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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 10, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2.00pm the bodyguard who shot dead the westminster attacker tells a court how he warned khalid massood to drop his knives before firing at him three times. cracking down on dirty money in britain — the wife of a former banker from azerbijan is told to prove where her wealth came from in the first case of its kind. a british couple are among nine people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of mallorca. the uk's highest court rules that when a christian bakery refused to ice a cake with the slogan "support gay marriage" it did not break discrimination laws. family businesses like ours are free to focus on giving all their customers the best service they can without being forced to promote other people's campaigns. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. england and away the first match of
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their one—day series with sri lanka, looking to their status as favourites at next year's cricket world cup. helen has got the weather. quiet at the moment in the uk but this is a very dangerous hurricane indeed, a category four, and when it hits, but make it can record for florida. it and do catastrophic damage. also coming up — with hurricane michaeljust hours away from making landfall in northwestern florida, we'll bring you the latest from the region. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live.
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a minister's bodyguard who shot and killed the westminster attacker khalid massoud has described the events leading up to the moment he opened fire. the close protection officer, known only by his call sign sam, the told the inquest into the deaths that day, how massood was coming towards him with two large knives covered in blood. he said he thought masood was going to kill him, and he fired three shots from his glock pistol. our correspondent helena lee was in court. these two close protection officers in court were visible only to the jury, the barristers and the coroner. they were out of sight from the public gallery and those of the media. but what they described in
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court was on that day they were in palace yard, the area between the gates where keith palmer was standing and the members entrance, they were waiting for a minister to come out. at that point they heard a loud explosion. they then saw and heard people screaming and uniformed officers running towards them into the new palace yard. the close protection officer who ended up shooting khalid masood said, they we re shooting khalid masood said, they were moving towards me time to get away from something or someone. then, they saw khalid masood with two knives in his hand. that officer went on to tell the court, he was carrying two large knives and i could see they were covered in blood. at times during his evidence he had to pause at one point because he had to pause at one point because he was upset and his voice was shaking. he then went on to tell the court how the jury was shown footage
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in court of khalid masood continuing towards these two close protection officers. he didn't stop, the officers. he didn't stop, the officer shouted at him to drop his knives come he didn't. at that point the body card fired at khalid masood twice. the barrister in court as the bodyguard, why do you think he was going to do? the bodyguard said, he was going to kill me. we then heard how both the bodyguards assisted in first aid how both the bodyguards assisted in firstaid in how both the bodyguards assisted in first aid in resuscitation on khalid masood. they have finished giving evidence in court this afternoon and we will hear more evidence from others who helped with that resuscitation, the first aid on the attacker and the timetable for the rest of the week the jury expected to go out on friday when they will consider deliberations. a woman who spent sixteen million pounds in harrods is fighting to keep her home
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after becoming the first target for a new uk anti—corruption order. she has been named as zamira hajiyeva, who's orginally from azerbaijan and is the wife of a former state banker. as well as her multi—million pound shopping sprees, she bought a house worth 11 million pounds close to the harrods store in knightsbridge and a golf course in berkshire. the high court has ordered her to explain the source of her wealth. if she can't she risks losing her home. investigators from the national crime agency say they believe there are billions of pounds of dirty money invested in british property — but it is almost impossible to charge the owners with a crime or seize the assets because of a lack of evidence. dominic casciani reports. the luxury home worth more than £11 million. in all of the most expensive and exclusive neighbourhoods of london. it is also
