Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 8, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm rebecca jones. today at 2. a planet in peril: scientists issue their starkest warning yet, about the dangers of climate change and the battle to limit global warming. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that's killed twenty people. many young people can't afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit — according to new research. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with holly — and harry kane making news holly for all of the right reasons. today
2:01 pm
we are revealing who has been nominated for this year's award. half of the names have been released so half of the names have been released so far, including harry kane and gareth bail. what an amazing autumnal scene behind you, is the weather to match? mid—20s by midweek. i will tell you what will be happening towards the end of the week in half an hour. also coming up — why taylor swift is getting uncharacteristically political. the singer revealed that she's supporting the democrats, in the upcoming us elections. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. scientists have issued
2:02 pm
their starkest warning yet about the danger of climate change. in a dramatic report, the un's intergovernmental panel says the world is nowhere near its target of keeping the rise in average global temperatures to 1.5 degrees celsius — instead, it says we're heading for an increase of 3 degrees from pre—industrial levels. the report says that just to stay on track would require ‘rapid, far reaching and unprecedented changes to all aspects of society.‘ our science correspondent victoria gill has this report. pictures of a warming world. scientists are more confident than ever that the impacts of climate change are playing out now, in the severity and frequency of droughts, storms, and other extreme weather events. and, having gathered in the south korean city of incheon for the past week, climate change researchers and government delegates hammered out the final details of a dramatic report outlining the consequences of a global
2:03 pm
temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees, and a plan for precisely how that can be prevented. so, the scale of the changes that we are experiencing in the climate system is unprecedented. the scale of the changes that humans would have to implement in order to keep climate change under control is unprecedented. so it's a challenge for human civilisation, and this report is therefore a milestone in conveying that message to human society. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. with no action, the world is on course to breach this crucial target by as early as 2030, compromising the very livability of our planet. hitting two degrees would mean coral reefs would be largely wiped out. melting polar ice means global sea level rise is projected to be around ten centimetres more if we allow warming
2:04 pm
to go to two degrees. keeping to 1.5 means 10 million fewer people exposed to the risks of flooding. but this plan is ambitious and will be expensive. renewable energy sources will need to provide about 85% of global electricity by 2050. currently, they account for about 25%. the renewable energy revolution that we've already seen unfolding around the world is going to be the key to the solution that starts from the energy sector and spreads to other sectors. i think we can definitely still do this, if we decide that that's what we want to do. even with a green energy revolution, this most comprehensive assessment of the perils of climate change concludes that every one of us will need to make changes in how we live our lives. changes that have to start now. victoria gill, bbc news. well, today's report has been described as a global wake up call for the planet — so what do governments and individuals around the world need to do to limit global warming?
2:05 pm
0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. the ipcc has warned of two possible futures for our planet. in the 2 degrees world, there is severe drought. there is more flooding in the northern hemisphere. people are poorer and have less food. all of the coral in our seas has gone. as things stand, that is the world that we heading towards, scientists warn. one of the very clear messages of this report is that inevitably, at the rate that we are going, it is quite likely that we are going to release too much carbon, burn more carbon than we can afford to burn. if we are going to stabilise temperatures, we are going to have to work out how to get rid of carbon dioxide without just dumping it in the atmosphere. to avoid damaging global warming, the scientists call for much more renewable energy. the development of transport that uses less fuel.
2:06 pm
and new ways to take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. all of that is happening, but not, according to the ipcc, at the speed it needs to. scientists are saying to everybody that we have to accelerate our action to tackle climate change, because if we don't, by the middle of the century, we could be facing a situation that we simply will not be able to cope with. at a time when china and india are growing their economies, the planet's net emissions of c02 needs to be zero by 2050, to prevent a 2 degrees world. up to 7 million square kilometres of land will be needed for energy crops, around the size of australia. and the technologies needed to remove enough carbon from the atmosphere have not yet been developed. the report is important because it also shows that there are options that we need to take. it shows that it is possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. if we have great
2:07 pm
transitions across the economy, if we change the way that we behave, such as eating less meat, eating more fruit and vegetables. with the backdrop of president trump taking the us out of the paris climate change agreement, avoiding damaging climate change will be difficult, but not impossible. the question is whether national leaders have the political will to bring about the changes recommended, or it will be too little too late. let's talk to corinne le quere, professor of climate change science and policy at the university of east anglia and director of the tyndall centre for climate change research. she is also a member of the uk committee on climate change. an independent body set up to advise the uk government and devolved
2:08 pm
administrations on targets. very well—qualified! this report is calling for unprecedented change. just give us an overview, if you could to begin with. we have seen already success stories, particularly in the power sector. deploying renewable energy, wind energy, solar injury has worked. as a result, the costs have dropped dramatically. what we need to do now is to do the same for other sectors, for transport, for agriculture and building and so on. the good thing is that we have the technologies already. when you talk about wii, are you talking about the uk or the rest of the world? young marquardt is very clear in the report is that this is a global problem. everybody to do their part. —— what is very
2:09 pm
clear in the report is that this is a global problem. that includes people, that includes the uk government, that includes governments that will meet in poland later this year. how is the uk doing in terms of reducing emissions? they have decreased a lot. more than 40% since 1990. however, that decrease has taken place mostly in power. in contrast, transport emissions, building emissions, agriculture and land use have all stagnated. particularly in the past five years. there is a lot more that we could and should be doing to turn around the trends in those sectors. how difficult will that be, i am interested that you use the word stagnating. are you saying that there has not been the will to make
2:10 pm
those changes? precisely. there are things that we know how to do. we know how to insulated our housing. rates of loft installation have been stagnating. we know how to do that and bumrah cost benefits. same thing in transport. we should be investing in electric cars. we should be promoting walking and cycling in cities. these are not things that cost particularly a lot of funding. but they do make a huge difference to the direction of travel in terms of emissions. in your view, where does the weight of responsibility lie? doesn't lie with governments or with individuals? the governments have a big responsibility to set the direction of travel. so that it is really clear for businesses and investors what is going to pay off
2:11 pm
in the future. individual actions matter hugely. what we do, the choices that we make. where we get oui’ choices that we make. where we get our electricity from. individual power really needs to wake up here and push government in delivering the actions that we need. just briefly, how optimistic do you feel about the future? today has been a wake—up call. we have been repeating those messages. for the first time today, i am starting to see that people are hearing the messages and it remains to be seen in the next year or it remains to be seen in the next year 01’ so it remains to be seen in the next year or so what action will follow. really interesting to talk to you. thank you for your thoughts and insights. in related news — it's been announced today that the nobel prize for economic sciences has been awarded to william nordhaus and paul romer. the two men will split the prize — with william nordhaus winning for his work on climate change economics and paul romer for his work on economic growth.
2:12 pm
the committee said the models they have created help with "pressing issues of our time" including sustainable growth and the welfare of the world's population. 20 people have been killed in new york state after a stretch limousine crashed into another vehicle. it's thought to be one of the worst road accidents in american history: two pedestrians and all 18 people in the limo died, local reports say the victims included four sisters who'd been on their way to a party. sophie long reports. it was amy's 30th birthday. here she is on the right with her three sisters. 16 of her friends and family climbed into the limo to some celebrate. according to reports her husband was among them. none of them survived. their mother lost all four
2:13 pm
of their daughters. you can't wrap your head around such a tragedy where you have four of your daughters died. they were very smart and they were beautiful. they lived life to the fullest. i don't know what to tell you except that they we re what to tell you except that they were the best news is anybody could have. this is where the accident happened. it is thought that the limo failed to stop, ploughing into a cafe, hitting and killing two pedestrians. this is one of the biggest losses of lives that we have seenin biggest losses of lives that we have seen ina biggest losses of lives that we have seen in a long time. the most ugly transportation accident in this country since february of 2009. -- the most deadly transportation accident in this country since february of 2009. all of the victims
2:14 pm
will not be named until their families have been an formed. one of britain's most senior police officers has told the inquests into the westminster bridge attack how he stayed in his car as pc keith palmer was stabbed to death — because he had no protective equipment. sir craig mackee who was acting chief of the metropolitan police at the time — told the hearing he was at westminster for a meeting when he saw the unarmed constable being attacked. helena lee is at the old bailey now with the latest — helena. this is the first time that we have heard from sir craig mackey, who as you mentioned there was acting commissioner of the metropolitan police at the time. by chance he ended up in new palace yard and witnessed the attack for himself. he came to the inquest here today, he told the jury he had been at a meeting in the house of commons. he came out of that meeting, got into the passenger seat of the car. his
2:15 pm
driver was sitting next to him and a colleague was in the back of the car. they move around in the car towards the gates, the gates where pc palmer was on duty in order to leave. it was at that point that he heard a very loud bang. he saw people running in all directions, then he told the inquest he saw a large male coming forward with a knife. it looks like one of those out of a carving block, he told the jury. he couldn't work out whether batman was connected to the bank that he had. at that point, he said because they had no protection in the car, they did not have a radio, they decided to lock the car. they sat in that car and they witnessed pc palmer being stabbed and sir craig told the inquest today it was to absolutely determined stab wounds. he said the attacker ran very close pass the driver side of
2:16 pm
the card that they were in and at that point he heard those shots. he told the inquest that it was his instinct to gas out of the car and go and help the officers who were dealing with the situation but there was a police officer close by who told them that they had to leave the scene. the inquest here, evidence has finished for today, it will resume on wednesday 11:30am when we are expecting to hear from those two protection officers, one of whom shot the attacker dead. the grenfell inquiry continues today, hearing more stories from residents of the tower. today they've been hearing from nadia jafari, who escaped but lost her father in the stairwell, and munira mahmud, who survived along with her husband and children. 0ur correspondent tom symonds has been at the inquiry and joins us now. what more has the enquiry been
2:17 pm
hearing today? evidence which i think tells us how hard it was for residents to keep track of each other as they escaped the fire. as you say, nadia was trying to escape with their father who is elderly. they got into a lift which stopped on the tenth floor. as the doors opened filled with black smoke, nadia said that she could not see or breathe and it was very confusing. the door shut on the left and the lift carried on right down to the ground floor. when she got out of the left there was smoke coming from inside the left and again it was very confusing. as you can see here, she is trying to get out. she thought that her father was ahead of her and that he had already escaped. when she found out that he wasn't outside she couldn't get back in. 0ne outside she couldn't get back in. one of the doors to enter the left
2:18 pm
was locked. the police would not let her back in. she said it was an incredibly traumatic experience because she did not know what it happened to her father and she was very u nwell happened to her father and she was very unwell from the smoke. when she found that he had died in the fire, she felt she must have lost contact with him as that lift stopped on the tenth floor. she gave another bit of evidence about the windows in her flat. she said that she had reported that they kept opening in the wind and that left rein in. when the fire happened, she said within about a minute or two of the flames reaching her flat, the kitchen minute or two of the flames reaching herflat, the kitchen window minute or two of the flames reaching her flat, the kitchen window had burst open through the heat. i think that will be interesting to the enquiry which is looking very closely at the way that the windows will put him in this building when it was refurbished in 2016. you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines: a planet in peril — scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america
2:19 pm
that's killed 20 people. many young people can't afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit, according to new research. and in sport, harry kane hasjoined the shortlist for a prestigious award. he was awarded this year's golden boot. gareth bale has also been nominated for the honour. she has gotten ankle problem and has returned for treatment. british and about one, kyle edmund has reached a career high. 14th in the world rankings. he moved up this week and has risen from 50th at the start of the year. the government has downplayed expectations that a deal on britain
2:20 pm
leaving the eu could be reached at a key summit due to take place next week. the gathering on october 18th was initially pencilled in as a potential deadline, but downing street say further concessions from brussels are needed and "big issues" still need to be solved. we'll be bringing you all the details here on bbc news. and every day we'll be checking in with our reporter adam fleming who is tracking the talks in brussels. yet another crucial week in the brexit negotiations. i know we were expecting to document this week, one on post—brexit eu relations and one on post—brexit eu relations and one on what would happen if there is no deal. the question is, what are we going to get them? a question that we are still asking and we will be asking until the end of the day. there is a meeting this afternoon where they are discussing their
2:21 pm
agenda for another meeting on wednesday morning which is fall of the eu commissioners. we expect to discuss the two documents. 0ne the eu commissioners. we expect to discuss the two documents. one is on preparing this for if there is no deal. the eu is likely to spell out just what it is prepared to do to help the uk if there is no deal. the other one is this document that may be presented by michel barnier which is described as an outline of the framework. you have the withdrawal agreement which is the brexit treaty which seals the terms of the divorce. then there will be a separate document called the political declaration which will set out the building blocks for the future relationship on trade,
2:22 pm
security and cooperation. what we thought was going to happen on wednesday was that michel barnier would publish something which you could describe as a first draft of that document. it became clear that it was going to be more of a summary and maybe just a it was going to be more of a summary and maybejust a list it was going to be more of a summary and maybe just a list of headings of stuff that would be in there. now it seems that it might as big an annotated table of areas where the uk and the eu have agreed on things in principle and areas where there is still disagreement. for example, there will be a column in green which says security, network on that. a column in red which says the trackers plan, we're not too sure about. in other words, stuff we already know. we will be it there 110w. already know. we will be it there now. no doubt talking to you later today. back to our top story here on bbc news — and a new united nations climate report being published at a meeting in south korea says there will have to be "unprecedented changes" to how people use energy — in order to restrict rising temperatures.
