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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 5, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2. it's feared that more than a thousand people are buried under mud and rubble, after the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia. a criminal investigation is launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. political leaders from northern ireland meet the eu's brexit negotiator in brussels, to discuss possible solutions to the irish border question. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with holly hamilton. we'll be looking ahead to this weekend's premier league action with six matches tomorrow. including another home game for manchester united, but can they avoid a fifth defeat at old trafford this season? welljose mourinho certianly hopes so — we'll hearfrom him at 2.30. thanks holly. it is set to turn a much colder in
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england and wales, but the weekend will have at least one friday with some sunshine. many will also see some sunshine. many will also see some wet and windy weather. we will be looking further into the weather, some storms have hit southern italy and we will be looking at the effect of those storms later. also coming up — what i did in my summer holidays — the eight—year—old girl who uncovered a 1,500—year—old sword. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. a week after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the island of sulawesi in indonesia, officials say they fear up to a thousand people could still be buried in the area.
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the number confirmed missing is more than a hundred, but rescue teams now believe more people may have been unable to escape the buildings as they were submerged under mud when the tremor hit. one week ago, this shopping centre was full of life as palu's people started their weekend. today, it is where the search for hundreds of bodies slowly continues. there is little family members can do but wait. hope of finding anyone alive has almost disappeared. in some places, it's hard to know where to begin, like here, where homes are encased in meters of mud. it means the final death toll could eventually double. i think it will be increased, as in many places, houses are buried, and we still don't know how many, but maybe double. law and order has been restored,
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but palu's jail is still missing 600 of its inmates after the earthquake turned it into an open prison. when the ground started to shake, the prison started to collapse. this is what's left of the internal wall of the cells. it came down, the prisoners could just walk over, and this is what is left of the external wall. jump over this, and they were out. the governor said he tried to stop them but was attacked as prisoners started to flee. translation: we panicked when the earthquake happened, then there was more panic as hot water, mud and sand started coming up through the ground. but remarkably, a few, including andy, decided to hand themselves in after checking on theirfamilies. he is injailfor shooting someone. translation: i have less than one year left to spend in prison. i have been injail for a long time,
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about six years,... humanitarian aid is now reaching many of those who need it. shelter kits and solar lamps and britain have now arrived in indonesia, but it will take another day before they arrive in sulawesi. the need for help here will last for many months, if not years, as people try to rebuild their lives. let's cross over now to cardigan where the plaid cymru leader adam price is adressing delegates at conference. we will bejoining his we will be joining his speech in a few minutes. adam price is the new leader of plaid cymru, he has ended
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the six year reign of the previous leader at the end of last month. adam price was elected a leader of almost 50% of votes. adam price was elected a leader of almost 5096 of votes. welsh politics is coming alive again. that is properly one of the most unlikely headlines ever of the 87 year history of go magazine. they are right. something is happening in wales. we are at a crossroads as a country, i don't mean britain in europe, i mean wales in europe and wales in the world. wales in our heart and wales in our mind. a hinge point in our history, one path forward is the same path as our past. 1918 marks the city of the first world war, but also the beginning of 100 years of labour's
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rule in wales. that great party, once a movement, a force to change, has shrivelled into the management class of the status quo, shackling us class of the status quo, shackling us to the courts of a british body politic, which these days is doing a pretty convincing presentation of the last days of the austria and hungarian empire. that's all they need now are the hats and the epaulettes. i could see borisjohnson wearing one! is chucking chequers is on the agenda, can we please ditch downing street, to? for 20 years, what passes for political leadership in wales has failed the test of our times. welsh
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politics has been an oasis of stasis ina sea politics has been an oasis of stasis in a sea full of change. politics is a vacuum as much as nature. many people have begun to lose faith in democracy, hoping the future and believing in themselves. some have cheered brexit as disastrously as those at 100 years ago dancing to the song. as the dream of empire sours, the welsh nation, and our ancient nation, begins to rouse from its long slumber. there is something happening in wales, and it's us. these moments, when history speeds up, when minds and hearts open up, when a nation begins to rise up, come along just once a generation. this is our moment. this is our time. this is our chance. in times
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such as these, the first imperative is to be clear and ambiguous. we have to be honest with the people of our country, there is no sustainable solution to the problems and challenges we face without welsh independence. it is only by owning our own problems that we will solve them, by owning our own opportunities that we will seize them, by owning our own dream, not boris johnson's, jacob rees—mogg's, that we can turn our welsh dreams into our reality. we have to be honest with our people about the destructive potential of a brittle and bitter brexit. some argue there is a constant to addiction in arguing for europe and
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welsh independence. —— a contradiction. wales has always been tightly woven together, from our language and roots in a celtic civilisation that ranged from turkey to our own country. we may be the descendants of the original britain, but we were welsh. a hybrid culture that looks outward, notjust in, and to the future, notjust that looks outward, notjust in, and to the future, not just to that looks outward, notjust in, and to the future, notjust to someone else's manufactured past. when england's kings wanted to crush our independence 600 years ago, it was the boys from scotland, and france, that honoured us with their presence when we had a prince. a few years after the prince disappeared, there was a council, the european parliament of its day. an english delegate proposed that voting should 110w
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delegate proposed that voting should now be by nation. it was a french delegate, who stood up to argue that the welsh on the island of britain we re the welsh on the island of britain were not part of the english nation that we were a nation in our own right. it was by a european in a european parliament that we were first proclaimed as a nation to the world. you did not forget as then and we will not forget you now. in1979, a in 1979, a welsh referendum was not possible. we cannot wait 20 years to undo the damage that is about to befall us, to see our farming
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industry decimated, our fishing sector eliminated, the disappearance of our manufacturer. brexit is the greatest existential threat to our civilisation. mirroring michael gove, the response to this is to ta ke gove, the response to this is to take away from's safetynet by phasing out the basic payment scheme from 2020. in wales, 80% of an average farmer's income comes from the common agricultural policy, and this figure is likely to be even higher. wales is 4.7% of the uk pub elation, but receives 9% of what comes to the uk. the scottish government is maintaining basic payments, northern ireland will do so as payments, northern ireland will do so as well, even labour's shadow
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secretary has announced that labour in england would maintain basic farm payments. this is creating an uneven playing field for wales. the summer was spent arguing strongly that the welsh government proposes that scrapping basic payment would be the biggest change since the second world war to agriculture in wales. despite this, very little has been done on the effects of this drastic policy change. the proposal is in race to do away with basic payment with farmers, what this could do to our rural communities would be what margaret thatcher did to industry in wales. we have heard in scotland, if we look at family farms going into business, then it will be the clea ra nces business, then it will be the clearances of wales. plaid cymru believes firmly that all foreigners should continue to receive a basic income and any new system following brexit must offer direct support to active farmers, rather than rewarding landownership in itself. it is not just
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rewarding landownership in itself. it is notjust rural wales that is facing catastrophe, we are on the titanic‘s deck. the iceberg is looming. the uk government strategy seems to tell the iceberg to move. carthago delenda laughing don't they realise who we are? david cameron is on a beach sunning himself, jacob rees—mogg has moved to dublin. but it is the people who are to dublin. but it is the people who a re left to dublin. but it is the people who are left in the third class cabins below. we have got to break that deadlock and give people a chance and a choice to direct the disaster for which it is they that will pave the heaviest price. this is why we say it is time for a people's vote.
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but what is labour doing in all this? holding hands with theresa may as the band plays. we lost the vote in favour of the people's vote in the national assembly, because labour and the liberal democrat couldn't bring themselves to vote for it. instead, they talk in terms of keeping our options open, when our options are fast running out. like bradford itself, labour and corbin promises of the illusion of change. because for us in wales, labour actually represents the essence, the very essence, of the politics of the past. this is why we must become the party of tomorrow. that's the crossroads that we face,
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that's the choice, change versus more of the same, the future or the past, the old wales, or the new wales. to build the new wales, we must invest in the next generation. in the campaign, we mentioned the importance of making wales the best place in the world in which to be young. this starts at the very beginning of life, the lib dems in 2015 proposed that free school meals would be available to all primary school children in england, but labour in government are doing the very opposite. due to their decision to cap the agility of families and universal credit at a net earned income of 7400, more than 40% of children who live in poverty in wales will not be eligible for free school meals. this will be the least generous offer in the uk, as all children in scotland and england are provided with free school meals and
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the cap for earned income in northern ireland has been set at £14,000, almost double the level proposed in wales. childcare costs, welsh families are spending almost a quarter of their income, even before tax. the childcare offer provides families earning up to £2000 a year with 30 hours a week, free childcare for three roles, but doesn't provide the parents seeking work or are in education or training. so much for labour's flying start, more a flailing start, shame on them. it is time for a new start for wales, a plaid cymru government will deliver a comp offensive childcare package, making it possible for pa rents to package, making it possible for parents to return to work when they choose, giving children from all backgrounds a good start in life, with a healthy and nutritious meal,
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clothes for school, support for field trips, and received a world —class field trips, and received a world—class education. that is how we build a new wales. but to build those new foundations of confidence, of promise and prosperity, we must first renew ourselves as a party. new ideas, new ways of thinking, new ways of working. over the course of the leadership election, i outlined my desire to transform our party into an election winning machine. what became clear to me this summer is that members across the country, those of you who have given years of selfless service to the party also share this same thing. we have islands of success in the party, where we establish communities with assembly members, members of parliament, and councils. in other
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constituencies, our candidates are often the agents, leaflet design, organiser and canvas, too. if we are to win, we need to transform, we have two tone supporters into members and members into activists. we must expand in every sense. we will establish a national campaign unit to deliver a dedicated team of support in campaigns across the country. consisting of specialists who will roll out campaign technologies and provide all the services you need to succeed. alongside this, there will be a national organising academy, to support our volunteers to become leaders in their community and teach the principles of grassroots organising. it also put candidates, branches and constituencies with their local plans to achieve
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positive change in their areas. from the local saver school campaign to standing for parliament, organising and expanding the group of grassroots activists, building personal relationships with voters, this will be crucial to achieving a plaid cymru government in 2021. to make sure we get this right, we need a fool and honest assessment of where we are. therefore, i am pleased to announce that my first act as leader is to commission the former snp westminster leader and the coordinator of the snp's independence campaign, angus robertson, to conduct a review of the party's robertson, to conduct a review of the pa rty‘s campaign robertson, to conduct a review of the party's campaign machinery. this work will begin immediately and we will report promptly and look at our structures and ability to secure
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a victory for plaid cymru in every corner of the country. in the desperate attempts to divert a views away from westminster, my message to them is simple, plaid cymru will have an election winning machine ready to face the challenge whenever an election comes, so bring it on. let that battle begin, a battle between the old ideas, the new ideas and no ideas. we will succeed, as we a lwa ys and no ideas. we will succeed, as we always have done. as the party of the new ideas, of the new wales, of the new ideas, of the new wales, of the new ideas, of the new wales, of the new horizon. the modernisers of an ancient nation. with leadership elections in each of the political parties, they should have been a
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great resettlement in welsh politics, a political renaissance. but when a single new policy was challenged to be mentioned, he couldn't mention one. in the old unionist parties, the cupboard is bare. there is is a desert of inspiration in a nation that is thirsty for change. karen jones, they were great indicators. they talked but without saying anything or doing anything of substance. what wales needs is not a prime monarch, but a prime minister, with the vision and knowledge to translate into action. we wa nt we want wales to be the creative country, a knowledge nation, a land
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of innovation, of inspiration and of hope. the hope that unite humanity, that sustains us all through dark times, the focus of our love for each other and each new generation, that the future will be better than the past, that the hopes and the dreams of all the years will not have been in vain, that we will persevere and we will prevail, that we will win the new world and the new wales, for which we have yearned so long. that new wales is on the horizon. its shores are beckoning. it is time for us to be the bridge that gets us there. we must fire up the national imagination with the sense of a wales that might yet be. we must create in our people a realisation of the radical urgency of now. we cannot afford to keep doing what we've done for another five years, it is time to end the
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well worn path of decline, the disgrace of falling life expectancy, the scandal of the collapse in educational rankings, the state of our economy, instead, we must begin to chart a new course. we have been a nation of innovators, when the welsh armies here at the battle in cardigan seized the superior forces of the anglos, there is nothing novel in this year ‘s's westminster power grab, what did they do but innovate? they dominated europe, until the gunpowder was
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invented here. we've been a nation of saving lives as well. the first social insurance scheme for help was introduced in 1911, the first full—time public health chair was endowed in preventative medicine in the world, in cardiff in 1917. in 1948, the first system to offer free medical care to the whole population anywhere in the world was introduced in the nhs. in 1972, evidence —based medicine began building on previous work in the south wales valleys, together creating the collaboration which is credited with preventing millions of deaths and disabilities throughout the world. in primary care, the world famous inverse care law, that those who need it the worst, get the worst health care,
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was the observation of the late socialist gp, working in wales. this innovation has come shuddering to a halt with this government. we have seen the default thinking at play in the welsh government's budget this week. how do they make its budget? i've seen them up close to make up my mind. there is no strategic thinking, they start by raising everyone's budget or more often cutting everyone's budget. then, the health service gets more because it is in crisis, so everyone else get a haircut. social care gets cut, meaning there is an even bigger crisis in the health service the following year. the truth is, no amount of new money will solve our health service problems if unaccompanied by new thinking. we spend 40% of our budget on help the health service and the oecd says that about 20% of that makes no or
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minimal contribution to positive health outcomes. worse than that, did from wales and other countries show that one in ten patients are actually harmed by hospital admission. i want to develop a conference of new vision for health and care, work is already under way, being led by a leading doctor and i wa nt being led by a leading doctor and i want this to approach every area of public policy. i will be setting up a series of panels, each of which will have terms of reference, priorities and the direction of travel. for health, these will be the creation of a national care service alongside the nhs. it shift in emphasis from hospital based to gp led, primary care provision in the community. a health approach which integrates health, notjust with care, with housing, education, transport, food and the environment. we will also ask the panel to examine the original compromises
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made to continue private practice by consulting specialists, the continuing status of gps as private operators of public service. the absence of local democratic accountability and mental health. we can and will go further, even further than the leading doctor did and build the truly universal health service of which he only dreamt. we wa nt we want to embrace that spirit of radical and transformational thinking in every area of welsh life. we're not here to reproduce the past, to tinker at the edges, to accept the current paradigms of conventional thinking. we are here to remake wales and fashion it into a beacon of what wales could come.
