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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 9, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live, it's11am and these are the main stories right now: as mps return to parliament after the party conferences, a former brexit minister warns theresa may that ‘at least 40‘ conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on her current approach. representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties are meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. a leading cabinet brexit supporter says she supports the prime minister but repeatedly refuses to publicly back her chakras plan. chakras plan. the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. five alleged victimsof notorious british paedophile douglas slade are suing him for the abuse they say he inflicted on them in the philippines. and the former girlfriend of strictly come dancing contestant seann walsh,
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speaks out, after he admitted kissing his dance partner, katya jones. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. mps return to parliament today after conference season mps return to parliament today after conference season and attention is likely to focus on brexit. steve baker has warned that at least a0 conservative mps are prepared to vote against theresa may's deal. representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties are meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. the democratic unionist party and ulster unionists held separate meetings in brussels. mr barnier recently called for "less drama" over the so—called brexit backstop regarding the irish border. let's look at what still has to happen in the brexit negotiations on 18th october eu leaders meet for a summit where
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the withdrawal agreement was supposed to be finalised. however, this is not now seen as feasible and the focus is on a special one—off summit that has been arranged for mid—november. if an agreement is reached, it must then be approved by the uk parliament. this vote is due at the end of the year. if the deal passes this hurdle and is ratified by the other eu staes, the uk will leave the eu on 29th march 2019. with me is our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster. also, i'mjoined by adam flemming in brussels. hello, let's talk first of all about those meetings going on between the two major unionist parties in northern ireland, especially the dup. of course, this whole issue of
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the irish border is absolutely vital, that must be sorted out ahead of the summit is coming up. yes, what's been happening is the european commission and michel barnier, the chief negotiator and his team have been tweaking the text of the backstop, that is the insurance policy to prevent a hard border on the island of ireland. and it is important because it has got to go into the brexit withdrawal agreement which is signed by both sides, the before brexit happens. the commission has been tweaking the text to make it more palatable. it's also focusing on the technical aspects of the backstop. in other words, we're checks would happen, and what checks would be done, just how light touch they would be. it didn't feel like a new border being erected between great britain and northern ireland at all. they have spoken to various people, be it anti—brexit parties like the sdlp
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and sinn fein, the alliance party and sinn fein, the alliance party and the greens, and yesterday the dup and the uup. today they are in brussels and arlene foster has started a news conference. she is giving us an idea of what she thought about what michel barnier had to say. she's not been particularly positive about the concept of making the backstop looked less dramatic and palatable. she says the problem isn't the technicalities, if the problem is the very concept of a hard border. this idea but as an insurance policy northern ireland would remain part of the customs arrangements, the customs union, and still be part of elements of the eu single market. this idea that it would have a different relationship with the eu, and a different trading and economic relationship with the rest of the world of the consequence, compared to the rest of the united kingdom. their problem isn't the drama ties
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to technical checks, it's the concept of the backstop itself. that's the message she gave at the conference in the last few minutes. given that, adam, give us a sense of how, apart from the backstop issue in brussels, the other members of the eu are feeling now that time is very short indeed ahead of the summit in nine days. a few short weeks from the november date, the one—off summit pencilled in for next month. is there a real sense of urgency, that you are sensing from the other eu members? there is. i'll give you an example, i'm getting texts from people going oh, that briefing that was this afternoon has been postponed until monday because people aren't sure what's happening. then you get a text saying they will be an emergency meeting on friday night, in luxembourg. 0h, keep an eye on what happens in the european
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commission over the weekend. that is a real sense of activity building up. that's what you would expect, that's always what happens in the build—up to these big summits where there is a big brexit component. there is a sense of stuff happening, but there is no sense of the substance of what it means and what they are actually talking about. the two sides are being quite coy about what they're actually discussing. the way it was put to me by one person was that they are in a tunnel and there is light at the end of the tunnel, but until you get to the end it's dark and we don't know what's going on. a stray word here, a miss interpret document, could have a whole impact on the process. they will be a lot of it is to keyholes of doors. they will be lots of information in the next couple of days. thank you very much, adam fleming in brussels. we cross now to westminster to speak to an assistant political editor, norman smith. adam
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was talking about lots of people trying to decipher the substance of what these conversations mean, what the impact will be on brexit, any deal that might be hammered out. adam gets a sense of urgency in brussels, is very similar sense in westminster as mps return? it's slightly different year, people are much more public about where they stand. no one is pining this morning. this morning we had steve baker, the former brexit minister and mastermind behind the ardent brexit supporters, saying there are 80 of us who don't like chequers, and after the tory whips have got out the thumbscrews and offer people career prospects, they will still be about a0 determined to vote against theresa may. whatever the deal she comes back with. and then come at the same time this morning we are getting indications of tensions over the chequers deal. we've seen
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ministers likejeremy the chequers deal. we've seen ministers like jeremy hunt, the chequers deal. we've seen ministers likejeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, seeming to leave the door open to canada option. this morning we had penny mordaunt, the international development secretary, a brexit supporter, today she had a press co nfe re nce a brexit supporter, today she had a press conference which was about reworking the way we supply international trade. but she was pressed about chequers, repeatedly pressed about chequers, repeatedly pressed about chequers, and went out of her way to express support for the prime minister again, and again, and again, she did not. she didn't publicly back chequers. listen to her being questioned on whether the prime minister can count on your support. the prime minister can count on my support, but what i would say is we don't know where this is going to end up. we are at a critical moment. the issue, currently, is that the ball is firmly back in the eu court. we
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waiting for them to respond. although penny mordaunt didn't attract checkers i think many people will read across the fact that she couldn't bring herself to express support for it as an indication that she has deep concerns about the deal. let's talk to mark harper, the former tory chief whip, a man who knows about winning votes. in terms of getting chequers through parliament, can theresa may do it? my view is, i don't think she can. we have a majority barely into double figures, even without dup allies. significantly more conservative mps have made it clear they won't support chequers. i want they won't support chequers. i want the prime minster to be successful and geta the prime minster to be successful and get a deal that she can bring back to parliament, and get through parliament. because that's in the national interest. she can only do that if she can get conservative and dup mps to back it. i don't think the opposition parties are going to
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support the deal, whatever she brings back. but you know governments can crush rebellions, they can gradually we're away the number of people prepared to rebel. we heard theresa may saying that conference, locke, vote down this deal you might end up with no brexit at all. given that, might they not blink? the proposals, chequers as you have been talking about, it's not a deal, it's an offer to the european union. and all the signals are that the european union is going to expect the government to evolve its offer. my view is if we evolve its current proposals, more in the direction of canada's free—trade deal, the prime minister could unite the conservative party and dup allies. if, however, she moves more in the norway direction, closer to the european union, that would becoming creasing the difficult. the canada direction is the direction i wanted to evolve in. we have heard theresa
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may see increasingly in interviews that chequers is the only deal on the table. no sign that she is going to shift. do you think she might? she also knows that she has to get the deal through parliament. she also knows that the eu isn't going to accept chequers, the proposals as they are. the chequers boulevard going to evolve, the big question is in what direction and i want her to involve them ina direction and i want her to involve them in a way she can bring back to parliament and unite the conservative party. we need to get back deal through parliament. it's in the national interest. then we can focus the government's agenda on the important domestic policy areas. that's what the public want. we saw the prime minister that the party conference in the observer at the weekend, reaching out to labour mps, labour support, there is a view that remain supporters from labour faced with a choice between chequers and no deal, may come on board, is that it credible strategy? no and for
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this reason. labour mps now agreed a clear policy that supported by the overwhelming number of their members, and the trade unions. i think you'd have to be a very brave labourmp to go think you'd have to be a very brave labour mp to go against that. there may be a handful, but i don't think it will be more than matt. i don't think the numbers add up. to carry this deal, the prime minister needs to bring the conservative party together without dup allies. that's the only way to be certain. we need a comprehensive free—trade deal. thank you very much for your time. we are heading towards a titanic moment in parliament. we have the summit next week and what is thought to be the final summit in november. then calculations about a fortnight later, we are likely to get that crucial commons vote. the outcome of
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which may well decide whether theresa may can even continue as prime minister. it's going to be a massive moment. it certainly is. thank you norman in westminster. we we re thank you norman in westminster. we were mentioning that the leaders of the two main parties deliberately unionist parties in northern ireland have a crucial meeting in brussels today. arlene foster is the leader of the dup. her ten mps are crucial to backing theresa may in westminster. arlene foster has been speaking in the last few moments and says she doesn't want northern ireland in brexit to be treated differently from any other part of the uk. we've always said that there is only one red line, and that's when we are treated differently from the rest of the united kingdom in terms of customs, regulatory alignment. that is to protect not only the constitution of the uk, but the economy of northern ireland which is vital, from where i sit. coming up on bbc newsroom live
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at 11:30am chris morris will be here from our reality check team to explain a little bit more about why the irish border is so important in the brexit talks. stay with us for that. and we want to know what you think about this story. you can tweet us using the hashtag bbc newsroomlive or text us at 6112a. the second man suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack has been identified. the investigative website, bellingcat, says the man who called himself alexander petrov and claimed to be a tourist is in fact a military doctor, called alexander mishkin, employed by the russian intelligence service, the gru. andy moore reports. the men suspected of poisoning the skripals were caught on camera as they headed through salisbury. the investigative website bellingcat says it can now reveal the real identity of the man on the right. they say he's alexander mishkin, a military doctor who was working for russian military
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intelligence, the gru. they've published these three pictures of him and claimed to have spoken to many people who know him. they say until 201a he was giving gru headquarters as his home address in moscow. this is his passport in his real name. in his fake id he used the same first name and date of birth. this is dr mishkin on the right here, in an interview with russian state television, where the two men claimed they were just tourists. sergei skripal and his daughter yulia both spent months in hospital in comas before eventually recovering, but dawn sturgess died after being exposed to the nerve agent novichok. she had accidentally handled a fake perfume bottle that contained the poison. let's get the latest from russia. joining me now is our moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford. what is the latest response from
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moscow to all of this? ‘s so far a deafening silence. that's what we have been told we will get. the kremlin has been refusing to comment on rumours and speculation in the press. it has said that if there is serious evidence against russian citizens then it is the british government needs to present those to the russian authorities and they will consider them. basically they flat deny at the beginning, and attempt to explain things, from the kremlin at least we've moved to stonewalling. they are saying nothing. it won't speak to the median anymore. that's indicative of the uncomfortable feeling that insulin rationale. investigative teams dig, dig, and find out more about the man believed to be behind the attempted poisoning in
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salisbury. in fact, are on journalists here have managed to contact someone in the village where the man identified grew up. he has also identified, the two photographs of the eight and real man are the same. and he has given us a bit more detail about his childhood, talked about him as a boy, who used to be into music, like computer games. he used to run the village disco. so a little more background from a man who became a medic in the military, and then was recruited, according to this website, in 2010 by russian military intelligence. is the silence a sign of discomfort, could it bea silence a sign of discomfort, could it be a sign of arrogance and disregard for international opinion, as some people have suggested? russia does care about international opinion. i think it's an uncomfortable feeling and i don't think it will change anything. by
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exposing and embarrass debugger embarrassing the kremlin, particularly last week when they we re particularly last week when they were multiple western governments releasing alleged cyber attacks by the gru, the british government believes, i understand, the gru, the british government believes, iunderstand, believes that it can try to persuade russia to stop aggressive actions. now, i think sitting in this position here in moscow, it doesn't quite feel like it's necessarily going to be the reaction. it feels, essentially, this is a battle that russia has one. perhaps it is feeling a little wounded, licking its wounds behind closed doors. it will come back fighting. that's what people here are telling me. it is the mindset, behind high walls of the kremlin. thank you, sarah in moscow. the headlines on bbc news... as mps return to parliament after recess, a former brexit minister warns that "at least a0" conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on theresa may's current plans.
