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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 8, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's monday. it's nine o'clock. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to the programme. drastic changes to the way we live are needed to bring global temperatures under control. that's according to a new report by the intergovernmental panel on climate change. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. global emissions of carbon will need to halve in 12 years to limit temperatures rises to 1.5 celsius. so what if anything can you do about it? 40% of young adults cannot afford to buy a cheap house in their area, even with a deposit. could a proposal to give tax breaks to landlords who sell directly to their tenants make a difference? she's the first ever female doctor and expectations forjodie whitaker in the first episode of the new doctor who were stratospheric. it's coming back. what are you?
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0k, don't like questions. more of a private type. i get that. what's your verdict on the first episode? let us know. and there are calls for tighter regulation of bouncy castles in the wake of fatal accidents. new figures show there have been more than 20 injuries on inflatable play equipment in the uk since 2011. two anchor points with nothing on. that's got no metal work on it. if you look there, you can see it is starting to fray. that damage there would weaken the integrity of it. i'm going to say it is beyond economical repair, basically. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. are you struggling to find somewhere to buy a house in the area you rent in? how do you feel when another report about climate change warns we need
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to take drastic measures to get climate change under control? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about. use the hashtag victoria live. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you and maybe want to take part in the programme, please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. we want your views on the first episode of the new doctor who too. did jodie whittaker nail it? let us know what you think. our top story today: scientists have given one of the starkest warnings yet about the changes needed to tackle climate change. the report by the intergovernmental panel on climate change says that limiting temperature rises to no more than 1.5 celsius will require massive changes to the way we live. it warns that without action, all the world's coral reefs will die out and low lying regions will disappear because of rising sea levels. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. pictures of a warming world. scientists are more confident
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than ever that the impacts of climate change are playing out now in the severity and frequency of droughts, storms and other extreme weather events. and, having gathered in the south korean city of incheon for the past week, climate change researchers and government delegates hammered out the final details of a dramatic report outlining the consequences of a global temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees and a plan for precisely how that can be prevented. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. with no action, the world is on course to breach this crucial target by as early as 2030, compromising the very livability of our planet. melting polar ice means global sea level rise is projected to be around ten centimetres more if we allow warming to go to two degrees. keeping it to 1.5 means 10 million fewer people would be exposed to the risks of flooding.
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but this plan is ambitious and it will be expensive. renewable energy sources will need to provide about 85% of global electricity by 2050. currently they account for about 25%. even with a green energy revolution, this most comprehensive assessment of the perils of climate change concludes that every one of us will need to make changes in how we live our lives, changes that have to start now. victoria gill, bbc news. 0ur science editor david shukman has been at the intergovernmental panel on climate change conference in south korea and told us more on this story. for many years, the time i have been covering this subject, we all thought that if global warming took the average temperature up a couple of degrees, that would be pretty safe. 0nly of degrees, that would be pretty safe. only when you went beyond that toa safe. only when you went beyond that to a higher temperature with the really bad effects of global warming kick in, perhaps later this century. what this new research says is that
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if you get above 1.5 degrees, as you have mentioned, all the unpleasant things we are talking about start to kick in. in other words, sooner than anyone expected. not in some distant horizon at the back end of this century, but perhaps the 2030s or 20405. i century, but perhaps the 20305 or 20405. i think that is quite a shock to the political system. for a long time governments have wondered if they can look at this topic and say, well, it is for down the track. let's not take it too seriously now. i think this report might change that view. david shukman. we will be talking more about climate change later. carole walker is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the authorities in china have said that they're holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion
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of corruption, and allegations of bribery. interpol says it's received the resignation of meng hongwei who hadn't been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. 20 people have died in a crash involving a stretch limousine. police say it's the worst road accident in the united states for almost a decade. all 18 of the people in the limousine were killed, as well as two pedestrians. labo diseko reports. it's a day that should have been filled with celebration. instead, emergency services are at the scene of america's worst transportation accident in almost a decade. it's thought the 18 people in the limousine were on their way to a party when their car came off the road and hit two pedestrians. all of them died. 20 fatalities is just terrific. i've been on the board for 12 years and this is one of the biggest loss of life that we have seen in a long, long time. this is the most deadly
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transportation accident in this country since february of 2009. this is the junction where the crash happened. it's thought the limo failed to stop, veering out of control and ploughing into this cafe. i heard this loud bang. i came out. i saw i heard this loud bang. i came out. isawa i heard this loud bang. i came out. i saw a lot of people at the apple barrel, in the parking lot, and i heard screaming. i walked up and i could see this large fan, very unusual looking vehicles were out here, in the bushes. really wrecked. it hit a tree. there are reports that four sisters are among the dead. i don't know how to say it. you can't wrap your head around such a tragedy where you have four of your daughters die. it's still not clear why the driver apparently lost control or the exact cause of the accident. investigators are expected to be on the ground for at least five days. the victims won't be officially named until all of their families are informed.
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lebo diseko, bbc news. 40% of young people are said to be unable to afford to buy the cheapest homes in their local area even if they've managed to save a 10% deposit. the institute for fiscal studies says house prices in england have risen steeply over the past two decades. ministers are thought to be considering a tax break to help long—term tenants to buy their home. the far—right candidate jair bolsonaro has topped the poll in the first round of brazil's presidential election. he took 46% of the vote, short of the outright majority he needs to win. mr bolsonaro will go into a run—off in three weeks' time against fernando haddad of the workers' party, who won 29% of the vote. the organisers of the cardiff half—marathon say they will carry out a review after two competitors died in yesterday's race.
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the two men, who have not been named but were in their 205 and 305, collapsed at the finishing line. they are believed to have suffered heart attacks. the organisers say they were both given medical treatment at the scene, before being taken to hospital where they died. more than a third of girls have been harassed in public while wearing school uniform, according to a new report. the children's charity plan international uk, surveyed more than a thousand teenagers and young women. two—thirds of girls also said they have experienced unwanted attention in public. the charity's calling on bystanders to challenge harassment when they see it. dame barbara windsor has appeared on video to speak publicly about dementia for the first time since she was diagnosed. the former carry on and eastenders star, who's 81, called on people to run next year's london marathon in aid of a campaign to raise funds for more research into the condition. speaking from her home,
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she said she wanted to make a stand against dementia. this year i'm asking you to make a stand against dementia. use your place to run for the dementia revolution for the alzheimer's society and alzheimer's research uk, to support ground—breaking research to support ground—breaking research to find a cure for a condition that affects so many people like me. dame barbara windsor. taylor swift has made her first political statement to say that she is endorsing two demoratic candidates in the upcoming us midterm elections. the singer, who is eligible to vote in the us state of tennessee, admitted that in the past she has been reluctant to publicly voice political opinions, but now felt differently because of events in her personal life and in the world. she said she cannot support the republican senate candidate marsha blackburn because her voting record appalls and terrifies her. that's a summary of the latest bbc news.
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more at 9.30. thank you. you are getting in touch on climate change. philip on email: it would be the start of the government put a 200% tax on all these flashy cars and suv is on the road. no one cares about global warming in the west, just their own personal pleasures and comforts. get real, bbc. the west is totally selfish. kevin: we need to be realistic about what can be done. even a fast—track programme of getting everybody into electric cars is probably ten to 20 years away with limited battering charging opportunities being the issue. and this: planting a new forest is a goodidea this: planting a new forest is a good idea but how long does that take? what we can do is stop the deforestation in indonesia. it is up toa deforestation in indonesia. it is up to a power like the un to order an immediate halt to forest clearing. thank you for those. please get in
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touch. if you text, you will be charged at the standard rate. 0llie is here with the sport. good morning. —— holly. it is not long since mo farah decided to switch from track to road racing and he is not doing badly. that is fair to say! the mo—bot is back! you'll remember he retired from the track in august last year. he said he wanted to focus on road racing. many had thought at the age of 35 he was too old to be a serious contender over 26.2 miles but he has proven them wrong. 0nly his third marathon, in chicago, this weekend, he even secured a new european record with a time of two hours five minutes and 11 seconds after bursting clear of his nearest opponent in the final half mile to claim his first marathon victory, which incidently was also a family reunion. he hasn't seen his wife while he's been training.
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i haven't seen them for a little while. i have been training for the last two months. ijust while. i have been training for the last two months. i just want to go home tomorrow, go back to london, see my kids, spend a bit of time with them, and think about what is the next step. maybe the world champs and other stuff. i'm not sure. that win does mean he now holds european records at 1500m, 10,000m and the marathon, which is a staggering range and he's not done yet so the farahs may have to put up with not seeing him for a while longer. where does it leave him for challenging for other 0lympic where does it leave him for challenging for other olympic gold medals? let's have a look at the statistics. his winning time in chicago was more than three and a half minutes slower than the world record set in berlin last month by kenya's eliud kipchoge. it doesn't even make the top ten quickest marathon times. but it is faster than the olympic record set in beijing 10 years ago. and bear in mind farah is already
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britain's most successful track athlete with ten golds and two silvers between the olympics and the world championships. and since making the decision to move to the streets, he's claimed the british record at the london marathon, and just last month he won a record fifth successive great north run. so he can confidently hope for more medal success, perhaps at the 0lmypics in tokyo in two years' time when he'll be 37. but then beating time is something he's used to. and finally some special guests of honour at the youth 0lympics. and finally some special guests of honour at the youth olympics. you will remember the 12 thailand boys who were trapped in the cave. they've been the guests of honour in buenos aires for the opening weekend of the youth olympic games.