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as phil williams used to say, we are the perfect scale for innovation. we are big enough to matter, small enough to manage, a nation of national cooperators with 1 degrees of separation and not six. when i'm first minister, we will re—localise the economy, watering the roots and building the foundations, we will do what the french government has just done and guaranteed by law that at least 50% of all food bought by the public sector is local. when i'm first minister, we will make upfor when i'm first minister, we will make up for generations of underinvestment i leap frog in and building the future here, building a reliable and fast and modern and renewable powered western rail line up renewable powered western rail line upfora renewable powered western rail line up for a wales, linking swansea with bangor... we don't need your western
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powerhouse, we will build our own here in wales. when i'm first minister, we will create a real development bank, to offer a patient loans to help local companies grow and when necessary, to be bought by the staff to help companies made in wales... we're going to leave this there, the new leader of plaid cymru, who is saying that he is aiming to transform his party into an election winning machine, saying that wales in europe is ata machine, saying that wales in europe is at a crossroads, wales and politics is coming alive again. he says, this is our moment and time, he calls for independence and a second people's vote on brexit.
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the green party conference is under way in bristol right now. on the stage you can see the co—leaders of the party. they are starting their joint speech. let's have a listen in to that as well. to standing up to the utter nonsense that was greed is good. labour leaders still have a lot to learn from the green party. they still have to drop that old 20th—century notion that says growth is good. greens... greens but real prosperity at the heart of policy. a real transition to a healthier economy that stays within the retirement‘s limits, because what else can it do? greens want an end to airport expansion, not at heathrow or
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gatwick or bristol. labour have failed at this. labour would give up fossil ‘s or nuclear. the greens say, shut down the bomb factories of bae and build for the future. labour would renew trident and put billions into military hardware we can never use. and so many times it has been the greens alone standing up for freedom of movement in europe, just as we stood up for refugees and migrants saying, we welcome you. conference, time after time the greens are the real alternative. we go further, we do it better and labour should expect us to challenge them and keep getting stronger. and then there's the tories.
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reckless and cruel, from gambling with peace in northern ireland to the despicable treatment of the windrush generation. cut off to cut after cut, from cradle to grave. children's centres, schools, youth services, community centres, libraries, social care. and then they have the audacity to say austerity is over, when the majority of welfare cuts are still to come. conference, we spoke up about austerity when everyone else stayed silent and we say, reversed the cuts that are destroying people's lives and scrap universal credit. the new big idea— a festival of
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brexit britain got a festival of brexit britain got a festival of brexit britain. roll—up to see the world's longest lottery queue, a parade of empty shops and pin the blame on the people who want to remain. a festival where you can refuse to pay the entrance fee and then demand and limited access to all of the attractions. —— unlimited access. conference, we all know what is driving brexit — this beautiful sherard is being engineered so that the tories can say they ended freedom of movement. sacrificing peoples lives and futures. it is not just cruel or reckless, this is no way to govern a country. , conference, it is dangerous. it has
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paved the way for the rise of the far right in our communities and on our streets. and let's be clear, if brexit does go ahead, deal or no deal, we will have to stand for than ever. a new wave of attacks on the poor and the powerless. a war on human rights, civil liberties, workers and our environments, opening the floodgates to any type of racism and nationalism. what's the point of beating the national front, the edl and the bnp if you then bow your need to ukip. —— bow your knee. we have all watched in dismay as the right have rioted in germany, taking cabinet seats in austria and promoted the exit of sweden. from
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the german greens standing up to the extremes, to running a pro—migrant platform. we stand firm in the belief that migration is a gift to us all which enriches all of our lives. greens reject the myth of skilled and unskilled. migrants are not just workers. they are our neighbours, friends, families. greens are best when we are internationalists, when we recognise that borders are created by people and they can be torn down as well as put up. our country rejected and fought the hard right and fascism and we will not allow their poisonous politics to take hold in politics in britain again. there is a battle going on to defend the soul of this country and it's time to
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pick a side. thank goodness for caroline lucas! and shining light in our parliament, and a thorn in the side of the government every single day. caroline, it has been an absolute privilege to work alongside you. you have shown the importance of having a green on every council, assembly and every parliament. you have led demand for a people's vote, you have led this party and this country. your voice rings louder than any other. thank you. and what about those who think a new
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party is the answer? that yet more vapid centrism is the solution to the problems we face? we say, think again. that is what got us into this mess. stare again. that is what got us into this mess. sta re ha rd again. that is what got us into this mess. stare hard into the so—called centre ground and all you can see is compromise, timidity and more of what has already failed. it is not a vision. it is that muddled middle ground that allowed the bankers to rise, the planet to burn. the future demands change, it demands politics with passion. radical common—sense for the common good. what the greens do best. and far too many of the people pushing a new centrism are doing so as some kind of alternative to
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brexit. this just shows as some kind of alternative to brexit. thisjust shows how little they have learned from the vote to leave. the politics of centrism, the blairite consensus is exactly what has led to so many people and places feeling forgotten and blaming europe. and they see that people wa nted europe. and they see that people wanted real change? the green opposition to leaving the eu is what people are crying out for. when we get a people's vote, we will fight twice as hard to make sure we will have that revolution when the brexit harry kane has passed. with the first party to call clearly for a people's vote and we have played a key pa rt people's vote and we have played a key part in building the campaign. london assembly, the greens propose the motion that brought london members together with us and pushed the mayor of london of his friends. the green mep has looked into the dirty money in 2016, just as for
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nearly 20 years, green meps have stood at 54 our values and everyone's rights, showing the difference that greens can make. can i say thank you, keith, jean and molly for all you have done. and it isn't quite over yet. it is in our hands and with our help a people's vote feels absolutely unstoppable. green politics will never be confined to parliamentary assemblies or council chambers. it must also be outside, banging on the doors. to
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change everything we must be willing to put our bodies on the line, and thatis to put our bodies on the line, and that is why on monday i stood outside chelmsford crown court as 15 of the bravest people in this country filed in to face a judge and jury country filed in to face a judge and jury who could send them to prison for life. their alleged crime— starting deportation. stansted 15 didn'tjust stop starting deportation. stansted 15 didn't just stop the flight taking off. they didn't just give didn't just stop the flight taking off. they didn'tjust give people didn't just stop the flight taking off. they didn't just give people a chance to appeal and state, they didn'tjust put chance to appeal and state, they didn't just put their chance to appeal and state, they didn'tjust put their bodies on chance to appeal and state, they didn't just put their bodies on the line. the stansted 15 acted as our conscience. the conscience of every person in the country who believes that britain is better than to shackle people and deport them into danger. people from the very tip of our
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shores to cornwall. people who could be my father, mother, brother, sister. people who believe that no one should be drawn from their families, stripped of their livelihoods and strapped to their seats on these brutal chartered flights. the stansted 15 are not criminals. they are human rights defenders, they are heroes .com today i call on the cps to see sense and drop the charges against them. conference, the hypocrisy that those who celebrate suffer just conference, the hypocrisy that those who celebrate sufferjust an anti—apartheid activist in one
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breath could then turn their backs on those who fight for human rights todayis on those who fight for human rights today is breathtaking. we should be under no illusions. no illusions that our civil liberties and our freedom to protest are under threat. from those who oppose the environmental vandalism of high—speed rail to those fighting against new open cast mines. today we stand on the shoulders of so many giants and we stand today on the shoulders of the three men who last week were jailed for their opposition to fracking. richard roberts, simon berghan 's, richard rees you are on the right side of history. you are on the right side of
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history, and you have our deepest thanks and gratitude. you are environmental rights defenders and today we say that fracking must be banned and you must be set free. throwing people in prison is a dying industry's desperate death rattle. but they can't arrest the whole of lancashire. they can try. it was a pleasure to see so many come for the green week of action. we are winning the fight against fossil fuels. and a victory is inevitable. police may have dragged us away from this, but
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it was third energy that left with its tail between its legs. we evicted europa oil, we booted the banks group out and we will kick quadrilateral of lancashire. —— could quadrilla out of leticia. and i have a message to all of the people who are involved in fracking. we will not stop until your industry is thrown into the dustbin of history. conference, it is four months since the leadership elections began. i wa nt to the leadership elections began. i want to say thank you to everyone who stood and spoke so positively about their passion for our party.