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representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties meet the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. and in sport... eden hazard says he is torn between signing a new deal at chelsea and fulfilling his childhood dream ofjoining real madrid. he admits he keeps changing his mind. hazard is one of the players nominated for the ballon d'or award. manchester united manager jose mourinho is under investigation by the fa, after allegedly making offensive remarks to a tv camera following saturday's win against newcastle. and kyle edmund looked unconvincing against filip krajinovic but he's through to the second round of the shanghai masters. i'll be back with more on those stories later. donald trump has hosted
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a ceremony at the white house after the swearing—in of brett kavanaugh as a justice of the us supreme court. he had been accused of sexual assault and the us president apologised to him, saying he'd endured "terrible pain and suffering. here's peter bowes. after weeks of political rancour, a ceremonial swearing in ceremony forjustice kavanagh. greeted by an extended standing ovation from his supporters, the new member of the us supreme court took the 0ath of office with his wife and daughters by his side. less than two weeks ago, he angrily denied a charge that sexually assaulted christine blasey ford when they were both teenagers. president trump said mr kavanaugh was owed an apology. on behalf of our nation, i want to apologise to brett and the entire kavanaugh family for the terrible pain and suffering
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you have been forced to endure. justice kava naugh thanked the president for what he called his steadfast, unwavering support throughout the process. i'm grateful to you and mrs trump for the exceptional, overwhelming courtesy you have extended to my family and me. mr president, thank you for everything. applause mr kavanaugh also adopted a tone of reconciliation. the senate confirmation process was contentious and emotional. that process is over. my focus now is to be the bestjustice i can be. this chapter in the extremely acrimonious appointment of a supreme courtjudge may be closing, but with the us mid—term elections just four weeks away, the politicalfallout could be critical to the future of donald trump's presidency. peter bowes, bbc news.
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let's look at some of the other stories making the news. thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes in the ukraine following a large explosion at an ammunition storage facility overnight. it happened in ukraine's northern chernihiv region and the cause is currently unknown. ukraine's prime minister, volodymyr groysman, has tweeted that he is on the way to the area. the international monetary fund has warned a trade war between the us and china risks making the world a "poorer and more dangerous place" in its latest assessment of the global economy. the imf has lowered its forecast for global growth this year and next. it said that a full—blown trade war between the us and china would put a significant dent in economic recovery. a limousine that crashed and killed 20 people had failed an inspection and should not have been on the road, according to the governor of new york. andrew cuomo told a news conference that the driver did not have an appropriate licence. two newlywed couples and four sisters were among those who died in saturday's collision.
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prison officers in england and wales are to be issued with canisters of a synthetic pepper spray to help deal with violence and disorder. the announcement came as the president of the prison governors association accused the government of failing to react in a "timely manner" to the "crisis" in jails. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. it's been used by police for years, and our present officers will be carrying one too. pava is the latest bit of equipment to help staff deal with violence behind bars. and this is how the pepper like spray works. stop what you are doing! we were given a demonstration at hull prison, one of fourjails where pava being trialled. the chemical causes ie irritation and coughing, giving staff time to get the prisoner under control. ministers say the spray acts as a deterrent
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and could even save lives. if a prisoner were in a horrible situation, to be stamping on another prisoner's head, for example, that might be a situation where, instead of reaching for backup, you may well want to say stop doing that, i have some pepper spray. prison officers in all adult male prisons will now be equipped with pava at a cost of £2 million. but some say the relationship between prisoners and staff is the key to good order, and that needs far greater investment. is 0k having pava, having body worn cameras, we have lots of things in place, but we need more people in our prisons to build those relationships to make our prisoners safe. pava will be widely available from next year, but it will be assessed before a decision is made before allowing staff to use it in women's prisons and youth custody centres. nicola sturgeon will say scotland needs to offer people "optimism and hope", as she makes her keynote speech
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to the snp conference in glasgow this afternoon. the first minister will hit out at what she'll call the "unfolding calamity" and "despair" at westminster, as brexit negotiations continue. she'll claim that an independent scotland would be "a beacon of progressive values". it is thought she will renew calls for independence. she is expected to say scotland needs to to contrast with the "unfolding calamity" of a westminster government. and a reminder you can watch full coverage of nicola sturgeon's speech, live from glasgow, here on bbc news this afternoon at 3:15pm. rebecca humphries, the former girlfriend of strictly come dancing contestant seann walsh, has said she is "not a victim", after he admitted kissing his dance partner. comedian walsh and katya jones, who is married to fellow strictly professional neiljones, apologised after they were pictured kissing on a night out. actor rebecca humphries tweeted that "she's not a victim and is now free". 0ur correspondent jenny kumah is here. bring us up to date with what the
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key figures in all of this are saying. this weekend the comedian, seann, performed a parcel don't play with his partner, seannjones, who is married to a fellow dancer. it was dramatic, even craig the judge, described it as heart. pictures emerged at the weekend of the couple, the pair, kissing. soon after both apologised on twitter, seann described it as a drunken mistake. now we have rachel humphreys, who has taken to twitter and explain the photo. she said... it was my birthday. seann said he was going for an innocent drink. she says she phoned him up and asked whether something was going on, she
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says he aggressively and repeatedly called her cycle, nuts, mental, as he has done countless times when she questioned his inappropriate hurtful behaviour. she also says that the incident had served to remind her that she is a strong, capable person, free and not a victim. she has moved out of the couple's home, and she said that she isn't sorry she's taken the cat. so far we haven't had a response from seann walsh to rebecca's a statement. has there been any response from the bbc specifically to all of this. there are specifically to all of this. there a re lots of specifically to all of this. there are lots of questions around whether seann will continue in the programme, so far there's been no response from bbc. 0ver programme, so far there's been no response from bbc. over the years there have been a number of victims of the so—called strictly cursed. a number of rumoured relationships between dancers and celebrities. i guess none of them have played out quite like this. thank you very
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much. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. hello, simon. you may have heard it's going to get warmer for many of us over it's going to get warmer for many of us over the next day or so. that's the case for tomorrow. at the moment, through the midlands, and parts of wales, there's lots of sunshine. this is the scene in devon at the moment. lots of blue skies. further north, this blue is rain. it's affecting northern anne western areas of scotland. temperatures though, still in the 16 to 18 degrees. for england and wales, a pleasa nt degrees. for england and wales, a pleasant afternoon with the sunshine and highs of 17 to 21. so tonight, eventually, this will bring further northward. we have that wind pushing the weather front further north and
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westward. 0vernight temperatures down to seven or 11 degrees. we have that wind tomorrow which will make it even warmer. lots of sunshine across the uk. temperatures up to 20 celsius, 20 to 2a degrees in england and wales. bye—bye. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... a former brexit minister and leading eurosceptic says he is one of at least a0 conservative mps willing to vote against the prime minister's chequers deal. meanwhile, northern ireland's two main unioninst parties are meeting
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with the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. the investigative website bellingcat has revealed the real name of the second suspect in the salisbury novichock case. they say alexander petrov is actually alexander mishkin, a doctor who works for russian intelligence. five alleged victims of notorious british paedophile douglas slade are suing him for damages following the abuse they say he inflicted on them in the philippines. and the former girlfriend of strictly come dancing contestant seann walsh attacks him on twitter after pictures emerge of him kissing his dance partner, katya jones. she has said she is not a victim. sport now. here is holly hamilton. good morning. eden hazard says he is torn between signing a new deal at chelsea and fulfilling his childhood dream of
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joining real madrid. he has less than two years on his contract and he admitted that he did not want to say that he was signing a new contract and then don't end up signing. he said that chelsea have given him everything and sometimes he wakes up thinking he wants to go and sometimes that he wants to stay. the fa are investigating, dismayed byjose mourinho after saturday's victory over newcastle. they were made in portuguese and have been interpreted as being offensive. the fa will get an official translation before deciding what course of action to take. england's women play australia tonight at craven cottage and australia are ranked sixth in the world against england's bird so they will offer another good test as they will offer another good test as they continue their preparation for they continue their preparation for the world cup next year —— third. they continue their preparation for the world cup next year —— thirdm is going to be a really physical game. australia at think are similar
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to the usa in terms of their physicality, they have real running power and strength in their team. regardless of who they have brought or not, they have players who can play in any league in the world and on any stage. 0ur players are going to have to show all their quality. in tennis, british number one kyle edmund it through to be second round of the shanghai masters. yet risen toa of the shanghai masters. yet risen to a career high in the world and went into the match against billy beck krajinovic as david but was given a serb that mega— stern test. he recovered to win in straight cents and earned himself a meeting with andreas seppi. wigan centre 0liver gildart has been called into the england rugby league squad for the england rugby league squad for the autumn internationals against france and new zealand. he replaces the injured sam burgess and will divert to the squad to travel to