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they're known as the wild boars, which includes boys aged 11—17, and were invited to play against the junior team of one of argentina's most famous clubs, river plate. dressed in purplejerseys with the team logo of the argentine champions, they faced a huge applause from their opponents. they also watched a roller speed—skating event, visited the athletes' village and had lunch with the international olympic committee president. and just in case you were wondering the final score of their game was 3—3. really lovely to see all those boys having a good time. thank you. every week in the uk, two women are murdered by a partner or ex—partner. many of these deaths attract media attention. today campaigners and relatives of people killed by their partners are calling for a change in the way that media reports such murders. they say coverage often gives
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the impression that victims are in some way responsible for their own death. with me to discuss this idea isjoanne beverley. her sister was killed by her violent ex partner. ryan hart is also here. his father killed his mum and sister yet some newspapers described him as a nice person. and janey starling is here. she's from the level up campaign which is trying to change the way the media reports domestic violence murders. thank you forjoining us. ryan, i will come to you first. your father killed your mother claire and your sister charlotte. describe the man you knew. we are talking today about the difference between the person you knew and the person portrayed publicly. yes, so he was portrayed asa publicly. yes, so he was portrayed as a nice guy. he is quoted as being good at diy and a caring man. behind closed doors he was a different person completely. he lived to just control us and dominate his family.
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we realised after the event that domestic abuse is grossly misunderstood. these men are able to abuse for so many years because they keep that abuse behind closed doors. it is not known. we came to realise that a lot needs to be done to raise awareness of what it is actually like behind those closed doors in secret. 0ur father, for example, like behind those closed doors in secret. 0urfather, for example, he did everything he could to take away oui’ did everything he could to take away our financial capabilities, to destroy our self—esteem, and just to grind us down day by day. he is not the man that the community thought he was. how did he do that on a daily basis, destroying self—esteem, grinding you down? he had complete financial control. he took my mother's wages. he rationed money back to us. anything that we children did, he would critical of it, and he would shout at us for the
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smallest mistakes. day by day, small actions, not big when you consider them alone, but day by day over decades, they do wear you down. 0ver time you start to feel like a victim, to blame for your circumstances. as a child you are co nsta ntly circumstances. as a child you are constantly told it is your fault you can't do this or that and as a kid you have no other means of gathering information. you just absorb what you are told. as children growing up, we believed we were wrong and we believed our father was a up, we believed we were wrong and we believed ourfather was a normal up, we believed we were wrong and we believed our father was a normal man and we kids were bad. but he was just control in the narrative of our lives. you talk about little things that to the outside world might not seem significant, but when they add up seem significant, but when they add up over seem significant, but when they add up over a seem significant, but when they add up over a lifetime, clearly it had an impact on all of you. was he violent? was there ever an attempt by any of you to explain externally what was happening? could you explain it? we were looking for violence as an indicator that we we re violence as an indicator that we were in danger because we
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misunderstood domestic abuse ourselves. we thought that someone had to have a taste for violence to start a frenzy. 0nly had to have a taste for violence to start a frenzy. only recently we have come to learn that control is a better indicator of potential homicide because it is the control that these men are after and violence is just a that these men are after and violence isjust a means that these men are after and violence is just a means to gain that control. for all of our lives, we we re that control. for all of our lives, we were completely unaware of our situation. we thought we just had normalfamily situation. we thought we just had normal family dynamics. it was only after the murders, when we were in a local police station, and we saw behind as a poster detailing coercive control and domestic abuse. it's described our father perfectly. 0nly it's described our father perfectly. only then did we recognise that our father had been abusive to us, when we saw it from a different perspective. that was a penny dropped moment for you. and then with the reporting in the media, your father was described as a nice person, and you didn't feel it and you are now getting a different
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handle on what it actually was, and potentially being able to label it. how did you feel when it was portrayed in the way it was in the media? firstly i think it shows a misunderstanding that people believe the story started when we moved out of the house, when in fact it started decades before. it wasn't a reaction to the events, what he did. it wasn't coerced by circumstance. he chose to murder. it showed that people like to find an easy sequence of unknowns to form a narrative which is comforting. —— sequence of events. people don't like to look into the story too deeply because it is uncomfortable for all of us to think that domestic abuse is so common in the uk. that is one thing, how misunderstood, and how purposefully badly portrayed it is, to avoid difficult topics. and in particular, the media like to sympathise with our father, and almost try and find reasons for what
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he did. like the divorce, money, almost taking responsibility away from him and blaming my mum and sister. we knew that my mum and sister. we knew that my mum and sister were the most selfless people ever and nothing they could ever have done would have made them responsible for what he chose to do. your sister natalie was killed by her violent ex—partner, jo. did you really know what he was like before he murdered her? i don't think any of us really appreciated what she was living with. and i would say the same as ryan. we didn't really understand domestic abuse. and what it is, until after it happened. we all have this image of battered women that are constantly in a&e, and the reality is something very
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different. he controlled every aspect of my sister's life and the children's. the result of her wanting to leave that relationship and move forward was his excuse to do what he did. and how was it portrayed in the media?” do what he did. and how was it portrayed in the media? i think from either one headline that stands out is that one of the local newspapers had used something along the lines of she had had an affair, which wasn't fact, and also it doesn't matter if she had an affair, he had fio matter if she had an affair, he had no right to do what he did. how did it make you feel when it was put in those terms? angry, really angry. they had had at any point approached us they had had at any point approached us to find out what the real facts were. “— us to find out what the real facts were. —— they had not approached us. and to distort all we had left of my sister in that way was incredibly difficult. did she or you really
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have any clue of the danger that she was potentially in? no. ifi had known then the things that i know now, we would have done things so differently. so differently. but we genuinelyjust differently. so differently. but we genuinely just didn't understand differently. so differently. but we genuinelyjust didn't understand the risks she was at. and the figures speak for themselves. i think something like 90% of the women murdered in the first year after leaving a relationship. if we had known all of these things, we would have done things very differently. jamie, you are campaigning for a change in the way the media reports domestic violence murders. how important is the type of reporting? we are calling for more responsible reporting because we live in a country where two women a week murdered by a partner or ex—partner, and yet when these news items appear, almost every time it is like it isa appear, almost every time it is like it is a surprise, that it came out
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of the blue. a perfectly nice guy, and then he murdered his partner or ex—partner. these are not crimes of passion. these are crimes of control. it is really the responsibility ofjournalists to look more into the context and the character of these relationships. there are very clear patterns. if as a society we can understand what the long lead up to homicide is, we can prevent more women die in. what impact would it have? jo was saying that they didn't and ryan and his family didn't have a clue where things would lead in their case. you see a newspaper headline and it is not you, it is somebody else and you don't know the context of that. how differently can portraying things with a different narrative and more ofan with a different narrative and more of an explanation of the background actually impact on everybody?” can't speak for you both, but for families of women who have been
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murdered, it would make a huge difference. it would be a much more dignified way to treat a woman after her death. a man has already taken her death. a man has already taken her life and to take a trip away as well is really irresponsible. and for journalists to well is really irresponsible. and forjournalists to echo that. —— to ta ke forjournalists to echo that. —— to take her truth away is really irresponsible. and for people in controlling relationships, to read accounts of men with similar behaviours to their partners, and something we are calling for is for these crimes to be called domestic violence and for the domestic violence and for the domestic violence helpline to be put at the end of the article so that people can startjoining end of the article so that people can start joining the end of the article so that people can startjoining the dots between these behaviours, the high risk they carry and where to seek help. what do you think, jo? would it have made a difference if coverage had been historically different in terms of pointing up the risks of controlling relationship? i know that training is not the answer to everything, but for me, if you are writing these of pieces, then if you go and speak to
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specialist organisations and charities and really understand what it is you are writing about, that will naturally change the way that you do it. it has changed the way i think, the way i feel and the way i see things, because i understand it now and if that is the case, that is the way forward now. with what you have learned and understand, if there is somebody watching in a relationship that is controlling, and there will be many, what would you say? what are the red flag? and if you are family member looking at someone in that situation, you don't a lwa ys someone in that situation, you don't always know what is going on, so what is the advice? i would say contact your local specialist agency, the likes of women's aid. the charities like that out there. if you are living with it or family members, they can offer you lots of support and advice and help you to
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plan safely if you want to leave. all those kinds of things. they are the people that really understand this and know this inside out and we can look to them for help. jamie, i know you have brought in examples of other newspaper headlines where it doesn't tell the full story. just talk through what you have got. absolutely. i can hold them up. how be guilty of murdering his wife after row over her lesbian tryst. —— hubby guilty. that is so irresponsible. this woman is dead and she can't counter the allegations. it is completely inappropriate to have a picture of a woman in her underwear. this is a very common issue where actually a woman has left an abusive relationship and she has been hunted down afterwards, and yet the press frame it with the perpetrator's defence that he loved it so much and she was having an affair when it is
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a crime of control, total control. father stabbed his eight—year—old girl after mother took her lesbian love r. girl after mother took her lesbian lover. absolutely inaccurate. they had separated. the woman had moved on to have a new relationship. as we all know, in the eyes of a perpetrator, that is not her right and he must control everything. languages are very important shorthand when something is being communicated. there has been a big effort to change the language around suicide. we no longer say that somebody committed suicide. they died by suicide. just that use of language immediately makes you think differently about something. is that a good example of how language is important in perception? that is a brilliant example and i think it is also an example of how the press can change. and with the right training, because journalists are not trained on this. there is no treading on this. if they are not a domestic violence survivor
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or expert, they may have no idea. 0ur guidelines that we have published today are there to help journalists and provide tips on how to report responsibly. jo and on twitter: this segment on victoria live is so heartbreaking. these are not crimes of passion that of control. my lord, this has got to stop. ryan palmer you feel very strongly about how your family enjoyed and what you continue to enjoyed and what you continue to enjoy and you have written a book about your experiences. i asked jo what her advice was to others in a similar situation. with your situation there was no violence but it ended there. what would you say and what would your advice be? it ended there. what would you say and what would your advice be ?m it ended there. what would you say and what would your advice be? it is important that it is notjust for victims to discover their situation. victims are in a helpless situation and they are controlled and they have no resources. 0ur book is 0peration lighthouse because we want eve ryo ne
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0peration lighthouse because we want everyone to understand. people need to step into these situations and help. does the call you out? -- does the call go out? were the people aware of your situation? there are signs where you can spot personality changes. 0ur mother couldn't go out with friends. her social life was slowly ta ke n with friends. her social life was slowly taken from her. she had no control. my father would stalk her at work. little things might not mean much to people but with a greater understanding of what coercive control is, you might be able to piece together the picture, and that is why we wrote the book to be able to give a detailed survivor's perspective of what it is like in that situation. we couldn't do anything because we had no money, no resources. we needed people like that posted to show us what our life was like. our book is almost the survivor's note. 0ur dad left a murder note to try and control the
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narrative. that was for you boys, his sons, was it? it was for us and we haven't read it but it was mostly for the media. he wanted to control the narrative after the death and he wa nted the narrative after the death and he wanted to tell his story. he wanted to keep his false reputation going. powerbook was our sister's voice, because very often the victim is silenced, it is only ever the murderer‘s voice you hear from, so more effort needs to go into understanding the victims. looking at the background and learning the story which led up to the events. in general, what would be fantastic would—be if everyone, the general public, social services, doctors, police, just had a greater understanding of what domestic abuse and coercive control is, and how you can spot the symptoms in perpetrators and victims. thank you
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all very much indeed for coming in. and if you have been affected by domestic violence, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website at bbc.co.uk/actionline. still to come. calls for tighter controls on inflatable play equipment after new figures show more than 20 people in the uk have been thrown from bouncy castles in windy conditions since 2011, and in one case it proved fatal. we've a special report. also, too many apprentices are being let down and aren't getting the training they deserve — that's according to new report by a group of mps. later we'll discuss how apprenticeships could be improved. time for the latest news — here's carole walker. good morning. climate scientists meeting in south korea have given one of the starkest warnings yet about the scale of the challenge involved in tackling global warming, saying society will have to undergo
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rapid and far—reaching change. the report, by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, urges limiting temperature rises to no more than 1.5 celsius above pre—industrial levels. it says that target will require massive shifts in the way we live, from the food we eat to the way energy is generated. the authorities in china have said that they're holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption, and allegations of bribery. interpol says it's received the resignation of meng hongwei, who hadn't been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. 20 people have died in a crash in new york state involving a stretch limousine. police say it's the worst road accident in the united states for almost a decade. all 18 of the people in the limousine were killed, as well as two pedestrians.