2:23 pm
the intergovernmental panel on climate change is calling for the rise in the earth's temperature since the industrial age to be limited to 1.5 degrees celsius. let's cross over to dublin and talk to mary robinson, former irish president who's a un special envoy for climate and also author of "climatejustice, hope, resilience and the fight for a sustainable future". we are very grateful for your time. this report paints a stark picture, doesn't it? it calls for unprecedented change. what is your response? it is a stark picture, but it is also a necessary one to bring home to us that we have only a fixed time and a short window of time, 11 yea rs, time and a short window of time, 11 years, 22030 to have a very severe reduction in carbon emissions. we would not have had the scientific
2:24 pm
report if it had not been for the most book countries, pleading and insisting in paris. 1.5 to stay alive was the mantra. they got that commitment, well below 2 degrees. and then the ip cc was asked to do a report, an important report which this is. this report does two things, it shows the difference between 2 degrees and 1.5 degrees. there is a very big difference. it reminds us that 2 degrees is the outer limits of what we could possibly tolerate before we get into a lack of control of the future. three or 4 degrees would be catastrophic. we have two stay at 1.5 degrees for safety, for the safety of humanity. that is a moral challenge and a political challenge and a leadership challenge. the
2:25 pm
great industrial nations, with vast populations are going to determine this. we already know that president trump wants to pull out of the international treaty on climate change. how much pressure can be put on those governments to do something? despite what president trump has decided, there is a lot of momentum in the united states. i was at the california summit about three weeks ago in san francisco and it was good to see the commitment of states of the united states, cities, business linking with cities and business linking with cities and business around the world, young people, trade unions and the desire to invest in clear energy campaign. that meant has increased now. —— that momentum has two increased now.
2:26 pm
i don't want to conclude that we are stupid as a race, i know that women in particular and young people have a real sense that things have changed and we need to do something about that. this is a stark analysis of that change and we have got to get very real about that change. we have to do it in a way that protects human rights. if we are going to give up call as soon as possible, we must run but that it is not the coal miners and their families who have two suffer the full brunt of that, they have to be given pensions, of thatis they have to be given pensions, of that is appropriate, retraining and reskilling. nevertheless, iwould be interested to hear your thoughts about what you think individual should be doing and whether governments should be legislating and making governments change people's individual behaviours. for
2:27 pm
example, banning people eating meat. i think it is not so much individual behaviour, although it is significant that people would get engaged because that will help them to use their vote, use their voice and pressure, everybody who thinks about this issue, i have written stories about this, a story of natalie isaacs who started a 1 million women project by reducing her domestic budget and getting other women to do it. far more important is government policies. we need a price on carbon that is much higher than it is at the moment. it does not even exist in certain countries. we need a global price on carbon. we need to shift investment to the developing countries who are going to have two grow and develop and havejobs going to have two grow and develop and have jobs and features for their people without fossil fuel. it has never been done before, but that is
2:28 pm
their future. they need the technology and the training and the investment to do that. they are very ambitious. i am close to the claimant vulnerable forum which will have a summit, a virtual summit from heads of state from around the world committing to more ambition about climate. they are the people who are the most ambitious, they need the help of the technology and the skills and the training. we must leave it there but really grateful for your time. thank you for talking to us. thank you very much. now, let us to us. thank you very much. now, let us catch up with all of the weather. the lovely thomas is here. thomas you are standing in front of a picture which i cannot believe has been taken today. it is a lovely summer day. i cannot believejust how warm it might get over the next few days. we have had some frosts,
2:29 pm
it has been fairly chilly and it has felt like autumn. now it is warming up felt like autumn. now it is warming up and the popular definition of an indian summer is that after some autumn frosts, you get a spell of warm weather and it turns absolutely beautiful. i want to show you why it is going to turn warmer. here is the uk. you can see the cities across europe. look at this air current here and present all the way back to where it is coming from. across france, down into the mediterranean and actually originating almost out of the sahara desert. if you look at the planet as a whole, there is a very dubious pattern here, you have got this bold of warmth coming here and any have got colder air coming year and that is the classic pattern of the yen and yelling in the weather.
2:30 pm
—— in the ying and yang of the weather. you can see the clue in these for disease. —— in these vortices. indian summers do not tend to last very long. it is going to turn a little bit stormy. the thinking is that it is north—western parts of the country that will get the worst of the weather. this time of year, the storms are pretty volatile. we can safely say that the end of the week for some others will be pretty stormy. southern parts of the country at the moment look a little bit better but there is no guarantee. let's concentrate on the short—term. at the moment, the weather is not that great. if you live in the north—west of the country you would not call it an indian summer. this is what it looks
2:31 pm
like at the end of the afternoon. heavy rain in scotland. persistent rain brought by a weather front which is pretty much stalled across this geographical area. it is kind of sliding along itself. dumped a lot of rain across western scotland. the south—westerly winds are developing and that is the beginning of this very pleasant spell of weather. you might not want warm weather, but if you do like the warmth and the sunshine, this is a real treat. enjoy it while it lasts because it will not last for very long. 20 degrees on tuesday in london. the wind is blowing out of the south mediterranean, this is that well and truly, pushing all of the rain back out to sea. that allows the warmth to extend all of the way to scotland and northern ireland. the north is going to get
2:32 pm
some of that warmth. 20 degrees in glasgow, 2a in london. this is the average forjuly and august. the sun is not a strong this time of year, so perhaps it won't feel quite as hot as it does injuly and august. 0n hot as it does injuly and august. on thursday, we will start to see changes. you can see some shower symbols there on thursday for most major cities across the uk. the wind is picking up on friday, thursday night friday night, saturday, we start to see these areas of low pressure. these isobars, the stronger the winds are blowing. this is basically a sign of severe gales going through some parts of the uk. let's loop it again. the blue is obviously the rain. this could be further towards the north—west, it could be taking some of those winds out of the western coast. at the
2:33 pm
moment, it looks like the east welfare best throughout this stormy period. enjoy the short spell of indian summer because it is definitely not going to last. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a major un report on climate change says there must be "unprecedented" changes in how people live to prevent catastrophic changes to the planet. the report says the consequences of letting temperatures rise by more than 1.5 will be dire — including flooding, droughts and fires. 20 people have been killed in a crash involving a stretched limousine taking people to a party in the us state of new york. it's feared four sisters are among the dead. the acting commissioner of the met police tells an inquest into the westminster terror attacks that he was told to stay in his car as khalid masood murdered pc keith palmer — because he had no protective equipment. 40% of young people can't afford to buy one of the cheapest homes in their area even with a 10% deposit, according to a new research.
2:34 pm
and coming up... in light of today's critical report on climate change, we'll have reaction from the the co—leader of the green party. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. holly, it's that time of year when we find out who's been nominated for football's most prestigious award — the ballon d'0r? the most important than football. who's on the list? that's right, rebecca. good afternoon. we've been finding out the names of those players who've made the 30—man list, five at a time — keeping us guessing as to who's up for european football's oldest award — although for the past decade —
2:35 pm
two names have domiated... it's either been won by cristiano ronaldo or lionel messi, with each winning a record five. ronald's already on the shortlist again this year, but also nominated is england striker harry kane! he was among the third batch of nominees announced this afternoon. of course kane helped england reach the semi—finals of the world cup in russia earlier this year and was awarded the golden boot. also on the shortlist too is wales and real madrid forward gareth bale. you might remember he scored twice for real madrid in the champions league win over liverpool. other names to feature — manchester city's sergio aguero and kevin de bruyne. don't worry if your favourite player is not on the list yet. there are still 15 more to go, rebecca. and i can hardly believe i am saying this, but i write that for the first time there were also be a female player of year? —— am i right in saying. that's right. the award has been running
2:36 pm
since 1956 and, bizarrely, this year will be the first time ther ewill be a ballon d'0rfor the best female player of the year. we're still to find out the 15 woman shortlist. but for the full list of the men and women's award, stay with bbc and we will keep you informed. manchester city midfielder jill scott has withdrawn from the england squad for tomorrow's match against australia. she has an ankle problem and missed saturday's1—0 win over brazil as a precaution. she's now returned to city for treatment. meanwhile, the squad trained today ahead of the game at fulham's craven cottage ground. australia are ranked sixth in the world, with england third, so they'll offer another stern test to phil neville's side, as they continue their preparations for next year's world cup. in tennis british number one kyle edmund has reached a career—high of 14th in the world tennis rankings. he made it to the semi—finals of the china open last week and he's moved up two places — but, even more impressively,
2:37 pm
he's risen from 50th at the start of the year. edmund has been british number one since march, when he passed andy murray, who's of course now number 262 in the world. the new zealand flanker sam cane will miss the autumn tests afterfracturing a bone in his neck. he was injured during the all blacks' narrow victory over south africa on saturday, and he'll be out for five matches, including those in england and ireland next month. he's expected to make a full recovery, but the team doctor said it would probably take about three months for the bone to get strong again. mo farah is now likely to focus on next year's world championships in qatar, after winning his first marathon title. victory in chicago came at only his third attempt over the distance. he broke the european record in the process and also took over a minute off his own personal best — and his wife was waiting at the finish line. i haven't seen them
2:38 pm
for a little while. i have been training for the last two months. i just want to go home tomorrow, go back to london, see my kids, spend a bit of time with them, and think about what is the next step. hopefully, you know, maybe the world champs and other stuff. i'm not sure. the former australia opener matthew hayden said he "dodged a bullet" after he was injured whilst out surfing. he posted a picture of himself after he fractured a bone in his neck and tore ligaments in the accident off stradbroke island in queensland. hayden is 46 now — he thanked everyone who'd helped him and said he was on the road to recovery. that's all the sport for now. we wish all the best from everyone here at bbc sport. for now, rebecca, back to you. holly, thank you. back to our top story here on bbc news — and a new united nations climate report being published at a meeting
2:39 pm
in south korea says there will have to be "unprecedented changes" to how people use energy — in order to restrict rising temperatures. the intergovernmental panel on climate change is calling for the rise in the earth's temperature since the industrial age to be limited to 1.5 degrees celsius. i'm nowjoined byjonathan bartley, co—leader of the green party. we are grateful for your time, thank you. this report clearly paints a stark picture and calls for unprecedented change. do you agree with the target of 1.5? yes, i do agree. this report could not have been stronger in the way it is written and it makes clear we are on the edge of catastrophic and com plete the edge of catastrophic and complete climate breakdown. we must limit temperature to under 1.5 degrees, we must take political action, and that is the loudness that comes across. we need to make that comes across. we need to make that political change happen in this
2:40 pm
country. tell us more about what you have in mind. looking at how the government is acting, developing a whole new fossil fuel industry, fracking, pouring subsidies in the fossil fuels, fracking, pouring subsidies in the fossilfuels, developing hs2 at fracking, pouring subsidies in the fossil fuels, developing hs2 at a cost of £62 billion that will destroy ancient woodlands. we have been told we need to increase carbon to natural means. why not put that money, almost half the entire nhs budget, into a local energy and transport revolution, giving people the choices they need to get out of their cars. we can pump money into a renewable energy revolution, harnessing the power of the wind and wave. wind is now much more cheap than the nuclear options which the government is considering. they are making the wrong decisions. it doesn't have to be catastrophically expensive, but if we don't put the money in the right places and spend it it will be a catastrophe. having said that, the government is doing rather a good job in some areas, isn't it? for example, between 2012
2:41 pm
and 2017 britain's carbon emissions fell to levels not seen since 1890s. let's hope so because we know they have to come down. the committee on climate change which published its 10—year annual report said the government is really going to miss its climate change targets. it has to do much more, notjust in the area of energy, but in housing. we need to retrofit and insulate our old housing and build new housing to very high carbon standards. we need to be having the renewable revelation, and the foundation estimates we could generate six times our annual electricity consumptionjust times our annual electricity consumption just from offshore renewables, but instead it is investing £36 billion in new nuclear power at hinckley. imagine what we could do with that money to revolutionise our clean energy production. from what you are seeing clearly the responsibility lies with government, in your view. clearly the responsibility lies with government, in yourview. ijust wonder where you think it lies with individuals, and how confident are you people are actually prepared to
2:42 pm
change the way they live?, i think people want to change the way they live, they realise the economy is not serving us well —— live, they realise the economy is not serving us well -- yes, i think people want to change. we need to be enabled to make the right choices... but will people be prepared to give up but will people be prepared to give up meat, give up their cars, those individual choices? as an individual who has a son who is disabled i have to rely on my car, but if the government gave me accessible local transport and accessible local train stations, tube stations, where i could travel with him, buses where i could travel with him, buses where i could get a wheelchair onto, of course i would use them because they would be quicker, and it is about making that right environment for people to make those choices. if we have, you know, let's get rid of petrol and diesel cars, let's penalised the ones that are expensive but incentivise the goods transport options that work for people. we know if we had just that small investment, comparatively, in
2:43 pm
housing, rapid installation, we could have cheaper fuel bills. it can work for everyone but it is about making the right choices. people want it, theyjust want those options to pursue. jonathan bartley, co—leader of the green party, thank you for your time today. around 40% of young adults in england cannot afford to buy the cheapest houses in the area they live — even when they have a 10% deposit — that's according to a new report today. the institute for fiscal studies say house prices have risen by 173% in two decades — far outstripping growth in pay. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. every home has an owner, but often now it's someone older renting to young tenants, who can't afford to buy. in her 20s is florence, who lives in reading and feels she's effectively been shut out from purchasing a home. i don't think i'll ever be able to get on the housing ladder based on my own income and my own salary without the help of parents or my partner, because of the area of the country that i want to live in. these house prices are just driving up and up and rental prices
2:44 pm
are driving up and up. one idea the chancellor may be considering for his budget is to make it easier for tenants to buy the homes they're renting by giving them some of the capital gains tax, which the owner should have to pay on selling and refunding the rest to the owners themselves. the aim would be to change the situation in which just 61% of young adults with a deposit already and with a mortgage of four and a half times their salary can afford to buy the cheapest home in their area. it may sound like quite a lot, but it compares with 93% of young adults in the same position who could afford to buy, two decades ago. it's true that some 20 and thirtysomethings prefer to rent. but the majority dream of owning their own home. there are no easy solutions, but for a government that really
2:45 pm