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papua new guinea next week. he was the young player of the year in 27p and is played an important role in wigan's progress to saturday's grand final -- wigan's progress to saturday's grand final —— 2017. and after winning the by final —— 2017. and after winning the rugby league man of steel award, ben barba thanked st helens for helping him enjoy played the game again. he joined saints last year after a speu joined saints last year after a spell with rugby union side toulon and is now heading back to his native australia to play for north queensland cowboys. he was instrumental in st helens winning the league leaders shield this season. in the first ever woman of steel award went to georgia rhodes of castleford. at 17 she is just one of castleford. at 17 she is just one of the youngest players in the professional game is in the england squad to face later this month. that is all the support for now. more in the next hour. thank you. dup leader arlene foster has been speaking in brussels in the past hour, following talks with the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. she again insisted she won't accept
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any customs barriers within the uk when pushed on wedded —— whether her party would block a practical, she said the dup did not expect to be alone in the objections. you are assuming that if something came forward that we will be standing alone on this issue but i don't think that would be the case at all. certainly not from the conversations we have been having in relation to the regulatory and customs union of the uk. you should not actually say which is worse or better, a border in the irish sea or on the island at ireland. that is the choice you face. it is not the choice, actually both the choice is to proactively look at the solutions that have been put forward, to deal with the ball border post up of course there is a border, we have two currencies and the 80 regimes
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but there are ways to deal with that ina but there are ways to deal with that in a proactive way and that is what we have been saying. there needs to be the political will to deal with it, that's right, but it should not be presented as either a border in the irish saints or a hard border on the irish saints or a hard border on the island at ireland —— of the irish sea. i know that is the way that some people would like to present the choices for their own reasons but those are not the choices ahead of us. to find out more about the irish border issue, let's speak to our reality check correspondent chris morris to find out why it's proving so difficult. thank you. yes, we know that there's only just over a week to go until the next eu summit, so it really is coming close to crunch time. and once again, it's all about making progress on the complex issue of the irish border. but why is ireland such a big issue in these negotiations? well, the map tells the story. after brexit, the land border between northern ireland and the republic will also become the only land border on between the uk and the eu, which will be two separate economic areas. both sides have agreed
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that there should be no new infrastructure or checks on the border, basically keeping things as open as they are now. and they've agreed that there should be a backstop plan, or guarantee, to avoid a hard border "in all circumstances. " now they hope that they can solve all these border issues as part of a long—term agreement on a future trade relationship. but the backstop would automatically kick in if there was a delay or an outright failure to secure such as agreement. so what does that mean in practice? back in february, the eu put out a draft legal text for the backstop that would, in effect, keep northern ireland in the eu customs union, with no customs checks or payments, and in the single market for all trade in goods and agriculture, following all eu rules. but that would mean you'd need checks between northern ireland and great britain instead. no way, said the government, that would break up the uk. but eight months later we're still waiting for detailed alternative proposals which may emerge this week.
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they're likely to include a plan for the whole of the uk to stay in a customs union with the eu for some time after brexit, and a compromise which would see some checking of goods, in particular of food and animals, moving between great britain and northern ireland. which brings us to this — no border in the irish sea. the democratic unionist party, on whose support the prime minister depends in parliament, is not alone in insisting that any suggestion of a border would be unacceptable. but the eu and, it seems, the government will argue that it won't be a border, just a series of checks that few people will notice. in the longer term ,though, if northern ireland was tied more closely to all the rules of the eu customs union and single market, and great britain wasn't, then most trade deals the government was able to negotiate in the future,
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with other countries around the world, wouldn't apply to northern ireland. that's a big problem, which could be very difficult to fudge. but if there's no backstop agreed, then there would be no overall withdrawal agreement, and then the uk would leave the eu with no deal at all. thank you very much. a complex subject. let's return now to the latest developments following the nerve agent attack in salisbury back in march. the investigative website bellingcat, which has named the second suspect as military doctor alexander mishkin, says they will release more details about him shortly. sir tony brenton is a former uk ambassador to russia and joins me now from our cambridge studio. good to have you with us as ever. how impressed are you hide the information that bellingcat has managed to gather? bellingcat are obviously an impressive organisation in in the new world where data is available they have uncovered his second identity and that has further confirmed all the evidence for the
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uk view and the widespread international view that it was indeed the russians and the gru in particular who were responsible for the attack on mr skripal. for every operation that has come to light including salisbury and the operation in the hague which we heard about last week in incredible detail, how many other gru operations have gone undetected in your opinion? i think a lot but it is worth emphasising one point. the narrative that has gone with the failure of the skripal operation, undoubtedly a failure, and the uncovering in the hague, is that the gru area uncovering in the hague, is that the gru are a bunch of clowns which should not take seriously but that is simply wrong. the gru are extremely effective and in russian eyes they organised the operation which reclaimed crimea for russia, the hacking that helped donald trump win the us election. they are a serious and effective organisation. given the exposure of the two men discovered the work carried out the salisbury operation, are you surprised that the televised
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interview with russian state tv was allowed to happen? what was the motivation for that? i think it was basically directed at russian public opinion to underline the russian government's claimed that there is some sort of western plot, they are claiming a western intelligence plot against russia. i don't think they ever seriously believed in persuading us but they want the people behind them and they largely do. it is worth adding that what is going on in russia is that they are very angry with the west, angered by the sanctions. they see themselves as almost in a state, i hesitate to use this phrase of almost cold war with us, and they seem to have unleashed their intelligence agencies like the gru to do as much damage as they can also get you have used that phrase, albeit with the caveat that heathers —— of hesitation. what do you think the gru will do at this point given the exposure of these operations? will
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it have a long hard look at itself and to figure out different ways to operate? i am sure they will. intelligence operations like professional sport, you win some and you lose some possibly try to learn as much from your failures. you lose some possibly try to learn as much from yourfailures. skripal as much from yourfailures. skripal as been a big failure and there have been a lot of failures of tradecraft, the fact that the people in the hague were carrying computers with lots of information about the gru wasa with lots of information about the gru was a disaster in their eyes i would guess and they will need to tighten up. but we should be under no illusion that they will back away from a continuing set of operations to further, as they see it, russian interests in the west. and how long do you envisage that situation continuing? let mejust do you envisage that situation continuing? let me just say, this is more than a pity, this is a disaster that we seem to have got to a situation where, in cyberspace come in intelligence areas, in a lot of politics, we are now in direct
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confrontation with russia. and the russians are expecting this to go on for yea rs russians are expecting this to go on for years from here on in. it will be very expensive, very dangerous, andi be very expensive, very dangerous, and i still think we should be trying to find a way back from it. what the skripal operation and the hague operation demonstrate is that the russians will not help us in this. they are all out to prove to us this. they are all out to prove to us in every way that they are top and not to be trifled with. and a final question, do you think that britain and other allies are taking the necessary steps to counteract the necessary steps to counteract the sort of operations you are talking about from russia, and when you talk about finding a way back from it, what exactly are you thinking of? ministers have said that we are strengthening our capacities and building up our defences against espionage and propaganda, developing cyber capacities, both offensive and defensive. 0n the way back, we need to re—establish lines of
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communication, some areas of cooperative action with russia. there are things we should be talking to them about such as islamic extremism, the management of cyberspace, the management of nuclear weapons, which we are not at the moment. if we could start dialogues on those sorts of subjects, you might be able to generate some kind of trusts which would allow cooperation to expand thereafter. very interesting to talk to you, thank you. a convicted british paedophile is being sued for damages by five filipino boys, who claim they were sexually exploited by him overseas. they'll give evidence via video link about alleged abuse by douglas slade while he was living in the philippines. mr slade says the claims against him are a "total fabrication". our news correspondent, angus crawford has more. a dangerous and manipulative paedophile, douglas slade, now behind bars in the uk. but for 30 years he lived here in the philippines. it is claimed he would entice children into his
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home and abuse them. whenever i remember the things he did to me, the way he abused us, it comes back to my mind. everything he did. a member of the notorious paedophile information exchange, two years ago he was extradited, tried and convicted of sex offences against children in the uk in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. but today he faces a new legal battle. five young people in the philippines are suing him over the abuse they say they suffered. it is thought to be the first case of its kind to reach the high court. i think the message needs to be sent out to those in the west in particular who think that they can go to far away places, such as the philippines, to sexually abuse children and young people, that you are not beyond reach. slade may spend the rest of his life in prison here, but children on the other side of the world are still seeking justice. angus crawford, bbc news. in a moment we'll have
