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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 6, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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gained increasing political traction in recent weeks. at turns it has been referred to one air as a people's vote, a term that but the term second referendum is not uncontroversial itself. here it is being used a couple of times recently on bbc news. campaigners claim momentum is building behind a second referendum. the lib dems want a second referendum on the brexit deal and servings urged the prime minister to follow their example. the difficulty with that description of another vote is outlined in this telephone message received. we have already had two referendums. if you remember, there was one in the 19705 so why keep on saying the second referendum when of course if another referendum occurs, it would be a third referendum. can't bbc journalists count? well, bbc news has been thinking
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about the terminology around this issue so we asked them for their position on it and this is what they told us. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, you can call us. or e—mail at... you can find us on twitter and do have a look at our website for previous discussions. the address for that is on the screen. we will be back to hear your thoughts on bbc news coverage next week. goodbye. good morning, welcome
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to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: hope among the devastation. as the search for the hundreds missing in the indonesian earthquake continues, we hear one boy's astonishing story of survival. protests and bitter divisions, but us senators say they will approve brett kava naugh‘s controversial appointment to the supreme court. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, says there's fresh momentum in brexit talks and warns no deal would be a disaster. safe for now. despite reports of his imminent departure, the bbc understandsjose mourinho has been given the backing of the manchester united board. good morning. a little bit of folk
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this morning, we also got heavy rain in the forecast, but for many of us, there will be one fine day in the weekend. find out which day it is for you in weekend. find out which day it is foryou ina weekend. find out which day it is for you in a few minutes. it's saturday 6th october, our top story — it's been one week since the indonesian island of sulawesi was hit by a devastating earthquake — officials say more than 1,000 people could still be missing beneath the rubble. so far, around 1,500 people are known to have died in the disaster. hundreds of buildings were destroyed after the island was hit by a wall of water. among the despair, there have been glimmers of hope, as our asia correspondent nick beake explains. within this devastated city you find incredible stories of survival. including here, where the injured are still being treated outside because they fear the hospital could collapse. 12—year—old football fan rizki was in an internet cafe in palu watching highlights of his beloved manchester city where
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the earthquake struck. "suddenly the earth started to shake," he tells us. "i tried to run, my hand was crushed, but i was able to stick out my other hand. i waved it so people could see it." this is where he was trapped. eventually a neighbour spotted him and dragged him to safety. "i'm no hero," he says. rizki survived with a broken arm and is now reunited with his family. he still hopes to achieve his dream of becoming a footballer, joining his heroes at his favourite team. who is your favourite manchester city player? riyad mahrez. algerian international riyad mahrez became manchester city's record signing when they bought him for £60 million this summer. we thought manchester city may
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want to know about their young fan's amazing story of survival thousands of miles away. so we got in touch. and it turns out riyad mahrez wants to send a personal message. now, rizki doesn't know anything about this. hi, rizki. somebody wants to say hello to you. hi, rizki. how are you? i hope you're getting better. i heard that you are a big city fan. so i just want to wish you a good recovery. i hope you get better and we will give you the best wishes from man city. so, what does he make of it? "it's great, i'm so happy." he also said that he'd like to send you a signed shirt as well. "i can't wait to get better and wear it". in the city of sorrow, where they have lost so much... thank you.
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..a smile goes a long way. our correspondent nick beake is in palu for us this morning. nick a week on what is the situation like there? simile people trying to get back to their everyday lives but this devastation is unavoidable? yes, absolutely. it is uplifting when you meet people like that little boy who tells you their experience but that isa tells you their experience but that is a rare glimpse of happiness in an otherwise pretty bubble situation here. when you see a place like this, this used to be a restaurant, com pletely this, this used to be a restaurant, completely flattened. some of the chairs stacked up are completely crushed and unfortunately there are still bodies trapped in here. they have not been able to get injured in a proper search. you see pockets like this across the city. as where
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you can year the traffic is up and running again. they got electricity backin running again. they got electricity back in some areas and people are trying to get back to some sort of normality here but it is fully difficult. the aid is coming in slowly, the pace has increased over the last few days but we're hearing that reaching the most exposed and the most damaged areas are really, really difficult. some of the road which had slid out of recognition so even on motorbikes, it is difficult to get the last part of the journey, the people who, were soon, i still stranded. people talking about the exact numbers who have died or the numbers who are missing. really difficult to see because the mud slide that was triggered after the scenario and earthquake, but wiped out some villages totally so putting a finalfigure on out some villages totally so putting a final figure on this is really difficult to stop what we can say is that this place has been devastated and recovering from this natural disaster is going to take weeks, months and years. president trump's controversial supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh, is almost certain to be appointed later today after weeks of protests and controversy over