cares about increasing home ownership, the key is to increase the supply of homes and the responsiveness of construction to demand. the government needs to facilitate more house—building in places and areas where people want to live and in particular in the south east part of the country. and this is about people who can get together a deposit. many others are struggling to do that. because so much of their earnings go on high rents. simon gompertz, bbc news. because so much of their earnings go on high rents. simon gompertz, bbc news. the authorities in china have said they're holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption and bribery. interpol says it's received the resignation of meng hongwei, who hadn't been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. 0ur correspondent, john sudworth, is following the story for us in beijing. and we will bring john to you in
2:46 pm
just a few short moments. meanwhile, a coroner has named a second person who died from a suspected allergic reaction after eating a sandwich bought from pret—a—manger. celia marsh — who was 42 and from wiltshire — died in december last year afterfalling ill in bath. the chain says contaminated yoghurt supplied by a third party was responsible for the woman's death. the company involved — coyo — has strenuously denied the claim. news of her death followed the inquest into the death of 15 year old natasha ednan—laperouse, who died after eating a pret baguette. and ina and in a moment we will hear what is happening in the world of business inafew happening in the world of business in a few short moments from maryam, but for now, the headlines on
2:47 pm
afternoon live. scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that's killed 20 people. many young people can't afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit — according to new research. here's your business headlines on afternoon live... (00v) taxing times for big tech firms as social media giant, taxing times for big tech firms as social media giant, facebook sees its uk tax bill soar as profits rise. meanwhile online payments firm paypal is paying more tax after an hmrc enquiry. a group of mps have criticised the apprenticeship scheme, saying the training is not good enough and that disadvantaged people are not being given the support they need. and struggling fashion chain french connection has confirmed speculation that it may be up for sale. it issued a statement earlier saying it is "currently reviewing all strategic options...which include the potential sale of the company". you will be aware our top story
2:48 pm
today has been climate change, and business implications as well. that's right, this report is damning in what it says needs to be done by governments, by people, but also by businesses. in particular it holds inafew businesses. in particular it holds in a few areas, land use, the role of people, energy, regeneration, so really the key question is what is the role of governments but also what are the roles of big, small and medium multinational businesses around the world. a little earlier, my colleague spoke to the environmental scientist chief executive of the climate alliance. he asked about the situation was when it came to climate change. we have already reached overi degrees of warming since preindustrial times and we are heading to 1.5 degrees in the very near future, and that is what all the governments agreed was
2:49 pm
the sort of safe limit to keep temperatures at. so what is happening now, they can show the impacts of climate change, it is everything predicted in the models, so we everything predicted in the models, so we have had wildfires, acidification of the sea, so all the coral reefs are bleaching, the heatwaves and the droughts this summer, and then of course the flooding and the super harry kane is happening around the world. so the footprint of climate change is strong and it is there for everyone to see —— super hurricanes happening around the world. what isn't happening is the reduction in greenhouse gases. what impact has climate change had on our daily lives? in the uk we are having more extreme weather events and also hotter, drier weather. extreme weather events and also hotter, drierweather. so we extreme weather events and also hotter, drier weather. so we have a situation in the uk, like almost around the world, where most of our towns and cities by the coast, so one in six of our properties are
2:50 pm
flooding, so flooding is becoming a bigger problem for everyone. we have had the heatwaves this year, 625 people died prematurely from heatwaves. we had the drought, fairwater, particularly for agriculture, was a problem, because cattle and other animals need it for drinking —— frear water, particularly for agriculture. but there was also a problem with the harvest because of the lack of rain. that has a knock—on effect on food prices and also food availability. what can businesses do to negate the impact of climate change? for for businesses, the most obvious thing is to start to source their energy and get rid of social doing it fossil fuels, throughout their business and in the supply chain. there are two business to do that, firstly, obviously, to reduce their carbon footprint, and the other is that customers prefer to shop with companies that have a green footprint. but, crucially, it makes
2:51 pm
economic sense, so footprint. but, crucially, it makes economic sense, so it is cost effective for businesses. energy prices keep escalating, however the prices keep escalating, however the price of clean technologies such as solar panels come onshore wind farms, keep reducing. therefore it makes business sense, it makes economic sense and it isjust better for everyone. that was angela from the climate alliance speaking to my colleague... you mention facebook in your headlines. what is going on there? yes, the tax story and another big story for the social giant because it is going into the hardware business, coming out with a machine called portal, which basically allows users to video chat with one another, sounds like a great idea. the particular modus operandi of this machine is it follows you around the room if you get up and walk around the room, if you are the restless kind of person. it brings up a a lot of issues around security, which has been an issue for facebook. a little earlier my colleague went to find out exactly what portal is all about.
2:52 pm
have a look at this. as you can see, now that i'm moving, the camera is framing me perfectly. why should people trust facebook to put this kind of device into their homes? we have this privacy from the ground up, the fact that we could build the hardware, software, that we sure you. we put privacy in every
2:53 pm
layer of this. facebook is obviously and advertising business, so will you use this screen to put advertising in people's homes? no, that's not really the plan. i don't think we could get much value, neither to our users are to us that way. —— are to us. neither to our users are to us that way. -- are to us. because it brings facebook right into your home, looking at you, every day, we don't know too much about what information facebook is going to retain from these devices. the only thing companies could be sure about is that somehow the device is going to be hacked. that's what we have seen over and over again. seriously weird! i'm not sure how i feel dirty chasing me around the room, ami feel dirty chasing me around the room, am i allowed to say that? of course you are, but as the package said there, not available in the uk yet. unclear when it will be, but interesting times ahead. yes! shall we look at the markets? yes. a
2:54 pm
number of things show you. firstly, the london market not doing particularly well, over the state of the us economy can also the chinese markets have left. european markets wanting for direction. the putted—mac has fallen slightly against the euro, brent crude up very slightly. —— the pound has fallen slightly against the euro. she over supply and demand having an impact. great to speak to you. we'll see you in an hour? —— issues over supply and demand having an impact. absolutely. now, taylor swift has made herfirst political statement — to say that she is endorsing two demoratic candidates in the upcoming us midterm elections. the singer, who is eligible to vote in the us state of tennessee, admitted that in the past she has been "reluctant to publicly voice political opinions", but now felt differently because of events in her personal life and in the world. she said she "cannot support"
2:55 pm
the republican senate candidate marsha blackburn because her voting record "appalls and terrifies" her. time for a look at the weather. who better to tell us all about it? here's tomasz shafernaker. just when you thought summer was over. guess what? warming up over the coming days. we could call it an indian summer, i guess. a few is a very warm weather potentially. by mid week we could see highs around the next 20s across southern parts of the uk, july, august temperature. at at the moment a lot of cloud, particularly in the north—west. not so great here, heavy rain and if anything it will turn heavier through the course of the day. in fa ct, through the course of the day. in fact, the next couple of days will bring a lot of rain in western scotland, parts of northern ireland as well. tonight, the rain keeps falling in the north—west. the western isles getting a real soaking and parts of northern ireland as well. to the south of that, that of cloud that by that amy get to the south coast of england it is dry, and mild. a mild south—westerly
2:56 pm
wind, temperatures into double figures —— by the time we get to the south coast of england. the sun should eventually come out here, those winds swinging tomorrow the south, south—westerly, so temperatures keep rising, talking about 20 degrees in london, 18 in belfast and still chilly in the far north. getting warmer into wednesday, so basically, looking at the wind, it is pretty much coming out of africa, across the mediterranean, france and into the uk, meaning only one thing for our shores. the words isjust uk, meaning only one thing for our shores. the words is just wafting uk, meaning only one thing for our shores. the words isjust wafting in and the wind is also pushing the front back out into the ocean —— the warmth is just wafting front back out into the ocean —— the warmth isjust wafting in. i think the best temperature is probably 23-24, but the best temperature is probably 23—24, but look at this, in the yorkshire, even the lowlands of scotla nd yorkshire, even the lowlands of scotland getting up to about 20 celsius. thursday, that is when things start to change. we will see whether fronts coming in off the
2:57 pm
atlantic, so the weather going downhill across the western areas. we are anticipating some rain and then by the time we get to friday we are keeping a close eye on the atlantic, looks like things will be turning more stormy, and this nasty low pressure could be sweeping to the north—west of us, bringing the speu the north—west of us, bringing the spell of some very strong winds, and destructive winds potentially. they remained towards the end of the week it could turn a little stormy. —— bearin it could turn a little stormy. —— bear in mind that towards the end of the week it could turn on the stormy side. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm rebecca jones. today at 3. a planet in peril: scientists issue their starkest warning yet, about the dangers of climate change and the tough challenge ahead on global warming. in the report says that temperature rises should be limited to no more
2:58 pm
than1.5 rises should be limited to no more than 1.5 celsius, just half the increase currently predicted. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action. if we are going to keep 1.5 degrees in reach. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that's killed twenty people. many young people can't afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit — according to new research. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with holly — and harry kane making news, holly? he is among those nominated for an petition mac. gareth bail is on their as well. who better to bring you the weather news than thomas? it will feel a bit more like summer in the coming days. indian summer on the coming days. indian summer on the way despite it being autumn. mid
2:59 pm
20s by midweek. i will tell you what will be happening towards the end of the week in half an hour. also coming up — why taylor swift is getting uncharacteristically political. the singer revealed that she's supporting the democrats, in the upcoming us elections. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. scientists have issued their starkest warning yet about the danger of climate change. in a dramatic report, the un's intergovernmental panel says the world is nowhere near its target of keeping the rise in average global temperatures to 1.5 degrees celsius — instead, it says we're heading for an increase of 3 degrees from pre—industrial levels. the report says that just to stay on track would require ‘rapid,
3:00 pm
far reaching and unprecedented changes to all aspects of society.‘ 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has this report. pictures of a warming world. scientists are more confident than ever that the impacts of climate change are playing out now, in the severity and frequency of droughts, storms, and other extreme weather events. and, having gathered in the south korean city of incheon for the past week, climate change researchers and government delegates hammered out the final details of a dramatic report outlining the consequences of a global temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees, and a plan for precisely how that can be prevented. so, the scale of the changes that we are experiencing in the climate system is unprecedented. the scale of the changes that humans would have to implement in order to keep climate change under control is unprecedented. so it‘s a challenge for human civilisation, and this report is therefore
3:01 pm
a milestone in conveying that message to human society. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. with no action, the world is on course to breach this crucial target by as early as 2030, compromising the very livability of our planet. hitting two degrees would mean coral reefs would be largely wiped out. melting polar ice means global sea level rise is projected to be around ten centimetres more if we allow warming to go to two degrees. keeping to 1.5 means 10 million fewer people exposed to the risks of flooding. but this plan is ambitious and will be expensive. renewable energy sources will need to provide about 85% of global electricity by 2050. currently, they account for about 25%. the renewable energy revolution that we‘ve already seen unfolding around the world is going to be the key to the solution that starts from the energy sector
3:02 pm
and spreads to other sectors. i think we can definitely still do this, if we decide that that‘s what we want to do. even with a green energy revolution, this most comprehensive assessment of the perils of climate change concludes that every one of us will need to make changes in how we live our lives. changes that have to start now. victoria gill, bbc news. well, today‘s report has been described as a global wake up call for the planet — so what do governments and individuals around the world need to do to limit global warming? 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. the ipcc has warned of two possible futures for our planet. in the 2 degrees world, there is severe drought. there is more flooding in the northern hemisphere. people are poorer
3:03 pm
and have less food. all of the coral in our seas has gone. as things stand, that is the world that we heading towards, scientists warn. one of the very clear messages of this report is that inevitably, at the rate that we are going, it is quite likely that we are going to release too much carbon, burn more carbon than we can afford to burn. if we are going to stabilise temperatures, we are going to have to work out how to get rid of carbon dioxide without just dumping it in the atmosphere. to avoid damaging global warming, the scientists call for much more renewable energy. the development of transport that uses less fuel. and new ways to take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. all of that is happening, but not, according to the ipcc, at the speed it needs to. scientists are saying to everybody that we have to accelerate our action to tackle climate change, because if we don't, by the middle of the century, we could be facing a situation that we simply will not be able to cope with. at a time when china and india are growing their economies, the planet‘s net
3:04 pm
emissions of c02 needs to be zero by 2050, to prevent a 2 degrees world. up to 7 million square kilometres of land will be needed for energy crops, around the size of australia. and the technologies needed to remove enough carbon from the atmosphere have not yet been developed. the report is important because it also shows that there are options that we need to take. it shows that it is possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. if we have great transitions across the economy, if we change the way that we behave, such as eating less meat, eating more fruit and vegetables. with the backdrop of president trump taking the us out of the paris climate change agreement, avoiding damaging climate change will be difficult, but not impossible. the question is whether national leaders have the political will to bring about the changes recommended, or it will be too little too late. a little earlier we spoke to mary
3:05 pm
robinson. special envoy for climate. she told us the report would not have come about if it were not for the lobbying of small, vulnerable island states. youngs we have a short time, 11 years to 2030 to have a very severe reduction in carbon emissions. we would not have had this report if it were not for the small island states pleading and marching and insisting in paris. 1.5 to stay alive was the mantra. they got that commitment and then the ipc see was asked to do a report. an
3:06 pm
important report, which listeners. this report does two things. it shows the difference between 2 degrees and 1.5 degrees. it reminds us that 2 degrees is now the outer limit of what we could possibly tolerate. the lack of control for the future. into three or 4 degrees would be catastrophic. we have two stay at 1.5for would be catastrophic. we have two stay at 1.5 for safety, for the safety of our children, our grandchildren. that is a moral challenge and a political challenge and a leadership challenge. it‘s been announced today that the nobel prize for economic sciences has been awarded to two men whose work highlights climate change and sustainable growth — william nordhaus and paul romer. the two men will split the prize — with professor nordhaus winning for his work on climate change economics and paul romer for his work on economic growth. the committee said the models they have created help with "pressing issues of our time"
3:07 pm
including sustainable growth and the welfare of the world‘s population. 20 people have been killed in new york state after a stretch limousine crashed into another vehicle. it‘s thought to be one of the worst road accidents in american history: two pedestrians and all 18 people in the limo died, local reports say the victims included four sisters who‘d been on their way to a party. sophie long reports. it was amy‘s 30th birthday. here she is on the right with her three sisters. 16 of her friends and family climbed into the limo to some celebrate. according to reports her husband was among them. none of them survived. amy died along with her sisters. their mother lost all four of their daughters. you can‘t wrap your head around such a tragedy where you have four of your daughters die. they were very smart and they were beautiful.