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all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. as mps return to parliament after recess, a former brexit minister warns that ‘at least a0' conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on theresa may's current plans. representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties meet the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. i'm ben thompson with the business news. the bank of england has called on the eu to do more to protect financial services in the event of a hard brexit. the bank's financial policy committee said that the need for action "is now pressing". it's warned that insurance, derivatives and the transfer
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of data are all at risk. a committee of mps say water companies should be able to force customers on to water meters to reduce usage. the environment, food and rural affairs committee also says targets for companies to reduce water leaks don't go far enough. three billion litres of water are lost from the network every day. more on this shortly. aviva boss mark wilson is to stand down after more than five years at the helm. mr wilson will leave the role immediately, but remain with the group until april 2019 while a successor is appointed. his move follows a decision tojoin the board of rival asset manager blackrock, which angered some shareholders. would you use less water if you could see exactly how much you are using and how much it's costing? well, mps want water companies to be able to force customers to have a meter installed, to cut how much we use. but they're also demanding tougher targets for companies to cut water leaks, after figures showed three billion litres are lost
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from the water network each day. the chair of the environment, food and rural affairs committee is neil parish. he joins us now from westminster. good morning. let's start with those lea ks and targets good morning. let's start with those leaks and targets because we have talked about this a lot, that we have to put more pressure on firms to cut them and they are still not doing it. why not? we want ofwat to be much trouble with the water companies. nearly 20% of water, 3 billion litres, enough to fill over 1200 olympic style swimming pools, you can see a massive amount of full speed is a two pronged approach. companies have to reduce their water lea ks by 50% companies have to reduce their water leaks by 50% by 20a0 and also for consumers to be metered so many companies that have brought in metering like southern water tenths
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have found a 15% reduction in the amount of water is consumers use. we wa nt we want those with challenging incomes and also perhaps medical reasons for using more water to get help through water sure. you will see why help through water sure. you will see why consumers are help through water sure. you will see why consumers are reluctant to have a meter installed. it might make them use a few less litres, but we are also hearing that 3 billion litres are lost every day. it will not make any difference if we have a meter? of course it will because they balance each other out. about 1596 they balance each other out. about 15% of water that is leaked through the pipes, i think we can get a reduction of about 50% of usage by customers by bringing in metres. that brings in about a third less water being used. at the moment we are wasting the resource, taking more water out of the rivers and water courses and reservoirs than we need, especially in times when we have had a drought situation this
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year. we are getting weather patterns that are bringing in tighter conditions on water supply. we wa nt tighter conditions on water supply. we want to keep our rivered in good environmental condition but also we wa nt environmental condition but also we want enough water for our population. it is right that we should pay for the water we use but not what we don't use. and a lot of what we don't use is that wasted stuff and you might say we are still paying for that through our bills. you talk about 0fwat having more power, what would those powers look like? it seems we talk about it a lot, being tougher on water firms but they don't seem to play ball at 0fwat does not have the power to be able to fine them to a huge extent. michael gove raised it earlier this year, that water company ‘s are perhaps paying their executives too much and their shareholders too much and not investing enough in their business. from the secretary of state through to 0fwat there is no pressure on water companies to conform more. you also have the labour party talking about possible
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nationalisation in the future. i think water companies can work in private hands but they had to step up private hands but they had to step up to the plate and do better than they are at the moment. they do need to get water under control in their leakage in their pipes. they had better technology now, they can find the leaks that are deep in the ground. we can do much better and thatis ground. we can do much better and that is why the report emphasises on the water companies doing their part and also on consumers playing a role as well so that we don't need to use as well so that we don't need to use as much resource. and as our population grows and we build more houses, we have enough water in all parts of the country. as you know, the east in particular is challenged with water very often but even in the north—west of england this year we had almost a hosepipe ban. something we will keep a close eye on some action on both sides would make a difference. good to talk to you. in other business news, the british film institute says
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the uk film and tv industry generated a record £7.9 billion in 2016, helped by government tax relief. it said hm revenue and customs got more than that money back, gaining £2 billion in tax. films with a strong uk story, place and culture, such as harry potter, paddington and kingsman, have featured prominently in uk tourism campaigns. shoppers reined in their spending last month according to the latest survey from the british retail consortium and kpmg. the survey found stores suffered a "summer hangover" in september, with total sales growing byjust 0.7% from a year earlier. that was the slowest growth since october last year. greggs sales didn't suffer from a summer hangover, though. sales at the bakery chain grew over the summer, despite fears that the stores would see a drop off in demand during the heatwave. total sales rose 7.3% for the 13 weeks to the end of september,
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while like—for—like sales were up 3.2%. and the tech giant microsoft says it will invest in singapore—based ride—hailing company grab, as part of a new strategic partnership. the two firms will also collaborate on technology including artificial intelligence. microsoft and grab have not disclosed how much the deal is worth. a quick look at the board. it seems to be that greggs can do no wrong. aviva shares up a little bit. keep out for oil prices creeping up. $8a a barrel. that affect the price we
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pay for all sorts of things, goods at the shops have to be delivered with fuel and that means they do as well as the price of petrol. that's all the business news. you can tell it is getting too close to lunchtime when people talk about food! the winner of the royal institute of british architects' most prestigious award, the riba stirling prize, will be announced tomorrow night. the nominations to become britain's best new building include a student housing development, a cemetery, and a nursery school. we've been looking at each building in the shortlist over the past few days, and today it's the turn of storey‘s field centre and eddington nursery in cambridge by muma, which was commissioned by the university, for the new community of north—west cambridge. inspired by the college cloisters and courts of the city, this project has a sustainability agenda at its core. with this building, the client
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wished to create a new focus at the heart of the new community in eddington, cambridge. the building comprises a community centre and a nursery, and those two parts of the building are rather different. the community centre is outward engaging, something of the community. the nursery is for children's education, a secure place for play for kids. with a building of two parts, we've worked carefully to balance the nature of the architecture. with the nursery, we've created moon gates, portal windows, the sunburst grill. all of these are highly crafted elements made from brick, made from metal, made from timber. as we move through the building, then, into the main hall of the community centre, there is more of
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a sense of gravitas. we see this as a room that might suit a wedding or a memorial service, so we're balancing the different uses through the articulation of the architecture. the spaces that we see around us are, for the most part, very elegant and refined. and what i really enjoy are the occasional moments when that's interrupted and there is a delight. when you walk into a nursery classroom and you see a triangle, a square and a circle on the wall or a constellation of windows or a very, very elegant staircase in the main hall that actually creates wonder and excitement while you're in the spaces. it's amazing. we feel really lucky being able to live in this place and have such an amazing community centre. we feel like it's our own place. we're really happy about that, aren't we? yes, we are! you can find out more about all of the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and watch this year's riba stirling prize live here on the bbc
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news channel tomorrow evening between 8:30 and 9pm. time now for the weather. you may have heard already we will get some quite warm weather tomorrow that it will turn unsettled again by the end of the week. all the details coming up. a lot of sunshine at the moment, this was in hampshire, a lot of blue skies for many parts of southern england and wales. further north in scotland, very different. awful weather in parts of scotland. this is where the rain has been so far, quite relentless in western scotla nd far, quite relentless in western scotland which has led to a few problems this morning. it will continue for the rest of the afternoon mainly across western
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scotla nd afternoon mainly across western scotland but still some patches in eastern areas as well also the rain in northern ireland will gradually move further north and west would but for england and wales, increasing amounts of sunshine and it will feel quite pleasant, maximum temperatures up to 21 degrees. tonight, a southerly wind starting to develop which will gradually edge the rain out of western scotland, may be affecting the far north—west still tomorrow morning with temperatures down to 8—11d, some patchy mist and fog possible in the south. that wind will push the weather fronts away and it comes all the way from northern africa. that airwillgive us the way from northern africa. that air will give us temperatures way above the average, maybe 5—9d above average. any mist and fog will clear and we have a lot of sunshine across the uk on wednesday will stop and it will be really quite warm also
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central and south—eastern area is perhaps the highest temperatures, 23 or 2a degrees but even as far north as scotland, 19 or 20 degrees here. 0n as scotland, 19 or 20 degrees here. on thursday, sharon was moving northwards and it will become largely drier in eastern and central areas “— largely drier in eastern and central areas —— showers moving. but the west, rain spreading in and that means it will be fresher as the rain clears with temperatures dropping down a touch. 0n clears with temperatures dropping down a touch. on friday, we have this deep area of low pressure spinning up in the atlantic and it will move closer to the uk. the ice close together, quite windy on friday. the strongest winds will be in scotland and parts of northern ireland and stormy in the north—west. quite widespread gales on friday with heavy rain and certainly worth staying tuned to the forecast. you're watching bbc
