close protection officer, 82 seconds after the attack began. the armed officers that were supposed to be on the gate we re that were supposed to be on the gate were at the other end. it was eight months since a truck attack on pedestrians in nice, butjohn phrased things that london did not learn from that attack. we don't just have to protect our buildings, but also our people. even if a simple railing was dividing the pavement and the road, he would not have been able to mount the pavement and all of those victims wouldn‘t have suffered the horrific consequences. and why were there no armed officers at the main gates to parliament, which, at that time, we re parliament, which, at that time, were always open during the day? the inquest heard that the official
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instructions were for armed officers to be in close proximity to the gate. the two officers on duty that day said in evidence that they fought for years that the orders we re fought for years that the orders were to patrol the whole of the yard. —— thought for years. were to patrol the whole of the yard. —— thought foryears. keith palmer‘s sister and mother said they felt let down by the force, and feel that the metropolitan police are trying to scapegoat rank—and—file officers for what was a bigger problem. the westminster attackers threw in difficult questions for the people that keep us and our democracy safe. but the killer was khalid masood, 52 years old and a father of four, motivated by his extreme, violent, islamist ideologies. i feel sorry for people that feel that way, that think that way. i think if we just could all find a little connection with each other, maybe some of this hate would
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go away. melissa cochrane, ending that report. let‘s speak to richard lister, who has been following these inquests at the old bailey. talk us through the conclusion that the coroner has drawn. yes, the bulk of the day‘s session was really about the day‘s session was really about the evidence that has been heard of the evidence that has been heard of the three weeks or so that the inquests have been setting. right at the very end, the last few minutes, the very end, the last few minutes, thejudge has been talking about the very end, the last few minutes, the judge has been talking about the conclusions he has come to us to whether there are any shortcomings in the way that the systems involved on the day with dealing with the attack the aftermath, came to bear. he said, due to shortcomings in the
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security system at new palace yard, including the supervision of those engaged in such duties, the armed officers were not aware of a requirement to remain in close proximity to the gates, as the gates to new policy art, just inside of which pc keith palmer was attacked and killed by khalid masood. the coroner went on to say, have the armed officers been stationed at the gates,itis armed officers been stationed at the gates, it is possible that they may have been able to prevent pc palmer from suffering fatal injuries. he is saying that there is room for improvement in the security system that was in place at the time, and he is, to some extent, pointing the finger at the metropolitan police systems in place at that time on the 22nd of march last year, saying that if the armed officers who were stationed at that area had been aware of the official directive about how they was supposed to carry out theirjob, then there is a possibility, and it is no more than
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that, it is possible they may have been able to prevent pc palmer from suffering fatal injuries. what he is referring to is the fact that the two armed officers that are on duty that day, they were on location with five or six unarmed officers, those two armed officers, according to directive is written and published in 2015, should have stayed at the gate area with only short patrols away from the area because it was recognised as a security risk when the gates were open, as they were on the gates were open, as they were on the 22nd of march. it emerged that the 22nd of march. it emerged that the officers were away from the gate area for little less than an hour at the time of the attacks. so they we re the time of the attacks. so they were not in the immediate vicinity of the gate area when it was carried out. the met has insisted that the directors were in place, all officers should have been aware of them. the officers involved say they we re them. the officers involved say they were unaware of that specific
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directive, they were working to a different, and older directive, one that came with a map that one of the officers at least carried in his pocket. what has happened now is that the coroner is going to issue, at some stage, a prevention of future death report. he has asked for submissions to that report, some by tomorrow and others by november. he will then write a report on how to prevent future deaths of this kind, and remember, this is only referring to the death of pc keith palmer. he is not referring to the other four people killed palmer. he is not referring to the otherfour people killed in palmer. he is not referring to the other four people killed in the attack. he is only referring to the events that took place within the palace of westminster, within the ya rd area palace of westminster, within the yard area where pc keith palmer was killed. he will be filing recommendations in a few weeks‘ time as to how the system should be changed. thank you, richard lister. just a reminder that the chief