3:08 pm
they lived life to the fullest. i don‘t know what to tell you except that they were the best nieces anybody could have. this is where the accident happened. it is thought that the limo failed to stop, ploughing into a cafe, hitting and killing two pedestrians. this is one of the biggest losses of lives that we have seen in a long time. the most deadly transportation accident in this country since february of 2009. it is still not clear why the driver lost control. an investigation is under way. all of the victims will not be named until their families have been informed. one of britain‘s most senior police officers has told the inquests into the westminster bridge attack
3:09 pm
how he stayed in his car as pc keith palmer was stabbed to death — because he had no protective equipment. sir craig mackee who was acting chief of the metropolitan police at the time — told the hearing he was at westminster for a meeting when he saw the unarmed constable being attacked. helena lee is at the old bailey now with the latest — helena. this is the first time that we have heard from sir craig mackey, who as you mentioned there was acting commissioner of the metropolitan police at the time. by chance he ended up in new palace yard and witnessed the attack for himself. he came to the inquest here today, he told the jury he had been at a meeting in the house of commons. he came out of that meeting, got into the passenger seat of the car. his driver was sitting next to him and a colleague was in the back of the car. they move around in the car towards the gates, the gates where pc palmer was on duty, in order to leave. it was at that point that he heard a very loud bang.
3:10 pm
he saw people running in all directions, then he told the inquest he saw a large male coming forward with a knife. it looks like one of those out of a carving block, he told the jury. he couldn‘t work out whether that man was connected to the bang that he had. at that point, he said because they had no protection in the car, they did not have a radio, they decided to lock the car. they sat in that car and they witnessed pc palmer being stabbed and sir craig told the inquest today it was two absolutely determined stab wounds. he said the attacker ran very close past the driver side of the car that they were in and at that point he heard those shots. he told the inquest that it was his instinct to get out of the car and go and help the officers who were
3:11 pm
dealing with the situation but there was a police officer close by who told them that they had to leave the scene. the inquest here, evidence has finished for today, it will resume on wednesday 11:30am when we are expecting to hear from those two protection officers, one of whom shot the attacker dead. the grenfell inquiry continues today, hearing more stories from residents of the tower. today they‘ve been hearing from nadia jafari, who escaped but lost her father in the stairwell, and munira mahmud, who survived along with her husband and children. 0ur correspondent tom symonds has been sitting in on the inquiry he told us what evidence has been given today. evidence which tells us how hard it was for residents to keep track of each other as they are scared. as
3:12 pm
you say, nadia was trying to escape with her father who was 82 and elderly aunt invent. they got into a lift which stopped on the tenth floor. as the doors opened, it filled with black smoke. nadia said that you could not see 0rgreave. it was very confusing. the door shut and the lift carried on down to the ground floor. when she got out of the left, there was smoke coming from inside the left and it was very confusing, as you can see here, she is trying to get out. she thought that her father was ahead of her. when she found out that he was not outside, she tried to get back in, but one of the doors to enter the lift was locked and the police would not let her in. she said that it was incredibly traumatic because she did not know what had happened to her father. she became very unwell from the smoke. when she found out that he had died in the fire, she felt that she must have lost contact with
3:13 pm
him as that lift stopped on the tenth floor. she gave another bit of evidence about the windows in her flat. she said that she had reported that they kept opening in the wind and at that let rain in. when the fire happened, she said within about a minute or two of the flames reaching her flat, the a minute or two of the flames reaching herflat, the kitchen window had burst open through the heat. that will be interesting to the enquiry, looking very closely at the enquiry, looking very closely at the way that the windows were put in when the building was refurbished in 2016. you‘re watching afternoon live — these are our headlines: scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that‘s killed 20 people. many young people can‘t afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit, according to new research. also coming up why taylor swift is getting uncharacteristically political. the singer revealed that she‘s supporting the democrats, in the upcoming us midterm
3:14 pm
elections. and in sport: tottenham and england striker harry kane has joined the shortlist for this year‘s prestigious ballon d‘or award. kane helped england reach the semi—finals of the world cup in russia and was awarded this year‘s golden boot. wales forward gareth bale has also been nominated for the honour. manchester city midfielder jill scott has withdrawn from the england squad for tomorrow‘s match against australia. she has an ankle problem and has returned to city for treatment after missing england‘s win over brazil on saturday. and british number one kyle edmund has reached a career—high14th in the atp world rankings. he moved up two places this week, and has risen from 50th at the start of the year. i will be back with more on all of those stories at 3:30pm. scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon says she wants people across the uk to have a chance to change their minds on brexit and has been giving more detail on her party‘s support for another
3:15 pm
referendum on leaving the eu. well, we can cross now to glasgow where the snp is holding its annual conference, and speak to our correspndent nick eardley. good afternoon, nick. good afternoon. thank you. the snp has been grappling with some big constitutional questions over the last few weeks. independence and what brexitjudd look like. yesterday, for the first time, nicola sturgeon said that she wanted to see a referendum on the brexit question. she has been explaining about box this morning. the people of scotla nd about box this morning. the people of scotland did not vote for this tory government. they did not vote to having a referendum on leaving the eu. didn't to having a referendum on leaving the eu. didn‘t vote for breakfast... didn't the eu. didn‘t vote for breakfast... didn‘t vote for brexit either?
3:16 pm
independence is the goal eventually. nicola sturgeon is hoping that the rest of the uk it might have a change of heart. if that opportunity presents itself, i don't think it is right for us to stand on the way of giving people the chance to change their minds. i think it would be odd for us to not grasp an opportunity for us to not grasp an opportunity for scotland to reaffirm its vote to remain in the eu. not a perfect solution, the first minister says. what of scotland voted against two remain and the rest of the uk to leave ? remain and the rest of the uk to leave? many here are desperate for the option for independence.” leave? many here are desperate for the option for independence. i think there will be an independence referendum, but in terms of when it is right to have that, when people will have the clarity to answer some of those questions. that requires greater detail than we have just i'iow. greater detail than we have just
3:17 pm
now. ultimately, everybody here wa nts now. ultimately, everybody here wants independence. nicola sturgeon is not ready to ask the question again, for now. another eu referendum is an option. albeit one that the snp knows it won‘t control, it might not deliver the result it once in this brexit era. easy a nswe rs once in this brexit era. easy answers aren‘t easy to come by. now, in the last 20 minutes or so, the conference here has voted for that idea of another eu referendum. also to potentially extend the brexit process. so that we don‘t leave europe at the end of march next year. mike, how would that work, how would you extend the article 50 process ? would you extend the article 50 process? i don't think we would, i think there are situations where the eu might be persuaded to do that. they would have to be very special circumstances, circumstances where there was a people‘s fault. i don‘t
3:18 pm
think they would extend that just to convenience theresa may. there has never been such a messy, chaotic situation. we have do think our way through this. the first minister was on the radio this morning saying that not allowing scotland to have another independence referendum was anti—democratic. a lot of people will make the exact same charge about the idea of having a second brexit vote. people voted to leave, why should that happen? scotland did not vote to leave the european union. in my view, what a second referendum is, it is not really a second chance to ask the same question, it has a verdict on the process of the past two years, and extraordinarily messy to years which has produced no clarity and may
3:19 pm
produce no result. we also know that the original choice was done on the basis of a flawed perspective, possibly on an illegal campaign. there is every reason to say things have changed so greatly, people are so worried about the present situation and how such lack of clarity that the time is right to pause and to say, should we be doing less ? pause and to say, should we be doing less? you lead the scottish government talks with the uk government talks with the uk government on the whole brexit process. what is your sense on whether there will be a deal? we have another round of talks between the three governments this week. i am clear as to what will happen. i think the eu wants a deal, it wants to get on with things, but it is not going to do it at any price. i think the uk probably once a deal but has an enormous problem with enron backbenchers and with the dup. the
3:20 pm
verdict is unknown. however, if there is no deal, that will be an appalling catastrophe. a high—level deal without any detail, as michael gove indicated could be changed week after, would be very problematic as well. the choice is a rational approach. that is why scotland is asking people to take a rational approach. scotland's brexit secretary, thank you very much. we will hear more from nicola sturgeon tomorrow on brexit. i expect we might hear more details about what it may look like. nick eardley reports. around 40% of young adults in england cannot afford to buy the cheapest houses in the area they live — even when they have a 10% deposit — that‘s according to a new report today. the institute for fiscal studies say house prices have risen by 173% in two decades — far outstripping growth in pay. here‘s our personal finance
3:21 pm
correspondent, simon gompertz. david smith is here with us now. this report paints a pretty bleak picture, what can be done to improve the situation? house prices in elation to what people are and have far outstripped each other. now, in london, you need 16 times the average salary to buy a house. what we are doing is calling on governments to make sure that there is land availability to build the houses we need every year in order to drive down the cost of housing and let young families get a chance to get a foot on the housing ladder. what you mean by land availability? we need to prioritise land for affordable house building. let‘s
3:22 pm
say, this was a public asset, let‘s prioritise it for affordable housing. you represent housing associations. i know that the government made £2 billion available to housing associations, which suggests that they are taking this problem seriously? hill i think so. housing associations can now deliver genuinely affordable house ownership for people. we can‘t neglect the importance of social housing. the government has promised to build a million more homes by 2020. will that be enough? hill i think it will be close. i am not entirely sure how realistic it will be. of the 340,000 but we think that we need, we need
3:23 pm
to up the number that we are building. the government should give uk private renters a chance to buy their homes by rewarding landlords who sell to long—term would tenants, that help the situation? effectively, you give capital gains relief to private landlords who have sold the house to tenants who have been there for three years or so and the money that comes about from that is split. i don‘t think it is a bad idea. i don‘t think it is a panacea for the housing crisis. it doesn‘t do anything to bring forward new supplier chains. can i finally turn this whole issue on its head? wires home ownership such a good thing‘s does it matter? when you look at countries like france and germany, they have far more people who are happy to rent their entire lives. what we need to learn about that is
3:24 pm
that private renters in france and germany have more regulation supporting them. they don‘t have two move their children between schools because they have the possibility of being kicked out. just very finally, as somebody who works as an advocate for affordable rented housing, i don‘t think we should ever advocate anything for anybody else that people want for ourselves. we‘ve got to encourage affordable homeownership if that is what people want. it back thank you. a coroner has named a second person who died from a suspected allergic reaction after eating a sandwich bought from pret—a—manger. celia marsh — who was 42 and from wiltshire — died in december last year afterfalling ill in bath. the chain says contaminated yoghurt supplied by a third party was responsible for the woman‘s death. the company involved — coyo — has strenuously denied the claim. news of her death followed the inquest into the death of 15 year old natasha ednan—laperouse, who died after eating a pret baguette.
3:25 pm
the authorities in china have said they‘re holding the worldwide head of interpol on suspicion of corruption and bribery. interpol says it‘s received the resignation of meng hongwei, who hadn‘t been seen since leaving lyon in france for china two weeks ago. barbara windsor has been speaking publicly about dementia for the first time since he was diagnosed with the condition. she called on people to run next year‘s london marathon in aid of a campaign to raise funds for more research into dementia. this year, i am asking you to make a stand against dementia. use your place to run for the dementia revolution for alzheimer‘s society. support ground—breaking
3:26 pm
research to find it here for a condition that affects so many people like me. dame barbara windsor. let‘s catch up with the weather. hello. there is some rain in the forecast for today, but the good news is if you wants warmer weather, it is heading your way. temperatures could be in the mid—20s by the middle of the week. perhaps around 20 degrees. we have got fine weather across many parts of england and wales. in the north—west it is raining and will continue to rain as we go through the course of tonight. a very male nighty night. temperatures into double figures. the rain will be happy. tomorrow in western scotland there will be heavy rain. even in belfast it brightens up rain. even in belfast it brightens up tomorrow. as far as england and wales is concerned, a stunning day on the way. even in the high teens
3:27 pm
in belfast. let‘s see how those temperatures will rise. if this is bbc news — our latest headlines: —— our latest headlines: a major un report on climate change says there must be "unprecedented" changes in how people live — if catastrophic shifts in the climate are to be avoided. it says the consequences of letting temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees celsius will be dire — including flooding, droughts and fires. 20 people have been killed in a crash involving a stretched limousine taking people to a party in the us state of new york. it‘s feared four sisters are among the dead. the acting commissioner of the met police tells an inquest into the westminster terror attacks that he was told to stay in his car as khalid masood murdered pc keith palmer — because he had no protective equipment. 40% of young people can‘t afford to buy one
3:28 pm
of the cheapest homes in their area even with a 10% deposit, according to a new research. and coming up... turkish officials request to search the saudi consulate in istanbul as it suspects a saudi journalist was murdered there. we‘ll bring you the very latest. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. in an ballon d‘0r. as you clearly know more about it than i do! —— holly, tell me a little more about the ballon d‘0r. holly, tell me a little more about the ballon d'or. the biggest award in football, the one they all want, really. been around since 1956, the biggest one based in europe, anyway. today ee‘ve been finding out the names of those players who‘ve
3:29 pm
made the 30—man list, five at a time, and they‘ve beenkeeping us guessing as to who‘s up for european football‘s oldest award — although for the past decade — two names have domiated... it‘s either been won by cristiano ronaldo or lionel messi, with each winning a record five. ronaldo‘s already on the shortlist again this year, but also nominated is england striker harry kane! he was among the third batch of nominees announced this afternoon. kane helped england reach the semi—finals of the world cup in russia earlier this year and was awarded the golden boot. also on the shortlist is wales and real madrid forward gareth bale, who helped his side win the champions league last season, scoring twice against liverpool in the final. you might remember that. other names to feature — manchester city‘s sergio aguero and kevin de bruyne. don‘t worry if you‘re favouriete player isn‘t on the lsit yet — there are still 15 more to go.