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newsroom live, it's midday and these are the main stories right now: as mps return to parliament after recess, a former brexit minister warns that ‘at least a0' conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on theresa may's current plans. meanwhile, penny mordaunt says she would debugger support the prime minister but refuses to back the chequers deal. the dup leader, arlene foster, insists she won't accept any customs barriers within the uk, following talks in brussels
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with the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. it shouldn't be presented as a boarder in the irish sea, or a hard border on the island to island of ireland. those are not the choices. those are not the choices ahead of us. the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. a convicted british paedophile is being sued for damages by five filipino boys, who say they were sexually exploited by him overseas. and the former girlfriend of strictly come dancing contestant seann walsh speaks out, after he admitted kissing his dance partner, katya jones. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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mps return to parliament today after the conference season and attention is likely to focus on brexit again with. the former brexit minister, steve baker, has warned at least a0 conservative mps are prepared to vote against theresa may's deal. meanwhile representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties have been meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. the dup leader, arlene foster, has again insisted she won't accept any customs barriers within the uk. they have been discussing the controversial backstop plan, relating to the border between ireland and northern ireland. we can cross to westminster and speak to our assistant political editor norman smith. so, steve baker, mark harper, others this morning, seeming to hint, to varying degrees, their concern about theresa may's current plan to deal
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with brexit. how worried should the prime minister be? deeply worried. all the signs are that she faces a titanic tussle, if she is to get her chequers deal through. steve baker, the former brexit minister, the mastermind behind the ardent brexit supporter saying there are 80 of us who don't like the chequers deal. evenif who don't like the chequers deal. even if the whips get to work, and drive down the numbers with the metaphorical thumbscrews, there will be a0 of us who will not budge. that's enough to defeat theresa may. and then there are signs within the cabinet, tensions over the chequers deal. we heard from penny mordaunt this morning, the international development secretary, who said zilch about the thing maxim sidwell struck. today she was doing a press conference would gearing international aid money, and
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inevitably, in the key one—day session afterwards she was pressed about chequers deal, and she refused to publicly come out and say, yes, i support chequers deal, it's a good deal. in fact, she didn't mention it by name. well, the prime minister can count on my support, but what i would say is that we don't know where this is going to end up. we are ata where this is going to end up. we are at a critical moment, the issue currently is that the ball is firmly backin currently is that the ball is firmly back in the eu court. we are waiting for them to respond. that suggests, to me, that miss mordaunt has deep concerns about the chequers deal. you get a sense of the tensions, and the unease felt by the tensions, and the unease felt by the likes of her, within cabinet. and at the same time we heard today from mark harper, he was the former
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tory chief whip, the man responsible for getting tory mps to vote for particular measures. a man who knows the numbers when it comes to winning votes. he said very clearly that theresa may is going to have to change course, and evolve her chequers deal into something more like canada if she is to get through parliament. i asked like canada if she is to get through parliament. iasked him if like canada if she is to get through parliament. i asked him if he thought theresa may could get the deal through parliament. thought theresa may could get the dealthrough parliament. my view is, i don't think she can. if you look at the majority, bailey in double figures, even without dup allies, we have significa ntly figures, even without dup allies, we have significantly more conservative mps who have made it clear they don't support the chequers deal. i wa nt don't support the chequers deal. i want the to be successful and get a deal she can bring back to parliament, and get through parliament. that's in the national interest. she can only do that if she can get conservative and dup mps to back her. i don't think the opposition parties are going to
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support the deal, whatever she brings back. so, is it good night, game overfor brings back. so, is it good night, game over for theresa may? brings back. so, is it good night, game overfor theresa may? perhaps not. the strategy seems to be to try and put the there of god into the potential rebels by saying, to those ardent brexit borders, vote down my deal and you might end up with no brexit at all. that might provide space for people to call for a second referendum, or even a general election and decor than government. if you vote down my deal you could put brexit at risk. at the same time, to say to remain as, labour remain as, if you vote down my deal you could end up with what you really there, which is no deal. cometh the hour, the tory whips will try and put the squeeze on potential rebels by saying, look, it is theresa may's deal, or potentially a much worse outcome. they will hope that mightjust much worse outcome. they will hope that might just be much worse outcome. they will hope that mightjust be enough to scrape through. 0k, thank you, norman.
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that was norman smith in westminster. meanwhile, in brussels, the dup leader has been talking this morning, following talks with the chief brexit negotiator for the eu. we can listen to what she had to say about the issue of the irish border. first of all, you are assuming that if something came forward, we would be standing alone on this issue. i don't think that's the case at all. certainly not from a conversation that we have been having in relation to regulatory and customs unions with the united kingdom. you know, you should not, actually, say which is worse, or which is better. border on the eye irish sea... that's not the choice. the choice is to actually, proactively look for solutions put forward. to deal with the border on the island of ireland. of course there is a boarder, two
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separate jurisdictions with two currencies, two regimes, but we need to deal with that in a proactive way. we've been saying that now for a considerable time. we need the political will, but it shouldn't be presented as a boarder in the irish sea, ora hard border on the presented as a boarder in the irish sea, or a hard border on the island of ireland. those are not the choices. i know that's the way some people would like to present the choices for particular reasons, but those are not the choices ahead of us. breaking news just those are not the choices ahead of us. breaking newsjust coming in, we are hearing that health care environment services, the company that had been charged with disposing of hundreds of tonnes of nhs waste including body parts, has been stripped of its nhs contracts. this follows, you may be aware of the story, the discovery that it had fallen behind on its targets to dispose, ina fallen behind on its targets to dispose, in a timely fashion, of
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this medical waste, including human body parts. we were told last week, they were allowed to pile up at its facilities. this was announced by the health minister, stephen berkley. mr barclay said nhs improvement concluded that hds, the private company, health care and environment services, failed to demonstrate they were operating within their contractual limits. they have been stripped of those contracts. mr barclay said, consequently, 15 nhs trusts in england and scotland have served termination notices to them to terminate contracts as of apm on sunday. new arrangements have been made with a facility's management company to replace the service. nhs services will continue to operate as normal. that news hasjust services will continue to operate as normal. that news has just coming to us. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, is expected to bring up brexit
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when she makes her keynote speech to the snp conference in glasgow this afternoon. ms sturgeon will hit out at what she'll call the "unfolding calamity" and "despair" at westminster, as brexit negotiations continue. and she'll say that scotland, in contrast, needs to offer people "optimism and hope". let's talk to our correspondent in glasgow nick eardley, he's there in glasgow for the conference. within the context of brexit, how much room does this give nicola sturgeon to discuss the possibility of another independence referendum in scotland ? i think that issue will come up. they will be reference to independence, in nicola sturgeon's speech this afternoon. i don't think we'll get much further forward in terms of when that might be. the first minister has been pretty clear in the last few days that she's not ready to ask the question again, as
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things stand. i don't think that will change this afternoon. but they will change this afternoon. but they will be an outspoken attack on the way the uk government is approaching brexit. she will say that theresa may is overseeing a calamitous process , may is overseeing a calamitous process, that she is stumbling from disaster to disaster. it's not much ofa disaster to disaster. it's not much of a surprise that the snp are critical of the way that the uk government is going about the brexit process. they were particularly against leaving the eu in the first place. what's nicola sturgeon is going to try and do is contrast that with what she says is a level of optimism and hope, with her government, in edinburgh. so i expect we'll see policy announcements this afternoon as well. it will be a hint towards doing something other than focusing on brexit and independence. we understand that nicola sturgeon is going to be talking about something called fair work first, perhaps you can tell us more about that?
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yes, the scottish government has a lwa ys yes, the scottish government has always been keen to flag up its credentials when it comes to things like the living wage. there was an earlier adoption of that policy. this afternoon nicola sturgeon will talk about expanding that policy, within public bodies, to a fair work scheme to make sure that things like cereal i was contact which might in fa ct cereal i was contact which might in fact some stuff, they will be more details on that. —— zero i was contracts. they may touch on education, health, and the big devolved areas that the scottish government has control over. it wa nts to government has control over. it wants to be seen to be doing things, offering ideas i'm trying to contrast that with what nicola sturgeon argues is a stalemate at westminster, with the government's time taken up by brexit. thank you very much. nick nairn in glasgow. and a reminder you can watch full coverage of nicola sturgeon's speech, live from glasgow, here on bbc news this afternoon at 3.15.