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the vehicle was on its way to a party when the incident happened. the cause of the crash isn't clear, but witnesses described seeing the vehicle shoot across a junction, hitting another car and then ploughing into pedestrians. 12 thai boys who were rescued from a cave have been honoured in the youth olympic games in argentina. the boys, who are members of a football team known as the wild boars, attended the opening ceremony as part of their visit to the country. they also played a friendly match against an argentinan youth team in the famous monumental stadium which hosted the 1978 world cup final. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with holly hamilton. good morning. riyad mahrez missed a late penalty in the eagerly awaited game between liverpool and manchester city which finished goalless. city are top ahead of
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everton and liverpool on goal difference. gareth bale is in the line for the ballon d'or after helping his team to the champions league title in may. mo farah has claimed his first marathon victory, winning at only his third attempt at the distance, breaking the european record in the process. and london broncos will be back in the super league next season after five years away, thanks to victory over toronto wolfpack in the million pound game. that is all your sport now, more after ten o'clock. thank you very much, holly. too many people on apprenticeship schemes are being let down, and aren't getting the high—quality training they deserve. that's according to a report by a group of mps today. the education select committee has recommended an increased role for 0fsted in inspecting apprenticeship providers, and says more effort is needed to recruit people from disadvantaged backgrounds. it's also called for an increase in the minumum wage for apprentices — which is currently £3.70 an hour. we can speak now to robert halfon
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the conservative mp for harlow and chair of the education committee behind today's report. dr carole easton from the young woman's trust charity gave evidence to the committee. shoaib aslam had a bad experience at his first apprenticeship when he was 18. and we hope to bejoined by naila bibi in a moment— she's currently on an apprenticeship and says she is receiving fantastic training robert, what are the key findings from this report? we are told that the march of the robots, potentially something like a 28% of 16 to
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24—year—old will lose theirjobs by 2030, so we need to build an apprenticeship and skills nation, so our report looks at the quality of training and says it is just not good enough. 0ne training and says it is just not good enough. one in five providers are not giving good enough training to their apprentices, we need more disadvantaged apprentices climbing the ladder, so we are suggesting a bursary and proper travel costs for those who are disadvantaged to get to their apprenticeship, and we want to their apprenticeship, and we want to make it easierfor to their apprenticeship, and we want to make it easier for businesses to wade through the bureaucracy and hire more apprentices. why do you think they are not getting the training and good enough training in some cases? are some companies seeing this as a route to cheap labour? there are many good apprentice providers, company usually works with a training provider whether it is a further education college or private provider, and many do wonderful jobs, but too many are not, and when 0fsted ca m e
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jobs, but too many are not, and when 0fsted came to our committee, they said something like half the training providers they had seen this year were simply not good enough. so what we are trying to do is say that 0fsted needs to have more powers, there needs to be less subcontracting when provider has another want to do the training, and really to improve the monitoring and inspection of all apprenticeship providers. so if apprenticeship providers. so if apprenticeship providers are not doing a good job, should they be taken off the list? that is what we are suggesting in the report, but particularly ones who are failing should be taken off the list. we have had big providers like learn direct that have failed, after having millions of pounds of government money, and that is not good enough. lots of new providers come in who have no record of training apprentices, and they should be capped, 0fsted should monitor them at least in the first year. carole, you gave evidence to
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the committee. what are your concerns? we were encouraged, i'm very hopeful that government will listen and implement everything that is in the report, particularly encouraged by the recognition that for so many young people, actually doing an apprenticeship is costing them more, so they can't make ends meet, and particularly young women. there is a gender pay gap already even in apprenticeships. how come? because the areas where men are working in ten to pay less. that is so stereotypical already is that men and women are going into different areas. explain a bit more about the different areas on the differential in pay. for example, young women are still more likely to go into something like hairdressing, probably because it gives them a bit more flexibility and more
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opportunities for part—time, so they canjuggle it opportunities for part—time, so they can juggle it with caring responsibilities, notjust can juggle it with caring responsibilities, not just children but other family members, and it pays roughly on average half of what something like engineering would p5y~ something like engineering would pay. and so the opportunities for women are less, and as i say, particularly one of the things we would like to see is the requirement for more apprenticeships to be offered on a flexible or part—time basis so that young men and women with other responsibilities are able to undertake apprenticeships. robert, are you disappointed to hear that even at that level, kids starting at 16, that even at that level, kids starting at16, in that even at that level, kids starting at 16, in 2018, there is a gender divide even now at that stage? carole is right, and she gave some brilliant evidence to our education select committee. it is roughly 50/50 of men and women apprenticeships, but there is a huge deficit in female apprentices doing
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stem subjects, and i think there should be financial incentives in terms of the levy to encourage companies to employ more women apprentices in those areas. we also need much better careers advice, we need much better careers advice, we need to enforce the law in terms of schools allowing apprentice organisations and skills organisations and skills organisations into schools so that they can encourage boys and girls, all pupils, to do the right quality apprenticeships. sean, you had a bad experience, you now run the company and take on apprentices, but take us back to when you were 18, what was it like? first of all it wasn't my expectation. when you're18, you are pretty excited, you think an apprenticeship is all about training, and on—the—job learning, so training, and on—the—job learning, so when i started off, i suppose the
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expectation was that i would get all sorts of training and an academic qualification, but i suppose things just didn't add up. in what we? to begin with, one of the biggest perceptions out there for apprenticeships is the fact that if you don't have a degree, you go to an apprenticeship, it is for the less fortunate, for the people who have got less academics, and essentially, they don't really train you up as much. 0n—the—job training is pretty awful. i'm not saying every employer out there is the same, but there is that minority of employers who do look down upon candidates, and essentially they see it as cheap labour. the apprenticeship you were doing was four accountancy. did you not, with any qualification? i had as and bs
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in my a—levels. any qualification? i had as and bs in my a-levels. so what you come up with from the apprenticeship?” in my a-levels. so what you come up with from the apprenticeship? i was ona with from the apprenticeship? i was on a fast track a british training scheme, but initially when you go the on—the—job perception and the training their is that of quite a junior candidate. i essentially ended up qualifying as a chartered accountant. and you have gone on to good things, you have now got your own business. absolutely, i haven't let that experience get to me. at the moment i employ a tonne of people, so i make sure the same experiences aren't passed on to the people we recruit. naila, you are an apprentice, you started at 16 and got asian apprentice of the year, i
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believe. tell us about your experiences. why has it been so positive for you? it's very positive, my apprenticeship. since i started, it has been really good, all the training that i received and all the training that i received and all the training that i received and all the new people that i have met along the way. they have really helped me from day one, i couldn't fault them at all. and if you hadn't had the opportunity for an apprenticeship, what would things have been like for you? how important has it been to you?” think it has been really important for me. i have met so many people, had loads of opportunities come my way. now i go into school and i speak to young people about apprenticeships, and my journey since winning the award. it is great to talk to you all, thank you very much indeed. let us know what your thoughts are, if you are an apprentice and you have got any experiences you want to share, all the usual ways of getting in touch.