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sexual assault allegations. last night, two wavering senators decided to support the nomination, saying the accusations, which judge kavanaugh denies, had not been sufficiently proven. the outcome of his appointment could shape important decisions in the us for decades to come. from washington, our correspondent chris buckler reports. the system is corrupt! for days the senate's corridors of power have been filled with protesters. each one trying to influence the few senators still wavering over whether to support brett kavanaugh‘s nomination to the supreme court. he has angrily denied claims that he sexually assaulted christine blasey ford decades ago, when they were both teenagers. after wrestling with her political beliefs and the simple question of who to believe, the republican senator susan collins finally decided she would vote in favour ofjudge kavanaugh. the facts presented do not mean that professor ford was not sexually assaulted that night
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or at some other time, but they do lead me to conclude that the allegations fail to meet the more likely than not standard. but another republican, lisa murkowski, broke party lines to say she couldn't support him. stop this, it's not too late! with a final vote nowjust hours away, campaigners have made clear they intend to keep up the pressure on america's politicians. i am so angry, i do not want to leave this place or leave the streets. they're not listening to women and are not listening to survivors. this confirmation process has been nothing short of a bruising and divisive political fight. but all the indications are that president trump is quietly confident that his nominee is now likely to secure a place
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on america's highest court. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, has suggested there's been fresh momentum in the brexit negotiations over the last few days. 0ur political correspondent tom bartonjoins us now from our london newsroom. tom what has mrjuncker been saying? it seems that the mood music surrounding the brexit negotiations could be improving. jean—claude juncker telling three austrian newspapers last night that the likelihood of a rapprochement between the uk and the eu has increased in recent days. meanwhile, his officials last night gave eu member states and optimistic
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assessment of progress in the negotiations, saying that there is now a better atmosphere in the talks aimed at agreeing a deal which. the need for the reintroduction of border checks with ireland. butjean claude—juncker could not say whether a daily would be reached in time for the next meeting of eu leaders in a couple of weeks' time, or whether a special brexit summit in november would still be needed. further rail strikes will bring disruption today as industrial action continues in the long—running row over the role of guards on trains. members of the rmt union on south western railway will continue with a 48—hour walkout, and workers on northern will stage their seventh consecutive saturday stoppage. a spanish opera singer has died at the age of 85. she became renowned
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at one of the top international divas during the 1960s, playing in the leading opera houses of the world. 1992, she had furtherfame for her duet with freddie mercury on the occasion of the barcelona 0lympic the occasion of the barcelona olympic games. it was a fantastic performance. after little more than a month in the job, sian berry is hosting the green party conference in bristol with co—leader jonathan bartley. thejoint leaders told members they want to see improvements to work—life balance, including a greater focus on well—being rather than material wealth. sian berryjoins us now from our bristol studio. thank you for taking the time to talk to us this morning. tell us about this work life balance your trying to achieve for us. what we wa nt to trying to achieve for us. what we want to see is the government putting together what is called a
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three—time index that actually measures the amount of time you have away from work, away from commuting, away from work, away from commuting, away from work, away from commuting, away from being on call and away from things like leisure time. at the moment it is not measured but it is an important indicator of our well—being and we are currently not measuring it. it is the more important thing to think of which is the amount of money going around in the amount of money going around in the economy because money doesn't ta ke the economy because money doesn't take account of things like whether 01’ take account of things like whether or not you are harmed to the environment, whether you are in proving a mental health and measuring peoples free time is something that really matters to people and we don't currently do it, so we people and we don't currently do it, so we want to see this and we want to see it used as a policy goal so that you can put in place policies like the four date week that would actually increase peoples leisure time. i think that's really important and something that to people, much more than gdp growth
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actually causes parts of harm to the environment and people stress levels that we don't be deceived. how can we afford it is like it's great having the time off, rate having time to spend with family and to focus on mental health, no one would ever object to that as a concept at all, but there are people struggling either to find work or who are in work who are rarely being paid the minimum wage and are struggling, so to have a four date week, this almost sounds like a solution for wealthier people who can afford to ta ke wealthier people who can afford to take this time of? now, in contrast what we've got is a crisis in the world of work and the green party are looking for solutions to that and some of our policies to fit in with a changing world so we got a lot of people now who are looking in the economy. we have increases in productivity that are not being shared out equally so people are unemployed while some people on low incomes are overworked. the last time this was looked at back in the