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coroner has concluded that all five people who died in the westminster bridge terror attack were unlawfully killed. you are watching bbc news. new measures will see councils given greater freedom to borrow to fund the construction of new houses, theresa may said in her keynote speech at the conservative party conference. the prime minister said the "broken market" needs to be fixed — to put the dream of home ownership back within people‘s reach. she announced that the government will remove the cap on the amount local authorities can borrow against their housing revenue account assets. with me is polly neate, chief executive of shelter, a housing and homelessness charity that provides expert advice and support to the people in need. thank you for coming in. how significant is the removal of the cab? really significant. it will make a significant difference to a
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lot of people. we estimate that it could enable an extra 27 and a half thousand homes to be built. if you compare that to last year, just over 5000. actually, in terms of social homes, it will potentially make a big difference. what we hope is that it will be turned into the kind of housing that people at the sharp end of the housing crisis really need. what is that? well, for a start, social housing. we have 1.2 million people on waiting lists, who urgently need investment in social homes. this is a golden opportunity. the ball is in the council‘s court and we want to see them stepping up and we want to see them stepping up and building social housing again. what expertise do local authorities have these days, given that they have these days, given that they have very much moved away from building the number of council housing that we have seen many years ago? i don't think the issue is a
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lack of expertise, it is more what the other obstacles might be that might get in the way of them actually making the most of this freedom. for example, the cost of land. one of the things that is worrying is that the price of land is so high that if local authorities have to compete directly with private developers, they will end up paying such a high price for the land that they won‘t be able to afford to build low—cost homes on it. so, they do need to have other reforms that go with this if they are going to fix the broken housing market, as the prime minister says. how important is it that whatever social housing gets built isn‘t then sold off? it's very important that if it is sold off it is replaced. what we need to see is a rolling programme, and we do need a lot more homes thanjust programme, and we do need a lot more homes than just what would be guaranteed with a cat being lifted. asi guaranteed with a cat being lifted. as i say, it is a really significant step in the right direction. if
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council homes are sold off, we know that a lot of people do aspire to by their own home, if they are sold off, they need to be replaced, like—for—like. more importantly, there are families in totally unsuitable private renting, bed and brea kfast unsuitable private renting, bed and breakfast accommodation, they may not ever have the ability to own their own home, but surely they also have the right to a safe home, somewhere to call their own, to put down roots and have a long—term basis of their family? thank you. pret a manger has announced that full ingredient labelling, including allergens, will be introduced to all products that are freshly made in its shop kitchens. it follows the case of natasha ednan—laperouse who died after suffering an allergic reaction to a sandwich containing sesame seeds bought from one of its outlets. in a statement, pret chief executive clive schlee said he hoped the measures set the company on course to drive change in the industry. the court of appeal has ruled that the government acted unlawfully over its treatment
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of child refugees. the government agreed to relocate 480 children in britain as part of the so—called dubs amendment. but the court of appeal said some young asylum seekers were given "patently inadequate" reasons for being refused entry. ben will be telling us the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister urges her party to hold its nerve on brexit as the conservative conference comes to a close. theresa may also announced a new cancer stategy to boost the chances of early detection. a coronor has concluded that all five victims of last year‘s westminster terror attack were "unlawfully killed". here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. shares in the british luxury car—maker aston martin have begun trading on the london stock exchange. they debuted at £19 a share a price which gives the firm a value of more than £4.3 billion. the company is best known for providing james bond‘s vehicle
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of choice but is trying to broaden its appeal. pret a manger will list all ingredients, including allergens, on its freshly made products. this is after the death of a teenager who had an allergic reaction after eating a pret sandwich. as we‘ve been hearing, people in their 20s who want to rent a place for themselves face having to pay out an "unaffordable" amount in two—thirds of britain, according to bbc research out today. at the prime minister‘s speech, she said austerity is over. what is the business reaction? some people will say after eight years of cuts it is about time. at the treasury will feel a bit of pressure from those comments. they still want to strike that balance between what is spent and what is coming in, when they