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more new members signed up injuly and in any time since the last general election, and we are honoured to be your new co—leaders with the job of showing the country held green politics can change everything, and we extend a huge welcome to everyone who has joined. and congratulations to amelia. our members are backing him as a third term deputy leader. the way she co nve nes term deputy leader. the way she convenes fearlessly, leading the work on fighting cuts and misogyny and come rain or shine, you are out there with local parties, inspiring activists and starting campaigns across england and wales. big thank you to amelia. conference, one thing that also
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became clear during the leadership elections is that we need to be better as a party in the way we relate to one another. we need to be willing to listen to those we disagree with, and when we disagree we should disagree well. we are proud of our policies on free speech, peace building, conflict resolution and restorative justice. but let's lead the way by our actions, notjust point in the right direction. let's pledged today to be the good in any argument, notjust the good in any argument, notjust the right. let's be the change that we want to see. conference, our members code of conduct tells us to assume the best of each other in all our
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interactions, so let's do our vital work together with generosity, and integrity. let's work for the common good with ethics. let's make decisions by seeking consensus, a lwa ys decisions by seeking consensus, always demand respect for opponents as well as our allies. because, conference, the greens stand against all hatred— trans phobia, by phobia, homophobia, against racism, disabling some, misogyny, sexism and patriarch e. we must do so together in solidarity. —— and the patriarch e. vince the last conference, the ballistic review commission has been working day and night to review our
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party structures and practices. it has been a huge, convex and long overdue task. i want to see a huge thank you to each and every one of the commission today. you have our support. conference, let's keep the party moving forward in every way. injune, at the black party moving forward in every way. in june, at the black cultural archivesjust off in june, at the black cultural archives just off windrush square in brixton, i was proud to launch a new fund for the person who was candidate for mayor of manchester. the fund will support candidates from ethnicities that are underrepresented. add amongst those attending was donald trump's nemesis, our grand lord mayor of sheffield. showing us exactly how to
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shake things up. and we need to invest in the next generation of green leaders. we need more chances for new people to get the skills they need to develop and shine, with more access to campaign school, in it to win it and the amazing 30 under30 it to win it and the amazing 30 under 30 plan. let's it to win it and the amazing 30 under30 plan. let's build it to win it and the amazing 30 under 30 plan. let's build up 18 for new regions, ready to hit the ground running when the election happens. when we get elected, we change everything, and that is why we are planning for a shadow cabinet with a wealth of strong, challenging green voices holding the government to account. let's show why the department for work and pensions should be renamed the office for welfare and well— being, why should be renamed the office for welfare and well—being, why the home office should become the department for security and welcome and why the treasury should be transformed into
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the ministry for economic transformation. conference, we are all ambitious for our party, and we are right to be. this may soar our best local elections ever. we have a record number of councillors, we made the link breakthroughs and six new councils — traffic, peterborough, mosley, richmond, birmingham and burnley, taking seats from the conservatives and labour in equal number. and what a victory in lambeth! london greens are now the official opposition on lambeth council afterjonathan official opposition on lambeth council after jonathan was elected with four new games. that breaks open labour's complacent 1—party state in style. labour tried to wipe
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the greens out. how they tried! they had mps down to campaign, the mayor of london, but they could not keep the greens down. and i'm so pleased we have here today the man who has just launched his campaign to become the next mayor of bristol. we need someone using this city with the courage to invest in our future so well done, and good luck. friends, we have greens elected to 68 local authorities, holding them to account. we hold the balance of power in places like stroud, the forest of dean and will start. the next local elections are just seven months away. we will be defending a record number of councillors and we wa nt to record number of councillors and we want to win a record number of new
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seats as well. we are on the way to becoming the country's third party, so let's hit the streets, knock on doors and start those conversations that will get a green voice on every council. conference, every green who stands for election, every green who stands for election, every green who stands for the town hall, the assembly or parliament brings about change. and the green party changes lives. earlier this year i went to campaign for our pollution by—election candidate. together we visited her daughter's memorial outside the children ward. it is made up of thousands of paper cranes, each
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individually decorated by her school friends. the japanese legend says that anyone who folds 1000 origami cranes will be granted a wish. her wish is that the government wakes up to the air pollution epidemic and takes action. her daughter, ella, was nine when she died. she died of breathing difficulties. she visited hospital 27 times in the preceding three years. her final admission happened during one of the worst air pollution episodes in london. conference, it is green voices that puts air pollution on the agenda when no one else is talking about it. it is green voices that are pushing it up the agenda now, and every green voice calling for a countrywide car free day, a new
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clean airact, clean countrywide car free day, a new clean air act, clean air zones, an end to waste incineration, no more road—building, investment in walking and cycling is helping her wish come true. conference, let me tell you about the ways are bright green ideas shine through and win. from 20 miles an hour speed limits to community renewable energy. the council for rent controls, the end of immigration detention and road pricing to clean up our air. these ideas, radical now, will seemed so normal in a few years. we are already winning the battle of ideas in london. sadiq khan was not going to do anything to plug the huge gaps in council youth services. that is until we got involved. thanks to our pressure, we now have £45 million
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going back into youth workers, projects and youth work in london. it took even more pressure at all levels from greens across london to get the mayor to change his mind and back ballots for residents on estates facing redevelopment and demolition and having won democracy, now we want more rights for private renters, two and section 21 notices. the most simple change— removing a clause from the housing act so that no fault evictions cannot happen, so that renters who want to stay cannot be turfed out. so it is a fight but we always stood up for the fact that housing is a human right. just like
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our brighton and hove councillors, david gibson and tom do it. homeless people there now have a secure overnight shelter thanks to their courage and determination. conference, when we get elected and we work with campaigners and communities, we can always win these battles. it is what green politics does best. it is why so many of you joined, it is why i'm stood here today and together we can win more arguments and change so much more. conference, we need fundamental change and we needed right now. this summer's heat wave must be a wake—up call. climate change should be on the front page of every newspaper every day and, conference, we won't debate with climate change deniers. because there isn't time. the un war
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and just last week that the biggest enemy is not denial, its complacency. we are nowhere near to doing enough. and we won't succeed by thrashing around with the same economic settlement that has sailed for so long that the scale of this crisis demands nothing short of syste m crisis demands nothing short of system overhaul. the decisions we make today dictate our tomorrow and thatis make today dictate our tomorrow and that is why we have to say a firm no to airport expansion and road—building and reject the vanity projects of hinckley and h52 and say yes instead to a renewable revolution in local transport, a revolution in local transport, a revolution in local transport, a revolution in renewable energy and the economic transformation that we desperately need. and, conference, we need to get real
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about wealth redistribution. did you know that there was just 2% difference in the tax spending plans of the other major parties in the la st of the other major parties in the last election? just 2%. rather than shift wealth from top to bottom, both parties are entrenching inequality and levels of consumption and growth that are unsustainable. the problem is not that there isn't enough wealth, the problem is that the wealth is in the wrong hands. and, conference, it requires boldness to say it and then it requires the political will to make that change happen so we are saying
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it now— it's time to shift away from the narrow obsession with gross domestic product. it is time for real effective wealth redistribution and it's time to reprogram our economy and put people and planet first. 18 months ago, caroline and jonathan stood before you and floated the idea of a four—day working week. i've never seen a green proposal ca ptu re i've never seen a green proposal capture the public imagination so quickly. since then, the momentum for this idea has grown and grown... we are going to leave the green party conference there in bristol, where you have been listening to a joint address from the co—leaders of the party, sian berry and jonathan ba rtley. the party, sian berry and jonathan bartley. much more coming up but first we will bring you the news at the top of the hour. hello, you're watching
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afternoon live. today at three. brett kavanaugh leaves his home — as the senate starts to discuss the confirmation of president trump's nominee for the us supreme court. it's feared that more than 1,000 people are buried under mud and rubble after the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia. a criminal investigation is launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. we have plenty of premier league action this weekend. we will be hearing from manchester team manager p9p hearing from manchester team manager pep guardiola, head of that class with liverpool which could see the return of kevin. more from pat
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guardiola at half past three. —— pep. the weather across england and wales is set to turn much cooler in time for the weekend. i will renew the full weekend weather prospects a little bit later on. also coming up — what i did in my summer holidays. the eight—year—old girl who uncovered a 1500—year—old sword. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm ben brown. the senate has started to discuss the confirmation of president trump's nominee for the supreme court. republicans say an fbi investigation has exonerated brett kavanaugh of sexual assault allegations — but democrats said the probe was 'incomplete'. there have been protests
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outside the senate. but donald trump has accused women who "screamed" at brett kavanaugh of being "paid professionals". the final vote on his confirmation is expected to take place tomorrow. republican senator chuck grassley sits on thejudiciary committee. we had a campaign of destruction, what we have learned is the resista nce what we have learned is the resistance that has existed since the day after the no member 2016 election —— november, is centred right here on capitol hill. they have encouraged mob rule. we have also been hearing from dianne feinstein. this has been my ninth supreme court
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nomination hearing and i must say i have never experienced anything like this. never before have we had a supreme court nominee well over 90% of his record has been hidden from the public and the senate. never before have we had a nominee displays such flagrant partnership under hostility after hearing a never before have we had a nominee facing allegations of sexual assault. the nominee before us being considered for pivotal swing seat, if confirmed, would be the deciding vote on some of the most important and divisive issues of our day. senator feinstein. let us show you live pictures from the senate. we just half an hour also from the procedural votes on whether to go
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ahead with this and although the key vote will be tomorrow, this procedural vote will give us a very goodidea procedural vote will give us a very good idea of which way the senators are leaning. at the moment, the indications, i will not predict any more strongly than that, the indications are wavering republican senators looked like they are going to fall into line and back brett kavanaugh for the supreme court. donald trump's very controversial nominee. joining me now is drjonathan parker, senior lecturer on us politics at the keele university. thank you for being with us. explain for us the importance of what is happening today and tomorrow in the senate and what exactly is going to happen and when we are going to know whether brett kava naugh happen and when we are going to know whether brett kavanaugh has got is based on the us supreme court. todayis based on the us supreme court. today is the vote whether to close debate on, they will vote to close all moved to the full vote chris
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will probably be tomorrow morning. we will wait and see because one republican is threatening to go to his daughter's wedding instead. we think he will be confirmed tomorrow. dianne feinstein with saying, we have never seen anything like this. it is extraordinary. we know the importance of the supreme court and that brett kava naugh importance of the supreme court and that brett kavanaugh as a social conservative is going to make a lot of difference, till the balance of the supreme court and that is why the supreme court and that is why the stakes are so high. yes, it is an indication of how polarised the american politics has become, it has become such a nice —— nasty fight. it is not an easy confirmation by any means. it is not, quite an extraordinary spectacle. brett kava naugh, it is not, quite an extraordinary spectacle. brett kavanaugh, his evidence, which he is now saying some of it was over emotional, doctor christine ford, her evidence.
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really polarised opinion with those big demonstrators in washington that we have seen as well. yes, where people fall is determined where they stand on partisan issues. democrats will tend to focus on the fa ct democrats will tend to focus on the fact he illegally perjured himself on the stand about minor things, drinking, his behaviour towards women when he was 17 and 18. on the other hand, republicans will claim this is a witchhunt and minor stuff going after, again where you fall on this is often determined by which party you are in. what is your hunch about which way it is going to go? there have been some senators wavering, but do you think they will fall into line, having read this out by i —— fbi report that has been controversial and fall into line and back brett kavanaugh? given the hints to the press, the ones who said they have read the report and do not see anything that would disturb the minute, i would
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suggest they are going to vote to confirm. it would be politically very damaging for them to turn him down at this stage, they have got so far, i think they will all have to fall in line. the fbi report was controversial because a lot of people are saying it is not thorough enough, did not talk to a enough people, did not examine doctor ford's allegations fully enough. yes, it was a very quick investigation, it was very truncated, they did not interview many people. they were not allowed to ask questions about unlimited topics. the president said they could do whatever they wanted, it was a very, very small investigation. i think the republicans countered on it giving them the cover they would need to vote. the whole episode has shown an light on donald trump, his inconsistency when kirsty said that doctor ford, she was compelling, a credible
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witness, and then he derided her evidence and mocked it. we have seen this before with president trump, i'm afraid. again, he was listening to his advisers that says i'm a wee thing do not attack the victim. the republicans had a very careful line on this. —— his advisers were saying do not attack the victim. he eventually slips and what he lost to do is attack people who are opposed to him. the question for him electorally is whether what he said about doctor ford would alienate women he motivated for him in the past, he might vote for him in the future. what is your reading on that? we have had some polling out and it is pretty mixed. again, we've seen this from the election. during the campaign, everyone said donald trump cannot say these things because he will alienate women, hispanics and black people. we thought on the election that many of those republicans in this groups did read
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them. thejury is republicans in this groups did read them. the jury is out whether people are going to suffer a big backlash from this. we do not know because the republican states where the key elections are, those women are the ones who are least likely to break ranks. for the moment, thank you very much, doctorjonathan parker, for the moment, thank you very much, doctor jonathan parker, a for the moment, thank you very much, doctorjonathan parker, a senior university on politics at keele university. some clear answers on those questions. jane o'brien is in washington for us. just give us your take on where we are with the senate hearings on the way that the rating is likely to go in your opinion. doi in your opinion. do i really have to do? we just do not know which way the vote will go. all eyes on a couple of key senators, two of them are republican women, kelly under pressure —— clearly under pressure from the female vote. they do not want the season dismissing these allegations
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but equally they are republican and they have a republican base. they are torn. we have got senatorjoe mansion because he's a democratic senator who you would think would vote along party lines but he is also defending his own seat in the state of west virginia, he's got an incredibly tight rope to balance. we do know that he is so undecided, he eventually gone back into the secure room where this fbi report is being held to look at it again. that is how undecided people are right now, thatis how undecided people are right now, that is how close to the wire we are with just an hour or so to go before we expect them to wrap up this procedural vote and to decide whether or not to go on to the full confirmation vote, which could be tomorrow. as we were just discussing, that fbi report in itself is controversial, the whole episode, the nomination is controversial. this fbi report, because it was very quick and a lot
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of people saying not nearly thorough enough, yet it is what the senators are deciding their vote upon. one former fbi agent said yesterday that part of the problem with the fbi report is the management of expectations. this was not a criminal investigation. this was a a expanded background check. by its very nature, it would be limited, it was ordered by the white house and with certain parameters that were set. the fbi does not draw any conclusions in this case, it gathers information based on interviews and presents it. that is what it has donein presents it. that is what it has done in this case. what it says, what conclusions that be senators are reading in this report has gone down party lines. democrats say it is inconclusive, it is not go far enough, they want more information, other allegations explored, republican senators are saying there is no quarrel between evidence for these allegations that christine blasey ford made and therefore brett
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kavanaugh should be appointed to the supreme court. that is where we are now. thank you very much for the moment. we will be back there in washington in the coming minutes. and very dramatic afternoon there and we expect that procedural vote which will give us a very clear idea of whether the nomination will go through or not within this hour. we will bring you that live here on bbc news. a week after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the island of sulawesi in indonesia, officials say they fear up to 1,000 people could still be buried in the area. the number confirmed missing is more than 100, but rescue teams now believe more people may have been unable to escape the buildings as they were submerged under mud when the tremor hit. one week ago, this shopping centre was full of life as palu's people started their weekend. today, it is where the search for hundreds of bodies slowly continues. there is little family members can do but wait.