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coming up: jodie whittaker‘s proved to be a big hit with dr who fans as the first female time lord. as the new series launched last night — you'll be hearing from some super fans. let us know what you think as well. two years ago, a seven—year—old girl called summer grant died after a bouncy castle she was playing on blew away while she was inside it. now the bbc has discovered that more than 20 people across the uk have been hurt or seriously injured while using inflatable play equipment since 2011. the figures revealed by the inside out east programme have led to calls for tighter regulation of bouncy castles and other inflatables. david whiteley reports. this was the day a bouncy castle ripped from its moorings and blew across a park. seven—year—old summer grant died. this was two years ago in harlow in essex. we've discovered
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21 people have been hurt or seriously injured since 2011 by castles that have hurled into the air. 0ne castles that have hurled into the air. one of the victims was another girl called summer. she was enjoying a day out with her brother brodie and parents. she had just come through cancer treatment.” and parents. she had just come through cancer treatment. i asked if i could go on the bouncy slide with my friends, and i was halfway up the stairs and my friend was just coming down the slide, and it flew up, and shejust got off down the slide, and it flew up, and she just got off it and i was up down the slide, and it flew up, and shejust got off it and i was up in the air. summer was thrown into the air, she suffered head injuries and air, she suffered head injuries and a broken thigh bone. so are the rules for the use of inflatables tough enough? every year, an operator needs to get their castle inspected by someone like neil gossage. he tested the mattress factory in wellingborough. he is
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pa rt factory in wellingborough. he is part of a scheme backed by the health and safety executive to make sure inflatables conform to safety standards. he's seen his fair share of dodgy equipment. this is one that somebody has bought, and he brought it here so we could test it for him. two anchor points there with nothing on. that has got no metal work on it. if you look there you can see it is starting to fray. that damage they would weaken the integrity of it. i'm going to say it's beyond economical repair, basically. it. i'm going to say it's beyond economical repair, basicallym it. i'm going to say it's beyond economical repair, basically. it is recommended by the health and safety executive that inflatable play cupboard is secured by a certain number of pegs, at least six, and they have to be the right pegs. and they have to be the right pegs. and they have to be the right pegs. and they have to be put on the ground properly. we always ask to see the anchor pegs, because that is a fundamental part of the test. the ones in here are ones that people have presented to us. that is just a standard tent peg. that is another
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style of tent peg. if these were used, they would put people in danger. a bit more substantial style of tent peg. this one is just a nail. all of these unsuitable pegs have come with castles centre neil things back. —— for inspection. i wa nt to things back. —— for inspection. i want to see how things can go wrong. clive ellis is also an inspector. so you have got that right down into the ground, nothing sticking out. why is that so imported? a large percentage of the strength of the sta ke percentage of the strength of the stake is that last couple of inches into the ground. we're going to see what happens if the bouncy castle is used in high winds. clive is putting some slack in the straps, but with the right number of anchors to stop
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it flying away completely. the hse in advises that a bouncy castle shouldn't be inflated if the winds are above 24 mph. we are going to put this bouncy castle to the test. that is ten miles an hour at the moment. what i'm saying over the noises the wind meter is notching up to over 30 mph. this just shows that you have to be certain the inflatable will hold before letting anyone use it. we stopped our experiment under 40 mph. the day summer grant died in harlow, the wind had reached 36 mph. the equipment was also not properly
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secured. the operators were found guilty of gross negligence. but even if the regulations are tight enough, are there enough inspections? however vigilant people like neil and clive are, a small proportion of operators will take chances, and this has led to injuries. summer also went on a castle in windy conditions, and the pegs didn't keep it secure. her parents feel that the castle should never have been put up in the first place. they shouldn't have had it up and running if they had done the checks to do with the wind, if there are regulations that if the wind was a certain speed, they would have to take it down. we got hold of vhs e report, they concluded that the inflatable blow across the park because wind speeds we re across the park because wind speeds were in excess of the maximum, in fa ct a were in excess of the maximum, in fact a gust of 47 mph was registered that day. the pegs did not keep the
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castle secure enough, only five anchor points were retrieved, leading the hsc to conclude it had probably been set up with less than the 22 possible anchor points a p pa re ntly the 22 possible anchor points apparently provided by the manufacturer. the hse said that there had only ever been five, and we have got a witness saying five big bits of turf came out of the ground. but no one was prosecuted, and in karen and chris's view, the hse is not being rigorous enough. anything that makes it that has to happen. this can't go on. you can't have people dying. if people are doing theirjobs directly, the hse, spot checks, opening associated with that, these accidents will stop. we
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asked the health and safety executive what it does to prevent accidents happening again. it told us accidents happening again. it told us it uses a variety of methods to identify where risks exist. it can respond to concerns raised by members of the public, and the guidance around the law itself is under continual review. it also said it's working with the fairground industry where necessary will improve health and safety across the industry. but the hse could not tell us the number of checks carried out, but says it does regularly turn up to fairground is a theme parks unannounced. clive has no doubt that properly operated bouncy castles are safe. what can be done to make sure people running these businesses with inflatables is safer? at the end of the day, you can have all the safety certificates on the castle, but if the operator
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doesn't use the training correctly and doesn't put it up correctly, then that is the issue. it is all about training, much better training across the whole industry would improve things a lot. summer made a full recovery, but with all the activities she does, there is one thing she won't go on.” activities she does, there is one thing she won't go on. i don't really wa nt thing she won't go on. i don't really want to go on a bouncy slide again, because i don't really like them any more. if you're in the east region, you can see more on that story tonight at 7.30 on inside out on bbc one. it will also be on the iplayer. many of you getting in touch about domestic violence and the way people are treated. jonathan says i am concerned at the anti—male bias in this piece. i was a victim of this, and my father was as well, many men
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are victims, and our stories don't count. they do, john, and thank you for getting in touch. i'm sorry that you felt that way. my you felt that way. my parents had a violent, coercive relationship, and my mother cited it in the divorce proceedings. my father used the parental role to mask his extreme psychopathy and narcissism. he was adept at playing people with film star looks. and anonymous got in touch to say men are anonymous got in touch to say men a re often anonymous got in touch to say men are often victims, too. please don't make this all about winning. and on twitter, i was trapped in a controlling relationship for years with no access to my bank account. when i was finally able to leave, i was made out to be the baddie, all of this because i was the man. please share this for men as well as women. thank you for getting in touch, and if you do need support, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc action line website. so, the first ever female
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doctor who — jodie whitaker — crash landed through a train roof last night to mark the start of the first episode, amidst an alien invasion in sheffield. and the verdict on her performance? very positive, on social media at least tweets sherlock star and former doctor who writer mark gatiss wrote that he absolutely loved it — praising jodie whittaker and her co—star bradley walsh , he called last night's episode "a creepy, moving and fun first adventure" and said, "above all, i loved its hearts". another fan of the show, laura, tweeted that jodie whittaker was "outstanding" as the new doctor, mixing "sheffield steel" with a core of "galatic grit that's lived through so many faces and so many lives". she added: "what a breath of fresh air. what fun. it's about time." twitter user maximus brodie said: "writing was fantastic, cinematography was superb,
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characters were beautifully crafted, music was brilliant, and jodie — well, she is the doctor". and adam rutherford wrote: "i just found myself reassuring my four—year—old daughter that it's going to be ok because she is the doctor, and she's not afraid of anything. and now i've got a bit of a tear in my eye." let's take a look at a clip from last night — here's the doctor with her new assistants. what? that should bias a few seconds! long story, tell you later. doors? locked shut. we will see about that. so,
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she landed. what's the verdict? scott bryan, tv editor at buzzfeed and kez newson who is a writer for doctor who magazine and co—creator of the time ladies, a blog for female doctor who fans. what did you think?” what did you think? i thought it was brilliant. there seems to be no doubting anybody‘s mind thatjodie is that part, right from the very first line, she is the doctor. this is the newest dr who has felt in a very long time. when the new doctor is arriving, do you feel nervous that they are going to deliver? it is natural to be nervous, because you always loved the previous incarnation, but to be
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honest, no doctor has ever disappointed. you have to have faith in the script, in the cast. the cinematography was gorgeous, the script was great, the acting was brilliant, so you have to have faith. scott, what did you think? there was such a media storm last year about whether there could be a female doctor, and from the very first moment we saw her, she was funny. and i think the viewers felt the same way. she was quirky, warm, vibrant, inclusive. and i think it really says something when about two minutes in you are forgetting about all the speculation, all of the drama surrounding the show that has been building for the last 18 months and just focus on the story and go along with the story. and i think that was a real sense. i get the impression that for many people this is their first time that they've been getting into doctor who. i felt that with capaldi, it lost its sense
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that with capaldi, it lost its sense that at its heart it was a kids show, and this series with chris chibnall, it felt like it was very much a family orientated audience. kez, she will always be in a category of her own, because she will always be the first female doctor who. it is early days, but would you compare her now against the others in terms of ranking of your favourites? that is really difficult, it is difficult to ask any doctor who fan who their favourite is. but absolutely, she is different already. chris has done a brilliantjob different already. chris has done a brilliant job with different already. chris has done a brilliantjob with still respecting the previous incarnations of the doctor but still having elements of the doctor, but putting jodie's spin on it. she is still regenerating in
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the story, so we still don't know who she is yet, and i'm just really excited to see what her doctor will be like and what her development will be like, but she is so brilliant straightaway, i just can't wait. scott, you are talking about potentially bringing in a new audience here, 8 million watched last night, what are the viewing figures doing for doctor who overtime? the show used to be on saturday nights, and i think if there had been a gentle slide, they had quite a lot of viewers catching up had quite a lot of viewers catching up on iplayer, but it seems to have lost its blockbuster gravitas in terms of millions of viewers. the 8.2 from last night, that isjust people who watched it yesterday, not including people who will be catching up on iplayer, so 8.2 million, the bbc will be very impressed with that, that is a real success for them. and moving it to a sunday audience just before strictly and after country file, they are onto a winner because you will have that sense of routine, the issue
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with the doctor who ratings for the la st with the doctor who ratings for the last few years is that the bbc messed it about in terms of putting it on messed it about in terms of putting itona messed it about in terms of putting it on a conventionally latex —— later slot, after 8pm, and now they are pretty much putting it at 7pm every sunday, it will be interesting to see how it goes, but it has been very strong. and it will be interesting to see if there is any knock—on for other franchises. we have heard from the bond producers saying that there will never be a female james bond, but i wonder whether this will be looked at if it does really rejuvenate. at the end of the day, it is down to the character, not the gender, and what the doctor has been so strong at is being all embracing and not caring about the individual, institutions, people of authority. with any other franchise, the superhero is down to the character and not the gender. what is really
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great to see on social media is young girls and parents of young girls talking about how great it is to have a role model, but also parents saying it is great that my son is looking up to a woman as well. the fact that they don't see that gender specific role about the superhero being a specific type of person. thank you very much. let us know what you think. if you are big fan or maybe a new fan. doctor who continues on bbc one on sunday at 6:55pm and if you missed the episode last night, you can catch it on bbc iplayer. now the weather with carol. thank you. this morning we have got a band of rain across northern ireland and scotland but in england and wales, something brighter. you can see why we have got the rain. it is as weather front moving north and south, waving front, so we could see some of it getting into northern england at times today as well. this is what has already fallen. it has been coming in from the west and in
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the north and west of scotland especially it will be happy as we go through the day. for the rest of the uk through the day there will be a lot of cloud currently, but it will thin and break—up and sunny spells will develop and it will feel pleasa nt will develop and it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. light breezes across pleasant in the sunshine. light breezes a cross m ost pleasant in the sunshine. light breezes across most of england and wales. northern england, northern ireland and also scotland, with the rain, it will be windy for you. if you are stuck in that combination in stornoway it will not feel very warm at 12 degrees. further south, we are looking at temperatures of 17 or 18. heading through monday and tuesday, it will get warmer with it speaking on wednesday. —— peaking on wednesday. hello. it's monday. i'm joanna gosling. a stark warning on climate change.