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talk about balancing the public finances. they have promised more for the nhs, but on the other hand they have committed to a freeze on fuel duty remaining. it ties the hands of how to raise money. the economic risks of brexit, of course, are still losing. —— looming. aston martin, the car of choice for james bond but not for some investors ? james bond but not for some investors? the gentleman there is not in fact james investors? the gentleman there is not in factjames bond, i should point out. that is the aston marton chief executive, andy palmer, outside the london stock exchange. the luxury car—maker began trading for the first time. an outcome that is more shaken, than stirred, if you will indulge me without reference. the shares started at £19 and it does low as 17.81, i have checked and they are about 18.23, a bit
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lower than they opened. it has gone bust several times in its 105 year history, but despite that, a lot of excitement about the sale because it is the first uk car—maker to sell shares for years. the glamorous association, of course, with 007. they want to appeal to more women, maybe they could take a leaf out of another car manufacturer‘s book? maybe they could take a leaf out of another car manufacturer's book? the boss of citroen, linda jackson, the country‘s first female chief executive, has told them that the car industry needs to consider women more. i love driving, i like a nice engine, but where am i going to put my handbag and where are the kids going to be? let‘s bring in simon french. let‘s stay on the car theme. aston martin, why don‘t you think the shares performed better than they did, given the anticipation and excitement? the price of this
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initial public offering was quite aggressive in terms of the multiple's, how investors value the company. it is on about 60 times earnings. uk shares are on about 12 or 13 times earnings. it is very much priced as a luxury brand on the basis they will be able to double output and improve profit margins. l think investors are a little bit sceptical this morning. they don't think they could deliver those things on a high multiple and still achieve the success story of recent years. another company whose shares have not done well at all, tesco. that was interesting, because they reported rising sales and rising profits. but investors are looking at it and saying, profits are not quite good enough? you would have thought registering a £930 million profit for the last six months, investors will be celebrating, but shares are down 8%. the reason is
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that some of the other markets outside the uk, noticeably thailand, poland, delivered below average results. what you are seeing at the moment in share prices is that if a company mrs profit margins, some of them lose on their share price. let's go to the old bailey and hear a response to the outcome of the westminster bridge inquests. even though these proceedings can never bring ice show back, we are here to make sure that the only ones that should be remembered as a result of this atrocity are the victims. one of the first pieces of advice that she ever gave me was that for things to change, you need to change. we hope that, as part of her legacy, lessons will be learned to prevent otherfamilies from lessons will be learned to prevent other families from being lessons will be learned to prevent otherfamilies from being in lessons will be learned to prevent other families from being in this situation in the future. aysha will
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be ourguiding situation in the future. aysha will be our guiding light, and even though the family will never be the same without her, we will continue to fight against the injustice of her death. we would like to express our eternal gratitude to the family liaison officer who has supported us since the beginning, to gareth patterson, hogan lovells, and the expertise and humanity that has gone above and beyond in every aspect. thank you. that was the husband of aysha frade, one of the victims of the westminster bridge terror attack of march last year. the chief coroner, who has been presiding over the inquest into the death of the five victims has reached the conclusion that all five were unlawfully
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killed. that was the conclusion from the coroner, sitting at the old bailey after those inquests, which he described as a deliberate act of terror. that is from us. time for the weather. we have seen some gaps, but for the vast majority will stay cloudy for the rest of the day. weather fronts bringing cloudy for the rest of the day. weatherfronts bringing rain across orkney and moving into shetland. we are going to see the cloud thicken. temperatures for most are going to stay in double figures. the weather picture for thursday, we have a weather front moving into scotla nd have a weather front moving into scotland and northern ireland, bringing thicker cloud through the day and outbreaks of rain. a largely dry start for england and wales, but
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patchy pieces of rain in wales and northern ireland for the afternoon. otherwise, it stays dry. there will be occasional brighter spells, but on the whole a pretty cloudy day. temperatures up to 90 degrees. that is your weather. today at 5pm — a rallying call from the prime minister as she promises better days ahead for britain. in an upbeat message, she urges conservatives to hold their nerve on brexit as the party conference draws to a close. ours isa ours is a great country. ourfuture is in our hands. together, let us seize it, together, let‘s build a better britain. the prime minister signals an end to austerity and makes several announcements — including steps to boost housing and new nhs cancer targets.
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we‘ll have the latest on those announcements. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm...
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