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treat government was trying to improve its image and look at national well—being, there was a survey done and what was found is that people on lower incomes are much more likely to be working on weekends, so busy but overall earning less and we think the love of the country needs to be spread out more equally and making improving leisure time across the board while maintaining their income should be an important policy goal of any government. i still don't understand how it is going to be paid for. there is plenty of wealth in the economy, it is just not shared out equally. there are people making huge profits from lots of industries. not sharing that equally with their workers. do you really think you're going to persuade businesses, and there is already pressure per businesses to pay better, do you think you're going to persuade businesses who say they are struggling with the uncertainty of brexit, struggling with the economy
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which in growth terms is very low comparatively and historically, the 110w comparatively and historically, the now pay more to people to work fewer hours? the four date week, when we started talking about 18 months ago, was seen as a novel started talking about 18 months ago, was seen as a novel thing but is incredibly mainstream now. lots of unions are looking at it, the labour party are looking at it. you don't get paid more, do you? is being seen asa get paid more, do you? is being seen as a thing that can improve productivity and work life balance, equality, these are all things we should be aiming at, not a focus solely on gdp and that's what of and currently focuses on and we think thatis currently focuses on and we think that is wrong, it has all kinds of perverse effects. you would work four days a week and you would earn less. many cannot afford that. companies are not prepared to pay you more. that is the idea, but you will earn the same amount. people argue when they wanted the weekend that this was unaffordable. people argued about the minimum wage, that
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this was unaffordable but all of these things have improved welfare in the economy as a whole. people are able to earn more and able to have the weekend of, that is something, but we are finding that with the new world of work, we are co nsta ntly with the new world of work, we are constantly being on call, and string e—mailand constantly being on call, and string e—mail and long commutes, people are having less and less leisure time. that is not good for society and for the economy either on the we shouldn't be using that as a overall goal to make policy. that shouldn't be using that as a overall goalto make policy. that is the headline policy you're putting across, was about the impact the green party is going to make when we see the next general election because of the last one, you were taught targeting certain seats, labour increased their majorities. you also had your people standing who were stepping aside to make sure the conservative government didn't get a majority. what is the tactic the next time around? we are going
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to be fighting for every single vote we can get at the next general election. the snap general election was very tough on us and we took the right decision to put forward the idea of an alliance to change the voting system for a good stop at the moment, the voting system is incredibly unfair and does not lead to the right government and the right mps in parliament. that was something that was tough for us in electoral terms in that election but i think it was the right thing to do. we want be doing it again. we will not be making the first move, we will fight for every single vote and the reason why is that every green belt. send a message that the ideas were putting forward which tend to win three in the end, things like 20 miles an hour speed limits, focus on air pollution, the living wage, these are all ideas that we we re wage, these are all ideas that we were pushing forward before the other parties but have now been taken up. when you vote for us, those ideas make it through to the other parties quicker. the more but we get, the more they set up and
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notice. the weather is next. good morning. it's a tale of two have today and tomorrow so for most of us, one fine day this weekend. this is how it looks if you are looking up in leicester this morning, lots of rain on the lens of the camera. this is why, it is a weather front working its way southwards. it has been stuck in this position much of the night but it will start to edge its way further south and east. behind it we are starting with frost this morning and ahead of it, fog, so we have almost everything in the forecast today, as well as potential gale force winds later on in the day. those stronger winds will blow the cloud away from the north of england. already, a sparkling start to the day. just if you show is mostly around the coast and the hills, most places have lots of dry
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weather. by that stage, we have replaced the morning fog and it is quite foggy at their the moment, with the wind and rain. the bridge is starting at 1a, and not getting much better. feeling pretty miserable. the reason for the wind and rain is this weather front which brings minor heir to the south but colder air behind. as it comes overnight tonight, and we are between weather systems, it will be a cold night across inland and will smack and another cold night for northern ireland and east of scotla nd northern ireland and east of scotland as well. tomorrow we are reversing the rules, we have the sparkling day across england and wales m. perhaps some cloud lingering and then later in the day we have ploughed coming to the north—west of england but for scotla nd north—west of england but for scotland and northern ireland, sunny skies today and a lot more cloudy and reger tomorrow. temperatures not
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that high. the more pleasant day of the weekend in the south. tomorrow night and into monday, we have another frost start of the southern half of the country are possibly some fog as well. weather front is pretty much stuck and meandering around across scotland and northern ireland and will be through sunday night and monday night and into tuesday which means we stay largely dry in the south and we pick up those tunnel problems overnight with potential for ground lost and fog. temperatures were left by day but that will bring a lot of rain to the north and west. as for the rest of the weekend, the better day—to—day scotla nd the weekend, the better day—to—day scotland and northern ireland, tomorrow for england and wales m. scotland and northern ireland, tomorrow for england and wales mm is really a tunnel, isn't it? thank you by much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. phil hall, former editor of the news of the world, is here to tell us what's caught their eye.