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the property at the heart of the ground—breaking legal battle to reveal suspected corrupt foreign wealth hidden in the capital. the owner and his wife are the targets of the uk's first use of the new anti—corruption power, and unexplained wealth order demanding they had reveal how they became so rich. the court order targets this man's wealth. the former chairman of the international bank of azerbaijan, jailed for 15 years for fraud and embezzlement, tens of millions of pounds disappeared from his bank. where did the money go? that is the question posed to the bank's wife and referred to in court as mrs a. she was one of the harrods best customers. mrs a went on a spending spree. the high court heard over a decade she blew £16 million inside. she indulged her mother of
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luxury goods throughout the store. one day, £150,000 went on jewellery, the next, £1800 topping up the wine cellar. it's not just the next, £1800 topping up the wine cellar. it's notjust her harrods big spending that is under official scrutiny. the national crime agency also wants to know how a company controlled by her could afford to buy this berkshire golf club for more than £10 million. the couple's lawyers say he was, a fat cat banker but not a crock, he is a victim of a miscarriage of justice but not a crock, he is a victim of a miscarriage ofjustice and his wife is seeking to overturn and the wealth order. but campaigners say the power could turn off the tap of dirty money. the police themselves of estimated money laundering through the united kingdom is in the order the hundreds of billions of pounds a year. these first unexplained wealth orders and are
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extremely important test case but are going to need many more than to pursue the proceeds of crime that have come to the united kingdom. we're going to need a transformation to our messages to do too many round—the—world trip the can't prove a legal source for their wealth the courts could seize the property. investigators are preparing to target other suspects, the battle to uncover correct cache has just begun. the supreme court has ruled that the christian owners of a bakery in belfast did not breach the law when they refused to bake a cake, decorated with a message supporting same—sex marriage. the judgement overturns two previous rulings that found ashers bakery had discriminated against the customer. emma vardy was in court. it's four years since gay—rights activist gareth lee walked into this belfast bakery to place an order. his purchase of a cake became a bitter legal row over the extent to which businesses can refuse to promote political views. the cake was to be iced with the message
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support gay marriage. today the supreme court ruled that the bakery‘s refusal to take the order did not amount to discrimination. this court has held that nobody should be forced to have our express political opinion in which he does not believe. the bakery‘s connors had previously been sued for discrimination and had lost their subsequent appeal. the decision of the uk's highest court to overturn a previous rulings marks a hard part vindication of their views. we did not turn down this order because of the person who made it but because of the message itself. thejudges have given a clear signal today, in fact, it could not be more clear, family businesses like ours are free to focus on giving all their customers the best service they can, without being forced to promote other people's campaigns. the customer, gareth lee, spoke of his disappointment that seen
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the judgment overturned. i paid my money. my money was taken and a few days later it was refused. based upon the beliefs of the business owners. that made me feel like a second—class citizen and the judgment today tells me that that is ok. i am concerned notjust for the implications for myself or other gay people, but for every single one of us. the supreme courtjudges said the conclusions reached today were not intended to diminish the need to protect people who are gay from discrimination, saying it would be an affront to human dignity to refuse someone servers based on sexual orientation but that does not have that happened in this case. the original cake cost £36. legal bills are no more than 200,000. with me is our legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman. this is an absolutely fascinating
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case, isn't it, legally. what is at the heart of this judgment? case, isn't it, legally. what is at the heart of thisjudgment7m case, isn't it, legally. what is at the heart of thisjudgment? it is about discrimination and it is about whether the discrimination was discriminating against gareth lee because of his sexual orientation. the court found it wasn't discrimination against mr lee as an individual, the whole case revolved around the message, support gay marriage. in effect, orthe around the message, support gay marriage. in effect, or the court found, the archbishop of canterbury had gone into that shop and asked for the cake that is iced with those words, they would have been treated in exactly the same way. so, there was no discrimination against mr lee isa was no discrimination against mr lee is a person. the company made clear they have gay customers and they employ gay people. there was an interesting argument here that was put forward on behalf of gareth lee, you couldn't this associate the way