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hope of finding anyone alive has almost disappeared. in some places, it's hard to know where to begin, like here, where homes are encased in meters of mud. it means the final death toll could eventually double. i think it will be increased, as in many places, houses are buried, and we still don't know how many, but maybe double. maybe double the current figure? yes. law and order has been restored, but palu's jail is still missing 600 of its inmates after the earthquake turned it into an open prison. when the ground started to shake, the prison started to collapse. this is what's left of the internal wall of the cells. it came down, the prisoners could just walk over, and this is what is left of the external wall. jump over this, and they were out.
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the governor said he tried to stop them but was attacked as prisoners started to flee. translation: we panicked when the earthquake happened, then there was more panic as hot water, mud and sand started coming up through the ground. but remarkably, a few, including andy, decided to hand themselves in after checking on theirfamilies. he is injailfor shooting someone. translation: i have less than one year left to spend in prison. i have been injail for a long time, about six years,... why should i stay away? humanitarian aid is now reaching many of those who need it. shelter kits and solar lamps and britain have now arrived in indonesia, but it will take another day before they arrive in sulawesi. the need for help here will last for many months, if not years, as people try to rebuild their lives.
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a man who pushed a former eurotunnel boss on to the tracks of the london underground has been found guilty of attempted murder. sir robert malpas, who's 91, was shoved from the platform by paul crossley at marble arch station on 27 april. we can cross to the old bailey and speak to our correspondent richard lister. tell us more. there were actually two attacks by crossley on that day, april 27, this year. the first was ana guy april 27, this year. the first was an a guy called tobias frenchie was standing ona an a guy called tobias frenchie was standing on a platform quite close to the edge at tottenham court road station when he suddenly felt himself pushed violently from behind. that was paul crossley who was filmed on cctv doing so. he was able to get away and thankfully for mr french, he did not ball in front
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of the tube train which was just, he told the court, meters away when he was pushed. crossley made his escape, he got onto an undergrad drain any emotion at marble arch. he came behind sir robert malpas, pushed violently across the platform and he blew into the air and landed on the train tracks. as he did so, he struck his head, severely injured, a big cut on his head. he fell down under the safety pit below the tracks on the other broken pelvis. clearly there was a trainee expected within a minute or so and one very brave member of the public job done onto the tracks to try to save them, try to rescue him. he did manage to pull up, but as he did so, he put his hand down on one of the electrified rails and bent is an quite badly. he managed to pull him to safety. —— burnt his hand. crossley was arrested after being
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detained by members of the public. he told the police he did not know either man, he had not had enough sleep. it mostly with diagnosed with schizophrenia some time ago. he was taking medication for that but still after considering, the jury went out yesterday, the jury decided after considering, the jury went out yesterday, thejury decided he after considering, the jury went out yesterday, the jury decided he was guilty of the attempted murder of both men. this was the reaction of the senior officer in charge of the investigation. this was the most shocking incident and the victors in this case were extremely lucky to have survived. —— victims. this could have easily in a double murder investigation and more victims and if there'd not bend for the brave actions of the travelling public to stop them restrained crossley and assisted victims. i would like to remind the public that this type of incident is very ripe and millions of journeys this type of incident is very ripe and millions ofjourneys are made across the railway and the underground without incident. —— very rare. we police as cctv rich
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environment and this evidence has proved invaluable in bringing crossley to justice. i am pleased that the jury saw fit to find him guilty of the offences of attempted murder of guilty of the offences of attempted murderof mr guilty of the offences of attempted murder of mr french and sir robert malpas. crossley showed no emotion as he came ‘— crossley showed no emotion as he came “ as crossley showed no emotion as he came —— as thejury came back crossley showed no emotion as he came —— as the jury came back with dave berdych, guilty on both cuts. thejudge that dave berdych, guilty on both cuts. the judge that darkly psychiatric issues with this court. at the conclusion, sir robert wept as he left the court. thank you very much indeed, richard lister. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the senate has started to discuss the confirmation of president
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trump's controversial nominee for the us supreme court. there are fears the death toll in indonesia after the earthquake and tsunami could rise dramatically — a thousand people could still buried in the city of palu. a criminal investigation has been launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. mourinho house back in front of the cameras ahead of manchester united's premier league meeting with newcastle tomorrow. he had little to say on the club's recent run of poor form but admitted it was unacceptable. lewis hamilton was fastest in first and second practice for the japanese grand prix. he was the best part of half a second clear of any other driver. sebastian vettel was the distant third. british number one kyle edmund is into the semifinal of the china
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open. he beat his opponent in straight set. i will be back with more no stories —— those stories later. french police are investigating the disappearance of the head of the international police organisation, interpol. the family of meng hongwei, seen here on the left, say they have not heard from him since he left to travel to china a week ago. mr meng became the first chinese national to head interpol when he was elected in 2016. we can cross to paris and speak to our correspondent hugh schofield. an intriguing case, an intriguing disappearance. it is, indeed. meng hongwei went to china a week ago, last saturday, on a plane and has not been heard of since. it was his wife he went to the police think she was very
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worried. the french police opened an investigation, once they are stubborn she had left france, he boarded a plane, —— they established he had left france. it becomes a matter of china. quite clearly this isa matter of china. quite clearly this is a chinese story, something has happened to him in china. there is also the speculation. maybe it is a personal thing, an accident. for sure the main speculation is that he has been summoned back all detained for questioning because of some kind of score settling or political infighting in the communist party. it has been noted here that this man, meng hongwei, rose to prominence in china under the aegis ofa man prominence in china under the aegis of a man who was the previous sort of a man who was the previous sort of security bosses in china but who fell from grace heavily under the current president and is now serving a life term in prison. is this part
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of the fallout of the downfall of that security cheap used to be his boss? we do not know, but it's also worth noticing there's a pattern of chinese detaining members of their well—known diaspora who come back to china and then holding them and not necessarily holding them forever, letting them go again, but giving them a survey and worrying time under interrogation for maybe some weeks. thank you. a criminal investigation has been opened by the environment agency, after it emerged that hundreds of tonnes of medical waste, including human body parts, have been stockpiled by a contractor working for nhs hospitals. the private company blames the backlog on a shortage of appropriate incinerators. the government says there is no risk to the public. lauren moss reports. hundreds of tonnes of medical waste, backed up inside this treatment facility in west yorkshire. pharmaceutical refuge including chemicals and even body parts are waiting to be disposed of.
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there are also delays at five other sites in england and scotland, delays which have been described as staggering. this is a scandal that simply shouldn't have happened. this is a really solid example of what happens when we start to regard services that should be central to our public services, services like cleaning, catering, portering, as ones that can easily be contracted out and we can absolve ourselves of responsibility. the environment agency says that healthcare environment services, the contractor in charge of removing and incinerating hospital waste, is in breach of its permit, and has launched a criminal investigation. here, 350 tonnes of waste is piled up, five times the amount there should be, stored in secure, refrigerated containers. the health secretary chaired a cobra meeting to discuss the backlog last month,
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but there is anger that this was not made public sooner. if this issue was serious enough for a criminal investigation to be launched, serious enough for the environment agency to raise concerns about the wider environmental health consequences, and serious enough for the health secretary to convene a meeting of cobra, why was it not serious enough for parliament to be informed? today, the department of health says it is monitoring the situation and insists there is absolutely no risk to patients or the public. a spokesperson says: on its website, healthcare environment services describes itself as the uk's leading independent provider of health care waste management. the company says it has repeatedly told authorities that there has been a reduction in the capacity to use high—temperature incineration facilities. for now, the focus is
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on disposing of the waste. questions will need to be answered about how this happened in the first place. now it's time for a look at the weather. much cooler as spreading into scotla nd much cooler as spreading into scotland and northern ireland, glorious sunshine here at the moment. over the next 24 hours, the cool conditions in the north of the uk will be spreading southwards across england and wales and with that comes a nine celsius drop in temperature between this afternoon's highest temperatures and tomorrow's highest temperatures and tomorrow's highest temperatures. it will tend much cooler. some wet weather to come overnight across northern england and wales, southeast still in the milderair. england and wales, southeast still in the milder air. some low cloud, some mist and fog patches, some drizzle. the north of the uk, cold. we could see some patches of grass
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developing in the countryside overnight. that goes on to saturday, england and well having some rain, turning heavier as it pushes toward east anglia, the wind is picking up as well. scotland and northern ireland having beautiful weather, plenty of sunshine but whether you are, it will feel chilly with temperatures between ten and 14 celsius. that is your weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the united states senate is now in session debating the nomination of brett kavanaugh for the supreme court. there's fears at least a thousand people are still buried under mud and rubble in indonesia after last week's earthquake and tsunami. labour's shadow health minister says it's "shocking and disappointing" that parliament wasn't told that medical waste, including body parts, have been left to pile up at six sites across england and scotland. the eu's chief brexit negotiatior has met with northern irish political leaders as they try to find agreement over the irish border.