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you've picked a back page story because even if you don't know about football, this story transcends that, doesn't it? it is one of the difficulties of being in pr, especially in sport, is that social media runs away with it so quickly and pressure builds and by the time we get into a press conference, they're looking for something you so they're looking for something you so they are pushing managers harder and harder. jose mourinho is the story and the question is, and some people are saying that today could be the day. a respected reporter with good contact day. a respected reporter with good co nta ct says day. a respected reporter with good contact says he will go this weekend effectively. he does say set to budget is a little bit of a copout. we should see that mike mentioned earlier that simon stone has had an
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understanding from manchester united that he has the support of the board at this moment in time. that he has the support of the board at this moment in timelj that he has the support of the board at this moment in time. i think the bottom line in all of this is, is bring this great football club to its knees in reputation terms. david moyes for instance when he managed in chester united, he told the press fire to his sacking that he was going to be sacked, which is the same. the operations and big corporations should not behave like that. the board try to win a popular ata that. the board try to win a popular at a contest against their own managers so at a contest against their own managers so they briefed the press in the hope that the press will be kinder to them. i think that is very unfairand if the kinder to them. i think that is very unfair and if the mirror have been briefed, it is wrong. in your role in pr, you have worked with big football clu bs in pr, you have worked with big football clubs and being involved in what goes on. are people in those senior roles, there is no bigger
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role than in manchester united? i have a very naive about the things that are going on? is very difficult because they ultimately have an older they want to impress so the board are wary of being sullied so this briefing. that is naive because it always comes back to haunt you. 0nce it always comes back to haunt you. once you start the fire, you got to be ready for a punch to come back. it is becomes tit—for—tat and it doesn't help anybody or do the club any favours. moving on, shall we talk about this story in the times today. tribute to the fallen. as is danny today. tribute to the fallen. as is da n ny boyle today. tribute to the fallen. as is danny boyle who is involved in this you production. he fell out with the james bond makers so that this is what he is doing now. one of the most creative talents we have had in this country and danny boyle is talking about the pages of the sea so talking about the pages of the sea so what they are going to do is in beaches around britain on november 11, anniversary of the end of the
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first world war, this fantastic tribute where they are going to draw pictures in the sand of the fallen, many of them, real pictures of fallen soldiers and then as the waves come in, it will wash the images away, which brings in to my throat even talking about it. very beautiful to see and moving. i am adjusted in the technicalities of this. these are busy have to be done while the tide is out very, very quickly and who is going to be doing them? they've got artists all across them? they've got artists all across the country and they have commissioned a poll from the poet laureate so it is going to be a very moving ceremony but if you don't mind moving on because it is the same subject, the daily mail are talking about what is going to happen at the tower of london which is going to be incredible. last time, we had 888,246 poppies, do your member that? that's the image there. it was a format years ago and
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they are not trying to compete with it but i think the new idea going to be incredible. there will be 10,000 flamed tortures gradually planted over a week outside the tower and then they will come alight and finish on november 11. these images will go around the world and he ever has greeted this idea, fair play to them, this fantastic. it is because at the time, it was the foreign secretary legally declared that the lands are going out all over europe, so lands are going out all over europe, so they are using these lands to commemorate it. it is interesting and there are two things you mentioned there. in some ways, we have amazing technology now. films can create extraordinary things when they are not there but a real thing, like the poppies or something on a beach, still has a traffic impact. it does and more important than words are the pictures and those pictures and symbolism involved is going to be fantastic. time for one
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more, shall we do this story about someone more, shall we do this story about someone who stole her bike back? this is a fantastic story. sometimes a little story can illustrate a very big issue and this is a classic example. this lady had a bag stolen in london. she spotted it on gumtree for sale. she rang the police and said my bike is there. they said, pose as a buyer and come back to us. she made an appointment and then they said, we have not got the stuff to go. she goes on her own, get the bike. she had the foresight to bring her bike and she left it with the buyer and then she escaped with the bike. she rang the police and they said, i'm sorry, there is not another evidence to proceed this any further. what evidence do you need? i know, is incredible! the thief
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rang her later and asked for the bike back. she said, it's actually my bike. i bought it and you still it. hejust laughed my bike. i bought it and you still it. he just laughed and my bike. i bought it and you still it. hejust laughed and put the phone down. it is a significant story. scary because he has a number and she does say she is nervous. she had taken the precaution of using a different phone number. she set upa using a different phone number. she set up a different from line, so she thought it through, but doesn't it seem thought it through, but doesn't it seem crazy? anyone who has had bicycles stolen, police always advise you to go on those sites and look for anything you have had stolen, to see if you find it. her tea m ste p stolen, to see if you find it. her team step to go on her own, people question that is sensible, what are you going to do? itjust feels wrong a p pa re ntly you going to do? itjust feels wrong apparently there are dozens of bikes this guy had for sale to there are many people involved and it is an easy one for the police to have cleared up. we will attack later.