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the international monetary fund has warned a trade war between the us and china risks making the world a "poorer and more dangerous place" in its latest assessment of the global economy. the imf has lowered its forecast for global growth this year and next. it said that a full—blown trade war between the us and china would put a significant dent in economic recovery. a committee of mps says water companies should be able to force just a reminder of our breaking news, a company which we learned last week had fallen behind on its contract last week had fallen behind on its co ntra ct to last week had fallen behind on its contract to deal with tens of nhs waste, including human body parts, has been stripped of those contracts. the health minister stephen berkley has announced. we heard that the company health care environment services had fallen behind dealing with incinerating
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waste in a timely fashion, and a number of sites in england and scotland. speaking to parliament mr barclay said nhs improvement had concluded that they failed to demonstrate they were operating within their contractual limits, new arrangements have been made with another company to replace the service will stop more today's restorers coming up, butfor stop more today's restorers coming up, but for now, goodbye to our viewers on bbc two. it is almost 1215. the recap of our headlines. the headlines on bbc news... as mps return to parliament after recess, a former brexit minister warns that ‘at least a0' conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on theresa may's current plans. the dup leader, arlene foster, insists she won't accept any customs barriers within the uk —— following talks in brussels with the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier.
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the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. let's get the sport now. hi, sarah. wayne rooney has defended jose—maria former manchester united captain wayne rooney has come to the defence of managerjose mourinho, saying he's an easy target and the players need to do better. united have made their worst start to a league campaign for 29 years and mourinho is under increasing pressure. but rooney's view isn't shared by everyone. speaking on radio 5 live last night, the former blackburn and celtic striker chris sutton said the manager had to take they lost to brighton, lost to spurs, beat burnley, did 0k against watford. and then the wolves were
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better than united. derby were better than united. derby were better than united. they've hardly been tested all season and were lucky to get away with newcastle. as a whole, he isn't the right man to ta ke a whole, he isn't the right man to take united forward. 15 minutes shouldn't paper over the cracks. it has been appalling. blame. england's women continue their preparations for next year's world cup tonight, with a friendly against australia at craven cottage. australia are ranked sixth in the world, against england's third, so they'll offer another good test for the lionesses. it's going to be a real physical game, where australia, i think are similarto game, where australia, i think are similar to the usa in terms of physicality. they've got a real running power. regardless of who they brought, or not, they've got players who could play on any stage, and players are going to have to show the quality.
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a meeting with andreas seppi. wigan centre 0liver gildart has been called into the england rugby league squad for this autumn's internationals against france and new zealand. he replaces the injured sam burgess and will divert from the knights squad who travel to papua new guinea next week. gildart was super league's young player of the year in 2017 and he's played an important role in the wigan's progress to saturday's grand final. after winning rugby league's man of steel award last night, ben barba thanked his club st helens for helping him to enjoy playing the game again. barba joined saints last year after a spell with rugby union side toulon and he's now heading back to his native australia to play for north queensland cowboys. he was instrumental in st helens winning the league leaders' shield this season. and the first ever woman of steel award went to georgia roche of castleford. atjust 17, she's one of the youngest players in the professional game and she's in the england squad to face france later this month. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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the second man suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack has been identified. the investigative website, bellingcat, says the man who called himself alexander petrov and claimed to be a tourist is in fact a military doctor called alexander mishkin, employed by the russian intelligence service,the gru. andy moore reports. the men suspected of poisoning the skripals were caught on camera as they headed through salisbury. the investigative website bellingcat says it can now reveal the real identity of the man on the right. they say he's alexander mishkin, a military doctor who was working for russian military intelligence, the gru. they've published these three pictures of him and claimed to have spoken to many people who know him. they say until 201a he was giving gru headquarters as his home address in moscow. this is his passport in his real name.
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in his fake id he used the same first name and date of birth. this is dr mishkin on the right here, in an interview with russian state television, where the two men claimed they were just tourists. sergei skripal and his daughter yulia both spent months in hospital in comas before eventually recovering, but dawn sturgess died after being exposed to the nerve agent novichok. she had accidentally handled a fake perfume bottle that contained the poison. in the last few minutes the investigators from the website bellingcat have been revealing somemore of their research on this suspect. let's go now to my colleague ben ando who has more. do we have any more details yet? what we know is the way that the website operators to go online and use open source data to put together
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what you might call a digital jigsaw, to build up a picture of who these people are. they've looked at various issues, and one of the things they are targeting is the poisoning of the skripals. the reason they are doing this is the man who called himself petrov is actually alexander mishkin, they used facial recognition software to show that his current passport photograph, the one he used to travel to the uk matches one from 15 yea rs travel to the uk matches one from 15 years ago in russia under the name of alexander mishkin. the dates of birth are the same. these details have been given to mps to let them know why they can believe this finding by the bellingcat website. when are we likely to hear more from bellingcat, after this briefing going on with mps?|j bellingcat, after this briefing going on with mps? i suspect so, the briefing is going on at the moment. i don't know how long it will last. if you list all the things that tie
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m, if you list all the things that tie in, the little bits of evidence, the small bits of data they say build up this compelling enough to prove that alexander mishkin is alexander petrov. the home office here in the uk say this is a police matter. the police won't comment on what they call speculation. it's really telling that no organisation or authority has tried to deny or suggest there is anything wrong with the information being put out about the information being put out about the identity of this man. thank you very much. a review has found that a man with a history of mental illness, admitted to nhs staff that he'd had fantasies of murdering women and raping them, before he killed a young teacher in a horrific sex attack. carl langdell was jailed for 26 years injune 2016, after admitting the murder of 23—year—old katie locke. locke was strangled at a hotel in hertfordshire, on christmas eve 2015,
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after the pair met on an internet dating site. the independent review, commissioned by nhs england, said the incident could not have been predicted with any degree of certainty, that would have made it possible to prevent. but it also found there had been, what it called, "systemic missed opportunities". let's get more on this now from dr david levy, who's regional medical director of nhs england. thank you for your time today. there isa gap thank you for your time today. there is a gap year, clearly, between systemic missed opportunities, and the review, also saying that the incident couldn't have been predicted with any degree of certainty, isn't there? 0k, certainty, isn't there? ok, so, i think what we have shown with our investigation report which was published today, is that this is a very complex case. the patient had an unusual mental health problem.
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certainly, they were shortcomings and opportunities were missed to understand the complexity of this patient‘s problems. and to gather information from agencies, including mental health trusts, the police, and other services, to form a full picture, about the condition of this patient. and the care plan that was required to keep him safe, and members of the public safe as well. as we mentioned in the introduction, he had admitted to nhs staff about having these violent fantasies, at the time of katie locke's death he was under the supervision of the probation service for threatening to kill a community psychiatric nurse. was no 1's saying that he should have been, shouldn't have been in public at that point? that he should have been in some kind of psychiatric care, not allowed to mingle with the public, let alone be
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on dating sites, meeting women? certainly, he had an unusual condition. and the fact that he was complex enough that three consultant psychiatrists came to very different views about him. what should have happened, is that the mental health treatment requirements, ordered by the court, should have taken place. that would have given that fuller picture. unfortunately, due to the way the hospital trust, and agencies worked at the time, they were unaware of the need to work collaboratively to do that. our report issue is that they will work together in the future to ensure that patients in a similar position should be treated appropriately, with the appropriate care plan and that communication is improved. you say various agencies were that communication is improved. you say various agencies were unaware they need to work together, that seems astounding. i'm sure many
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people listening will think that's astounding when you think of the cases that have come to public attention where children have been murdered, other horrific cases where it was discovered after the event, that agencies were not communicating with one another. surely, this was a huge failure. can you say to katie's family, and the public, that those gaps in communication are now definitely closed? thank you for that point. in fact, what new to report issued today recommend, notjust what new to report issued today recommend, not just for local and national improvement, particularly around the sharing of data between mental health trusts, they should be collaborating. that work will be taken collaborating. that work will be ta ken forward over collaborating. that work will be taken forward over the next few months. the aim of our report, the independent review, is to learn from what may or may not have happened, what may or may not have happened, what went wrong, and to understand what went wrong, and to understand what improvements can be made, and make those improvements. doctor david leavy, thank you.
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donald trump has hosted a ceremony at the white house after the swearing—in of brett kavanaugh as a justice of the us supreme court. he had been accused of sexual assault and the us president apologised to him, saying he'd endured "terrible pain and suffering. after weeks of political rancour, a ceremonial swearing in ceremony forjustice kavanagh. greeted by an extended standing ovation from his supporters, the new member of the us supreme court took the 0ath of office with his wife and daughters by his side. less than two weeks ago, he angrily denied a charge that sexually assaulted christine blasey ford when they were both teenagers. president trump said mr kavanaugh was owed an apology. on behalf of our nation, i want to apologise to brett and the entire kavanaugh family for the terrible pain and suffering you have been forced to endure. justice kava naugh thanked the president for what he called his
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steadfast, unwavering support throughout the process. i'm grateful to you and mrs trump for the exceptional, overwhelming courtesy you have extended to my family and me. mr president, thank you for everything. applause mr kavanaugh also adopted a tone of reconciliation. the senate confirmation process was contentious and emotional. that process is over. my focus now is to be the bestjustice i can be. this chapter in the extremely acrimonious appointment of a supreme courtjudge may be closing, but with the us mid—term elections just four weeks away, the politicalfallout could be critical to the future of donald trump's presidency. peter bowes, bbc news. ina moment
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in a moment we'll take a look at the weather, first let's look at some of the most striking images of the day. wet and windy weather is causing disruption in scotland. roads have been closed due to landslides like this one. also, the a83 is closed in both directions, that is a road, if you don't know what it is. now, two ships have collided in the mediterranean, the vessels from tunisia and cyprus crashed near the french island of corsica. they remained stuck to avoid a major fuel spill, but the incident has already caused a fuel trace of several kilometres. elon musk‘s spacex company has successfully launched its latest satellite into space — wowing social media users in the process. lighting up the skies above california, the falcon 9 rocket went into orbit and returned 8 minutes later to an air base north west of los angeles. the satellite will be used to track natural disasters,
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crop yields and soil—moisture levels from 385 miles above the earth. and finally — a washing up bottle — at least forty seven years old — has been found on the shores of a beach in somerset. it's thought to be the oldest item to have been discovered washed up. . .. a stark reminder of how long plastics take to disintegrate. the price on the packaging shows it was produced before decimilisation in 1971. now, it's time for a look at the weather. let's catch up with thomas. the pictures that you were showing in scotland really did show what a contrast there is across the uk. 0ften contrast there is across the uk. often when we have warm weather heading our way it's full of energy and moisture. there is a weather front stuck somewhere and it's pouring on scotland at the moment.