3:30 pm
in the liverpool goalkeeper, alisson, he‘s in there as well. —— and the liverpool goalkeeper, alisson, he‘s in there as well. holly, you tell me this incredibly important award has been going since 1956, and this is the first year there are female players nominated? yes, incredible. the award has been running since 1956 and, bizarrely, 2018 will be the first time ther ewill be a ballon d‘0rfor the best female player of the year. we‘re still to find out the 15 woman shortlist. we hope to find that out very soon. but for the full list for both the mens and womens award keep across the bbc sport website for the lastet annoucenments. but here‘s a questions — will any of the women‘s england squad make that ballon d‘or list, with the lionesses preparing
3:31 pm
to face austrilia tomorrow? they‘ll be wihtout manchester city midfielderjill scott who has withdrawn from the england squad for tomorrow‘s match against australia. she has an ankle problem and missed saturday‘s 1—0 win over brazil as a precaution. she‘s now returned to city for treatment. the squad trained today ahead of the game at fulham‘s craven cottage ground. australia are ranked sixth in the world, with england third, so they‘ll offer another stern test to phil neville‘s side, as they continue their preparations for next year‘s world cup. in tennis, british number one kyle edmund has reached a career—high of 14th in the world tennis rankings. he made it to the semi—finals of the china open last week and he‘s moved up two places — but, more impressively, he‘s risen from 50th at the start of the year. edmund has been british number one since march, when he passed andy murray, who‘s now number 262 in the world. the former australia opener matthew hayden said he "dodged a bullet" after he was injured whilst out surfing. he posted a picture of himself after he fractured a bone in his neck and tore ligaments
3:32 pm
in the accident off stradbroke island in queensland. hayden is 46 now — he thanked everyone who‘d helped him and said he was on the road to recovery. 0bviously wishing him all the best as well. that‘s all the sport for now. rebecca, back to you. holly, many thanks for that. turkey has requested a search of the saudi consulate in istanbul, after saying that a journalist was murdered within its walls. missing writerjamal khashoggi, a saudi national, was last seen visiting the consulate on tuesday. saudi arabia has called the allegations baseless. let‘s get from our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. james, i appreciate there is circumstantial evidence around this, but it does look quite sinister. what do you know? the british government says these are very
3:33 pm
concerning allegations around this particular incident. we know for a fa ct particular incident. we know for a fact that jamal khashoggi, the particular incident. we know for a fact thatjamal khashoggi, the saudi dissident, went to his country‘s consulate in istanbul, he was there on tuesday, there to get a document to finalise his divorce so he could marry his long—term partner. and he never came out, and he disappeared. and there has been huge speculation since then, there have been turkish police reports suggesting he was murdered and that his body... pretty gruesome speculation about how his body was removed, and this has been denied by their saudis. what is extraordinary about this, there have been cases of dissidents disappearing in saudi arabia before. this is the first time we have heard of this happening in an overseas consulate, with a very high—profile dissident. i mean, this man, mr khashoggi comedy was a correspondent for the washington post, the appeared here on the bbc. he was a
3:34 pm
doyen of these people, one of the first people ever to interview 0sama bin laden back in the 1980s, when fighting the soviets in afghanistan. so somebody very much known to the saudi establishment, part of the saudi establishment, part of the saudi establishment, very close, a long—term critic of the current saudi leadership, and that is what we think is behind this. briefly, james, we don‘t have very much time, but i would like to ask what are the broader implications around this? what impact does this have on turkey and saudi relations? 0n allies to the uk... if the uk, for example, said we welcome the criticism of russia because of the salisbury attack, then allegedly this is a uk ally has carried out in istanbul... we have to leave it there, thanks much. back to our top story here on bbc news — and a new united nations climate
3:35 pm
report being published at a meeting in south korea says there will have to be "unprecedented changes" to how people use energy — in order to restrict rising temperatures. the intergovernmental panel on climate change is calling for the rise in the earth‘s temperature since the industrial age to be limited to 1.5 degrees celsius. i‘m nowjoined by drjo house, reader in environmental science and policy at the university of bristol. we are very grateful for your time. thank you forjoining us. firstly, what is your response to this very stark warning issued today? well, this has been the work of a lot of signed hiss over a period of time, over three years now —— a lot of scientists over a period of time. bringing together 6000 references, and it is a really stark warning and and it is a really stark warning and an urgent call for action, clearly laying out the dangers of 1.5 degrees, and the need to limit 1.5
3:36 pm
degrees, and the need to limit 1.5 degrees, because the danger that 2 degrees, because the danger that 2 degrees are even worse. it also lays out some of the ways we might get there that are already being used but could be scaled up and are already economically viable in many areas. speak us through some of the things you think need to change as a matter of urgency. the first and most important thing is decarbonising the energy system, doing things like switching fossil fuels to using renewable energy. the expectation is that we would need to switch to about a half to two thirds of our energy production being renewable by about 2050, and we have seenin renewable by about 2050, and we have seen in the uk there has already been an increase in renewable energy. it is already cost—effective, the government has already been able to reduce or remove subsidies, because it is already cost—effective. remove subsidies, because it is already cost-effective. where do you think the weight of responsibility lies, only with governments, order individuals have a role to play? responsibility is withal. we need
3:37 pm
the governments to make it more feasible for people to take individual actions to make it affordable and possible, we need businesses, and many are already stepping up to the mark, but we need much more action and really we need to throw everything at the problem and everyone needs to do something about it. so that is changes in the way we use energy, changes in the way we use energy, changes in the way we use land and food, changes to our structure of cities. across all sectors, transport, everything. of course, the difficulty is how confident we can be that people, well, while i am sure they will be listening to this and thinking, "yes, i want to do my bit," but at the end of the day people actually prepared to change the way they live, for example, buying more expensive electric cars, possibly even giving up meat? exactly. it is about making it ok for people to be able to change their lifestyles, and maybe it is not about not eating meat but eating less meat, about making electric cars affordable,
3:38 pm
which they have done in norway, with plenty of incentives in place, tax—free, and subsidies for buying them. there is so much people can do as individuals as well. themselves, but also in terms of pressuring governments and pressuring their pensions companies to divest from fossil fuels, so there pensions companies to divest from fossilfuels, so there is pensions companies to divest from fossil fuels, so there is a pensions companies to divest from fossilfuels, so there is a lot pensions companies to divest from fossil fuels, so there is a lot of action people can take. afternoon live from the university of bristol, we must leave it there. really good to yoon thoughts and insight. thank you. —— good to hear your thoughts and insight. the american pop star taylor swift has broken her political silence to back two democratic candidates in the up—coming midterm elections. the 28—year—old singer had previously remained tight—lipped with her politics, drawing some criticism for not speaking out.
3:39 pm
she broke the news to her millions of followers on social media where she has a considerable influence — the likes of which many politicians can only dream of. well, joining me in the studio is our correspondent charlotte gallagher. she said she is elvers be reluctant to make her political views known, so what has changed? yes, she said events in recent years have led her to this. she doesn‘t say what they are but we can guess, the election of donald trump, brett kavanaugh, but weak dollar is not exact what major change in she has always told her flat fans to get out and vote but has refused to endorse a candidate in the way many do —— we do not know exactly what made her change her mind. the congress woman in her state, she said she finds her views are poor and appalling, for example, she is against gay marriage and voted against equal pay for women, and taylor swift says, "look, i can‘t vote for her because of
3:40 pm
that," so she has backed two democratic candidates. two men. yes, she said she has voted for women in the past, she wants to vote for women but you can‘t vote for this particular woman. this is quite strange because taylor swift has never come out and check your particular views before but she has a lwa ys particular views before but she has always been associated with being republican and in fact her silence was interpreted by many to mean she was interpreted by many to mean she was pro—donald trump and in fact quite bizarrely she was sort of adopted by the white supremacist movement, who called her at their arya n movement, who called her at their aryan princess, and last your lawyers actually had to take action because there was a blog going around which said she was a figurehead of the all the right movement, which obviously is not true. she is influential, particularly on social media, amongst young people. she has millions of fans, countless followers, but what has been the reaction to her announcement. yes, 112 million fans on instagram. donald trump won‘t like it, but actually far more than him. it is a real split reaction depending on what side of the political coin
3:41 pm
you‘re on. liberals say it is great, she is using her current theme for a good reason, to influence fans. a lot of conservatives and liberals is saying, shut up, you don‘t know what you‘re talking about. we have kanye west, a lot of people thought was a democrat, running around in make america great again hats, and taylor swift people thought was a republican coming out and endorsing two democrat candidates. you might say, "why should i care who taylor swift boats for?" she has huge influence and influence over people politicians struggle to connect with, young women aged between 18 and 25 who perhaps will not vote. firstly, she could be motivating them to vote, and vote for democratic candidates. what a lot of people are seeing which will be interesting if donald trump comes out on twitter and packs for supporting democratic candidates, that will motivate her fans even more to go out and vote, so you can really see is way, especially in her
3:42 pm
home state of tennessee —— and attacks howard for supporting democratic candidates. we have to leave it there. charlotte, good to speak to you —— attacks taylor swift for supporting. now, the winner of the royal institute of british architects‘ most prestigious award — the riba stirling prize — will be announced this week. the nominations to become britain‘s best new building include a student housing development, a cemetery, and a nursery school. we‘ve been looking at each building in the shortlist, and today it‘s the turn of bushey cemetery in hertfordshire by waugh thistleton architects — which is formed of natural rammed earth walls and described as an extraordinary spiritual building with the beliefs and customs of the jewish faith at its heart. one of the fascinating and liberating things about building
3:43 pm
for the jewish community is that there isn‘t a typology, there is no religious typology in thejewish faith so there‘s no spires, there‘s no domes, no stained—glass windows. these buildings really are basic shelters. they are places for the community to gather. so, the form of the buildings, you know, they‘re quite orthogonal, they‘re quite linear, and the idea really behind that is to make them very understandable, to make them so that, you know, when you‘re in a distressed state, when you‘re at a funeral, that actually you have a kind of intuitive understanding of how to pass through those buildings. the prayer hall floor is at a slight slope so there‘s a constant orientation to really guide that flow of people through and then up into the cemetery. the relationship between the landscape and the building is absolutely fundamental. when the prayer hall doors fly open, after you've said the prayers and you're moving out into the landscape, that framed view is incredibly important, and it gives you a kind of sense of tranquillity, the sense of being connected with nature at the time you really need to be. the prayer halls themselves
3:44 pm
are made from rammed earth. so this is and ancient technology, so we use soil from the site compacted in form work. they‘re rammed down and made into these great blocks here so you can see the kind of, you know, the earth that‘s outside you and around you, that the body is buried in, is the same earth that the buildings are made from. for the jewish community attending at this building, i think it's a place of serenity. everything is pleasing to the eye and i hope and feel that it will bring comfort to the people who attend here. we will be bringing you the
3:45 pm
announcement live on the bbc news channel, so stay tuned for that. meanwhile... ivan harbour — architect and senior partner at rogers, stirk, harbour and partnersjoins me now. you were the design lead for the riba stirling prize winning building under this name. building under this namelj building under this name. i did a maggie centre, the cancer centre at sharon cross hospital. it was the first one. it involves the people coming together, and talking, and it is that moment where you realise you‘re not alone, and a moment where the staff who work with you, you know, they offer you a cup of tea,
3:46 pm
the first thing you do when you going, so it is really like a home, home from home. as an architect, of course, what are giving their is really a backdrop to allow those activities to happen, because architecture really is all about the people. explained, because it is on the grounds of charring cross hospital in london, isn‘t it? —— explain to me. just give me a sense of how you approach that blank piece of how you approach that blank piece of paper —— charring when most hospitals are covered with car parking so we really wanted to use that space to create a refuge with its own distinct environment around it. the battle, of course, is to deal with the parking, particularly co nsulta nts‘ deal with the parking, particularly consultants‘ parking, which is a high priority. as is the patients',
3:47 pm
as well. a whole other subject! the challenge also to think beyond your boundaries, and that maggie‘s at charing cross hospital we did more than the formal surroundings, so the building has anchored itself into the hospital, it doesn‘t feel like the hospital, it doesn‘t feel like the last building to arrive on site. what you mean by anchored it?|j the last building to arrive on site. what you mean by anchored it? i mean embracing the neighbouring spaces, so we had municipal garden which has been drawn into the approach to the building, and that approach is of course part of the process of engaging ina course part of the process of engaging in a very difficult subject. many people approach this building and it takes them a number of atte m pts building and it takes them a number of attempts before they actually go m, of attempts before they actually go in, and the whole building is about lengthening that threshold of the journey, so when you —— so when you finally going to the building and are offered you a cup of tea, you feel welcome. how are offered you a cup of tea, you feelwelcome. how much are offered you a cup of tea, you feel welcome. how much thought goes
3:48 pm
into how the interiorfloors, i guess, once you are actually inside the building and you have your cup of tea ? the building and you have your cup of tea? —— how the interiorflows. yes, the flow, particularly in the maggie‘s centre, is important. what we have here, sliding doors, so you know the fedora is closed you clearly go in. we have skylights above the door —— you know that if the door is closed. you know the extent of the building. you know where you can go, and of course it is that door that is really telling you whether someone is there. there is no signage in the maggie‘s centre and that is really important. ivan harbour, really good to speak you. thanks for coming in to tell us about your award—winning building. thanks. i want to bring you some breaking news that has just come into the
3:49 pm
bbc, and it is a statement from jaguar land rover, and it says "as pa rt jaguar land rover, and it says "as part of the continued programme for growth,... is part of the continued programme for growth, . .. is what part of the continued programme for growth,... is what they part of the continued programme for growth, . .. is what they are part of the continued programme for growth,... is what they are creating efficiencies and will align supplier to reflect fluctuating demand globally... what all this means, according to the statement, it will introduce a two week shutdown period later this month at solihull, one example, it says, of actions it is taking to achieve this strategy for profitable growth. it says that customer orders in the system will not be impacted and employees affected will be paid for the duration of the shutdown. no doubt more news on that as we get it but that statement from jaguar land rover that it is introducing a two week shutdown later this month. that news may have come a bit too
3:50 pm
late for you, maryam, that news may have come a bit too late foryou, maryam, i that news may have come a bit too late for you, maryam, i don‘t know, but she will be here with all the business news in a moment. first, look at the headlines on afternoon live... scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that‘s killed 20 people. many young people can‘t afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit, according to new research. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live... taxing times for big tech firms as social media giant facebook sees its uk tax bill soar as profits rise. meanwhile online payments firm paypal is paying more tax after an hmrc enquiry. a group of mps have criticised the apprenticeship scheme, saying the training is not good enough and that disadvantaged people are not being given the support they need. and struggling fashion chain
3:51 pm
french connection has confirmed speculation that it may be up for sale. it issued a statement earlier saying it is "currently reviewing all strategic options...which include the potential sale of the company". are you all right? a glass of water? i think are you all right? a glass of water? ithinki are you all right? a glass of water? i think i am. let's are you all right? a glass of water? i think! am. let's talk are you all right? a glass of water? i think i am. let's talk about facebook. yes, the social media giant is entering the world of hardware. it is paying more tax, as i mentioned, but also getting into hardware... the company today is unveiling a device called portal that allows users to video chat with one another. and with other facebook messenger users. it follows you around the room as you are talking and obviously allows you to see whatever the person is doing even if they are moving around, the camera can do that. in light of the issues facebook has had with privacy, with
3:52 pm
customer accounts being hacked, the question many people are asking, is this a good idea? and more importantly, will it sell? jack kent is a technology and media analyst at ihs markit. the think this will be a good idea? facebook, tying into an social clinic is work. unlike other areas of the market, it is really about video chat and communication between users “— video chat and communication between users —— tying into its other work. google, amazon, they all have a different way into your home, don‘t they? amazon tied into its retail experience, so has ways to get people to buy more stuff to amazon, with google, it is the music, all that, but for the spigot is about that, but for the spigot is about that chat and are socially speakers. facebook has obviously been in the news recently with privacy issues, and in particular accounts being
3:53 pm
hacked. do you think in light of that the timing of this is quite bad? yes, challenging timing for facebook, but this would have had years of development, so it is also a challenging market, very competitive, with apple, google, amazon, as you said. the smart home market looking to the future. what else to look for? - we have seen an explosion of devices connected in the home, smart speakers, tvs, thermostats, increasingly things like that, controlling the white goods as well as consumer electronics show neuron. jack, thank you very much indeed. shall we have a look at the markets? absolutely. not particularly good for the london market, down, the pound sliding ever so slightly against the euro. more analysis of what is going on in the financial markets in about an hour. you‘re just teasing us for now! i know, iam.