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coming up on breakfast: as park run welcomes it's five millionth member, we'll speak to the event founder about how it all started 14 years ago with a five kilometre run in his local park. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. it's been one week since the indonesian island of sulawesi was hit by a devastating earthquake, and officials say more than 1,000 people could still be missing beneath the rubble. so far, around 1,500 people are known to have died in the disaster. hundreds of buildings were destroyed after the island was hit by a wall of water. search and rescue efforts have been extended into next week. president trump's controversial supreme court nominee, brett kavanaugh, is almost certain to be appointed later today after weeks of protests and controversy over sexual assault allegations. last night, two wavering senators decided to support the nomination, saying the accusations,
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which come after weeks of demonstrations regarding sexual assault accusations, which judge kavanaugh denies, had not been sufficiently proven. the outcome of his appointment could shape important decisions in the us for decades to come. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, has suggested there's been fresh momentum in the brexit negotiations over the last few days. it's the latest sign that the two sides are making progress. mrjuncker said the eu remains determined to reach a deal with the uk, but couldn't say whether an agreement would be finalised before the next meeting of european leaders on 17th of october. police in france are investigating the disappearance of the head of the international police organisation, interpol. meng hongwei hasn't been seen since he travelled from his home in france to visit family in china a week ago. this morning there are reports that he was taken away for questioning by the chinese authorities when his plane landed. further rail strikes will bring disruption today as industrial action continues
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in the long—running row over the role of guards on trains. members of the rmt union on south western railway will continue with a 48—hour walkout, and workers on northern will stage their seventh consecutive saturday stoppage. the spanish opera singer montserrat caballe has died at the age of 85. she became renowned as one of the top international divas during the 1960s, playing in the world's leading opera houses. in 1992 she achieved further fame for her duet with freddie mercury on the occasion of the barcelona olympic games. a robot in the shape of a cockroach is the first to be able to walk on the surface of water and walk on land. it weighs as much as a paperclip and can carry its own weight without sinking. the biggest challenge for this micro machine is getting out of the water.
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the force of the water's surface tension is twice the robot's weight and the hind legs encounter friction. the next challenge for researchers is to find a way for the robot to return to land without using a ramp. and now you know. they are not as quick as real cockroaches, are they? a moment ago, we had about the experience of dealing with major football clu bs, experience of dealing with major football clubs, they are huge operations, but there is a story that about how they conduct themselves. yes, gary neville is furious at the moment. and then there is the
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international break, so is that a chance for mourinho and his players to regroup and come out afresh after the international break, or is it a chance, if you believe the mirror, to find a new manager? the bbc understands, that jose mourinho retains the support of the club's board, to turn the present situation around. united face newcastle this evening. the club's position has led to intense speculation about mourinho's future. however, it is understood there is no immediate threat to his position. this comes afterformer player gary neville, told sky sports that he was furious with the way the board had dealt with reports, which suggest that mourinho would be sacked this weekend. speaking yesterday morning, mourinho thought his side were on the right track, despite their goaless draw with valencia in the champions league this week. the effort, the commitment, the desire that the team showed against a difficult opponent like valencia. if you look at newcastle, probably we are a bit luckier and we will win the match.
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dan has sat down, ahead of football focus. we have got something to show you. glenn murray. his fifth goal of the season, was enough to burst west ham's recent bubble, and it moves brighton up to twelfth in the table. what is the phrase fox in the box? it is the sort of goal where you pop up it is the sort of goal where you pop up at the right time and just poke it in. what is that today with a fox ? it in. what is that today with a fox? they are coming. keep your thoughts coming in. fox? they are coming. keep your
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thoughts coming inlj fox? they are coming. keep your thoughts coming in. i think kerry in the area would be better. you going to talking about mourinho in football focus today? yes, we will be. essentially, and you have been explaining, there is a story in the newspapers, we have been trying to investigate what has been happening. there is an international break next week, which would be a good time if they want to make a change, as some people are saying. we try to get to the bottom of that. we have also got holes from last night, a bit of analysis. also manchester city against liverpool is a big one this weekend. also, the only filipino playing in the premier league. callu m playing in the premier league. callum wilson is also on the programme, who did not get a call—up for england, but has been highly