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let's go back to washingtion because the us senate is preparing to take its first vote on president donald trump's supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh. it's being seen as a test of support for the embattled nominee who has faced sexual assault allegations from several women. this vote will kick start a 30—hour period of discussions in the senate, followed by the final simple majority vote on saturday. let's listen in. it might give us an idea of which way floating voters will go, whether they go for brett kavanaugh all vote against him. with me is drjames boys, us policy analyst
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and professor of us politics at richmond university. tell us, if you can, first of all, what are they voting on right now? it's important to remember this isn't the final vote, it is a procedural process. we have seen the senatejudiciary procedural process. we have seen the senate judiciary committee in procedural process. we have seen the senatejudiciary committee in the last couple of weeks grilling the candidate, judge kavanaugh. now we are seeing mitch mcconnell ending the discussion, closing down the debate is moving forward to a full floor vote on the senate floor of the 100 senators to decide, as you rightly point out, the fate of this nominee. most of those senators have made of those mines, but there are a few floating voters or waverers with this vote right now, if they vote for this procedural vote, will that give us an indication of how they are thinking and where they will vote when it comes to the final decision? pretty much. if mitch mcconnell is
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going forward with this floor vote, he must be pretty certain he has the numbers involved. whether you like him or not, mitch mcconnell has a strong record of getting votes to the floor if he thinks he can pass them. levy wants to instigate this process and blues, for example. it isa process and blues, for example. it is a way of shaking loose any last—minute rebellions. —— nobody wa nts to last—minute rebellions. —— nobody wants to instigate this process and lose. the republicans have a slim majority, 51 against 49 either democrats or voting with the democratic caucus. the republicans can't afford to lose anybody, quite frankly. the most they can lose is basically one individual, that will ta ke basically one individual, that will take it down to a 50—50 tie and then a vote will be cast no doubt in favour of kava naugh. they have been studying this fbi report which in itself is quite controversial because people are saying the fbi didn't have very long, wasn't very thorough, they
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didn't talk to all of the possible witnesses. the republican leadership didn't wa nt the republican leadership didn't want this report to happen at all. the white house didn't want it. at the last minute, jeff flake, a retiring senator who is not up for real action in november basically said he would vote to get this out of thejudiciary said he would vote to get this out of the judiciary committee said he would vote to get this out of thejudiciary committee only as long as there was an fbi report. perhaps not many people thought that that would occur, but it did. the problem is it was only given seven days to report. it reported in in under that time. the only people who will see that were members of the senatejudiciary will see that were members of the senate judiciary committee will see that were members of the senatejudiciary committee who were led in one at a time with no notes, no ability to even comment upon it. if he wasn't to be saying anything about what was in this. the republicans came out and said there is nothing new here to see. the democrats all said weren't given enough time and they were targeted as to who they could talk to and who they couldn't talk to. it all seems a bit ofa they couldn't talk to. it all seems a bit of a fudge and if you're starting this process from scratch,
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i don't think many people would have thought this was really the way to go about it. it is where we are and this is the basis on which the supreme court nominee either will or will not be appointed for a lifetime appointment to the supreme court. what is all laid bare once again is just a divided america is, how divided the united states are. many people will famously remember barack obama many people will famously remember ba rack obama saying many people will famously remember barack obama saying there is no red states or blue states, only the united states. if only that were true. some will say it has always been thus and this is the continued drift apart, been thus and this is the continued driftapart, in been thus and this is the continued drift apart, in many ways, the two divided camps. i think what we are continuing to see not only with this case but in most incidents coming out during the troubled presidency is simply the idea that what emerges is simply the idea that what emerges is simply the idea that what emerges is simply reinforcement. opponents or supporters will say, this is yet more evidence of malfeasance or his
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inability to govern correctly or this was all put up by the democrats or the media. nothing is bringing the country together. or, quite rightly, driving supporters away from donald trump and what about his possible re—election in two years' time? it is also quite difficult to follow donald trump's thinking on this. at one stage he said that the main accuser of brett kava naugh, professor christine blasey ford, was a credible witness and then he basically mocked her, didn't he? i think it's interesting that donald trump is quite unusually put his finger in the wind and try to get a sense of the prevailing wind here. the white house itself has expressed surprise that he was being so restrained initially by, as you point out, suggested that having watched the testimony that he felt it to be if not compelling then at least certainly influential. in
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fa ct, least certainly influential. in fact, most republicans after doctor ford had finished her testimony had their head in their hands thinking, how can we get out of this? then of course we saw how can we get out of this? then of course we sanudge kavanaugh come in and give a very robust, aggressive defence. very much in line with a donald trump policy, if you will. that seemed to turn the ta bles you will. that seemed to turn the tables and we saw republicans after that, including the president, go on the attack. then since then the president has both in public and on his twitter feed and been very critical of the accusation against judge kavanaugh to the point where now, the expectation is that this afternoon's vote will go in favour and that will lead to a very narrow positive result for the white house when the vote occurs over the weekend. lets just listening for a few seconds to senator mitch mcconnell now as he moves to a vote.
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and with a conviction that we cannot go down that road again. we know the senate is better than this. we know the nation deserves better than this. by confirming judge kavanaugh or to the supreme court, he will be charged with upholding the rule of law and upholding american justice. we must hold ourselves to that very same standard. we must seize the golden opportunity before us today to confirm as supreme courtjustice to confirm as supreme courtjustice to make us proud and to reaffirm our own commitment to the justice to make us proud and to reaffirm our own commitment to thejustice that every single american deserves. asa reminderto every single american deserves. as a reminder to our guests in the gallery, expressions of approval or disapproval are not permitted in the senate cal. the cleric will report the motion to invoke. we the undersigned senators do
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hereby move we the undersigned senators do here by move to we the undersigned senators do hereby move to bring to a close debate on the nomination of brett kavanaugh are to be an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states. so, james boyce, professor of us politics at richmond university watching with me. extend what is going on right now. we havejust heard from mitch mcconnell. we have just heard a heard from mitch mcconnell. we havejust heard a motion, a heard from mitch mcconnell. we have just heard a motion, a vote to end discussion and eventually move to a full floor vote on the issue, which isn't expected today, as you pointed out. what we will see here is a roll call in alphabetical order of members of the united states senate, moving from a to z. mr brown. miss cantwell. mrs 0. mr
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carden. mr carver. mr brown. miss cantwell. mrs 0. mr carden. mrcarver. mr mr brown. miss cantwell. mrs 0. mr carden. mr carver. mr casey. mr cassidy. ms collins. mr kunz. mr caulker. mr gulen. miss cortes. mr cotton. mr cruise. mr danes. mr donnelly. mr duckworth. mr danes. mr donnelly. mr duckworth. mr durbin. mrs ernst. mrs feinstein.
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mrs fisher. mr flake. mr gardiner. mrs fisher. mr flake. mr gardiner. mrsjulie brand. mrs fisher. mr flake. mr gardiner. mrs julie brand. mr mrs fisher. mr flake. mr gardiner. mrsjulie brand. mr graham. mr grassley. ms harris. mis—. mr hatch. mr heinrich. mr heller. mr hoven. mrs highsmith. mr imhoff. mr isaacson. mrjohnson. mrjones. mr
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kane. mr kennedy. mr king. mr kyle. mr linford. mr lee. mrs mccaskill. mr linford. mr lee. mrs mccaskill. mr mcconnell. mr menendez. mr moran. miss matkowski. mr murphy. mrs
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murphy. mr nelson. mr paul. mr perdue. mr peters. mr portman. mr bede. mr roberts. aye mr rubio. mr sanders. mr schumer.
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mrschumer. mr mr schumer. mr scott. mrs shaheen. mr schumer. mr scott. mrs shaheen. mr shelby. miss smith. mr sullivan. mr sullivan. mr tester mr tillis. aye. mr tillis. aye. mrto me. aye. mrvan holland.
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mrvan holland. mr warner. mr warner. mrwarren. mr mr warner. mr warren. mr whitehouse. mr warren. mr whitehouse. mr wicker. mr wicker. mr wyden. mr wyden. mryoung. mr wyden. mr young. aye. senators voting in the affirmative. alexander, barrasso, one. bozeman, burke, 0, cassidy, collins, caulker, cornering, cotton, cruise, danes, parents, fisher, flake, gardener, graham, grassley, hatch, hello,
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hoven, height smith, isaacson, kennedy, kyle, langford, mcconnell, moran, paul, perdue, portman, roberts, rounds, rubio, size, scott, shelby, sullivan, tillis, wicker and young. mr mansion, aye. senators voting in the negative. baldwin, bennett. brown, cantwell, carden, casey, kunz, cortes, duckworth, durbin, finds time, julie brand, harris,
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heinrich, kane, leahy, markey, murky, matkowski, murphy, murray, nelson, peters, smith, stubbing out, tester, udall, warren, white house and wyden. mrsanders, tester, udall, warren, white house and wyden. mr sanders, no. mr lee, aye. miss harrison, no. mr jones, mrjones, no. mr johnson,
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mrjohnson, aye. mr mr johnson, aye. mr schumer, mrjohnson, aye. mr schumer, no. mr donnelly, no. miss high camp, no. mrs mccaskill, no. mr menendez, no. mr reid, no. mr king are no. mr van holland,
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mr king are no. mrvan holland, no. miss serono, no. mr blumenthal, no. so, that voting under way. quite
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tense on the senate floor. the professor of us politics at richmond university, what is your reading of the voting we had so far? it is incredible. not many times that a live vote has been broadcast on the bbc with such interest in the result. some interesting voting patterns. we have seenjoe mansion, the democrat has voted aye. also the senator of alaska voting against, so a trade there. also interesting that fla ke a trade there. also interesting that flake and collins, who had toyed with a opposing have gone aye. it is
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certainly very tense and a stampede of no votes going in. one would imagine, looking at where we are, those are democrats adding to the tallis but certainly, this is looking very, very close and i would imagine that mitch mcconnell is worried that this is closer than you might have imagined. just to be clear that this is a procedural vote about whether brett kavanaugh should be nominated. it is true. if you have republicans voting against the nomination then that certainly is quite a situation for both the white house and for the republican leadership on the senate floor who, as i indicated earlier, would have been helpful, quite frankly, of getting this through at this stage and certainly want to get this stage and certainly want to get this done as quick as possible with
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hopes to get a final floor vote as soon as tomorrow night, notwithstanding the fact at least one republican is due to attend his child's wedding. it was thought that the floor vote might be moved forward to this evening washington time. this has a lot of contention around it. there are barricades up around it. there are barricades up around capitol hill to try to keep opponents protest away from the building, ina opponents protest away from the building, in a relatively unprecedented move, it must be said. for those of us... senator has not been recorded. i vote no. and of course, the senate is very delicately balanced anyway, in terms of democrats and republicans. a51 majority for the republicans. 49
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democrats or those aligned with democrats. they can ill afford to lose anybody. asa reminderto lose anybody. as a reminder to our guests in the galleries, expressions of approval or disapproval are not permitted in the senate cal. —— in the senate cal. the aye 51, the nos, 49. the motion is agreed to. though we are. 51 yes, 49 no. pretty much almost as tight as it could be. pretty much exactly along party lines, with the exception of the two senators i alluded to earlier on, of west virginia and alaska. now the republicans can move forward and announce the time and date of their floor vote with every expectation, it must be said, that the result
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will go identical to that one, you would imagine, with a 51—49 majority to confirm judge kavanaugh, notwithstanding the events we have seen over the last couple of weeks and the testimony of those accusing him of sexual indiscretion some 30 yea rs him of sexual indiscretion some 30 years ago. and it seems that what has swayed people who were wavering, like senator flake is this fbi report, the fbi investigation which in itself has been controversial. a lot of people saying it wasn't detailed enough. indeed, and voices coming out of the democratic party of being reported they believe maybe they have been rolled by this. they called for the fbi investigation and it was ultimately passed at the request of a republican senator, jeff flake, but from a democratic point of view they have said this is certainly not sufficient, that the fbi wasn't given the time or remit to investigate but it has provided, as you said, effectively cover for
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those republicans such as senator collins and senator flake as well as a couple of others to go forward and vote for this on the simple basis they will argue there is no compelling evidence to substantiate the claims made against thejustice and therefore, as mitch mcconnell has repeated, everyone is presumed to be innocent until proven guilty and their suggestion is that the fbi has found no evidence to substantiate the allegations in this case. the reason all this matters is the us supreme court, ninejudges on that supreme court but they are there for life. brett kavanaugh, who is socially conservative on issues like abortion, he could be there for 30 or 35 years. at least. absolutely. many have drawn parallels with clubs thomas, who was nominated and then confirmed in the very early 1990s. he is still on the bench. many of my students weren't born until after that. he
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may be on the bench until they are in their midlife. here we have brett kavanaugh in their midlife. here we have brett kava naugh who is in their midlife. here we have brett kavanaugh who is in the same situation. we are seeing a drift towards nominated younger individuals because they will be on the bench for such a long prolonged period of time. if this had failed from donald trump's point of view, he could have found someone to replace brett kavanaugh found someone to replace brett kava naugh who is found someone to replace brett kavanaugh who is equally socially conservative. of course. the constitution has no qualifying requirement. anybody can be nominated to be on the supreme court by the president. all it takes is for a compliant senate to approve that nomination as as we have seen today, that has been what is likely today, that has been what is likely to happen this weekend. this is the kind of microcosm of how disunited and divided america is. it is. the vote has come down strictly effectively upon party lines, with one democrat county ground one of the republicans. what we are seeing here very much is red state, blue state being played out
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on the united states senate floor. a fascinating insight. thank you for your analysis. professor of us politics at richmond university. breaking news this are that the senate has voted, as you have seen, narrowly to move ahead with the nomination. the key nomination vote for brett kavanaugh, which we expect some time tomorrow. let's pause and ta ke some time tomorrow. let's pause and take a look at the weather forecast for the weekend. some glorious autumn sunshine. earlier today one of our weather watchers, the loch ness monster, surfaced to find this. over the next 24 hours, the cold air swings its way southwards across all of the uk, said england and wales turning much colder. how much colder? if you look at temperatures will today and compare them with tomorrow, in some