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for most of us, it really is a fantastic afternoon, or rather, tomorrow is going to be the best day of the week. pleasant temperatures, the high teens, 20 degrees. in scotla nd the high teens, 20 degrees. in scotland that rain continues and will continue this evening, eventually, overnight it moves out of the way. southerly winds are pushing the weather front backwards. temperatures will be around about eight or 11 celsius overnight. tomorrow, watch the temperatures go. from the morning into the afternoon, look at that orange colour developing there. temperatures will peak in central london at 2a, we could hit 20 degrees in the lowlands of scotland. enjoy it. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the former brexit minister steve baker says he's one of at least a0 conservative mps who say they're willing to vote down theresa may's
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so—called chequers brexit deal. meanwhile in brussels, the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, is meeting representatives of northern ireland's two main unionist parties to discuss the issue of the irish border. the investigative website bellingcat says the second suspect in the salisbury novichock poisoning case is actually alexander mishkin, a doctor who works for russian intelligence. he'd previously been named as alexander petrov. the notorious british peodophile douglas slade is being sued for damages by five people in the phillipines who claim he abused them. and rebecca humphries, the ex—girlfriend of strictly come dancing star seann walsh, says she isn't a victim. she's spoken out on twitter after pictures emerged of him kissing his dance partner, katya jones. a convicted british paedophile is
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being sued for damages by five filipino boys who claimed they were sexually exploited by him overseas. they will give evidence via video link over alleged abuse by douglas laid while he was living in the country. he says the claims against them are a fabrication. angus crawford has more. for 30 years, but the slade lived here in the philippines. it is claimed he would entice children into his home and abuse them. whenever i remember the things he did to me, the way he abused us, it comes back to my mind. everything he did. a member of the notorious paedophile information exchange,
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two years ago he was extradited, tried and convicted of sex offences against children in the uk in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. but today he faces a new legal battle. five young people in the philippines are suing him over the abuse they say they suffered. it is thought to be the first case of its kind to reach the high court. i think the message needs to be sent out to those in the west in particular who think that they can go to far away places, such as the philippines, to sexually abuse children and young people, that you are not beyond reach. slade may spend the rest of his life in prison here, but children on the other side of the world are still seeking justice. angus crawford, bbc news. all the talk around the brexit negotiations today is about the issue of the irish border. let's speak to our reality check correspondent chris morris to find out what makes coming to a deal so difficult. thank you. yes, we know that there's only just over a week to go until the next eu summit, so it really is coming close to crunch time.
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but why is ireland such a big issue in these negotiations? well, the map tells the story. after brexit, the land border between northern ireland and the republic will also become the only land border on between the uk and the eu, which will be two separate economic areas. both sides have agreed that there should be no new infrastructure or checks on the border, basically keeping things as open as they are now. and they've agreed that there should be a backstop plan, or guarantee, to avoid a hard border "in all circumstances. " now they hope that they can solve all these border issues as part of a long—term agreement on a future trade relationship. but the backstop would automatically kick in if there was a delay or an outright failure to secure such as agreement. so what does that mean in practice? back in february, the eu put out a draft legal text for the backstop that would, in effect, keep northern ireland in the eu customs union, with no customs checks or payments, and in the single market for all
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trade in goods and agriculture, following all eu rules. but that would mean you'd need checks between northern ireland and great britain instead. no way, said the government, that would break up the uk. but eight months later we're still waiting for detailed alternative proposals which may emerge this week. they're likely to include a plan for the whole of the uk to stay in a customs union with the eu for some time after brexit, and a compromise which would see some checking of goods, in particular of food and animals, moving between great britain and northern ireland. which brings us to this — no border in the irish sea. the democratic unionist party, on whose support the prime minister depends in parliament, is not alone in insisting that any suggestion of a border would be unacceptable. but the eu and, it seems, the government will argue that it won't be a border, just a series of checks that few people will notice. in the longer term, though, if northern ireland was tied more closely to the rules of the eu
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customs union and single market, and great britain wasn't, then most trade deals the government was able to negotiate in the future, with other countries around the world, wouldn't apply to northern ireland. that's a big problem, which could be very difficult to fudge. but if there's no backstop agreed, then there would be no overall withdrawal agreement, and then the uk would leave the eu with no deal at all. chris, thank you. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, has set out plans to cut the amount of taxpayers' money that is spent on international aid. the proposals would count profits from investments by aid bodies as counting to the uk's commitment of spending 0.7% of national income on aid, potentially reducing spending on aid by millions of pounds each year. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. the government is unlikely to be
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sensitive to any criticism of this given that it has prided itself for many years on its work in terms of international aid so tell us about the detail. good afternoon. if you cast your mind back to the distant past when politics involved a plethora of topics and politicians could get through a sentence without talking about brexit, conversations about international aid were pretty frequent and noisy because david cameron as prime minister made it a law that no .7% of our national income would be devoted to international aid which is an international aid which is an international target. but at a time of domestic austerity, when the economy was growing at the budget rows. last year it stood at £13.9 billion. what penny mordaunt is saying today is that she thinks her plan, which involves recasting the definition about what counts in that
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0.7% definition, could reduce the impact on the public purse. but, crucially, by how much? this was her answer. so, we will be modelling this but there are a huge number of ways that we can contribute to still being a 0.7 nation, potentially doing more, and reducing the asks of the public purse. and that is about people acting as individuals, it is about our own workers, dfid, it is also about what else we can lever in from outside with other investors. we are told that that figure is likely to be in the millions rather than billions, what could be saved from the public purse and ultimately spent elsewhere by the government. we don't have an exact figure. rough calculations suggest it could be hundreds of millions of pounds. labour are very critical of this, saying the government is getting its priorities wrong but no response yet
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from the charity sector, the likes of 0xfa m from the charity sector, the likes of 0xfam and save the children who work with international aid as well. thank you, chris. rebecca humphries, the former girlfriend of strictly come dancing contestant seann walsh, has said she is "not a victim", after he admitted kissing his dance partner. comedian walsh and katya jones, who is married to fellow strictly professional neiljones, apologised after they were pictured kissing on a night out. actor rebecca humphries tweeted that "she's not a victim and is now free". 0ur correspondentjenny kumah is following developments. just bring us up to date with the latest. what are people saying? she has issued this lengthy statement. to give you some background, comedian sean walsh and katya jones start of the competition with not very high scores. this weekend they performed a dramatic paso doble and did well
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even with onejudge a dramatic paso doble and did well even with one judge commenting you might describe it as hot. but pictures emerged of them at the weekend kissing outside a pub. they both apologised on twitter but now we have a statement from seann's former partner, rebecca humphries. she explains that the picture was taken last she explains that the picture was ta ken last wednesday, she explains that the picture was taken last wednesday, october three, her birthday when she was at home alone when she received a text from seann saying he was going for an innocent drink. she said they spoke and she said to him that, not the first time from his actions over the past three weeks had led her to believe something inappropriate was going on. she goes on to say that this whole business has served to remind her that she is a strong, capable person, who is now free and no victim. she ends in a conciliatory tone saying, despite
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everything, she hopes he gets what he wants from this but she is not sorry she has taken the cat. we have contacted sean welsh and had no response from him to this statement by rebecca humphries. —— sean walsh. has the bbc said anything ahead of what might happen before next weekend's show? so far we have not had a formal response, we understand there have been meetings going on with the strictly team. questions have been raised about what should happen, whether he should continue in the programme which is a family programme with a massive audience. it launched with 10 million people watching in september. 0ver it launched with 10 million people watching in september. over the yea rs, watching in september. over the years, there have been what is known as the strictly curse with rumoured public relationships but we have never seen anything quite like this which has been played out so publicly and bitterly. thank you. prison officers in england and wales
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are to be issued with canisters of a synthetic pepper spray to help deal with violence and disorder. the announcement came as the president of the prison governors association accused the government of failing to react in a "timely manner" to the "crisis" in jails. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. it's been used by police for years, and our present officers will be carrying one too. —— prison officers. pava is the latest bit of equipment to help staff deal with violence behind bars. and this is how the pepper like spray works. stop what you are doing! we were given a demonstration at hull prison, one of fourjails where pava is being trialled. the chemical causes eye irritation and coughing, giving staff time to get the prisoner under control. ministers say the spray acts as a deterrent and could even save lives. if a prisoner were in a horrible situation, to be stamping on another prisoner's head, for example, that might
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be a situation where, instead of reaching for backup, you may well want to say, stop doing that, i have some pepper spray. prison officers in all adult male prisons will now be equipped with pava at a cost of £2 million. but some say the relationship between prisoners and staff is the key to good order, and that needs far greater investment. it's ok having pava, having body worn cameras, we have lots of things in place, but we need more people in our prisons to build those relationships to make our prisoners safe. pava will be widely available from next year, but it will be assessed before a decision is made about allowing staff to use it in women's prisons and youth custody centres. hurricane michael has brought strong winds and heavy rainfall to western cuba, and is now set to strengthen as it makes its way across the gulf of mexico towards the us. the state of florida has
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been warned to prepare for life—threatening flash floods. the storm battered central america over the weekend. at leat 13 people died in the region after it struck off the coast of northern honduras. it's thought six of those deaths were in honduras itself. lebo diseko has more trying to get to safety with water all around. people in honduras doing their best to salvage what is left of their homes and their lives. where once there were streets, now there is flooding after rivers broke their banks. some communities were completely cut off after mud and debris closed roads. the message from the president as the rains came in — don't wait to get to safety. translation: the situation is getting more difficult with the passing hours. the important thing is to evacuate the areas of risk. don't wait for the authorities to arrive. the rain, which started on thursday, has destroyed several homes
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and a landslide killed two children and their mother as they slept. the worst looks like it might be overfor honduras as hurricane michael moves on. it is now lashing the coast of cuba with strong winds and heavy rains. michael is currently a category one storm but it is expected to be a major category three hurricane by the time it hits the coast of florida on wednesday. lebo diseko, bbc news. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. as mps return to parliament after recess, a former brexit minister warns that ‘at least a0' conservative mps are poised to vote against any deal based on theresa may's current plans. the dup leader, arlene foster, insists she won't accept any customs barriers within the uk following talks in brussels with the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. the second suspect in the salisbury nerve agent attack
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is identified as a military doctor working for the russian intelligence service. best known for her roles in iron man, the avengers and sliding doors, gwyneth paltrow has in recent years stepped away from the spotlight to concentrate on her lifestyle brand known simply as goop. the business is now tenyears old and hasn't been without controversy but has just opened its first uk store. charlie stayt spoke to the oscar winner exclusively as she told him how it all began. i've always been a very curious person. i've always loved food and travel and fashion and beauty, and i sort of harboured this secret desire to start a business and do something like this. i had no idea how to do it. i knew nothing about business, i knew nothing about the digital space.