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rated and bournemouth had a great start to the season. we have got steven naismith at hearts, having a great start to the season. and also kevin keegan, who was on the sofa earlier this week. a meaty interview with him about his 50 years in football. he won everything, liverpool, he was the only englishman to ever win a coveted trophy, but people always asking about his hair. people think i had a perm at liverpool, i didn't. the day after i signed, i went in to see the hairdresser who always said, if you get it earned, you can just go hairdresser who always said, if you get it earned, you canjust go into the bath, go like that, and get into your car the bath, go like that, and get into yourcarand go the bath, go like that, and get into your car and go home. i had a bit of stick about it, when i had it done. when you blow dry a perm, i looked in the shop windows and i thought wow, the windows must be distorting
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it, but they weren't! it was impressive, and it inspired many people to get the same haircut. another man, the great tony curran, he will be watching this one. as a leeds fan, i met him this week because he won a lifetime achievement award. he played 17 times for england, a great footballer, and many people say he should have played more. formica, he is your all—time hero. when you were a child, he was the player i always intended to be. apparently, he got on his knees and bow down in front of him. did i really? he passes on his hellos to all of you. that will be from midday on bbc one. lots to do! phil neville says his england women's side,
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will treat their match against brazil tonight like it's a world cup match. england will come up against the player, voted the best in the women's game, by fifa recently, marta, in the friendly at notts county's meadow lane. and, after neville's side, sealed world cup qualification in the summer, the countdown is now on to the tournament in france next year. qualifying is underway for the japanese grand prix, with lewis hamilton looking like the man to beat. turn your eyes and ears away now, if you don't want to know what's been going on. after going quickest in final practice, he was the early pacesetter in the first part of qualifying. championship rival sebastian vettel was just off the pace, not helped by this spin. conditions were tricky all day, with the wind and rain catching up many drivers. luckily, lewis hamilton went out in the best of the conditions, and has won a fight for his 80th career pole position. sebastian vettel was sent out on the wrong tyres, and made a mistake as
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the rain started to fall. he is 50 points behind lewis hamilton, with five races to go. wigan will play warrington in super league's grand final next weekend. wigan secured their place at old trafford, with a comfortable 14—0 win, over last season's runners up castleford. sam tomkins ran in a try and the final drop goal on his final home match for the club. he moves to catalan dragons, at the end of the season. it's also wigan head coach, shaun wane's, final season in charge, he's also leaving to join scotland rugby union, as a coach. i feel sad, i feel happy that i have something to go to, but i am a wigan light through and through and it is fantastic. and making memories for this little guy. he is my grandson, he never leaves my site and i love him to pieces. you will take him out at old trafford?
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yes, definitely, just getting him used to the noise. exeter are top of rugby union's premiership, continuing their perfect start to the season with a victory over bath. a much—changed bath side, pushed exeter hard at the rec, but the chiefs surged ahead in the final quarter, scoring five tries in all, this one from stu townsend which started the fightback. they've waited over half a century, but connacht have finally won in belfast, shocking ulster at the kingspan, 22—15. it didn't help ulster that they had a player sent off. elsewhere, there were wins for edinburgh and glasgow. it's the sport that tests your speed on the track and your shooting skills. can you hold your nerve and aim when out of breath at the end of 400 metres? well, the world tour and british championship for target sprint takes place in bristol this weekend, and i've been to train with some of the country's top athletes and some other beginners. three, two, one. and they're off, the class of 2018
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who're notjust learning how to be the fastest around the 400 metres track in pe, but as they cross the line, it is all about their composure and speed of thought. so, here they come then, they have done 400 metres on the track, understandably out of breath, it is a hot day and now they have to compose themselves, control their breathing, pick up the air rifles and hit the five targets. it is a combination of speed and also accuracy. once they have hit the five targets ten metres away, they run again, before more shooting, and finally a gruelling 400 metre race to finish. props to the people that do it pro, because it is really hard. you have to time yourself to hit it when you are breathing up and down. i have never shot before, so it is different and i can get to do it. yes. if you have never taken aim before, you have to join an organised club to help you get your eye in.
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i have seen what is involved and to really raise the bar i am up against some regional champions and number two in the world, emily has me in her sights. my first aim was to try and stay in touch with emily and the other elite junior athletes. but this came at a cost. by 200 metres, i was a spent force, and staggering to the end of my first lap, which wasn't the ideal preparation for picking up the gun. i've got to keep up with emily. first shot, i hit the target, but look, everybody has gone. everyone has gone already. and in fact, before i got all of mine down she was back again. i have knocked four down but still trying to get the last target and they have lapped me. yes, it is all about the technique and the rhythm of it.