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he was treated with the fact he was 93v- he was treated with the fact he was gay. here again, the court found the word, support gay marriage they are not limited to gay or bisexual couples. their relatives, friends, members of the wider community also support that so there was no discrimination against mr lee as an individual. his argument was he was being discriminated against on the basis of his religious or political views. this is wedded it gets interesting. but the court said he arose, as a service provider you can't have, if you like, forced upon you a message with which you profoundly disagree and with which you could become associated. this opens the door, although many people say it is great for freedom of speech, on the other hand what if you walk into a bakery and say, i wa nt you walk into a bakery and say, i want a cake that says happy bar mitzvah. can the bakers say, i
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disagree with fundamental ideas at the heart ofjudaism, so i'm not going to bake that cake. what about supporting brexit fox hunting. it opens up a nearly of debate here. there will be more cases that tests the boundaries are here. a lot of consequences. just as a footnote, this has cost hundreds of thousands of pounds in terms of legal costs. all about a cake which cost £36 50. this is the most expensive cake in legal history. the issue at the heart of this are very important. you are balancing the rights of in individual, who feels they have been discriminated against against the rights of service providers to hold fast to beliefs they believe in. thank you very much indeed. the uk economy stagnated in august with the office for national statistics having recording 0% growth for the month. economists had been expecting a 0.1%
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month—on—month rise in growth. that is compared to the 0.4% growth in gross domestic product logged injuly. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines — attacker — khalid masood — breaks down in court as he described the incident. a court identifies the wife of a jailed international banker who spent more than sixteen million pounds at harrods as the first target of a new uk anti—corru ption power. a british couple are among 9 people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of mallorca england reach 92—2 before rain stopped play in their first test against rancour. it is. gareth bale is out of wales's friendly against
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spain tomorrow. ryan giggs, the welsh manager, says he is 50—50 fight the nation ‘s league tie against the republic of ireland. content is searching for her fourth coachin content is searching for her fourth coach in three years after splitting with hers. she has struggled to find herformer took to with hers. she has struggled to find her former took to number four with hers. she has struggled to find herformer took to numberfour in the women's rankings. i will be back with more on all of those stories little later. theresa may has urged mps to "put the national interest first" when deciding whether to approve a brexit deal in a crunch vote likely later this year. asked about the issue during prime minister's questions, mrs may said she was working to secure the best possible agreement that respected the 2016 vote. our assistant political editor norman smith has been following pmqs closely and joins us now. the moment of truth on brexit
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getting ever closer and political tensions rising consequentially. the pressure on mrs may is just then cranked up and up and up. we had mrs may got through her party conference despite the borisjohnson moment, she gets back to parliament, it all kicks off. we had david davies yesterday warning of dire consequences of mrs may pressed ahead with her chequers plan. we had the former chief whip saying you will never get it through parliament. we had the dup, on whom mrs may depends on her parliamentary survival, saying if mrs may places ahead with a brexit compromise, which could possibly see a regular treat checks impose between northern ireland and the rest of great britain, then they would consider voting down the budget. why that matters is they have the numbers to
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defeat mrs may on the budget. that isa defeat mrs may on the budget. that is a huge, huge step because of the government can't get his budget through it is tantamount to a vote of no—confidence. the government can't get taxes revenues in and can't get taxes revenues in and can't carry out the policies, they can't carry out the policies, they can't carry out its mandate. it is kaput. it is a huge threat by the dup to say, if you impose these regular treat checks, we will move to vote down your budget. the stakes have gone up massively for mrs may as has the timetable because the budget is october 29, not far away. mrs may has got some very, very hard thinking to do quickly. norman, thank you very much indeed. let's move on to the eu perspective. with intense negotiations taking place in brussels to try to reach a brexit agreement by november. every day we'll be checking in with our reporter adam fleming who is tracking the talks. let's speak to him now.