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scientists say the world must keep the rise in global temperatures to under 1.5 degrees otherwise it will pay the consequences. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. we'll hear from one of the co—chairs of that report, professorjim skea. could tax breaks for landlords be a solution to the housing crisis? the proposals come as new research finds that 40% of young adults cannot afford to buy a home in their local area, even with a 10% deposit. and going shopping can be a stressful experience at the best of times. but for autistic people, who are hypersensitive to lights, sounds, smells and crowds, it can be a nightmare. in shopping centres there are that many things going on. then there can be crashes and bangs and they can just tip you over the edge. if i'm already on a high level of stress, that little bit can be that much to tip me over and, well, explode. now shops are recognising that they can be a hostile place for autistic people
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and are introducing an autism hour. we've all the details after half past ten. here's carole walker in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. climate scientists meeting in south korea have given one of the starkest warnings yet about the scale of the challenge involved in tackling global warming, saying society will have to undergo rapid and far—reaching change. the report, by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, urges limiting temperature rises to no more than 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. it says that target will require massive shifts in the way we live, from the food we eat, to the way energy is generated. and joanna will be speaking to the co—chair of that climate change panel, jim skea, live from south korea in a few minutes' time. the authorities in china have said that they're holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption and allegations of bribery.
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interpol says it's received the resignation of meng hongwei who hadn't been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. 20 people have died in a crash in new york state involving a stretch limousine. police say it's the worst road accident in the united states for almost a decade. all 18 of the people in the limousine were killed, as well as two pedestrians. the vehicle was on its way to a party when the incident happened. the cause of the crash isn't clear but witnesses described seeing the vehicle shoot across a junction, hitting another car and then ploughing into pedestrians. it's just horrific. i've been on the board for 12 years and this is one of the biggest losses of life that we've seen in a long, long time. colgan air up at buffalo killed 40 people, 50 people, but this is the most deadly transportation accident in this country since february of 2009. the far—right candidate, jair bolsonaro, has topped
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the poll in the first round of brazil's presidential election. he took 46% of the vote, short of the outright majority he needs to win. mr bolsonaro will go into a run—off in three weeks' time against fernando haddad of the workers' party, who won 29% of the vote. dame barbara windsor has appeared on video to speak publicly about dementia for the first time since she was diagnosed. the former carry on and eastenders star, who's 81, called on people to run next year's london marathon in aid of a campaign to raise funds for more research into the condition. speaking from her home, she said she wanted to make a stand against dementia. this year i'm asking you to make a stand against dementia. use your place to run for the dementia revolution for alzheimer's society and alzheimer's research uk. support ground—breaking research to find a cure for a condition that
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affects so many people like me. dame barbara windsor. the name of a second person to die after suffering an allergic reaction after suffering an allergic reaction after eating a threat onjake salmond has been released. 42—year—old celia marsh died last year and the coroner has said they are treating her death and serious. —— eating a pret a manger sandwich. police searching for a missing 9 year—old boy in blackburn say they believe they've found him in a serious condition. officers were called to a factory in the town just after 8 o'clock this morning, after staff members found a child lying on the floor of the factory. the boy is believed to be leon langford who went missing from home on sunday afternoon.
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police said it appears he had fallen through a roof. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30. now let's get the sport. good morning. the eagerly—anticipated premier league match between liverpool and manchester city ended in a goalless draw. city's record signing riyadh mahrez had the best chance to score a winner at anfield but he was off target from the penalty spot. city are top of the table, though, ahead of chelsea and liverpool on goal difference. chelsea won 3—0 at southampton. eden hazard taking his league tally to seven. but their boss maurizio sarri doesn't believe chelsea are quite good enough to challenge manchester city or liverpool just yet. i think exactly what i thought one week ago, that city and liverpool are a step forward of us and so now we are working and we are trying to cover the gap. just look at this wonderful team move from arsenal in their 5—1 win at fulham. nine passes took the ball from one penalty area to the other with aaron ramsey making an early bid for goal of the season.
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that's arsenal's ninth win in a row. it's turning out to be a topsy—turvy season in the scottish premiership and the leaders hearts have been beaten for the first time in 13 matches. it was rangers who did the damage, winning 3—1 at ibrox. hearts are now two points clear of hibs at the top of the table, with celtic one more point behind. the champions moved up with their first away win of the season. james forrest hadn't scored in the league since april but he put away four goals in half an hour, as they won 6—0 at stjohnstone. the nominees for this season's ballon d'or are being revealed this morning. and the wales forward gareth bale is among them. he's scored five goals for real madrid this season, after helping them to the champions league title in may. more names on the 30—man—long list will be released throughout the day, with bale's team—mate luka modric the bookies' favourite to end the dominance of ronaldo and messi
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over the past ten years. after ten olympic and world titles, mo farah's decision to swap the track for road running is paying off. he won the chicago marathon, his first victory over the distance at only his third attempt. he broke the european record in the process and took 71 seconds off his own best time and it all finished with a very welcome reunion with his wife. i haven't seen them for a little while. i have been training for the last two months. i just want to go home tomorrow, go back to london, see my kids, spend a bit of time with them, and think about what is the next step. maybe the world champs and other stuff. i'm not sure. good to see the mo—bot back too. london broncos will return to super league after five years away, thanks to victory in the million pound game. toronto wolfpack were the favourites to win in canada but it was a really cagey match — no tries and only three goals, jarrod sammut scoring both for the broncos,
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who won by four points to two. that's all the sport for now. back to you. thank you. we're facing a critical moment in our history, and the future of the planet hangs in the balance. that's the message from scientists, who've given their most extensive warning yet on the risks of rising global temperatures. the main target of the paris agreement on climate change was to limit the rise in global average temperature to two degrees celsius. but scientists on the intergovernmental panel on climate change say that needs to be lowered to 1.5 degrees. their dramatic report says the world is now completely off track, with global temperatures heading instead towards a three degree celsius rise. what will happen if we don't stop the rise? scientists say that if temperatures rise by even two degrees celsius, we are in for some significant and dangerous changes to our world. we're already feeling some of the effects. this summer saw some of the most extreme weather of all time. several countries, including california in the us, were hit by wildfires.
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greece also faced its worst wildfires in a decade, which killed at least 80 people. the country also suffered a drought. there were devastating floods in kerala in india and millions more could be exposed to flooding, as experts predict global sea levels will rise around ten centimetres more with even a two degree rise in global temperatures. spain and portugal roasted in temperatures of more than 40 degrees, while the uk had the driest start to a summer on record. scientists claim the window of opportunity is not yet closed, but say keeping the rise in temperatures below 1.5 degrees will require rapid, far—reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society. i'm joined from incheon by professorjim skea, co—chair of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, and with me in the studio is labour mp mary creagh, chair of of the environmental audit committee. thank you both forjoining us. tell
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us why1.5 degrees rather than two. what difference does that make?” think we need to be very clear that the impetus from this report actually came from the governments rather than scientists. when governments signed up to the paris agreement, they agreed to go for well below two degrees warming and pursue efforts towards 1.5. what they did was invite the intergovernmental panel to produce a report that spelt out for them what the impacts of global warming of 1.5 would be compared to two degrees, and secondly what would need to be done to halt global warming within that 1.5 limit. that is basically what the report has
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done. we had an intense week with scientists and governments discussing this report together. we have reached a very robust set of conclusions that have been bought into all the governments but also the scientists. this is a scientists meets policy plays, the ipcc, and it is not just meets policy plays, the ipcc, and it is notjust the scientists saying this. there are very significant differences between 1.5 degrees warming and two. some of the worst effects will be felt by poorer and more vulnerable people in developing countries. but again countries like the uk are not immune. we could see more flooding, we could see more intense and frequent extreme weather events, storms etc. so everybody is going to see that difference. you described keeping the rise to 1.5 celsius as needing rapid, far reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society. is it doable? we have been very careful not to answer that question precisely. what we have done is identify different conditions that need to be met if 1.5 degrees warming was going to be achieved.
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some of them are very simple things. we have concluded very firmly that it can be done within the laws of physics and chemistry. we have also identified what is technologically possible, if we have the technology to do it. the last conditions relate to do it. the last conditions relate to things like political will and institutions and in a way that is not for scientists to answer the question. the answer to that question. the answer to that question lies with the audience for that report, the governments. they are going to meet again in poland in december this year to think about what to do next. the next steps under the paris agreement. this report is the only named input into the negotiations that are going to be held. that is why the report is so important. it is really the next step in the world's efforts to deal with climate change. mary, politician, do politicians have the will? i think we do. i think it is very challenging and the reduction from two to 1.5 degrees rise poses a
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lot of problems not just were governments but for us as consumers and citizens as well. the question is not can we change, and jim has set up the fact that we can change. the question is do we want to change? do we want to buy fewer clothing so that everybody in the world gets the chance to wear decent garments? do we want to eat less meat so we can garments? do we want to eat less meat so we can use garments? do we want to eat less meat so we can use land for different purposes, for capturing carbon and to reduce the carbon footprint of our food? do we want to invest in flood defences to keep the whole of the east of england, which is very vulnerable to storm surges, and has seen devastating floods in the not too distant past, as citizens are we prepared to pay more for that? those are questions were governments need to show leadership and business needs to show leadership as well. is it showing leadership as well. is it showing leadership in areas where you want less consumption? for instance cars.