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what do you love about it? the fact that there are two sports combined together and you need the composure to shoot and the explosiveness to run. what does it mean to be second in the world? it is insane to be competing abroad against the best, so it is amazing. we have normally a very stationary sport, where you are shooting a target, this introduces the exciting element of having to run around the track, and we thought it was a good way to get new athletes involved in the sport. after the success of the biathlon at the winter olympics the aim is for target sprint to eventually get the olympic call. sorry to keep you waiting. the biggest problem i had was trying to load the gun with a little pellet, it was so federally. where you shaking? i was all fingers and
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thumbs. how big was the pellet? i have still got it, look. imagine getting five of those into the little slot. anyway, good luck to all the athletes. the sport really does test you in different ways. you are going to linger a bit because we are going out to the park run. yes, 5 million runners in this country, a fantastic free thing that you can do on a saturday morning. my sister does it every week. we might catch up with all the people in bushy park in a few minutes. let's get the weather now with helen. getting a splash of rain when you
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are running and getting warm might not be too bad, but this is how it looks at the moment in leicestershire. a bit damp. that rain stretches not just leicestershire. a bit damp. that rain stretches notjust through leicestershire, but up into the north—east of england, and write down towards the south—west. with that weather front, the wind is starting to pick up. if you are running this morning, it will be cold, wet and windy, but the sunshine further north and further west but where we have that sometime, it is cold. temperatures we re sometime, it is cold. temperatures were below freezing in parts of scotland. ahead of the rain, we have got fog, so actually getting to the park run if you have to get in the car could be quite treacherous. sunshine all the way for scotland, just a small number of showers. we have still got rain in the south—east, dragging its heels into this evening. add on gusts of wind
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of up to 50 mph across the channel islands, and tempters 10 degrees down on yesterday, not great. that cold air is with us behind the weather front, though not particularly warm with the sunshine. behind that, we have got a ridge of high pressure coming for the night, really at the wrong time for most of us, but it also means it will be a cold night right across—the—board. the far north—west may escape a touch of ground frost, but elsewhere, really quite cold. tomorrow morning, we flip the tables and it is a much brighter day, so if you are going for a football focus with the children in the morning, a much brighter prospect. —— park run. a very different feel to the weather across scotland and northern ireland. matters because of this weather front. once this a rise ireland. matters because of this weatherfront. once this a rise in the north, it hangs around. i pressure continues to influence the
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weather further south, so cold nights and fine days into monday. a cold start on monday. but this weather front, having cold start on monday. but this weatherfront, having been with cold start on monday. but this weather front, having been with us through sunday, is still with us on monday and there will be further rain. because it could hang around into tuesday, we could reach 150 millimetres of rain, particularly over the hills and mountains. that isa over the hills and mountains. that is a concern for flooding, but we will keep an eye on it. temperatures we re will keep an eye on it. temperatures were covering in the south. watch out for the fork today. —— fog. best of the weather is further north. we heard earlier this week that all couples in england and wales will be able to choose to have a civil partnership instead of getting married. paul lewis from radio 4's moneybox is here to explain the financial advantages soon to be available to the three million couples who live together in unmarried bliss. how do we do this, i'll be going to
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compare unmarried rights as they stand with what you might have in a civil partnership? yes, the thing about unmarried couples is they have virtually no rights, certainly in england and wales. if their relationship ends, they have no rights to each other‘s property. if they die, there is no inheritance tax concession. many people are surprised by this. they think there is something called common—law marriage, but there isn't, you have no rights. so this change, by allowing people in this situation to form a civil partnership, instead of getting married, but many people don't want to get married for various reasons, so don't want to get married for various reasons, so civil partnership brings you all the rights of marriage without it actually being called a marriage. break it down for us. what are the financial advantages? when you are actually together and happy, there are very few. you might be able to claim the marriage allowed in some
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circumstances, but they really kick m, circumstances, but they really kick in, either when your relationship ends, or when one of you dies. when your relationship ends at the moment, people have no right to property or money, a civil partnership when it is dissolved, you have the same right as you would on divorce, things have two be shared fairly. and when you die, when one of you dies, there are huge inheritance tax advantages, particularly important for people who live in a valuable house worth more than £325,000, because it could be that you might have to sell the house to pay the tax, but in future, leave it to your civil partner, and it will be entirely free of all tax. what is the timeline on this? when might the changes happen? that is a good question. the economies minister has said she will make the change as swiftly as possible, but she did warn there were technical issues to resolve, so there will inevitably be a consultation. in
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scotland, there is already a consultation going on, and in northern ireland, because there is effectively no devolved government there, it won't be considered until there, it won't be considered until there is a devolved government and ministers back in place. rank you, paul. -- ministers back in place. rank you, paul. —— thank you. gambling addicts say a new app, available from two mobile—only banks, has helped them to tackle their addiction. tens of thousands of people have signed up to the service which allows a "gambling block" to be activated by the customer. the app then identifys any transactions with a bookmaker, either online or in a shop, and blocks money from leaving the account. dan whitworth from radio 4's moneybox explains how it works. i'm literally surrounded by it. i've got one in that direction where i used to spend every penny. bookmakers seemed to be everywhere for danny cheetham and walking around manchester city centre brings bad memories where he spent most of his 20s addicted to gambling.
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i lost in excess of £50,000 to gambling. i haven't got much material things in my names. i see friends getting first deposit and first car. iam i am starting from zero again. danny tried to stop. he sent e—mails asking to ban himself from dozens of individual bookmakers but whenever his addiction would take hold, he could always find a new one willing to take is that until, that is, his bank cut off his gambling funds at the source. this new type of gambling block being offered by online banks like monzo and starling can spot any transaction with a betting company, whether at a shop on a mobile phone, and stop it from happening before the money leaves the recount. we've had about 25,000 people self exclude from gambling.