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we are expecting to hear from michel barnier, the eu negotiator later. he is doing a speech to business people, an event that is taking place at the european parliament in about an hour's time. being told this is one of his standard brexit speeches where he just says how things are going, but the big issues are and what his aspirations are. we should not expect too much from this speech. in terms of a substance of what is happening with the negotiations what is going to happen in the next couple of days. everyone in is aware that anything that is said, orany in is aware that anything that is said, or any documents published could have an affect on negotiations which error at a sensitive stage. that is why today we didn't see the publication as we are expecting of an outline of the political declaration about the future relationship which will accompany the brexit with the royal treaty. we didn't see an updated set of
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guidelines from the european commission. the decision was taken by the bosses in that building there, there was two pieces of paper that were too sensitive to have in the outside world for the likes of you and me to read when such sensitive talks are going on. michelle barney and his team know that any word that comes out of his mouth at the next hour will be interpreted and overinterpreted by the media. —— michel barnier. because you are a man who does a lot of interpretation, what is the mood music at the moment in brussels on these talks? the truth is, there is no mood music store. the negotiators have put themselves in the tunnel. they do not want anyone to know what is going on. they are free to make tough decisions, hard bargaining and really get into the tweaking of the
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tax they are working on. we will get an idea of what is happening on monday because the sherpas will be in town, that is the name for the prime ministerial advisers, the rest of the eu, they are here on monday to prepare for that eu summit which will start at a dinner on wednesday night. that is the mark a point from where progress has to be made. stay tuned. the prime minister has appointed the uk's first minister for suicide prevention and promised more support for young people to mark world mental health day. ministers and officials from more than 50 countries have gathered in london for what's said to be the first international summit on mental health, with experts warning of a global crisis. around 11,500 people take their lives every year in england, and suicide remains the leading cause of death among men under the age of a5. sophie hutchinson reports. the duke and duchess of cambridge showing their support for the global summit on mental health,
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which is under way. today the government acknowledged more support was needed for those suffering. i recognise the treatments on mental health in the nhs to date has not always been as good as it needs to be. and as we put in an extra £20 billion we are going to make sure we address those concerns foursquare. the 20 billion is for the whole of the nhs in england and it's not yet known how much will go to mental health. the government wants to tackle suicide, rates are falling but for the half thousand people still take their lives every year in england. the government has announced new funding for the samaritans to injury helpline remains free for the next four years and a new title for the health ministerjackie doyle price, to become the uk's first minister for suicide prevention. but some have questioned this is enough. we hear about people suffering from answers they wait for an
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appointment. just this week a poll suggested a quarter of mental health patients were waiting at least three months to see a specialist in england, wales and scotland and some say delays are putting lives at risk. we are failing people at the moment, so what the minister will do without having money to change the front line and employ more doctors and nurses and open more psychiatric beds, i don't see how we will prevent the loss of life. the government insists mental health is a priority, whether it is will become clearer when the nhs10—year plan is published next month. today, to mark world mental health day, ministers are focusing i'm joined by brian wood, who was awarded the military cross for his leadership in iraq and now campaigns to end the stigma surrounding male mental health, particularly in the military. thanks very much for coming in. tel
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isa thanks very much for coming in. tel is a little bit about your experiences in iraq and the problems you had as a result. thank you for having me on. when you join the military you go through the cycle. mental health, or the awareness, was spoken about back then. when we went operational and started to experience can take and some violent situations which i was revisiting daily really, you kind of get on with it. nobody speaks about it. you add in an all—male organisation, 800 men, i was a decision—makers. i wasn't going to open up about my headspace because, one, i was scared about what people would think of me, was i going to demotivate my men?
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all of this was so much pressure within my head, ijust parked it all. i visited some serious trauma events. you witnessed savage violence. did you suffer from essentially post—traumatic stress, do you think is among i think so. it took me eight years to pluck enough courage to knock on a door. it wasn't 80s too late, it was eight yea rs wasn't 80s too late, it was eight years too long but i still did it. i did cause a lot of damage on the way but i did it. i'm mending some pieces and mending some bridges. it has changed my life. it is a game changer. through that ten years, i was subject to quite a lot of mental resilience. what were some of the
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symptoms, your mental health problems are the result of what had been through in iraq? not reaching out and talking about it, people know who had been out there how violent it was, and war is brutal. but not having the coaching, the men touring, it is getting better now. but it was as back in the day. we had to get on with it. i had a lot of anxiety. could swing into a depression. the transition coming out of the military can flick a switch because you come from an institution where people are around you, motivating you, to all of a sudden being on around and not having that mutual support. that can trigger off a few things also. what ido trigger off a few things also. what i do say, you can have the best hopes, but you feel you are not