3:54 pm
you‘re just teasing us for now! i know, i am. maryam, you‘re just teasing us for now! i know, iam. maryam, see you you‘re just teasing us for now! i know, i am. maryam, see you later. tomasz schafernaker now has the weather... some rain in the forecast for today but the good news if you want warm weather, it is heading your way, and by midweek temperatures could be in the mid—20s, possibly, perhaps around 20 degrees across the north of the uk. this is what it looks like more or less right now. fine weather across many parts of england and wales but in the north—west, rainy and it will continue to rain through the course of the night. a very mild night tonight, temperatures into double figures. the rain will be heavy. tomorrow, in western scotland, heavy rain, rain for a time western scotland, heavy rain, rain fora time in western scotland, heavy rain, rain for a time in northern ireland, but evenin for a time in northern ireland, but even in belfast it will brighten up tomorrow. as far as england and wales are concerned, a stunning day on the way, 20 in london in 17 expected in hull, and even in the high teens in belfast. looking at midweek to see how those temperatures will rise, 23 in
3:55 pm
london, 23 in belfast. —— 23 in cardiff and 19 in belfast. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 4. a planet in peril: scientists issue their starkest warning yet, about the dangers of climate change and the tough challenge ahead on global warming. an un report says temperature rises should be limited to no more than 1.5 degrees celsius — just half the increase currently predicted. just half the increase in an up the ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we are going to keep 1.5 trees within reach. save the children
3:56 pm
publishes an internal review following allegations of abuse in the charity. one in five staff say they have experienced harassment or discrimination in the last three years. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america that‘s killed 20 people. britain‘s biggest carmaker jaguar land rover will close its solihull plant for two weeks later this month after it reported a nearly 50 percent fall in sales to china. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. holly has the headlines. harry kane making the news? we have been finding out the nominees for this year‘s ballon d‘0r. what a gorgeous scene behind you? is the weather
3:57 pm
going to match? i will take both! it will be stunning to moral, weapon state mid week we are in for the peak of the indian summer. temperatures could get up to the mid—20s, not lasting for very long, all will be revealed in half an hour. also coming up — why young people can‘t afford to buy their own place, even with a deposit. the institute for fiscal studies said house prices in england have risen by 173 percent in the last two decades — but the average pay for 25—34 year—olds has grown by just 19 percent in the same period. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. scientists have issued
3:58 pm
their starkest warning yet about the danger of climate change. in a dramatic report, the un‘s intergovernmental panel says the world is nowhere near its target of keeping the rise in average global temperatures to 1.5 degrees celsius — instead, it says we‘re heading for an increase of 3 degrees from pre—industrial levels. the report says that just to stay on track would require ‘rapid, far reaching and unprecedented changes to all aspects of society.‘ 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has this report. pictures of a warming world. scientists are more confident than ever that the impacts of climate change are playing out now, in the severity and frequency of droughts, storms, and other extreme weather events. and, having gathered in the south korean city of incheon for the past week, climate change researchers and government delegates hammered out the final details of a dramatic report outlining the consequences of a global
3:59 pm
temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees, and a plan for precisely how that can be prevented. so, the scale of the changes that we are experiencing in the climate system is unprecedented. the scale of the changes that humans would have to implement in order to keep climate change under control is unprecedented. so it‘s a challenge for human civilisation, and this report is therefore a milestone in conveying that message to human society. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate change action if we're going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. with no action, the world is on course to breach this crucial target by as early as 2030, compromising the very livability of our planet. hitting two degrees would mean coral reefs would be largely wiped out. melting polar ice means global sea level rise is projected to be around ten centimetres more if we allow warming to go to two degrees.
4:00 pm
keeping to 1.5 means 10 million fewer people exposed to the risks of flooding. but this plan is ambitious and will be expensive. renewable energy sources will need to provide about 85% of global electricity by 2050. currently, they account for about 25%. the renewable energy revolution that we‘ve already seen unfolding around the world is going to be the key to the solution that starts from the energy sector and spreads to other sectors. i think we can definitely still do this, if we decide that that‘s what we want to do. even with a green energy revolution, this most comprehensive assessment of the perils of climate change concludes that every one of us will need to make changes in how we live our lives. changes that have to start now. victoria gill, bbc news. well today‘s report has been described as a global wake up call for the planet — so what do governments and individuals around the world need to do to limit global warming? 0ur science correspondent
4:01 pm
pallab ghosh reports. the ipcc has warned of two possible futures for our planet. in the 2 degrees world, there is severe drought. there is more flooding in the northern hemisphere. people are poorer and have less food. all of the coral in our seas has gone. as things stand, that is the world that we heading towards, scientists warn. one of the very clear messages of this report is that inevitably, at the rate that we are going, it is quite likely that we are going to release too much carbon, burn more carbon than we can afford to burn. if we are going to stabilise temperatures, we are going to have to work out how to get rid of carbon dioxide without just dumping it in the atmosphere. to avoid damaging global warming, the scientists call for much more renewable energy. the development of transport that uses less fuel. and new ways to take
4:02 pm
carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. all of that is happening, but not, according to the ipcc, at the speed it needs to. scientists are saying to everybody that we have to accelerate our action to tackle climate change, because if we don't, by the middle of the century, we could be facing a situation that we simply will not be able to cope with. at a time when china and india are growing their economies, the planet‘s net emissions of c02 needs to be zero by 2050, to prevent a 2 degrees world. up to 7 million square kilometres of land will be needed for energy crops, around the size of australia. and the technologies needed to remove enough carbon from the atmosphere have not yet been developed. the report is important because it also shows that there are options that we need to take. it shows that it is possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. if we have great transitions across the economy, if we change the way that we behave,
4:03 pm
such as eating less meat, eating more fruit and vegetables. with the backdrop of president trump taking the us out of the paris climate change agreement, avoiding damaging climate change will be difficult, but not impossible. the question is whether national leaders have the political will to bring about the changes recommended, or it will be too little too late. let‘s cross over to newjersey and talk to drjennifer francis, a research professor at the department of marine and coastal sciences of the rutgers university who‘s research is mainly focused on global and arctic climate change. very well qualified to talk to us about this. this report paints a stark picture and calls for
4:04 pm
unprecedented change, what is your response in the first instance? unprecedented change, what is your response in the first instance ?|j think the many hundreds of scientists that contributed to this report and to previous ipc see reports in the past have been relatively conservative in their language and i think this report finally steps up and describes the warning and what we are likely to see happen if we don‘t step up and increase our model of our activities to reduce the amount of carbon that we put into the atmosphere, figure out ways to remove it from the atmosphere and think very hard about how we are all going to have two adopted the changes that we know are coming. given president rob's decision to pull out of the international agreement on climate change, how great is the gulf between where the world is now and what this report saying needs to
4:05 pm
done? —— given president trump‘s decision. despite what is happening in washington and the disturbing message that is coming out of the white house, there is a lot of excellent activities happening at the local level, and state levels and in industry. we are seeing a lot of motion in the right direction, but this report as saying that we have to make it happen faster and we have to make it happen faster and we have to make it happen sooner. there isa have to make it happen sooner. there is a huge gulf there, but it doesn‘t mean that we can‘t cross it. is a huge gulf there, but it doesn‘t mean that we can't cross it. how much appetite is there when it comes down to it amongst the public to change the way that they live and i am thinking particularly in america, for people to ditch their cars? am thinking particularly in america, for people to ditch their car57m isa for people to ditch their car57m is a tough message to get across to people, people don‘t like to give up their conveniences. they don‘t like to change their lifestyles, but i
4:06 pm
think the message is starting to get through. the extreme weather events that we have seen in the last few yea rs have that we have seen in the last few years have been a huge wake—up call, hurricane sandy, hurricane harvey. people are seeing these events happening to their own backyards, it is hurting their own wallets and those sorts of things are changing minds, in my opinion. unfortunately we must leave it there. thank you for your time. it‘s been announced today that the nobel prize for economic sciences has been awarded to two men whose work highlights climate change and sustainable growth — william nordhaus and paul romer. the two men will split the prize — with professor nord haus winning for his work on climate change economics and paul romer for his work on economic growth. the committee said the models they have created help with "pressing issues of our time" including sustainable growth and the welfare of the world‘s population. one in five staff at save the children say they have
4:07 pm
experienced harassment or discrimination in the last three years, according to an independent review of workplace culture at the charity. the review, published in the last few minutes, followed disclosures about the charity‘s handling of sexual misconduct allegations against two former senior executives between 2012 and 2015. save the children says it will draw up measures to reduce what it describes as ‘workplace incivility‘. 0ur reporter manveen rana joins us now now. this seems quite a startling statistic. tell us more about what is in this report? it is a surprisingly high figure. this report looks at the charity since 2015 when there was a previous review looking at the workplace culture. since then, there was supposed to be action plans and steps and committed to prevent this
4:08 pm
sort of thing happening. this was after the first few cases of sexual harassment had arisen. the fact that there has still been one fifth of staff complaining about harassment shows that those steps have not necessarily been taken. the review does criticise the lack of sticking to those plans. speaking to people in the charity bodice uprising is that they say that this review echoes the one in 2015. how does save the children uk explained that? they say they will open up a consultation with staff to open up a new plan for how to address these situations. having spoken to some of the people in the charity today, i found that there are serious misgivings even about this review in that apparently not all of the women who complained about sexual harassment were consulted. am i
4:09 pm
right that save the children uk is subject to other reviews, for example by the charity review? people in the charity say that they have more confidence in the charity commission review because it is entirely external. even though this was conducted by the charity it was conducted by an external review. they need to rebuild trust with the public, their donors, but also with the own workers. thank you, i know that that has just been published in the last few minutes, so thank you for bringing us that. the grenfell inquiry continues today, hearing more stories from residents of the tower. today they‘ve been hearing from nadia jafari, who escaped but lost her father in the stairwell, and munira mahmud, who survived along with her
4:10 pm
husband and children. 0ur correspondent tom symonds has been sitting in at the inquiry today and joins us now. just bring us up to date with what the enquiry has heard today? the point of this bit of the enquiry is to get first—hand accounts from residents who have a specific something they saw which is important to the enquiry‘s work. which is to examine what led to the fire and what happened on the night of the fire itself. this morning, we heard from nutty who was on the 11th floor of grenfell heard from nutty who was on the 11th floor of g re nfell tower heard from nutty who was on the 11th floor of grenfell tower and tried to escape with their father. the lift doors opened a thick smoke came in and in that moment, she believes her father stepped forward and got out the left where is she continued to the left where is she continued to the ground floor. when she got to the ground floor. when she got to the ground floor she found that her father was not in front or behind a
4:11 pm
fair, father was not in front or behind a fa i r, clearly father was not in front or behind a fair, clearly that was a very distressing moment. split—second decisions by residents may have resulted in life or death depending on those decisions. another thing that she was giving evidence on was the windows that were installed into her flat the windows that were installed into herflat during the windows that were installed into her flat during the refurbishment. she said that those windows were fa u lty she said that those windows were faulty because they let the wind and the rain in. within one or two minutes of the fire reaching the flat, they failed. another witness was on the fifth floor, just one floor above where the fire started. her evidence was about what the firefighters did. if firefighter gave her very important warning. he told me there is a fire and you have told me there is a fire and you have to leave. i told my husband straight to leave. i told my husband straight to leave. i told my husband straight
4:12 pm