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not all those were problem gamblers. we ran a survey and asked people how they were using it. probably seven 8000 people did have a history of gambling and we saw gambling transactions on their account previously and we monitored their usage since and saw a 70% decline in gambling related transactions. with at least 430,000 problem gamblers right across britain, the royal college of psychiatrists is now calling on the five big high—street banks to introduce similar blocks for their customers. this type of gambling block can make an enormous difference. we see people in our clinic who have lost their family homes because of moments when they can't control their spending on gambling. if you can't access your funds, notjust managing funds and getting spouses to help, but if you are unable to do it because you cannot spend that money, you can save people's homes and families
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and their mental health can be preserved. the five main high—street banks say, while they don't offer this type of gambling block yet, they are always looking at new ways to help vulnerable customers. while the gambling commission, which regulates the industry in britain, says it supports the idea and is already talking to banks about how to improve existing protections for problem gamblers. as for danny, put simply, this new type of gambling block has turned his life around. i'm feeling a lot better, happier, getting goals, getting on with my life and i can see where i want to be. i literally don't want to gamble any more. i don't see that as being the first thing i want to do now. they may not have known it at the time, but when 13 amateur runners gathered in a south london park 14 years ago, they were about to start a running revolution! how long did you think it would have taken them to reach 5 million. it is
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an incredible achievement. the gathering developed into park run, a free, timed five kilometre run that takes place in hundreds of parks across the world every weekend. the event has just signed up it's 5 millionth member and our reporter marc ashdown is in hampton where it all began. yes, this is where it started all that time ago. if you go anywhere near a park that time ago. if you go anywhere neara park on that time ago. if you go anywhere near a park on a saturday morning, the chances are you will see a park run. it is basically people running around a park, a bit more organised than your average jogger. once around a park, a bit more organised than your averagejogger. once i started it all those years ago, but there were 13 originally. james, you are one of the original 13. did you ever imagine it would get like this? never in a thousand years did you think 1710 up and take. but it is more than a run now, it is a family
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gathering, it is friends, a community, and it gets people out of bed. it gets us together as a community, it is a great innovation. you have brought your two boys with you, did you have two slow down and wait for him when you run around together? only at times. i understand you have beaten dad recently. yes, i beat him by half a minute. 21 minutes for five kilometres. yes. how old are you? 11. this is notjust about running, it is also about socialising. you we re it is also about socialising. you were running originally, but now you help with the volunteer side of things. we looked after this event for about eight years. paul described as this morning as the grandmother and grandfather of park run, iam grandmother and grandfather of park run, i am not sure grandmother and grandfather of park run, iam not sure how to grandmother and grandfather of park run, i am not sure how to take that! but we have been involved heavily
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with this. we started running, then we both had a small injury, ended up volunteering, and looked after the event for about seven years. you have got the finish opened in your bag. they are important. yes, at the end of the run, we hand out these tokens so people know what position they are in, what their time was. today, we have got 1650, so fingers crossed we will have more runners than that. & you bring the weather as well. yes, i keep the rain away until 10:30am every saturday. that is very good of you. so, you're running days are over? 0h, is very good of you. so, you're running days are over? oh, no, i still run regularly. the thing is, we volunteer and run. it is such a lovely community, we want to stay a pa rt of lovely community, we want to stay a part of it for as long as we can. thank you very much. we know mike is a run himself, and we have got his sister here. yes, this is a
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fantastic way of getting fresh air and exercise on a saturday morning, so and exercise on a saturday morning, so if! and exercise on a saturday morning, so ifiam and exercise on a saturday morning, so if i am free on a saturday i a lwa ys so if i am free on a saturday i always come. this is going to be my 154. that is at bushy park. i have also done a at whitley bay because my sister lives there. but i think bushy park is my favourite because you sometimes see the deer. do you and mike ever run together? we have done, yes. who is better? he tipped me to the post last time we did it. and i sometimes run with my son and husband as well, but they are both a lot quicker than me. what do we think? better than mike? kind of you to say, but now i bet you beat me. he has always been very competitive. i am sure jane will
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beat me because she does it every week at the moment, i have not done a park run for quite a while. he used to watch match of the day when we were young, he would not let me in the room because he said i brought bad luck. that's right, yes! jane, was mike a bit of a bully as a brother, because he is so sweet now? not really, no. he used to organise fun and games, but when it came to sport he was always very competitive. i picked daisies while he played football. there we go! thank you forjoining us. he played football. there we go! thank you forjoining uslj he played football. there we go! thank you forjoining us. i am running now. bye—bye. thank you forjoining us. i am running now. bye-bye. a little insight.
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too much information! headlines are coming up. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: hope among the devastation. as the search for the hundreds missing in the indonesian earthquake continues we hear one boy's astonishing story of survival. protests and bitter divisions, but us senators say they will approve brett kava naugh‘s controversial
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