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willing to make that first step and understand you've got an issue and be brave enough to admit you've got an issue, it isn't even admitting, there is no help with that mental health. it is important we keep raising the awareness. in the military, especially before a military, especially before a military campaign, there's quite a lot of testosterone. in a way, to talk about mental health issues that they might be or to prepare troops for what it might do to them mentally, it hasn't been bent additionally in the army or the military, that hasn't been a consideration. do the military are getting better about that now?” getting better about that now?|j have getting better about that now?” have been invited to give my experiences and my mental battle to a few different regiments which has been humbling for me. going back if i was 16 been humbling for me. going back if iwas 16 again been humbling for me. going back if i was 16 again walking through a gate and i was introduced to these
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weapon lessons, fitness lessons, mental health lessons, i would not be here now. i would understand it. it would be a normal thing. nobody likes to talk about it because there isa likes to talk about it because there is a stigma around it. you want to be the best version of yourself but we're only human. we're not ironmen, we're only human. we're not ironmen, we have people with a heart. tell us about some of the things you sort that were very traumatic particularly the fighting that you we re particularly the fighting that you were involved in in southern iraq.” was a casualty of war myself. i was ata was a casualty of war myself. i was at a waste in five—year. my platoon commander was unconscious and not responding. i paid the conference
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and saved his life when we got hit again. he was hit in the face and i went in and defy and dragged him out of his vehicle. i acted on life support. i was involved in the battle of danny boy which was the first time soldiers had gone close combat warfare. the aftermath of that was over brutal. the recovery of bodies. that was the main thing. at that time, was the adrenaline just kicking in see you just did what you had to do and then the mental repercussions came, what, days later? months later? years later? once things quietened down and you get your thinking space and you think about things, that creeps into your hand. i was exposed to so much. going on to another two of
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iraq. it supposed to be quiet until a fellow soldier took his own life, seeing that was heartbreaking. then, of course, the enquiry that turned a lot of things on its head. you feel talking to people has helped you in the years since. it has been a game changer. i say that. it is speaking out, it is so important. it is such a release. when i knocked on a door in 2012, i was sucked out of emotions. why didn't i do that? why did it take me eight years? ifelt alive again. your message to anyone
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going through the same thing is to going through the same thing is to go and talk. yes, you have to talk about it. it has been too long now. we have to end the stigma. i have been involved in some campaigns and my men are driving more now. strong, not silent. mental health is so important. we need to get behind these campaigns will stop it means a lot to me. thank you so much for coming in and talking so honestly and openly about what you have been through. very good to talk to you. thank you. by by your local services of warming in that it really can visit the bbc‘s nhs tracker
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up to half a million people have been urged to evacuate their homes in florida as hurricane michael approaches. the category four storm is packing winds of up to 145 miles an hour, and could produce waves 13 feet high when it makes landfall later today. earlier today florida governor rick scott warned the storm is the worst to hit the region in a hundred years. is the worst storm florida has seen in the century. now that i do seek refuge. it has only taken now that i do seek refuge. it has only ta ken lightly now that i do seek refuge. it has only taken lightly and central america and the eye of the storm will make landfall in just a few hours. expect conditions across the panhandle to deteriorate rapidly. we have spent the last few days visiting areas it will impact, warning people to evacuate. now the storm is here, it is not safe to
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travel. if you're in a coastal area, do not leave your house. the time to evacuate in coastal areas has come and gone. that is the latest on that hurricane heading towards the united states and opportune moment to look at the weather. also some terrible weather in majorca. absolutely. these were taken from the eastern side of the island earlier today, we have had just about a month as macro worth of rain in a short space of time. you can see this is a rainfall chart. there is more to come. we had over 200 millimetres of rain falling in about 12 hours. we don't exactly know where it will strike. this is how the forecast looks as we go to the early hours of wednesday. that is the thing away. another pulse lose through. it starts affecting
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italy and the mediterranean islands as well. there are warnings for tomorrow in this part of the world. that is how it is looking. we will talk more about michael, shall we? how dangerous is it to previous hurricanes we have seen in the active states? for the panhandle, michael will be the most powerful to have ever made landfall. it is a record, this one. it is category four. we had one last yearin it is category four. we had one last year in florida, but this is such a low—lying area that it will affect alabama as well, but the worst of the storm surge will be on the coast of the panhandle. riot of this, we had dennis which is a major category three and 2003. sustained winds of 145 miles hour. we talk about how storms later, we're talking about just 70 mph. this is a sustained win at 140 mph.