to leave. when i put my baby in the buggy. to leave. when i put my baby in the buggy, he said you only have two seconds. that two seconds meant everything. we were lucky that two seconds saved us. those who didn‘t have the chance for two seconds... she was able to get out of the tower with her children, sadly her very great friend who was on the 23rd floor of the tower was trapped and did not make it out. as you heard there, it was that two seconds to get out warning from the fire service that probably unable to —— probably made it able for her to live. as her friend probably made it able for her to live. as herfriend didn‘t get that warning, she was not able to escape. britain‘s biggest car—maker jaguar land rover will close
4:13 pm
its solihull car plant for two weeks from the 22nd of october, the company says no jobs will be affected by the shut down and workers will continue to get paid. let‘s get more from our business correspondent theo leggett jaguar land rover so that they need to rush in production because of slowing global sales. china is its biggest market. last year, jaguar land rover had a record year globally. a lot of the cars being sent to china are built at the solihull plant. we are talking about the big cars that appeal to the chinese market. sales in china of pretty much all western brands have fallen quite erratically recently. in september, jaguar land rover‘s sales were down 46% compared to the
4:14 pm
previous year. what they are telling us is that it is a slowdown in production to allow existing stock to be sold off. would it be fair or to be sold off. would it be fair or to be sold off. would it be fair or to be unfairto to be sold off. would it be fair or to be unfair to say that this is the latest in a series of problems for jaguar land rover? it is clear that the company is coming under pressure from a number of different directions. at the solihull site this year, jaguar land rover said it would be laid off a number of agency workers. it‘s prom at plant, workers ina workers. it‘s prom at plant, workers in a three—day week. jaguar land rover makes a lot of diesel cars. we have the chief executive recently saying that the handling of diesel policy and of brexit is threatening the company and if the government does not revise its policies, then
4:15 pm
potentially there could be a a lot ofjob potentially there could be a a lot of job losses potentially there could be a a lot ofjob losses in the future. thereon it -- ofjob losses in the future. thereon it —— there are a number of problems looming and eroding consumer confidence. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. save the children publishes an internal review following allegations of abuse in the charity, one in five staff say they have experienced harassment or discrimination in the last three years. four sisters are feared dead after a limousine crash in america, that‘s killed 20 people. many young people can‘t afford to buy a new home — even when they can afford the deposit — according to new research. in sport, tottenham and england
4:16 pm
striker harry kane has joined the shortlist for the prestigious ballon d‘0rand shortlist for the prestigious ballon d‘0r and was awarded this year‘s golden boot. manchester city midfielderjill scott has withdrawn from the england squad for tomorrow‘s match against australia. she has an ankle problem and has returned for treatment. british number one kyle edmund has reached a career high, 14th in the atp world rankings. he moved up two places this week and has risen from 50th at the start of the year. i will be back with more those stories at 4:30pm. one of britain‘s most senior police officers has told the inquests into the westminster bridge attack how he stayed in his car as pc keith palmer was stabbed to death — because he had no protective equipment. sir craig mackee —
4:17 pm
who was acting chief of the metropolitan police at the time — told the hearing he was at westminster for a meeting when he saw the unarmed constable being attacked. helena lee has been following the story from the old bailey. this is the first time that we have heard from sir craig mackey who as you mentioned there was the acting commissioner of the metropolitan police at the time. by chance he happened to witness the attack for himself. he told the jury he had been at a meeting in the house of commons. he got into the passenger seat of the car, his driver was sitting next to him and a colleague was in the back of the car. they moved around in the car towards the gates, the gates where pc palmer was on duty. it was at that point that he told the inquest he heard a very
4:18 pm
loud bang, he saw people running in all directions and he told the inquest he saw a large male coming forward with a knife. it looked like one of those out of a carving block, he told the jury. he couldn‘t work out whether that man was connected to the bang that he heard and then at that point he said because they had no protection in the car, they didn‘t have a radio, they decided to lock the car. they sat in the car and witnessed pc palmer being stabbed. craig told the inquest today that it was to absolutely determined star queens. the —— two very determined star wounds. he told the inquest that it was his instinct to get out of the car and to go and
4:19 pm
help with the situation. a police officer told them that they had to leave the scene. evidence has finished for today, it will resume on wednesday at 1138 and when we are expecting to hear from those to close retraction officers. 0ne expecting to hear from those to close retraction officers. one of whom shot the attacker dead. a coroner has named a second person who died from a suspected allergic reaction after eating a sandwich bought from pret—a—manger. celia marsh — who was 42 and from wiltshire — died in december last year afterfalling ill in bath. the chain says contaminated yoghurt supplied by a third party was responsible for the woman‘s death. the company involved — coyo — has strenuously denied the claim. news of her death followed the inquest into the death of 15 —year—old natasha ednan—laperouse who died after eating a pret baguette. 20 people have been killed in new york state after a stretch limousine crashed into another vehicle.
4:20 pm
it‘s thought to be one of the worst road accidents in american history: two pedestrians and all 18 people in the limo died, local reports say the victims included four sisters who‘d been on their way to a party. sophie long reports. it was amy palis 30th birthday. she and her husband had been married for just a few months. they and their friends got into the limo to go and celebrate. none of them got out alive. according to local reports among those who died was amy‘s sister, another sister and her husband leave behind two children. another sister, mary dyson and her husband rob were also in the car. amy‘s mother lost all of her four
4:21 pm
daughters. you can't wrap your head around such a tragedy where you have four of your daughters died. they we re very four of your daughters died. they were very smart, they were beautiful and they lived life to the fullest. i don‘t know what to tell you except that they were the best nieces anybody could have. the authorities have called this the deadliest us transport crash in nelly a decade. the car veered into a car park, hitting and killing two pedestrians before coming to a rest. this is one of the biggest losses of life that we have seen in a long time. it is still not clear why the driver a p pa re ntly still not clear why the driver apparently lost control or the exact cause of the accident. an investigation is under way. the victims will not be officially named
4:22 pm
until all of their families have been informed. around 40% of young adults in england cannot afford to buy the cheapest houses in the area they live — even when they have a 10% deposit — that‘s according to a new report today. the institute for fiscal studies say house prices have risen by 173 % in two decades — far outstripping growth in pay. here‘s our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. every home has an owner. 0ften, now it is somebody older renting to young tenants who cannot afford to buy. in her 20s is florence who lives in writing and feels she is effectively being shut out from purchasing a home. i don't think! will ever be able to get on the housing ladder without the help of my parents orate partner because of the area of the country that i want to live in. these house prices are
4:23 pm
driving up and up, rental prices are driving up and up, rental prices are driving up and up. the chancellor may be considering to make it easier for te na nts may be considering to make it easier for tenants to buy the homes that they are renting by giving them some of the capital gains tax which the owner should have to play on selling and refunding the rest to the owners themselves. the aim would be to change the situation in just 61% of young adults with a deposit already and with a mortgage of four and a half times their salary can afford to buy the cheapest home in their area. it may sound likewise a lot but it compares with 93% of young adults in this imposition who could afford to buy two decades ago. it is true that some 20 and thirtysomethings prefer to rent. the majority of owning their own home. there were no easy solutions, but from a government that really cares
4:24 pm
about increasing homeownership, the key is increasing responsiveness to demand. the government needs to facilitate more house—building in areas where people want to live, in particular in the south—east part of the country. this is about people who can get together a deposit. many are struggling to do that because so much of their earnings go on high rent. now, remeber this from the conservative party conference? theresa may‘s little dance as she came on stage well, the dance craze appears to be catching.... jean—claude juncker, president of the european ccouncil, has done his own little tribute dance "theresa may" style before addressing european week of regions and cities opening session.
4:25 pm
is he a fan, or is he actually mocking her as some commentators speculate? we‘ll let you decide. i won‘t ask thomas to do a dance, but who is your money on for strictly? i can see it is going to turn much warmer. is that a picture from today? i am not sure. i know we saw it earlier on, but it does tell the story, doesn‘t it? some people told me that actually they have had enough of the summer now. they want the fresh, cool autumn weather. i am sure there will be a lot of happy faces when i tell you that we get into the mid—20s. it does happen, it
4:26 pm
has happened a few times in the last few years. three or four years ago we had temperatures up to around 23 or 24 degrees. if you look at this weather map, you can see where all of the weather is coming in from the south, drifting out of africa. here we have colder weather and at this time of the year, the atmosphere is a lot more volatile. the battle between the cold and the very warm. iam sure between the cold and the very warm. i am sure that you know what i‘m going to say next. stormy weather! how did! going to say next. stormy weather! how did i do there? right onto. it will be heading our way towards the end of the week. i am liking your charts. take it away. that storm and isa charts. take it away. that storm and is a pretty ferocious, it could be
4:27 pm
the next named storm, but is is too early to say just how vicious the next named storm, but is is too early to sayjust how vicious it is going to get. 0r exactly where it will hate. for the time being, before this indian summariser, there isa before this indian summariser, there is a lot of cloud out there. this isn‘t the storming us yet, this just a weather front. it has been stuck across western parts of scotland for quite some time now. the key is the direction of the wind. you can see it as south—westerly. the south—westerly is well established themselves across the rest of the uk and then turn to more of a southerly. the more southerly they become, basically the more the warm airwill become, basically the more the warm air will start drifting towards us. tomorrow, still a south—westerly, that means still some cloud and rain here. for much of england and wales and eventually northern ireland as well, the weather is looking smashing. 20 degrees in london, 18
4:28 pm
degrees in belfast. still a bit cooler in scotland. then the southerly coming straight out of france and the mediterranean and possibly africa. look at all of these oranges. the oranges are basically the air temperature and that warmth extending right across yorkshire into scotland and into northern ireland. i am struggling to see any rain. there are a couple of showers here, but wednesday is your day. thursday, a big change on the way. this is the storm. you canjust about see it here. that will be racing in our direction. the last 0k day for some of us will be thursday. i think there will be some rain in western parts of the uk. by friday, the weather is going downhill. it is not looking pleasant at all. we‘re talking about friday here. this low pressure could be here all further
4:29 pm
here. the position of the low is crucial, where the strength of the winds and the severe gales could sweep across western parts of the republic of ireland and on to the western isles of scotland. they could go up the irish sea here and in effect the north—west of england. let‘s enjoy that spell of warm weather that we will have at the middle parts of the week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a major un report on climate change says there must be "unprecedented" changes in how people live — if catastrophic shifts in the climate are to be avoided. it says the consequences of letting temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees celsius will be dire — including flooding, droughts and fires. britain‘s biggest carmaker, jaguar land rover, will close its solihull plant for two weeks this month after it reported a nearly 50% fall in sales to china. save the children publishes an internal review
4:30 pm
following allegations of abuse in the charity — one in five staff say they have experienced harassment or discrimination in the last three years. 20 people have been killed in a crash involving a stretched limousine taking people to a party in the us state of new york. it‘s feared four sisters are among the dead. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. i‘ve been learning all about the ballon d‘or this afternoon, holly. they seem to have been drip feeding the nominations this year, for the top footballer of the year? that‘s right, rebecca. it‘s one of the oldest and most prestigious football awards — the one they all want. the ballon d‘0r, first presented in 1956, essentially given to the best footballer of the year.
4:31 pm
compiled by the editorial staff of france football and voted forjournalists across the world. they‘ve been revealing the names of those who‘ve made the 30—man list, pretty slowly, five at a time — keeping us guessing. we have 15 names so far including seven premier league players... among them — enlgand and tottenham striker harry kane! he was among the third batch of nominees announced this afternoon. he helped england reach the semi—finals of the world cup in russia earlier this year and was awarded the golden boot. also on the shortlist, chelsea stirker eden hazard — after a really impressive world cup campaign with belgium and a very fast start to the new season at chelsea. he was voted second best player at the world cup, behind croatia captain luka modric — who‘s also expected to make an appearance on the list. and manchester city‘s kevin de bruyne was among the second set of nominations after earlier.