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places it will be nine celsius cooler. redding, for example. 21 degrees today and just 12 tomorrow. a big drop in temperature. it will turn colder with plenty of sunshine showing up. we've also got such adequacy east anglia and southern england unaware it is pretty warm. we have a weather front and overnight that gets more active. heavy rain for wales and northern counties of england. in the south with the mild air overnight but it will turn low—key with mist and fog patches and some drizzle. to the north of the uk it is called for scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england as well we will see some frost. this is that we can start of. low—pressure bringing rain across england and wales. high pressure for scotland and northern ireland, leaving most areas in beautiful sunshine. a few showers in coastal areas but of part from that it is sunny but quite cool with temperatures won't tell or 12 degrees. dash around ten or 12
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degrees. dash around ten or 12 degrees. outbreaks of rain in england and southern wales. the wind then picking up as well. it is going to bea then picking up as well. it is going to be a cold day with temperatures between ten and 40 degrees. a big drop in temperature across england and wales and that will make it feel quite chilly with the start of the weekend. looking at the weather picture through saturday night with clear skies in place, there will be some patches from developing across parts of england, wales, scotland and northern ireland as well with temperatures dipping below in the countryside. it will be a chilly day on sunday. the best of the weather this day will be across england and wales. further north and west we have cloudy weather for northern ireland and scotland with some rain, turning quite heavily in western scotla nd turning quite heavily in western scotland where it looks to be windy. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 4: the us senate narrowly decides to proceed with a vote on whether brett kavanaugh — president trump's nominee for the supreme court —
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will be confirmed in his office or not. on this road, the yeses are 51, the nos 49. the motion is agreed to. —— on this route. it's feared that more than 1,00 people are buried under mud and rubble — after the earthquake and tsunami that hit indonesia. it is a criminal investigation is launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with holly. we will be looking ahead to all the premier league action, including two teams unbeaten in the league so far. manchester city and liverpool in one of the most highly anticipated pictures of the season. we will hear from city boss pep guardiola at half
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past four. chris has the weather. turning much cooler, particularly for england and wales. everyone will see rain this week in, casting our eyes further afield where we have seen storms affect parts of italy over the past 24 hours. thank you. also coming up — what i did in my summer holidays: the eight year old girl who uncovered a 1500 year old sword. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm ben brown. in the past few minutes, the us senate has voted to approve the latest stage of brett kavanugh‘s progress towards becoming a supreme court judge. president trump's controversial nominee has denied
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historical allegations of sexual misconduct. senators have voted to limit their debate on the issue, which means that a final vote will take place this weekend on whether to approve his appointment. in recent days there have been protests outside the senate. but donald trump accused women who, as he put it, screamed at brett kavanaugh of being "paid professionals". this was the moment the result was declared. on this vote. the yes is 51, beano is 49. the notion is agreed to. let's cross over to washington and talk to louis michael seidman professor of constitutional law at georgetown university. were you surprised by that vote in
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the senate and in your view does that pave the way for final confirmation of brett kavanaugh probably tomorrow? the vote was not surprising, most people expected it and most people expect that he will get a favourable final vote, although nobody knows for sure. this come down to the view ofa for sure. this come down to the view of a very small number of people and those people, i think, are ambivalent and have not finally made up ambivalent and have not finally made up their minds. you think some of those who voted out in favour of the procedural vote just now could still change their mind on whether to give a final nomination to brett kavanaugh?m mind on whether to give a final nomination to brett kavanaugh? it is possible. for people not in this country, it is very hard to understand the degree of anger and
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controversy that this nomination has stirred up. in some ways it feels like the entire country is coming apart at the seams and for the senators who are in the middle, they are under lots and lots of pressure from both sides and there is an american expression that is not over until it is over and it is not over yet. it seems that some of the senators who were wavering have perhaps been persuaded by the fbi report, although that in itself has been a controversial report because a lot of people are saying it has been too rushed, it has not been thorough not, it has not spoken to another people. it is hard for me to believe that anyone was actually persuaded by the report... personally. ithink anyone was actually persuaded by the report... personally. i think it would be more accurate to say the report gave some people cover who needed it in order to to cast a yes
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vote. the reason all this is so important is that this is a judge is going to be appointed to the supreme court for life, potentially 30 or 40 yea rs. for life, potentially 30 or 40 years. he is a social conservative on issues like abortion and he will tilt the balance of that court. that is right. it is important first of all because their many people, it is just shocking and unacceptable but somebody who committed attempted rape would be on the united states supreme court and he's shown no report or acknowledgement of but beyond that, the balance of the court is at stake and the general orientation of the supreme court is likely to change dramatically because of this change in membership. but the reality is that even if donald trump had not got this nomination the route for whatever reason, he could've just found somebody else with a similar outlook
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to brett kavanaugh. i think that is very likely. it's not absolutely certain. a new congress takes office injanuary and if certain. a new congress takes office in january and if the matter were delayed to january and in the unlikely event that the democrats copyright the senate, they would be able to block a new nomination. the odds are that even at this nomination goes down, another to have —— another conservative justice would get the nomination. divided, you have said about united states, clear over the last three days over this nomination process, where does it leave the donald trump? he said that doctor ford, the main accuser of brett kavanaugh, he started off think she was a credible witness and then he derided her and he mocked her at that rally in mississippi. is in danger of alienating any of his supporters,
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particularly women? what is the polling evidence on that? maybe they are not bothered. polling evidence on that? maybe they are not botheredm polling evidence on that? maybe they are not bothered. if you are talking about trump's core supporters, which is something like 35% of the country, no, they are with him for the long haul. there is some evidence that people in the middle support doctor ford and don't believe kava nagh and middle support doctor ford and don't believe kavanagh and some of them may have been affected by but the truth that the matter is at this point are not a of people in the middle. the main effect is is having is raising the temperature and the determination of people to come out and vote on both sides. with regard to that, concerning the senate, i think the conventional view is that has actually helped trump. with regard to the house it may have
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marginally help the democrats, but nobody knows for sure. what is the shore is the election is coming at the end of next month, one of the most crucial in the history of the country. very good to talk to you. thank you. professor of constitutional law at georgetown university. jane o'brien is in washington for us. they're they‘ re pretty narrow they're pretty narrow vote in favour of going ahead, proceeding with the nomination process. what happens next? well, they have now got 30 hours to think about this a little bit more and then they vote. a lot of people were hoping that this procedural vote would give us an indication of how they will vote, the real thing. but honestly, i do not think you can see that right now. senators susan collins, a republican senator for maine voted
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for this to proceed but in a few hours' time we will hear from higher again when she is going to make a statement. we do not know what the statement. we do not know what the statement is going to be and she could well change her mind, she could well change her mind, she could decide to vote no in the full confirmation vote sometime tomorrow. lisa murkowski, have republican collea g u es lisa murkowski, have republican colleagues from alaska, she decided to break would have party and vote no. she did not want this to proceed. a democratic senatorfrom west virginia, fighting for his political life in the state, he has defied his party to vote yes. there's awful lot of horse trading going on, people changing their minds. to emphasise the schizophrenic nature of this entire progress, behind me i can hear chance constructing as protesters are here in the senate building —— shouts and chanting. they make it clear they do not want this to proceed.
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outlining how controversial this nomination is, how deeply divided america is. isuppose nomination is, how deeply divided america is. i suppose this whole nomination process has been a reminder of the very deep divisions in us society. this plays into america's cultural wa rs this plays into america's cultural wars fairand this plays into america's cultural wars fair and square. there's no getting away from that right now. you have had the democrats to have been energised since they lost the election in 2016 and now we are seeing by all indications from the polls, republicans suddenly becoming motivated once again to take to the ballot boxes in the mid—term elections because of what they have been seeing and hearing in these confirmation proceedings. you have donald trump firing up the base at rallies across the country, warning men that if democrats are allowed to put forward these types of allegations, he says, no son, brother, husband will ever be safe.
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so you have got that on the one hand and then you've got beat me to movement, women who are coming out in numbers to get the vote to say they cannot be ignored and these types of allegations, that have been uncorroborated, these allegations cannot be dismissed. this was a moment that does notjust cannot be dismissed. this was a moment that does not just focus cannot be dismissed. this was a moment that does notjust focus on the supreme court on this particular nominee, it goes far wider and into the heart of what america is and who americans are right now. thank you very much indeed for the analysis. a week after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the island of sulawesi in indonesia, officials say they fear upto a thousand people could still be buried in the area. the number confirmed missing is more than 100, but rescue teams now believe more people may have been unable to escape the buildings as they were submerged under mud when the tremor hit. one week ago, this shopping centre was full of life as palu's people
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started their weekend. today, it is where the search for hundreds of bodies slowly continues. there is little family members can do but wait. hope of finding anyone alive has almost disappeared. in some places, it's hard to know where to begin, like here, where homes are encased in meters of mud. it means the final death toll could eventually double. i think it will be increased, as in many places, houses are buried, and we still don't know how many, but maybe double. maybe double the current figure? yes. law and order has been restored, but palu's jail is still missing 600 of its inmates after the earthquake turned it into an open prison. when the ground started to shake,
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the prison started to collapse. this is what's left of the internal wall of the cells. it came down, the prisoners could just walk over, and this is what is left of the external wall. jump over this, and they were out. the governor said he tried to stop them but was attacked as prisoners started to flee. translation: we panicked when the earthquake happened, then there was more panic as hot water, mud and sand started coming up through the ground. but remarkably, a few, including andy, decided to hand themselves in after checking on theirfamilies. he is injailfor shooting someone. translation: i have less than one year left to spend in prison. i have been injail for a long time, about six years. so, why should i stay away? humanitarian aid is now reaching many of those who need it. shelter kits and solar lamps and britain have now
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arrived in indonesia, but it will take another day before they arrive in sulawesi. but the need for help here will last for many months, if not years, as people try to rebuild their lives. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the us senate has narrowly decided to proceed with a vote on whether brett kavanaugh — president trump's nominee for the supreme court — will be confirmed in his office or not. there are fears the death toll in indonesia after the earthquake and tsunami could rise dramatically — 100 people could still buried in the city of palu. a criminal investigation has been launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. mourinho has been back in front of
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the cameras ahead of manchester united's premier league meeting with newcastle tomorrow. he had little to say on the club's recent run of poor form but admitted it was unacceptable. lewis hamilton was fastest in further second practice for the japanese grand prix. the best part of half a second clear of any other driver. sebastian vettel was a distant third. in tennis, british number one kyle edmund is unduly semifinal of the china open. he has beat his opponent in straight set bright. i will be back at half past four with more on those stories. holly, thank you very much. a man who pushed a former eurotunnel boss on to the tracks of the london underground has been found guilty of attempted murder. sir robert malpas, who's 91, was shoved from the platform by paul crossley at marble arch station on 27 april. our correspondent richard lister was at the old bailey. there were actually two attacks
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by crossley on that day, april 27, this year. the first was on a guy called tobias french was standing on a platform quite close to the edge, at tottenham court road station when he suddenly felt himself pushed violently from behind. that was paul crossley who was filmed on cctv doing so. he was able to get away and thankfully for mr french, he did not fall in front of the tube train which wasjust, he told the court, meters away when he was pushed. crossley made his escape, he got onto an underground train and emerged at marble arch. he came behind sir robert malpas, 90, he pushed him violently across the platform and he flew into the air and landed on the train tracks. as he did so, he struck his head, quite severely injured, a big cut on his head. he fell down under the safety pit below
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the tracks and he had a broken pelvis. clearly there was a train expected within a minute or so and one very brave member of the publicjumped down onto the tracks to try to save him, try to rescue him. he did manage to pull him up, but as he did so, he put his hand down on one of the electrified rails and burnt hiis hand quite badly. he managed to pull him to safety. crossley was arrested after being detained by members of the public. he told the police he did not know either man, he had not had enough sleep. it emerged he was diagnosed with schizophrenia some time ago. he was taking medication for that but still after considering, the jury went out yesterday, the jury decided he was guilty of the attempted murder of both men. this was the reaction of the senior officer in charge of the investigation. detective inspector darren gough.
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this was a most shocking incident and the victims in this case were extremely lucky to have survived. this could have easily been a double murder investigation and more victims and if had not been for the brave actions of the travelling public who stopped them crossley and assisted victims. i would like to remind the public that this type of incident is very rare and millions ofjourneys are made across the railway and the underground without incident. we thankfully police a cctv—rich environment and this evidence has proved invaluable in bringing crossley to justice. i am pleased that the jury saw fit to find him guilty of the offences of attempted murder of mr french and sir robert malpas. crossley showed no emotion as the jury came back with the verdict of guilty on both counts. the judge said clearly psychiatric issues with this case.