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it is very scary and i think it will cause catastrophic damage. they are inundation in the storm surge of three to four metres. that is a double—decker bus you may well have noticed that it moves towards georgia, alabama and the carolinas. for tomorrow. meanwhile, he georgia, alabama and the carolinas. fortomorrow. meanwhile, he was georgia, alabama and the carolinas. for tomorrow. meanwhile, he was the uk, things are rather nice today, aren't they? it is beautiful out there. the warmest october day since 2011. 24 celsius. i will show you why. it will last through the rest of the day ahead. the evening starts to see changes being brought about. the channel islands get some showers, which come across mainland overnight. it will turn rather misty and murky. mild and increasingly humid air, you can see the next rain that waiting in the wings. the get of choice saw the start as macro we get off to a softly start. it works
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its way into northern ireland, the west of england and wales. still quite warm, 19 to 21 in the dance show. as the day. but that is the precursor of what is happening on friday. this is the third of the named storms this season, calum. we will have some autumnal gales in some areas, but the main concern here is it will be a rainmaker. when it comes in, the rain hangs around cross central pa rt it comes in, the rain hangs around cross central part uk. it looks really wet not just for friday, cross central part uk. it looks really wet notjust for friday, wet and windy. that moist air, that moist wheat thief line more rain over the hills. it finally clears away on saturday. either side of that, some places where we escape the rain and stay quite pleasant. you can see the weather system moves around. the low pressure is moving away. it eventually starts to clear
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away, but it might hang around the south—east into sunday. plenty going on with our weather as well. thank you. we will catch up on all of the day's sport news now. that is overin of the day's sport news now. that is over in the bbc sport centre. on the pitch, england reached 92—2 in theirfirst match of their one day series with sri lanka in dambulla before rain halted play. jonny bairstow and jason roy fell within five balls. england were 51—2, beforejoe root and captain eion morgan combined to move england to within 100. this is one of only three series remaining before england host the world cup on home soil next summer. shane warne said he was left embrassed by the ball tampering scandal that saw former captain steve smith, david warner and cameron bancroft banned from cricket. both warner and smith were given 12 month suspensions and bancroft nine months for the part they played
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in changing the surface of the ball in the infamous series with south africa six months ago. i was iwas in i was in paris. i'm not sure how it gets to the stage in a test match where you say, we will take sandpaper to the middle and put it on the ball. that was terrible and very embarrassing and disappointing. the australian team need to gain the respect back of the cricket community. they need to regain the respect of the australian public especially, the only way they can do thatis especially, the only way they can do that is how they can conduct themselves with i i have read and lose the australian dna, which is hard, tough but fair. after less than a year working together british number one johanna konta has split with her coach michaeljoyce. konta was as high as four in the women's rankings having reached the wimbledon semi finals last year but has struggled for form
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this season following early exits in all four of the grand slams. joyce had previously worked with maria sharapova for seven years. kyle edmund's impressive run continues, having reached the semifinals of the china open last week he's into the last 16 of the shanghai open following a straight sets win over andreas seppi. edmund the world number 14 closed out the match with his trademark forehand to set up a meeting with nicolas jarry of chile next, who knocked out fifth seed marin cilic. edmund is hoping to win his first atp tour title. in the doubles, jamie murray and his partner, bruno soa res, are through after beating argentina's diego schwartzmann and maximo gonzalez in straight sets. gareth bale is out of wales' friendly with spain tomorrow night. the real madrid forward was withdrawn in the 80th minute of saturday's loss with alaves. manager ryan giggs confirmed he won't feature at the principality and is 50—50 for the nations league match with the republic of ireland in six days time.