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someone said why not a 200% tax on the gas guzzling cars? and on fashion? does the government need to slap big taxes on this?” fashion? does the government need to slap big taxes on this? i think the government needs to change what government needs to change what government does. it is the largest purchaser of goods and services in the country and on environmental audit committee we are always checking. they talk the talk at the big intergovernmental meetings but do they walk the walk? are they asking their providers and switching to electric vehicles and consuming less? time and again the answer comes back no. the government needs to lead and through the supply chain it can make a huge amount of difference. it can also through subsidies for clean fuels do an awful lot to help people switch. and ca rs awful lot to help people switch. and cars seem to be the one area where our government is very reluctant. we have seen it again, for example with the freeze on fuel duty. actually it isa very the freeze on fuel duty. actually it is a very fair tax because it taxes people on the amount of carbon they are using. to freeze it again i
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think sends a negative step which is already what we have heard will be announced in the budget. jim, stewart has got in touch on text voicing what is probably the feeling of many out there, saying that climate change, if it exists, is a natural process that there is nothing we can do to prevent it and banning diesel and petrol cars is unrealistic and unattainable. what do you say to him and anyone else thinking the same way? well, the message is clear in the report and in previous ipcc reports. the global warming that we have seen, 1 degrees above the preindustrial levels from the 19th century, you can attribute all of it almost too human activities and the carbon dioxide emissions put into the atmosphere. there is absolutely no ambiguity about that. every country in the world at ipcc, from tuvalu to saudi arabia, has signed up to that view. i don't think there is really any question about it. scientists have
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been quite clear and governments have now accepted that message. simon on email: why not stop all of these experts from jetting off around the world and while we are at it but attacks on jet fuel? and another one from andy: 0ne long haul flight another one from andy: 0ne long haul flight from sydney to london creates more, both sides than all the cards in one day. i have heard this and i would like to know if that is true. no. a quick answerfrom area. would like to know if that is true. no. a quick answer from area. what about the second one, jetting off to talk about it? we have jetted off with great reluctance, i have got to say. the last ipcc meeting in paris was completely offset in terms of carbon dioxide emissions and i know the koreans are working on it for this meeting as well. we spend much of our lives on web conferences and telephone calls avoiding the need to travel. but every now and then you need to get together and people need
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to meet personally to do it. there is no avoiding that and we do try to offset it and make sure that it is a zero carbon footprint on this kind of meeting. what would you say to an individual who thinks there is nothing i can do as an individual to make a difference? there are plenty of things that people can do. the tea m of things that people can do. the team or energy efficiency into your home. considering an electric vehicle. —— putting more energy efficiency into your home. as scientists we are not going to tell people what to eat but if people followed healthy diet and health advice, they would live longer, be bouncier and jump around, advice, they would live longer, be bouncierandjump around, and advice, they would live longer, be bouncier and jump around, and at the same time it would reduce greenhouse gas emissions. it isn't all pain and effort and giving things up. it is about living better and differently rather than taking on burdens. mary, what would you say? i would say wash
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your clothes at 30, turn down your washing machine. try and leave your car at home forjourneys of less thana mile car at home forjourneys of less than a mile or two. try and walk the kids to school. try and do your bit for nature in your back garden. we tend to think about our beautiful national parks is wonderful places but many of us can't get out to them in our busy lives. what can you do in your local area? your local park, your local garden, to encourage biodiversity? with a four degree rise, we lose half of all land—based species, and we are already seeing a huge amount of species going extinct even with the! huge amount of species going extinct even with the 1 degrees rise we have seen. and we know is that at the extremes, the arctic which was on fire this summer, and the island states, 1 degrees rise for us is a 5 degrees rise in temperature for them. that is catastrophic. if the greenland sheet starts to melt. these are very big issues that have very big consequences that will come
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home to our children. the summer heatwave we have seen will become the norm by 2040, that is what our committee heard. there are lots of changes already baked in and the question is what are we doing now to make sure we don't go beyond that 1.5 degrees rise. it is a big challenge. what about the i'm all right jack attitude? the changes will impact differently in different places around the world. some people might think that some areas will suffer but it would really make a difference to us here —— but it will not really make a difference to us here. it will make a difference in the uk. mary and i have both spoken about extreme weather events, flooding and heat stress. if you are ina care flooding and heat stress. if you are in a care home or hospital, high temperatures in the summer rainy make a difference can cause mortality and real distress. these things will go up if we don't deal with climate change so the message is clear. we do have the means to
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act now and that is really the message of this report. if you are taking this1.5 message of this report. if you are taking this 1.5 degrees seriously, you need to get on with it and act now. the thing that mary had suggested and the other things that i have suggested are all part of a wide portfolio of options that we need to pursue if we are going to get really ambitious about this. jim and mary, thank you very much. coming up: the crisis in affordable homes for sale. research suggests that 40% of young adults in england cannot afford to buy the cheapest houses in the area they live, even when they have a 10% deposit. the institute for fiscal studies says the situation has worsened, as wages have failed to keep pace with house price rises and so the under 355 are now paying proportionately higher rents so can't save for a deposit. now a tory think tank is suggesting one solution, that tax breaks should be given to landlords who sell properties
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to long—term sitting tenants. we'll have all the details shortly. do let us know how you are finding things and what your experiences are. one in three girls have been sexually harassed in public whilst wearing their school uniform. that's according to a new report. the children's charity plan international uk surveyed more than a thousand females aged between 14 and 21. many said they felt street harassment was just part of growing up. we can speak now to 18—year—old maisie allen, who was was just 12 when she was first sexually harassed in the street. she had agreed to waive their right to anonymity. and tanya barron, chief executive of the charity plan international uk, who are calling on the government to recognise harassment in public as a form of gender—based violence. you were 12. what happened?” remember being out walking in public andi remember being out walking in public and i was literallyjust walking to the bank and i was wearing leggings and ajumper. i remembertwo
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the bank and i was wearing leggings and a jumper. i remember two men calling out to me and making a comment about my body and i remember just feeling really out of control in that situation. it was the first time it had really happened to me publicly and then it kind of happened more as i got older and it happens to girls a lot, especially when you go through puberty and your bodyis when you go through puberty and your body is developing. i remember walking to school along a main road, having fans rolling down windows and yelling things at you. —— vans. it has happened to me and my friends. it isa has happened to me and my friends. it is a real problem, i think, in the uk. some people will say it has happened to me and it has always been like this and it didn't do me any harm. some might say it is a compliment. what's the problem? you we re compliment. what's the problem? you were not hurt. how would you respond to that? i disagree when people say i wasn't hurt because although nothing physical happened, it can still upset you. it can still hit
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emotionally in the sense that you don't feel in control of your own body. you feel you are on public display. 0nce body. you feel you are on public display. once it happens, the first time it happens, you develop an awareness of it and you maybe get that seed of doubt in your mind. if i wear this jumper which is tight—fitting, am i going to get the comment when i leave the house? is anybody going to say anything or approach me? it is always there in the back of your mind and it has become so normalised. did it change the way that you would stress and did you feel every time you went out on the street vulnerable, wondering if someone would say something to make you feel self—conscious? if someone would say something to make you feel self-conscious? yes, i remember particularly when i was going to school, i would try to wear the bulkiest coat i could find to cover myself up more. i would take a more residential route to school rather than walking along the main road, even if it took slightly
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longer, because i knew i would be out of public view. it is making little changes to your routine, which you shouldn't have to make. ta nya, which you shouldn't have to make. tanya, you are from plan international uk and you want the government to recognise this harassment as a kind of gender—based violence. violence? it doesn't sound like violence. explain why you wa nted like violence. explain why you wanted to be linked to that. at first sight, it doesn't seem as if that would count as violence but actually what girls are saying to us is it is the relentlessness of their experiences. 0n is it is the relentlessness of their experiences. on their way to school, on the bus, on the train, in school. 0ne on the bus, on the train, in school. one third of girls have been harassed, up to the point of groping and calling and so on, when they are in school uniform. clearly children. harassed up to the point of groping, obviously groping is taking it to another dimension when there is physical contact. what do girls do?
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do girls ever call it out? we have probably all experienced it in our time and! probably all experienced it in our time and i would certainly not have called it out as a kid. did you ever called it out as a kid. did you ever call it out? only really as i got older. never when i was younger. so what is going on? i didn't call it out when i was younger and i think two things are happening at the same time. one awful and one encouraging. the awful bit is i think that many girls, we are hearing, think this is normal behaviour, and boys think this is normal behaviour. we certainly need to see a real change in relationship and sex education in schools. there is something that we feel has gone seriously wrong in young people's understanding of what is normal in terms of relationships. but the good news is that girls are actually getting together and #metoo
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has helped. and we have a big campaign where we are actually asking people to get together and say it is not ok. we have a hashtag. i say it is not ok. it takes guts if you are walking down the street and you are walking down the street and you run your own and there is a group of people on a building or whatever and they say something to you. and how often have you passed somebody in the street only thing, that doesn't look good, but if you can safely give somebody support, i would look at a girl as i go past and say, are you 0k? would look at a girl as i go past and say, are you ok? but you have to feel safe to do that, it is not a tactic that everybody. thank you both very much. let us know your thoughts if you have experienced any of that sort of treatment, do get in touch in all the usual ways. still to come. could tax breaks for landlords be a solution to the housing crisis? a new report thinks it could help — we'll be taking a look at how it would work.