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he has asked for a psychiatric report, that will take a few weeks. sir robert malpas was watching from the gallery. at the conclusion, sir robert wept as he left the court. a criminal investigation has been opened by the environment agency, after it emerged that hundreds of tonnes of medical waste, including human body parts, have been stockpiled by a contractor working for nhs hospitals. the private company blames the backlog on a shortage of appropriate incinerators. the government says there is no risk to the public. lauren moss reports. hundreds of tonnes of medical waste, backed up inside this treatment facility in west yorkshire. pharmaceutical refuge including chemicals and even body parts are waiting to be disposed of. there are also delays at five other sites in england and scotland, delays which have been described as staggering. this is a scandal that simply
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shouldn't have happened. this is a really solid example of what happens when we start to regard services that should be central to our public services, services like cleaning, catering, portering, as ones that can easily be contracted out and we can absolve ourselves of responsibility. the environment agency says healthcare environmental services, the contractor in charge of removing and incinerating hospital waste, is in breach of its permit, and has launched a criminal investigation. here, 350 tonnes of waste is piled up, five times the amount there should be, stored in secure, refrigerated containers. the health secretary chaired a cobra meeting to discuss the backlog last month, but there is anger that this was not made public sooner. if this issue was serious enough for a criminal investigation to be launched,
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serious enough for the environment agency to raise concerns about the wider environmental health and public health consequences, and serious enough for the health secretary to convene a meeting of cobra in september, why was it not serious enough for parliament to be informed? today, the department of health says it is monitoring the situation and insists there is absolutely no risk to patients or the public. a spokesperson says: on its website, healthcare environmental describes itself as the uk's leading independent provider of health care waste management. the company says it has repeatedly told authorities that there has been a reduction in the capacity to use high—temperature incineration facilities. for now, the focus is on disposing of the waste. next, questions will need to be answered about how this happened in the first place.
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french police are investigating the disappearance of the head of the international police organisation, interpol. the family of meng hongwei, seen here on the left, say they have not heard from him since he left to travel to china a week ago. mr meng became the first chinese national to head interpol when he was elected in 2016. our paris correspondent hugh schofield explained what we know. meng hongwei went to china a week ago, last saturday, on a plane and has not been heard of since. it was his wife, as we heard there, who went to the police saying she was very, very worried. and the french police opened an investigation, but once they'd established that he had left france, which they did pretty quickly, he boarded that plane. it becomes a matter for china. and the french will no doubt be asking for information from their chinese counterparts. but quite clearly this is a chinese story, something has happened to him in china. there is all sorts
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of speculation what. maybe it is a personal thing, maybe it's an accident. for sure the main speculation is that he's been summoned back or he's been detained for questioning because of some kind of score settling or political infighting in the communist party. it had been noted here that this man, meng hongwei, rose to prominence in china under the aegis of zhou yongkang who was the previous sort of security boss in china, but who fell from grace heavily under the current president xi and is now serving a life term prisonment. so is this part of the fallout of the downfall of that security chief who used to be his boss? we don't know, but it's also worth noting that there's a pattern of the chinese detaining well—known members of the diaspora who come back to china and then holding them and not necessarily holding them forever, letting them go again, but giving them a severe and worrying time under interrogation
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for maybe some weeks. here is the weather for the weekend. you are looking at some wild weather in southern europe. that is right, these pictures came to us just recently from the south of italy, this is in viz goodies, and they had a amount of rain turning the raids into river. catastrophic flooding. in the southern tip of the mainland, and in 50 millimetres of rainfall. we can see these storms on the satellite picture. low pressure in charge, this line of thunderstorms that was locked in the same place by the wind converging and it meant we saw storm after storm hitting the same kind of areas, bringing bows and almost of
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rain and severe flooding. could see some more storms over the next 24 hours. what about in the uk? nothing as wild, turning much, much cooler. the cold air across scotland and northern ireland already today because we go into saturday, the cold air will push southwards across england and wales and a big drop in temperatures is on the way. temperatures today, 22 celsius in london, down to 14 tomorrow. even worse for reading, 21 to 12. you will notice the change, something like some of the autumn. the trains brought in by this cloud, a cloud front. —— the change. the rain will put up for time, the south—east of this lot of low cloud over night. some mist and fog patches and probably a little bit of drizzle as well around the hills,
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maybe some pockets of cross out in the countryside in scotland as we head through the night and into the best pa rt head through the night and into the best part of saturday. apart from eventually, a glorious start to the weekend, autumnal sunshine. there will be a few showers working in from time to time. england and wales further south, cloudy start to the weekend, we will see this band of rain pushing eastwards, getting heavier cost times. as it moves through the comedy wind will as well. dragging down the cold air. it will google where have you, temperatures between ten and 14 celsius. —— it will feel cool. pretty much across the country it will be a cold night. these are the countries in the towns and cities. there could be a touch of frost anywhere in the countryside, her pretty cold night and a cold start to sunday morning. plenty of
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sunshine on sunday a reversal of fortu nes sunshine on sunday a reversal of fortunes further north. cardiff in northern ireland and scotland would be rain, the rain will be heavy. temperatures, 12 — 16 celsius. we will see some significant changes in the weather as we head into the weekend. it will turn much cooler across england and wales, rain across england and wales, rain across england and wales, rain across england and wales for saturday, saturday is best across scotla nd saturday, saturday is best across scotland and northern ireland. things switch around as we head into sunday, with the best of the weather further south in england and wales. but it will get much cooler. that is the latest. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the united states senate has voted 51 to 49, to set up a final vote on whether or not to confirm brett kavanaugh as a member of the supreme court. indonesian officials fear there are still thousands of people
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trapped under collapsed building and mudslides after last week's earthquake and tsunami. the government has launched a criminal investigation after medical waste, including body parts, have been left to pile up at six sites across england and scotland. the eu's chief brexit negotiator has met with northern irish political leaders, as they try to find agreement over the irish border. and the eight—year—old girl who went swimming in sweden, and found a 1500 year old sword. now the latest sport with holly hamilton. premier league action this weekend, i am hamilton. premier league action this weekend, iam particularly looking forward to liverpool against manchester city? absolutely, ben. ithink manchester city? absolutely, ben. i think many people are. it's last year's
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champions taking a team that beat them three times in all competitions last season. and this season both teams remain unbeaten in the league, with six wins from their first seven matches. it's also city's first return to anfield since that rather hostile champions league tie in april. that was when the city bus was pelted with objects as it arrived at the stadium. a window was smashed, thousands of pounds of damage caused. well, this issue was put to pep guardiola during his press conference earlier — to which he said this was liverpool's problem and city fans shouldn't have to arrive early. he was also asked about city's record against liverpool and admitted he's always been very impressed byjurgen klopp's side. i have a lot of respect about the way he plays, how proactive they are in his teens. never with a fellow manager do i have to beat him to be better. i tried to beat lots of teams. last season in the premier
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league we did it. in the champions league we did it. in the champions league we did it. in the champions league we could not do it. guardiola also suggested kevin de bruyne could feature on sunday. he's has been out for several weeks with a knee injury, and has only appeared in the premier league once this season — perhaps not the news liverpool fans wanted to hear. we will see what happens with that. ijust we will see what happens with that. i just city flying high. we will see what happens with that. ijust city flying high. manchester united doing quite so well. —— manchester city flying high. manchester united manager jose mourinho has also been speaking to the media today — although not for very long. it wasn't very long at all! his press conference lasted just over three minutes, which was actually less time than just one of pep guardiola's answers. but perhaps he had very little to say that he hasn't said before. last week we were talking about mounting pressure on mourinho — united enduring their worst start to a season for 29 years. and this weekend, they face newcastle at home. and even mourniho admitted this morning, another defeat would be unacceptable.
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most of the questions he was asked were around whether he felt the recent run of poor form was acceptable, to which he agreed. bear in mind the last time united went five games at home without a win was during the 1989—90 season. and one other piece of football news. in the last few minutes, newcastle united manager rafa benitez has been fined £60,000 after accepting a football association charge for commenting about the refereee prior to his side's premier league game against crystal palace last month. lewis hamilton was looking in fine form during both first and second practice this morning — fastest in both — and actually laughing as he crossed the line. and you can't blame him. he was the best part of half a second clear of any other driver, with valtteri bottas completing a mercedes one—two, while his title rival, sebastian vettel, was a distant third. there was incident during the first
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session when he narrowly avoid a huge crash with toro rosso's pierre gasly, who was then handed a reprimand for his actions. and in tennis, british number one kyle edmund is through to the semi—final of the china open, after beating serbian qualifier dusan lajovic in straight sets. edmund won the first set 6—3 but was taken to a tie break in the second which he won 7—4. it's his third semi—final of the year and he's guaranteed a new career—high ranking on monday. that's all your for now. lizzie greenwood hughes will be here with more in the next hour. goodbye for now. leading scientists have been meeting in south korea, to discuss the rise in global warming. they will publish a report next week, which is expected to say urgent action is needed to keep the rise in temperatures below 1.5 degrees celsius. many low lying countries say they may disappear under the sea if that limit is breached.
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david shukman has travelled to the mekong delta in vietnam, one of the areas most vulnerable to the effects of rising sea levels. he sent this report. i'm in the incredibly hot mekong delta in the south of vietnam. this region is described as one of the most vulnerable anywhere in the world to the effects of climate change. i'm on board with a team of scientists, so let's find out what they're investigating. one of the scientists on board is professor dan parsons from the university of hull. just to interrupt for a second, what are you trying to find out here? we're using this acoustic sonar technology to map the flows of water, of sand, silts, across this large delta plain. how much is this region changing? it's changing rapidly and changing very significantly. you found out the amount of silt carried by the river has reduced dramatically. the silt is what actually
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builds the land up here. how serious is the situation? absolutely right, the silt and the sands that are delivered from the basin upstream are the only thing that is offsetting relative sea level rise across the entire delta, which is home to 18 million people. i mentioned this is a hotspot for climate change. what makes it so vulnerable? it's low—lying, it's a large delta plain and it's sinking. the sea level is coming up. it's essentially drowning. serious stuff. many, many thanks indeed. let's go and see what else is happening. one of the really big concerns is food supplies, because the mekong delta is one of the world's greatest regions for producing rice. professor steve darby, university of southampton, you're looking into this. what are the risks to rice production? well, there are a number. the first and most important is that with rising sea level we are seeing a flow of that salt water onto the agricultural soils in the delta. the sea water's getting into the fields? that's right. during the flooding periods
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and during the dry season that salt water can flow over onto the rice growing areas and seep into the soils. it can contaminate them for productive rice agriculture. presumably rice can't grow when the water is too salty? that's right. some species or some crop varietals are very intolerant to that salt content. long—term, what are the implications? if you've got the land sinking, sea rising, sea water getting into the fields, what happens? unless there's a switch to some more tolerant varieties that can withstand that kind of salt pollution, then the current system of agriculture will have to change dramatically in order to be able to continue. to try to end on a positive note, what can be done? all of us need to do what we can to limit climate change, but also we need to find ways to learn how to live with the worst impacts. many thanks for that. professor steve darby there of the university of southampton.