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how do you make sure that things in the area of medicine claiming to have health benefits do what they say? well, we have a whole regulatory team in place now, and a science and research team, and that's really what they're dedicated to doing. so, a lot of times we'll find that a third—party product that we sell, people make claims about products, and so it's very important for us now, as we grow and as we learn, to make sure that the claims that we make on the site are efficacious and good. so you have a team of your own scientists, your own researchers, who are looking into this. we do. because the company has come in for some criticism. there was a court case in which a sum of money was paid out in connection with some of the claims, to do with claims about whether a product could help with depression, particularly. that's actually not quite what it is. 0k, explain to me. it is important, isn't it? yes, absolutely. so one of the products that we sell,
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some of the regulators in california said you can't say that it does that. and so we never had any customer complaints about it at all, but we chose. we didn't say it — we didn't have to admit any wrongdoing, but we just wanted to settle it and put it behind us. and of course, as you learn and grow, you... especially when you're a start—up, you have to learn kind of on—the—job, unfortunately, a lot of the times. the stuff about well—being more generally, no—one is going to argue that thinking about well—being is a bad thing. when did that emerge for you as a big issue forwomen, in particular? well, i think a lot of what we do comes out of the fact that i think women feel that they are not being paid attention to. a lot of the feedback that we hear is that women don't feel well. they're exhausted, they're depleted, and they don't feel like they're being heard by their gp, and what are the things that i can do, as opposed to, you know, popping a pill? are there things that i could
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address, from a diet perspective, an exercise perspective? inevitably, because of your acting profile, a lot of people think about what happened in hollywood, harvey weinstein, which you have been quoted on in the past. that is directly connected, in a way, to women's welfare. you know, we're living in a time where paradigms are really shifting. and i think women have a very clear, especially in the united states, that they have had enough of certain systems, that have been in place for a long time. and they're being dismantled, and it's a bit of a bloody process, but it's an important process. and yes, i think it's very critical to women's wellness overall that women feel that they're safe in the workplace. some of this inevitably ends up a little bit personal, because of your profile, and who you are.
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do you have quite a thick skin? i would have to, wouldn't i, by this point. anybody who, i think, tries to move the needle gets resistance sometimes. this is part of it. thank you very much. thank you. next, the story a 22—year—old woman from the states who suffered devastating damage when she shot herself in the face and who has now become the youngest person in the us to undergo a full face transplant. katie stubblefield tried to take her own life four years ago. she had a 31—hour operation in may last year. this is her story. and as you would expect, this film contains some upsetting and very graphic images throughout, and if you find that kind of thing too upsetting to watch, it will last around five minutes, she was a deep soul when she was a
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young kid. she started playing soccer when she was four years old and she was a very aggressive player! it took awhile for her to wa nt player! it took awhile for her to want to but when she did they were best buddies. it's probably very difficult for you to think about and talk about that bring me back to when you were 18, what was life like? when i got to robert's house, she was sitting in a big fluffy chair with her legs over it and texting andi with her legs over it and texting and i said, how are you doing? she kind of shrugged her shoulders like a teenager sometimes will. i didn't feel an alarm, a teenager sometimes will. i didn't feelan alarm, i a teenager sometimes will. i didn't feel an alarm, ijust a teenager sometimes will. i didn't feel an alarm, i just felt a teenager sometimes will. i didn't feel an alarm, ijust felt my girl had gotten hurt.
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i remember we i remember we were i remember we were walking out and we heard this... but loud. i walked in and looked at the chair and she wasn't in the chair. i did not get alarmed, i walked to the kitchen, on the back patio, no. and i saw the bathroom door shut. i said, the back patio, no. and i saw the bathroom door shut. isaid, katie, are you 0k? she didn't answer. 0ur son picks me up and takes me through the living room outside in the yard and just stands me there and says, mum, katie got my gun and she's hurt. she will never eat, never drink, she will never bathe herself, she will never conve rsed , will never bathe herself, she will never conversed, she will be a vegetable in a facility for the rest
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of her life. i said i was not ready to let go of my daughter. i think ithinki i think i was trying to look for old characteristics, if i could see anything from the pre—accident katie. i don't think i did. it was very surreal. i remember thinking, where is katie? at the same time, so grateful that she is alive and so grateful that she is alive and so grateful that she didn't have to walk around the rest of her life without a face. but it was hard. i grieved her old face a lot, i have to be honest. the remarkable story of katie
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stubblefield. the bbc news at one is coming up. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. as far as tomorrow goes, i would go as far as to say the weather will be spectacular for this time of year. it is october, the month of storms, but we have this spell of warm weather with temperatures into the 20s, well above the average also you can see the air is coming out of africa across the mediterranean spain and france and up to the uk. in fact it affects much of europe so we are seeing temperatures much higher than they should be at this time of year. to date we end the afternoon with 20 degrees in london and sunshine but in the north west of scotla nd and sunshine but in the north west of scotland it is still wet and it has been pouring in the western isles but the rain will ease and
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tomorrow the winds will push that front out of the way, taking the heavy rain back out to sea. first thing, a bit of a heavy rain back out to sea. first thing, a bit ofa nip in the heavy rain back out to sea. first thing, a bit of a nip in the air, some mist and fog, 8—12d but then the sun comes out and it will be a beautiful sunny day in the south, across the midlands, northern ireland, scotland and all the way up to lerwick. these orange colours indicating the warm air. i think 2a will be the highest temperature, in london, and around 20 degrees in glasgow and edinburgh. then a change on thursday, this front moves in all stop before it arrives, still some warm weather in eastern parts because of the southerly winds at stormy weather is brewing. from thursday onwards, things will start to go downhill. 0n thursday onwards, things will start to go downhill. on thursday, rain in western areas sweeping into cornwall and devon and parts of wales,
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eventually northern ireland and scotland. eastern parts, another fine day, 21 degrees in london, norwich, 20 in hull but the winds are increasing in the west. not pouring all day long but take a brolly if you're out. the nasty weather arrives on friday. this low pressure could be a named storm by the time we get to friday. severe gales in the south—west and also that northwest as an heavy rain heading our way. wherever you are, bearin heading our way. wherever you are, bear in mind they could be nasty weather heading your way. the salisbury nerve agent attack — more details are revealed about the russian military doctor who's been named as the second suspect. alexander mishkin claimed he was a tourist — but in fact he was a hero of the russian federation who worked for their military intelligence agency, gru. they are a military outfit that is very aggressive and ambitious in doing things. they don't necessarily
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ca re doing things. they don't necessarily care as much of the consequences as your more traditional secret agents. we'll have more on the latest revelations this lunchtime. also on the programme... a waste disposal company is stripped of its nhs contracts after hundreds of tonnes of medical waste from hospitals — including body parts — were allowed to pile up. in brussels to talk brexit — the leader of the democratic unionists, arlene foster, insists again that she won't accept any customs barriers within the uk.
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