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thousands of shops in the uk are taking part in an intitiave called autism hour to make the shopping experience easier for people who find it hard. find out what it is before 11. time for the latest news — here's carole walker the bbc news headlines this morning. thank you. the bbc news headlines: climate scientists meeting in south korea have given one of the starkest warnings yet about the scale of the challenge involved in tackling global warming, saying society will have to undergo rapid and far—reaching change. the report, by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, urges limiting temperature rises to no more than 1.5 degrees celsius above pre—industrial levels. it says that target will require massive shifts in the way we live, from the food we eat to the way energy is generated. the co—chair of the climate change panel, professorjim skea, told this programme that the dangers of climate change threatened the uk as well as developing countries. there are very significant
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differences between 1.5 degrees warming and 2 degrees warming. some of the worst effects will be felt by poorer and more vulnerable people in developing countries, but again, countries like the uk are not immune. we could see more flooding, more intense and frequent extreme weather events, storms etc, so everybody is going to really see that difference. 20 people have died in a crash in new york state, involving a stretch limousine. police say it's the worst road accident in the united states for almost a decade. all 18 of the people in the limousine were killed, as well as two pedestrians. the vehicle was on its way to a party when the incident happened. the cause of the crash isn't clear, but witnesses described seeing the vehicle shoot across a junction, hitting another car and then ploughing into pedestrians. the authorities in china have said they're holding
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the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption, and allegations of bribery. interpol says it's received the resignation of meng hongwei who hadn't been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. the name of a second person to die after suffering a suspected allergic reaction after eating at pret—a—manger has been released by the coroner. 42—year—old celia marsh from wiltshire died after falling ill in bath in december last year. the high court has blocked a mass legal action against google over claims it collected sensitive personal data from more than 4 million iphone users. the tech giant faced claims that it bypassed privacy settings on apple iphone handsets between august 2011 and february 2012, and used data to divide people into categories for advertisers. the campaign group
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which brought the action hope to win at least £1 billion in compensation foran at least £1 billion in compensation for an estimated 4.4 million users of the device in the uk. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you, carol. in a few moments, we will be talking about the problem with getting affordable housing. an anonymous text said that the government and our older generation have failed the younger generation by making houses almost impossible to afford. the right to buy actors taking houses off the market, the only solution is to build more houses and at a fast pace. it is a shame that the main reason most people like me are left out of owning a home is simply because we we re owning a home is simply because we were born at the wrong time. another anonymous text, as a pensioner stuck in rented accommodation, very high red, sold my house with the intention of downsizing, but cannot afford any house, can i get a mortgage is too old, so all my money is going on rent. all i hear is that
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the young can't get on the housing market, while i can but no bank will help the elderly. jessica says since leaving university in 2001, me and my partner have paid thousands in rent, we will be lucky to save a deposit and buy a house by the age of 30, we earn over £20,000 each. many do not have the luxury of living with parents to save, let alone go on holiday. rent needs to be more affordable and capped the long—term tenants. keep your comments coming in. here's some sport now with holly hamilton. good morning. riyadh mahrez missed a late penalty as the eagerly—awaited game between liverpool and manchester city finished goalless. city are top of the premier league though, ahead of chelsea and liverpool on goal difference. the wales forward gareth bale is among the nominees for this season's ballon d'or — he's scored five goals for real madrid this term, after helping them to the champions league title in may. mo farah has claimed his
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first marathon victory — winning in chicago at only his third attempt at this distance — and he broke the european record in the process. and london broncos will be back in the super league next season, after five years away, thanks to victory over toronto wolfpack in the million pound game. that's all the sport for now. more on the bbc news channel throughout the day. thank you, holly. 40% of young adults cannot afford to buy one of the cheapest homes in their area even with a 10% deposit, according to a new research. the institute for fiscal studies says house prices in england have risen 173% over two decades. so are there any solutions besides mass house building? a report released this morning by a think tank with links to the government called 0nward makes one suggestion. it says tax breaks should be given to landlords who sell properties to long—term sitting tenants.
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the aim would be to spur landlords to offer longer tenancies and then to sell on to a new generation of homeowners. joining us now, will tanner is a former no 10 policy?chief who now runs the conservative think tank 0nward, which has come up wih this idea. richard blanco is the london representative of the national landlords association. and reuben young is from the housing campaign group priced 0ut which is calling for action from government to build more homes and reduce the cost of decent housing. donna—marie love—davies has been a full time landlord for the past eight years manages several properties including many that she owns. welcome, all of you. well, you have come up with this idea of tax breaks the landlord, so how would it work? the government has said it was to encourage longer tenancies and get more people into ownership, so what we are saying is that you could do both of those things in one go by giving a tax break to landlords who celta sitting tenants, so for three
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yea rs or celta sitting tenants, so for three years or more, and for the tax gain from that tax relief to be given not just the landlord but split between the landlord on the tenant, so the landlord gets a windfall, encouraging them to knock off tenancies and encouraging them to sell, —— encouraging the them to have longer tenancies and encouraging them to sell, and a win for also comes to the tenant to help them by. what about those who might use it to avoid capital gains tax? we argue that this policy would be paid for by tightening other tax relief, such as lettings relief, both meaning that second home are significantly tax advantaged, so this should incentivise long—term tenancies and selling at the end of the tenancy. you think that would be
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enough to stop this being exploited by wealthy multiple property homeowners? we think it would be enough to encourage those homeowners to sell to their tenants and offer long—term tenancies. those are the things the government said it wants to do, and personally i think they are the right things to do given the growth in the private rented sector over the last 20 years. do you think it could work? i think this policy will no doubt help a lucky few tenants, most of whom will probably be able to buy anywhere at some point in the near future. i don't think it will help nearly as many tenants as they are saying it will. cutting the tax breaks on second homes, which are also proposing, is it great idea, but let's spend the money on building housing. mass building is the only way. is itjust that simple solution? just build more homes? we do definitely need to build more homes, and the government has announced a number of things recently in order to do that. the
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prime minister last week announced the lifting of the cap on the ability to councils to borrow to fund social housing. and actually from my perspective, the government is doing a lot on supply. but this is doing a lot on supply. but this isa is doing a lot on supply. but this is a kinder relatively minor change which could encourage lots of landlords to offer longer tenancies, which is something everyone wants to see, what are the same time encouraging more people into ownership. rubin says if it does work it will only help the lucky few. if you are renting and the person that is living in the house doesn't want to buy it, it isn't going to make any difference, is it? it does only appeal to a relatively small number of people. we think that help 88,000 households moved from renting into ownership. using the government's data, we have done some modelling, and the idea is that 80 million could be made. how much
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is capital gains tax a sticking point when it comes to selling properties on releasing back into the market? it isn't a massive thing. if you are landlord, you are landlord. that is just thing. if you are landlord, you are landlord. that isjust what thing. if you are landlord, you are landlord. that is just what you thing. if you are landlord, you are landlord. that isjust what you do. the report in essence, the headline sounds great, and i don't have anything against the idea of encouraging and incentivising landlords to sell properties to existing tenant play auto think they would probably prefer do anyway to avoid other costs, advertising and periods when properties are empty and they want to sell them. to be honest, the whole report is full of assumptions and estimates, just seems like another government ploy to make it seem that they are doing something about the crisis because they know it is going to affect them in the next general election, and it points that very fact out in the document itself. it seems another
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back door way of trying to pull the arms at the back of landlords to force them into offering long—term tenancies, whereas most landlords wa nt tenancies, whereas most landlords want long—term tenants, they don't wa nt want long—term tenants, they don't want periods where they are not receiving rent, and they are much happier giving longer term tenancy agreements if there were adaptations made within the laws to evict problematic tenants that aren't paying their rent and aren't looking after properties. that is why people and landlords don't necessarily give long—term tenancies at the moment, thatis long—term tenancies at the moment, that is a tweak within the existing legal system. not all the expense and time involved in bringing out new ways and time involved in bringing out new ways to blackmail the private sector. richard, chief executive of the national landlords association, how do you see at? i am broadly supportive of this measure. i think it is good that people are being creative about tax solutions like this, but i think it important that we don't have any compulsory or
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right to buy element to it. the other thing i'm not so keen about that i've read so far is that some of the allowances might be withdrawn. landlords are already being taxed on their turnover, which is very unfairand being taxed on their turnover, which is very unfair and no other businesses are at the moment. so we need to be careful that we don't start slipping in any new measures which i think the report suggests. you say you are broadly supportive of the measure. a lot of people might say, you would be, wouldn't you, because it is a tax break the landlords in the end. but i think it is fair because the tax break is shared between the tenant and the landlord, so it is an incentive to keep long tenants. i should say that on average tenancies last and least four years anyway, so i'm not so sure that we need as many tenancies as people are talking about. landlords want tenants to stay as long as possible, and in many cases they already do. a lot of nodding and shaking of heads going on. well, your chance to respond to those. as
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your chance to respond to those. as you saw there, a broad welcome for landlords to have the opportunity to sell to tenants, potentially saving on other costs. but what about donnamarie saying that it will suit the landlord often to sell to a te na nt the landlord often to sell to a tenant and it suits landlords to have long—term tenants? tenant and it suits landlords to have long-term tenants? what i would say is that that may be true, but there are lots of people who are currently in the private rented sector who pay far more for their rent than they would do if they were a homeowner, and they pay far more today than they did 30 or 40 years ago. in the 19805, you paid an average 10% of your post—tax income towards rent, now just average 10% of your post—tax income towards rent, nowjust 30%, 40% in london, so the idea that more and more people should be in the private sector for longer more people should be in the private sectorfor longer and more people should be in the private sector for longer and longer is something which penalises people we should be giving them opportunities to move into home ownership. and a final thought from ruben? to move into home ownership. and a finalthought from ruben? they
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to move into home ownership. and a final thought from ruben? they don't need incentives, it needs to be legislated for, at least three years needs to be the mandatory minimum, and i'm very concerned at this policy would be... three years is a mandatory minimum? that means that a homeowner can't even sell if they are renting to someone with a mandatory minimum three—year tenancy, doesn't it? it means that they would have to get a court to ee, they would have to get a court to agree, or they would have to pay the ten compensation. i think this government will use it as an answer to the core for longer tenancies rather than legislating for them, which is what... we already have longer tenancies in many cases. tenancies last an average four yea rs, tenancies last an average four years, as i say, and having compulsory three—year tenancies which usually increase the risk of a landlords. the court system is too slow and it would be far too punitive for landlords. we need more houses, that is what we need. robbing peter to pay poor isn't going to work. we need more housing. we aren't arguing that this be a