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we're now waiting for a report from the un climate panel looking into the implications of trying to limit global warming in the way vietnam and other countries want. we'll see if that is going to be possible. david shukman. the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, has suggested that a deal between the uk and the eu could be reached within a fortnight. speaking in brussels, he said there is a good opportunity for an agreement — though he urged the government to confirm plans to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic as soon as possible. four of northern ireland's pro—remain parties have been meeting the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, this morning, as pressure grows to reach a solution to the irish border problem before the eu summit later this month. our reporter, adam fleming, is in brussels. a broken leg didn't stop the leader of sinn fein in northern ireland joining the dash to solve the irish border issue, with three other parties opposed to brexit making their case to the eu's chief
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negotiator. we want to protect the special relationship which we have, north—south and east—west. we need to see the protection of citizens' rights , we need to stay in the customs union and single market, so we'll be seeking assurances in terms of the eu stance which they have held to this point, but as we reach the end stage of the negotiation, it's important that they stay firm. michel barnier is sticking with his plan that northern ireland could stay in the eu's customs arrangements and parts of the single market, but he is tweaking it. it's still opposed by the uk, though, and the government's drawing up an alternative, one that could involve a customs deal covering the whole uk. and powers for the northern ireland assembly at stormont to approve any new regulatory checks. guys, are you making progress on brexit? on his own visit to brussels yesterday, the irish prime minister was optimistic a deal could be done, only if the uk publishes its proposal well before an eu summit in two weeks. very important now over the next couple
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of weeks that everyone gets down to business. i think we are entering a critical and decisive stage of these negotiations, and there is a good opportunity to clinch a deal over the next couple of weeks, running through october into november. it's also the case that theresa may will have to satisfy her partners in the democratic unionist party as well. we've been very, very clear that we leave the eu as one country, because to do otherwise, to separate our economy and to put barriers up, that's the test, put barriers up, would do real damage to the economic future of northern ireland. the dup will be ushered through the eu's doors next week in a search for a solution. if there isn't one, the whole brexit deal risks being hobbled. a british man has died after being bitten by a sea snake in australia while working on a fishing trawler. emergency crews were called to a boat off the coast of groote island, 400 miles east of the capital darwin, but were unable
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to save the 23—year—old. police say uk officials have been notified. two companies that sponsor the footballer cristiano ronaldo have expressed concerns about an allegation of rape made against him. nike described the claim as disturbing and said it was deeply concerned. the videogame maker, electronic arts, said it is closely monitoring the situation. nike's deal with ronaldo is worth a reported one billion dollars. he denies assaulting kathryn mayorga in las vegas in 2009. caroline rigby reports. as one of the biggest names in sport, cristiano ronaldo is used to being in the spotlight. his performances on the field have attracted huge endorsement deals, but it's an allegation of an incident off it that has led to two of his biggest sponsors expressing concern. with a contract reportedly worth almost £800 million,
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the us sportswear giant nike has said "we are deeply concerned by the disturbing allegations and will continue to closely monitor the situation". a sentiment echoed by another sponsor of thejuventus star, ea sports. the former manchester united and madrid star insists he's innocent, tweeting, rape is an abominable crime that goes against everything i am and believe in. the portuguese international has been left out of the squad for this month's matches against poland and scotland. his coach isn't saying why. translation: do you think i will tell you here what i discussed with the player, how he felt or not? i will not. these are intimate personal issues. as for ronaldo, he kept his head down as he left training in turin. caroline rigby, bbc news. this year's nobel peace prize has
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been jointly awarded to two campaigners against the use of rape as a weapon of war. the nobel committee said the congolese gynaecologist, denis mukwege, and the yazidi human rights activist, nadia murad, had made a "critical contribution" to the fight against sexual violence in conflicts. nadia murad was kidnapped by islamic state militants in 2014, and endured three months as a sex slave before managing to escape and tell her story. speaking on bbc hard talk in 2016, nadia murad spoke of the moment militants entered her village. ben bland is here in a moment. he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the us senate has narrowly decided to proceed with a vote on whether brett kavanaugh — president trump's nominee for the supreme court — will be confirmed in his
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office or not. there are fears the death toll in indonesia after the earthquake and tsunami could rise dramatically — a thousand people could still buried in the city of palu. a criminal investigation has been launched by the environment agency, after it emerged tonnes of medical waste, including body parts, have been stockpiled by an nhs contractor. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. uk productivity grew in the second quarter of the year, but is still behind rates achieved before the global financial crisis in 2008, according to data out today from the office for national statistics. as we've been hearing, unilever, which makes marmite and dove soap, has scrapped its plan to move its headquarters to the netherlands. it has headquarters in both london and rotterdam, but in march, revealed plans to close its london one. it failed to get enough
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investor support — some feared it could force uk shareholders to sell their shares. the us unemployment rate fell to 3.7% in september, the lowest rate since december 1969. figures from the department of labour also showed the us economy created 134,000 jobs during the month, fewer than were expected. a u—turn from unilever then? yes, one of unilever‘s biggest brands marmite is famous for the slogan "love it or hate it". i hate it, by the way! our directors says she loves it. i'm not a fan, i have to say. it is so divisive. and so was their plan. investors were divided over the plans to close
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their london office and have won office in the netherlands. it has other brands as well. dover soap, ben and jerry's. it is now scrapped that idea because there was a lot of opposition from some big institutional investors. interesting that this afternoon the business secretary has welcomed this decision to scrap the plan to move. it is not history. this current structure goes right back to 1930, when the dutch margarine from merged with lever brothers in the uk, giving us unilever. not a lot of people knew that, although i did! i heard it on the radio last week! also toyota, a big recall? yes, the japanese car giant has recalled 2.4 million of its hybrid vehicles around the world. this is because of a fault in the system that could cause them to suddenly lose power. it is the
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previous and arius models. there are more than 50,000 affected in the uk. they were made between 2008 and 2014. toyota said it wasn't aware of any accidents but it will notify owners that the vehicles are affected. people may not have heard of intu — but they will be familiar with some of its properties? yes, it's the company that owns the trafford centre in greater manchester and lakeside in essex. its shares jumped more than 27%, lifted by news of a potential cash takeover offer for the business as it grapples with a downturn in britain's bricks—and—mortar retail sector. a consortium comprising peel group, saudi arabia's olayan and property investor brookfield asset management announced late on thursday that it was considering a takeover bid for intu. pressure on retail property specialist intu, the company behind sites such as manchester's trafford centre, is expected to increase as tenants including new look,
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toys r us and prezzo restructure or enter administration. that puts pressure because those shopping centres rely on having those companies as tenants. joining us now is laith khalaf, senior analyst at hargreaves la nsdown. let's start with unilever. whatever happens, whatever its headquarters are, it will not affect the taste of ben &jerry‘s. are, it will not affect the taste of ben & jerry's. why are, it will not affect the taste of ben &jerry‘s. why does this matter? you are absolutely right. customers of unilever, who buy products like marmite, probably don't even know where unilever is. the big four ore we have had over whether it's headquarters will be in london and rotterdam orjust headquarters will be in london and rotterdam or just rotterdam, headquarters will be in london and rotterdam orjust rotterdam, doesn't make a jot of difference to the earnings of the company. at a global level millions of people are using its product every day. it has been a
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big deal in the city, because it sits —— unilever had moved to rotterdam, then it would have left the ftse 100. that is significant in and of itself. but actually, what is really significant for some of the big shareholders in unilever. it would have meant that they would have had to sell. they didn't want to. unilever is a great company. it has a great track record. at the end of the day their opposition has scotched —— of the day their opposition has scotched — — squashed of the day their opposition has scotched —— squashed the proposed move. interesting results on productivity. starting to climb a bit more quickly now. but still not near the levels that we saw before the financial crash. what is happening? this is the productivity puzzle that has been puzzling economists ever since the financial crisis. we have got the highest growth since 2016. but still below
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the levels that we saw prior to the financial crisis. and we are also higher than financial crisis. and we are also higherthana numberof international peers like france, germany and the united states. heading in the right direction but a lot of work to do. shading into properties have surged. —— shares in i m properties have surged. —— shares in imtw. itis properties have surged. —— shares in imtw. it is not properties have surged. —— shares in i m t w. it is notjust the retailers who are at the sharp end of that particular issue. it does have a knock—on effect on the landlords who on the shopping centres. the company's shares have halved over the last couple of years asa halved over the last couple of years as a result. that has probably made ita as a result. that has probably made it a bit more attractive as a buying opportunity. it is also worth noting that a lot of the investors in this potential consortium are already big
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shareholders. they are already exposed to the sector. the question is whether the cupid listed or keep it private. the big jump today suggesting they are expecting one. many thanks. have a good weekend. and a look of the markets? yes, the ftse is down. feeling a little bit of pressure from the strengthening pound against the euro and the dollar after some positive noises about it positive —— possible brexit deal. a lot of exporters earn in foreign currencies. profits worth less when converted into pounds. a red note to end the ftse. thank you, ben. some of britain's leading fashion retailers are being asked by mps to explain what they're doing to reduce the environmental and social impact of their clothes and shoes. the commons environmental audit committee says the clothing industry fuels climate change,
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spreads microplastics into the oceans and fills up landfill sites. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. fashion is worth £28 billion a year to the uk economy. mps say british shoppers buy far more new clothes than any nation in europe. clothing production has more than doubled globally over the last 15 years and in the uk we are buying twice as much as we were buying 15 years ago. what that means when we have more clothes is we are using them, we are wearing them, less. you have those go—to things, don't you, but i do get bored after new fashions come in, new colours, new styles. every time i go out for shopping i pick something up. but what happens to all these clothes that are loved and then junked? this warehouse in north london sorts some of them and sends them to charity shops for resale.
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that saves the environmental impact of making new clothes. but it's only a tiny proportion of garments and shoes that get recycled. most are scrapped, with around 80% ending up in landfill, around 20% getting incinerated. the fashion industry is ranked fourth in terms of environmental impact, after housing and food and transport, so that gives you an idea of the massive impact. the fashion industry as an industry that poisons soil, pollutes rivers, generates a lot of massive amounts of carbon emissions. and here's another recently identified problem — fragments of synthetic fibres that are washed off our clothing. they're being eaten by creatures in the sea. working conditions in the fashion industry are another concern for mp5. they've written to the chief executives of the uk's ten leading fashion retailers to find out what they are doing to reduce the environmental and social impact of the clothes and shoes they sell.
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we as retailers have a really big responsibility in making sure that those clothes are as sustainable as possible. we know from the figures that we've been looking at, working with government, how we have cut things like energy and water use. there is much more we can do and that's what we've said in response to this report. the mps welcome the move, but say there is a fundamental problem with an industry that relies on people throwing away good clothes because they're last year's colour. they say fashion firms must try harder. roger harrabin, bbc news. an eight year old girl in sweden has found a sword believed to date from 1,500 years ago — before the viking era. saga vanecek stepped on the sword in a lake this summer, when the water level was low because of a drought. the discovery was kept secret until now, to give archaeologists
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time to search the lake for other artefacts. richard galpin has the story. despite the approach of winter, this la ke despite the approach of winter, this lake is still a popular destination for those in search of ancient treasures. earlier this year there had been an extraordinary discovery of something which had lain under the water for of something which had lain under the waterfor up of something which had lain under the water for up to 1500 years. and this is it, a sword dating back to the sixth century before the vikings. it is surprisingly well preserved. translation: scientifically, culturally and historically it is very important for us. it is an important piece of history for the area. and it has attracted attention abroad. the discovery was made not bya abroad. the discovery was made not by a seasoned archaeologist or
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treasure hunter, but by an eight—year—old girl. she had been playing in the water while on holiday with her family. translation: i felt around with my hands and knees when i noticed something that felt like a stick. i was on the verge of throwing it away, but i didn't. i picked it up. isaid to away, but i didn't. i picked it up. i said to my dad, dad, ifound a sword. it felt very cool and a bit scary. archaeologists have found a relic dating back to the third century since then. but it is the discovery of this iron age sword which is now the prize exhibit at the nearby museum. quite a discovery. cool and scary. that's it from your afternoon live team. next it is the bbc news at five with jane hill. first, the week on with chris. —— weekend weather. cooler air in
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scotla nd weekend weather. cooler air in scotland and northern ireland. glorious sunshine at the moment. cool conditions spreading south across england and wales, bringing in nine celsius drop in temperatures between this afternoon and tomorrow. it will turn much cooler. overnight we have got some wet weather across northern england and wales. in the south—east we are still in the mild air. they will be some low cloud, mist and fog patches. some drizzle as well. the north of the uk's cold. we could see patches of frost developing in the countryside. that ta kes developing in the countryside. that takes us into saturday. england and wales having rain which will turn heavier. the winds picking up as well. scotland and northern ireland having beautiful weather. plenty of sunshine. it will feel chilly. temperatures between ten and 14. tonight at five... a critical vote in the us senate on president trump's nominee
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for the supreme court. in a test of support for brett kavanaugh, senators narrowly back a motion to advance his nomination to a final vote. on this vote, the yeas were 51, the nos were 49. the final senate vote could take place this weekend. we'll have the latest live from capitol hill. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. in an interview with the bbc, stormy daniels speaks out about her alleged affair with donald trump. i would have never included any of those things or had a kiss and tell for lack of a better explanation if it was not for the fact i
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