4:32 pm
not hard to figure out why he is there. city won the premier league, carabao cup and community shield last year, and he also played a major role in helping belgium finish third at the world cup. cristiano ronaldo has also made the list — in the running for his third—consecutive ballon d‘0r. and, remember, between ronaldo and lionel messi — well, they‘ve won it for the past ten years, five each, so can anyone steal their crown? and i have to ask, if you win, do you actually win the golden balloon? laughter no, it actually is the french for bsll! laughter that‘s my high school french for you. and this year, for the first time a woman will win the ballon d‘0r — what‘s taken them so long?
4:33 pm
yes, that‘s right. the award has been running since 1956 and bizarrely this year will be the first time ther ewill be a ballon d‘0rfor the best female player of the year. previously france football magazine who run the award merged the accolade with the fifa world player of the year award in 2010, but the pair split again two years ago. but in this guise — this will be the first. we‘re yet to find out who‘s made the 15 woman shortlist. but here‘s a question. will any of the women‘s england squad make that shortlist? well, the lionesses are preparing to face austraila in a friendly tomorrow, however they‘ll be wihtout manchester city midfielder jill scott who has withdrawn due to injury. she has an ankle problem and missed saturday‘s 1—0 win over brazil as a precaution. she‘s now returned to city for treatment. meanwhile the squad trained today ahead of the game at fulham‘s craven cottage ground. australia are ranked sixth in the world, with england third, so they‘ll offer another rather stern test to phil neville‘s side, as they continue their preparations for next year‘s world cup. in tennis british number one kyle edmund has reached
4:34 pm
a career—high of 14th in the world tennis rankings. he made it to the semi—finals of the china open last week and he‘s moved up two places — but, more impressively, he‘s risen from 50th at the start of the year. edmund has been british number one since march, when he passed andy murray, who is now number 262 in the world. and, finally, let me show you some pictures from georgia, where the players were given the run around...by a dog. not sure what he‘d cold but he got very involved in the top division game. third against fifth in the league. i‘ve been told reliably he usually players for the terriers,
4:35 pm
also had a spell at rovers. it was definitely the highlight in the goalless draw and was lapping up all the attention. that‘s all the sport for now. enjoy your evening. goodbye for me. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to sarah sturdey is in nottingham, where regulators are investigating the actions of boots pharmacies after the death of a great—grandfather who was sent duplicate packs of prescription drugs. sarah will be with you in just a moment. also with us this afternoon... jemma woodman is in plymouth where celebrity chef rick stein has issued a warning over the depletion of local crab stocks, due to increasing demand from china. more on that a little later. but, sarah, firstly, with you, this sends
4:36 pm
a terrible story. what happened? tony lee was a grandfather who died in 2016. his granddaughter was clearing out the house and made the most shocking discovery, he had been given four duplicate packs of medication with over 100 tablets in each pack and he had taken those extra tablets for a week. the assistant coroner ‘s concluded this contributed to his death, following a breakdown at communication at a boots store in doncaster. boots see an extremely rare set of circumstances led to the error, and procedures have been updated since. did you hear me, sarah? you may have missed that. my understanding is that mrs pickles complained to the regulator? she was upset that turkey had not apologised for the error. when we approach them they have now told first night they are truly
4:37 pm
sorry i deeply regret not apologising earlier, but gail has yet to receive that britain apology. she is particularly concerned after seeing the boots initial investigation report, because she told us at the end of the inquest it said herfather told us at the end of the inquest it said her father was unharmed and didn‘t need medical attention. said her father was unharmed and didn't need medical attention. the worst pa rt for didn't need medical attention. the worst part for me has been seeing the internal report, in which they claimed that dad was well and didn't need hospital treatment, and that there was no need to escalated to a higher level. how can they do that? how can this company be doing these things? i'm just appalled at them. in response to her comments about the investigation, boots see as soon as an issue is identified and it was made on limited information and that the chief pharmacist was already supporting that investigation. they say procedures have already been updated and patient safety is their
4:38 pm
number one priority. but gail is also concerned that having examined 15 medication packs dispensed by boots to her father, 15 medication packs dispensed by boots to herfather, she believes is standard operating procedures had not been followed on numerous occasions, so we ask the patient safety pharmacy expert to take a look... safety pharmacy expert to take a look. . . the safety pharmacy expert to take a look... the standard procedure in certain areas is never adhered to for these packs. iwant certain areas is never adhered to for these packs. i want to see whether it was more widespread. pharmacists are horrified... if you are getting errors and violations occurring, you do need to look at your standard operating procedures, your standard operating procedures, you need to look at staffing, at the workload pressed on people, to see whether they are contributing to that. turkey accepts there were some failings to comply with standard operating procedures in this case —— boots accepts that there were some fillings. but they say they‘d work with others in the industry to —— there were some failings. the general pharmaceutical council told us they are now investigating these
4:39 pm
concerns and they take all complaints raised with them extremely seriously, particularly those relating to patient back, and gail is also an wawrinka claim against boots and you can watch a whole story on inside out tonight and you can also read her story on bbc online —— gail is also considering a claim against boots. thank you, sarah. let‘s go to plymouth to speak tojemma. jemma, what is making the celebrity chef rick stein crabby? laughter that‘s right. laughter that's right. yesterday china spent double that amount on the uk crab than the year before. i met him in padstow and he told me about how the cold winter has led to a crab shortage with china wanting to pay
4:40 pm
over the odds for our local patch. catch. —— local cat. it such an enormous population. i mean, the sort of affluent, middle—class population of china and it is a greater number than the whole population of the united states, and they've all got money and they all want, you know, expensive tasty protein like this. well, it is the tradition of a nice crab sandwich by the sea, the english tradition, under threat? crab sandwich by the sea, the english tradition, under threat7m certainly fell off the menu at some places over the summer, that‘s for sure, but it might mean some people have to get used to paying a lot more. people in the trade have said it could become as expensive as lobster, and rick stein said in the future he thinks crab will be considered a luxury like caviar. 0f course not all bad news, great for the fishermen in our export trade outside of europe. this fishermen who supplies rick stein‘s restau ra nts who supplies rick stein‘s restaurants suddenly had a smile on his face... we've been told that the end—user in china is paying around £21 a kilo, which is an incredible price.
4:41 pm
if we get around £3 a kilo, we are happy. but it's notjust that. we even had some crab go from hong kong, padstow crab, from hong kong to san francisco. that‘s crazy. it have loved to have found it who went to san francisco, because i think we could send it a shorter way round the world and get an even better price. jemma woodman in plymouth and sarah stu rd ey jemma woodman in plymouth and sarah sturdey in nottingham, thank you both for helping us go nationwide today. great to talk to you. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them on the bbc iplayer and remember we go nationwide every afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. back to our top story here on bbc news — and a new united nations climate report being published at a meeting in south korea says there will have to be "unprecedented changes" to how
4:42 pm
people use energy — in order to restrict rising temperatures. the intergovernmental panel on climate change‘s co—chair debra roberts has been speaking about what she hopes individuals will take away from the report. the report points to changes in four big systems. it points out the need for changes in energy systems, in land systems, in urban systems and in industry. and what does that mean to the individual? well, it means we can make choices related to those systems that can really make a difference, because now every element of warming really makes a difference to the future of the world. around energy, we can all make choices about the energy we choose to consume, so we can make a move, through our choices of energy consumption, to renewable energy, to provide the market for renewable energy. in terms of land, a lot of the land we use produces food, so we can make choices, dietary choices, about what we choose to eat. we all live in cities, and
4:43 pm
in those cities we can choose how we choose to commute, we can choose low carbon lifestyles. around industry, we can make choices around consumption. favouring industries that choose a low carbon path, so while this is global report aimed at nation states, by choosing or identifying those four big systems of change, it gives us a clue how we as individuals can change the way we live our lives. debra roberts there. maryam is here — in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. we look forward to that. first, though, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: scientists issue their starkest warning yet about the dangers of climate change. save the children publishes an internal review following allegations of abuse in the charity — one in five staff say they have experienced harassment or discrimination in the last three years. britain‘s biggest carmaker, jaguar land rover,
4:44 pm
will close its solihull plant for two weeks this month after it reported a nearly 50% fall in sales to china. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: taxing times for big tech firms as social media giant facebook sees its uk tax bill soar as profits rise. meanwhile online payments firm paypal is paying more tax after an hmrc enquiry. a group of mps have criticised the apprenticeship scheme, saying the training is not good enough and that disadvantaged people are not being given the support they need. and as you have been hearing jaguar land rover is planning a two week shutdown of its solihull plant at the end of october. the country‘s biggest car—maker said employees at the west midlands plant would be paid for the duration of the shutdown and no jobs would actually be lost. talk to me about the pound. yes,
4:45 pm
particularly sensitive to what is happening in the news, traders concerned about brexit negotiations, and we have had a few indications in the last few days that perhaps theresa may is planning to rein back a bit in terms of brexit negotiation pace, which has weakened the pound across pace, which has weakened the pound a cross m ost pace, which has weakened the pound across most major currencies. and the sails, or the wind... with french connection? shares have soared aftter it seemed ot confirm -- it —— it has responded to rumours it could be up for sale. it has released a statement. the board confirms it is currently reviewing all strategic options in order to deliver maximum value for its shareholders, which includes the potential sale of the company.
4:46 pm
shares have risen 27%, last i checked. what about aston martin?“ you‘re a member last week, is listed on the london stock market for the first time. its ipo was pretty much a su ccess first time. its ipo was pretty much a success but its share price has dropped back today, so valuing the company at a lot less than it was hoping to be valued at. let‘s talk through all these stories with eimear daly. chief economist, global reach group aston. wires martin shares down? think dished traders peering there long —— via either aston martin shares down? i think there will be from
4:47 pm
conciliation, that theresa may is suggesting this temporary agreement which may be more acceptable to the eu. we haven't had any confirmation from the eu said that they will acce pt from the eu said that they will accept this or that there will be more reconciliation to the uk sol think of today is just traders trying to be a little more conservative, just because we are heading into a lot of event risk, and any kind of headline about brexit google knock the wind out of the sails for the pound. yes, very sensitive to what is happening. let‘s talk briefly about french connection, interesting with the rumours over the weekend and then the confirmation on monday, and their share price is really up, last i checked i think it was 25%, off the back this news. yes, really looking for a taker, for sale to happen in the company. this is again another story, and i think there has
4:48 pm
beena another story, and i think there has been a lot of disruption in the retail space, and one key thing, internet sales, they now account for about 18.2% of all retailing in the uk, soa about 18.2% of all retailing in the uk, so a massive disruptor into the retail space and brings in a lot of accommodation. notice in terms —— notjust in terms of accommodation. notice in terms —— not just in terms of style but price. retailers have to be more price. retailers have to be more price competitive. let's talk about aston martin. its first full day of trading, eimear, for the luxury car brand, and the issue is when it started trading on the stock exchange we were hoping, or it was hoping, for a valuation of around £5 billion in order to enter the ftse 100 with the reshuffle in december. it did not achieve that and has fallen back slightly today as well. what is going on? if you look aston martin, uk manufacturer, facing brexit, you know, isn't doing well in terms of the global trade... not
4:49 pm
a great time, you know, to be holding this stock anyway. i think the thing about being listed on the stock exchange is that your share price is kind of thrown around, a bit volatile, financial markets, so today all stocks were down, so something aston martin will have the stomach. any kind of whim in the financial markets could drag its price down, concerns over italy, are china, that does kind of permeate markets and create a negative environment. more a case of bad timing. eimear daly, thank you very much for turning us. a brief look at the markets... not very good in london. as eimear was seeing, worries over the italian commie having an impact. lovely to see you, maryam. thanks for that. the co—winner of this year‘s
4:50 pm
nobel peace prize, nadia murad, has been speaking about the award. it was given to the yazidi human rights activist alongside congolese gynaecologist, denis mukwege in light of their work campaigning against the use of rape as a weapon of war. ms murad was tortured and raped by islamic state militants and later became the face of a campaign to free the yazidi people. she‘s been speaking through a translator. translation: my survival comes with great purpose to defend the rights of persecuted communities in the middle east and in the world, and to advocate for the victims of sexual violence. but a single prize and a single
4:51 pm
person cannot accomplish these hopes. we need an international effort, with the help of institutions and participation of women and youth, and participation of the victims themselves, to bring back live to regions destroyed by war. i call on all governments to join me in fighting genocide and sexual violence. the world should bear its moral and legal responsibility and ensure proper and fair accountability. the sexual conflict and violence in our towns and cities must be stopped. that is the winner of the nobel
4:52 pm
peace prize. and that is it from all of us here on the afternoon live tea m of us here on the afternoon live team for today. thank you for watching. next the bbc news at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here‘s tomasz. some rain in the forecast for today but the good news if you want warm weather, it is heading your way, and by midweek temperatures could be the mid—20s, possibly, perhaps around 20 degrees across the north of the uk. this is what it looks like more or less right now. fine weather across
4:53 pm
many parts of england and wales but in the north—west, rainy and it will continue to rain through the course of the night. a very mild night tonight, temperatures into double figures. the rain will be heavy. tomorrow, in western scotland, heavy rain, rain for a time in northern ireland, but even in belfast it will brighten up tomorrow. as far as england and wales are concerned, a stunning day on the way, 20 in london, 17 expected in hull, and even in the high teens in belfast. looking at midweek to see how those temperatures will rise, 23 in london, 23 cardiff, and even 19 in belfast. today at five: a plea to save the planet before its too late — scientists issue their starkest warning yet on the risks of climate change. they warn that huge changes are needed to government policies and individual lifestyles — in order to avoid a catastrophic rise in global temperatures. countries need to up their ambition and get moving now with climate
4:54 pm
change action if we are going to keep1.5 change action if we are going to keep 1.5 degrees within reach. we‘ll be asking what needs to be done to meet the revised targets. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. britain‘s biggest carmaker jaguar land rover will close its solihull plant for two weeks this month — after a 50% fall in sales to china four sisters are feared among the dead after a limousine crash
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on