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replacement to the government's consultation, but policies specifically to encourage others to sell to their tenants. it is a proposal at this stage, let's see what happens. thank you all very much. going shopping can be a stressful experience at the best of times. but if you're hypersensitive to lights, sounds, smells and crowds something as simple as stepping into a busy shop can be a real ordeal. this week thousands of shops are running autism—friendly calm hours to help make stores less hostile environments for autistic people. the scheme, led by the national autistic society, is now in its third year, and more and more stores arejoining in. charlie haynes found out more. for autistic people, the world can sometimes seem a bit too full of information. and for some, that means something as normal and everyday is going shopping can a nightmare. you've got no idea what could happen. you get all types of people in shopping centres, and sometimes you get people walking
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into you, and i don't like people touching me. and this can lead some to elaborate coping mechanisms or avoiding the shops altogether. can you hear the pelicon crossing? i can hear the pelicon crossing. this is andy, and this is his dad, kevin. andy is autistic, and for him and his family, there is no trip to the shops without also having completed his rituals to help him cope. are we going to the toy shop now? so we are going this way? yes? we could never do shopping experience where just wandering around the shops for recreation. it is always for a purpose and it always involves a lot of lifts and a lot of going to churches. for every time we go in a shop, he will have to go up in a lift or go to a church or go and get his favourite foods. andy films everything on his camera, inspired by dad kevin who is a vlogger. every lift and every till, helping him to process the day. they each have a youtube
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channel where every day they upload the video to their 80,000 subscribers. are we going back down now? the main coping mechanism we have got where we are out and about is making sure that he is fully aware of everything that we are going to be doing. right, we've got seven minutes until the shop opens. eight minutes until the toy shop opens and we can go and get some lego. the shopping experience for autistic people is unique to each individual. connor can sometimes find the experience overwhelming. you've got no idea what could happen. you get all types of people in shopping centres, and sometimes you get people walking into you and i don't like people touching me. in a busy shop, sound has a big part in it, because the music, depending on what type it is, can really affect me, so if it's club music,
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for instance, the beat of that really puts me on edge and makes me really anxious. all lights seem too bright, everything is a bit much. so having them that extra bit brighter makes it really draining on my eyes. it feels as if i'm at a rock concert. it's interesting when you get shop assistants come at you, because i don't particularly like the interaction, i don't want small talk, ijust like... wait for... i hate pigeons. you get all those perfume counters, and all those different smells just add up, it is too overwhelming, too much to process. it almost hurts my nose, which then hurts everything else. in shopping centres, there is that many things going on, often there can be crashes or bangs, they can just tip you over the edge, because if i'm already on a high level of stress, that little bit can just be that much to just tip me over, and, well, explode. sometimes autistic people get
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overwhelmed by everything around them, and they might temporarily lose control of their behaviour. the worst it ever got was a couple of years ago, not having the thing he wanted in a shop in the last straw, and he ended up going into a full meltdown, took off all his clothes, dropped down onto the floor and he wasjust naked on the floor of the co—op screaming because he didn't want to be there. now shops are starting to recognise that the stores can be a hostile place for autistic people. this week as part of a campaign with the national autistic society, they're pushing to make a change, experimenting with running something called an autism hour. thank you. can this improve connor's shopping experience? once a year for an hour we try and do what we can to accommodate the needs of the customer, so the music will go off like it is now in the store. normally we are quite a loud environment, a bit of a sort of disco feel,
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so we turn that off, or right down to make people comfortable, we accommodate their needs in service, so if they need to be left alone for a little bit, or if they need more interaction than we normally give, then we do that. over 10,000 shops and businesses across the country are running autism hour this week. people are just a lot more accepting of the fact that not everyone faces the same challenges. things that other people find simple can be quite difficult for a lot of us, so it's good to see that people are more empathetic towards that, because that's the way we need the world to be. if they can do that once a year, why can't they do it once a week or once a day even? it didn't take them that much effort, but it would make a lot joining me now is andy's dad kevin who we saw in that film. also with me is florence leslie — she is autistic. and also here is tom purser — he's the campaign manager at the national autistic society — and dad to an autistic son himself. welcome, all of you, thank you for coming in. kevin, that was a really
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powerful report to watch, andy giving us a really good sense of what it is like to go into an environment of all of us take for granted, but to him it is a whole different ball game. absolutely. it isa different ball game. absolutely. it is a very stressful experience when it doesn't go well. it isn't always, and it depends on the day, depends on his mood, depends how he's feeling, but the clip we mentioned there about the incident in the co—op years ago was probably the lowest point shopping ever got him. and for you as well? presumably that was... i was at work at the time, i was... i was at work at the time, i was still working as a teacher, and i was was still working as a teacher, and iwasa was still working as a teacher, and i was a half—hour drive away, and ended up having to drive home from work to literally carry him out of the supermarket naked across the car park, because he just the supermarket naked across the car park, because hejust couldn't the supermarket naked across the car park, because he just couldn't cope with the situation he was in, the only way he could calm himself down would be to get back in his bedroom, but they were a two mile walk from home, and there was nothing she could do to help him. did you and
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your wife understand at that stage what it was that was making him respond like that in those environments? it certainly wasn't the first incident like that that we had had, and it is often an accumulation of different factors, and you never quite know when it is going to happen, but that particular day there was an incident on the way where he almost collided with somebody in a mobility scooter, and that we put him on edge, so he was already quite stressed out when he went into the shop and once he got in there the thing he was looking for wasn't there, and as soon as that happened, he just couldn't handle it any more. florence, you are 24 now and you were diagnosed with autism and 21. what have your experiences been of going into environment like this? might experience as an autistic woman would maybe be slightly different, sol would maybe be slightly different, so i was diagnosed when i was 21, which was quite late. it was investigated when i was younger, but
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i was told she isjust quirky, she will grow out of it, so because of that i learned to almost repress my autistic traits, sol that i learned to almost repress my autistic traits, so i might enjoy shopping with my friends, but i am sensitive to loud noise and bright lights, so then i would just learn to deal with it and shut it down. so how do you do that? we're hearing andy's experience described as a visceral thing, he couldn't articulate why and react in a physical way. you learned to deal with it over time, that must be quite hard. it was absolutely difficult. when i was diagnosed with autism at 21, i was in a very dark place in my life, very depressed, i didn't know why i felt the way i felt, why i would react to things differently than some of my friends. but everybody is different, so while imight not but everybody is different, so while i might not go into meltdown necessarily in a shopping environment, it wouldn't maybe
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lessen how i would have to make sure, feeling pressure to fit in an act ina sure, feeling pressure to fit in an act in a certain way, and since being diagnosed with autism, i am learning how to be more open with how i feel, sol learning how to be more open with how i feel, so i don't put myself in a situation where i could have a sensory overload and are not down. we're talking about this because of the autism hour that he's been introduced. it is a gesture, but it isa introduced. it is a gesture, but it is a small one. is as helpful? it does give a time for people to go into that environment, and feel perhaps differently about it, but it also gives the rest of us a chance to think about how some people feel when they go into those environments. what we want to do at the national autistic societies to create a society that works for autistic people, and what autism hour is about is about creating a moment where yes it is about making shops more accessible, reducing the lights, dimming the noise, but also about creating a time where people
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in shops are thinking about the needs of their autistic customers, it is where people who feel socially isolated because the world doesn't understand autism feel that they can go and give it another try, go somewhere that is going to be more accommodating, more understanding, and know that autism is starting to be understood better, because this is about changing how society thinks and understand autism. elizabeth on facebook says, i don't take my son anywhere like that any more, even with autism hour, too many variables. luckily we are in the age of online shopping. every shopping centre, hospital, leisure complex etc should have some kind of sensory saengkham people who need it, that was a big steps towards real inclusion. lorraine says you can't cater for everyone's particular problems, shops need light and are noisy and busy, best to have the last hour with dimmed light and no music. is there more that places could do, tom, just on a day—to—day basis? to the light have to be so bright? it's a bit like does the air
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conditioning have to be so cold. a lot of things might save a bit of money and help all of us. the entertainer toy shops, they took pa rt la st entertainer toy shops, they took part last year and have introduced a regular quiet out as a result of feedback. it is notjust autistic people and their families say this isa people and their families say this is a good thing. lots of other people have given us feedback that a calmer, quieter, more understanding shopping environment is a bit more pleasant to the overwhelming overload of noise and sound and light that modern shopping has become. but what we really want is for this to be a starting point for those taking part, all of the 10,000 shops taking part, we want them to think about what they can do after their autism hour to be more autism friendly, to think about the needs of their autistic customers and think about what part they can play in making society a more accommodating place for autistic people. and just very quickly, florence. it is part of normal life, when you are going out with your girlfriends at school, did it hold
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you back? i would say, yes, when i was diagnosed with autism, it would be almost the new normal, so my life did change in a positive way, and it didn't hold me back, but it changed how i interacted with people. didn't hold me back, but it changed howl interacted with people. thank you very much, all of you, thank you for your company today. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. hello there. we are not going to see a great deal of change in the weather through the course of today. towards northern and western parts it will remain quite wet with outbreaks of rain, and down towards england and wales, there will be some breaks in the cloud, a bit of sunshine breaking through such as this weather watcher picture. it will stay driver england and wales, the far north—west on the north and west of scotland will have heavy
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rain at times today. temperatures here, 14, 15 degrees, further south, 16-18. the here, 14, 15 degrees, further south, 16—18. the rain will continue overnight tonight many across western scotland but also at times across northern ireland on the north and east. dry across england and wales, patchy mist and for developing into tuesday morning, and thatis developing into tuesday morning, and that is where cabbages could get down into single figures, staying in double figures further north. during tuesday, some sunshine and turning warm of england and wales, still quite wet at times across scotland, particularly across the west. you're watching bbc newsroom live, it'511am and right now these are the main stories:
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scientists issue their strongest warning yet on climate change, saying society must undergo rapid and far—reaching change to meet targets. the ipcc report says temperature rises should be limited to no more than 1.5 degrees celsius, just half the increase currently predicted. authorities in china say they're holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption and bribery. 20 people die when a stretch limousine crashes in new york state. it's the deadliest us road accident in a decade. nicola sturgeon is set to defend her support for a second brexit referendum as she speaks to delegates on the second day of the snp conference.

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