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he will be on the pitch before the game to receive a golden boot for the record 30 goals he's scored for wales. probably 50—50 at the moment. we don't want to take any risks, but if he's able to play, then go. if not, then so be it. we are preparing for both scenarios. my mind is just on spain at the moment. and after spain, we will concentrate on ireland. england face croatia in the second nations league match on friday — the first time they will play behind closed doors, because of uefa sanctions against the hosts. that isn't stopping fans making the trip to ri—jeka. earlier i spoke to one fan who is making the trip despite being unable to get into the stadium to see them play. the england fans travelled out, we're not blaming this. it is their fan, and obviously as england fans
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that have travelled will try to make the best of it. if we can see it, what a story that will be. england women's manager phil neville has criticised the standard of refereeing in the international game as several decisions went against his side in their draw with australia. despite opening the scoring through fran kirby, england were denied two penalties and had a goal wrongly disallowed for offside as asutralia equalised late on. there will be no var technology at the women's world cup next year. england will hope to improve on their third place finish from three years ago.. but neville said standards must improve. it's easy to say, you can't criticise people within the women's game because it's the women's game. no, if the standards on bright... i criticise my team for not being
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ruthless enough will stop they need to access it. we need to be brave enough and say, this needs to improve. the search is on for geraint thomas' tour de france trophy which was stolen from a cycling show in birmingham last month. the coupe omnisports, awarded each year to the winner of the race, was on loan from team sky to their bike supplier pinarello when at the end of the event, it was stolen. thomas has pleaded with whoever stole it do the right thing and return it. it may not have the prestige as some other big trophies, the world cup or the fa cup, but there is of course some emotional value, as thomas becoming just the third british rider to win te race. that's all the sport for now. thank you. eight people and nine are still
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missing after a huge wave of water in golf the town —— engulfed a town in majorca. a brutal and fatal flashlight. -- flash flood. eight ages of rainfall injust four hours. flash flood. eight ages of rainfall in just four hours. that's three times the normal amount for the whole of october. two british people are believed to be among the fatalities. it's being reported that they were travelling ina taxi reported that they were travelling in a taxi when they were caught in the flood. the foreign office says it is in touch with the spanish authorities and seeking updates. hundreds of residents have had to leave their homes and seek shelter. translation: everything is destroyed. it is a tragedy, what has happened here. i can't believe it. translation: it is a disaster. at
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the moment, we are cut off and waiting for the emergency services to tell us what to do. in daylight, the search for the dozens of people missing continues. as time passes, there is growing fear that the death toll will increase. here, emergency teams left out a car washed away by the flood. they think a victim might be inside, but the car is empty. the flood swept cars away over long distances. this resident managed to find his cousin's vehicle over half a mile away from where it had been parked. translation: it was taken by the flood that we live on the first floor and so have the water washed away everything. the only thing we could do is go to another has to shelter. this is normally a calm, picturesque holiday resort. it is where the reality show love ireland is film. for the residents here, it
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will take months to recover from the /flood's impacts. a saudi journalists went missing visiting a consulate more than a week ago. he failed to re—emerge. turkish security sources say he was murdered inside the building. the saudi authorities deny that absolutely. our correspondent. the last time he was seen alive, entering the saudi consulate in istanbul last week to get papers for his upcoming marriage. there is nothing to show that he left. turkey alleges the journalist was killed inside the consumer by a saudi hit squad. this pro—government paper
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printed photos of the 15 men it claims comprise it. cctv shows their revival in istanbul by private jet hours before his disappearance. they are seen checking into two hotels near the consulate. their booking was several days, but they left early. blacked out vehicles are shown around the consulate, moving to the consul general‘s residence after he vanished. did they contain his body? the two planes returned to riyadh the high—profile saudi dissident had been living in exile in the us for the last year. critical of the new crown prince, he recently told the bbc he could not return. saudi arabia has called the turkish allegations completely false and baseless, claiming he left the consulate that day. they have
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provided no footage to back that up. meanwhile, his turkish fiancee waits for news, urging president trump's support in an open letter. i don't know how i can keep living, if he was killed or abducted, she says was that if the claims are true, there will be pressure on the west for a tough response to riyadh. up tough response to riyadh. up to half a million people have been urged to leave their homes in florida as hurricane michael approaches. it is packing winds of 130 mph and could produce waves of 130 mph and could produce waves of 13 feet high when it makes landfall later today. hurricane michael is whipping towards florida with full force. sustained winds of more than 130 mph. in parts of the state, there has already been sustained flooding.
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forecasters are warning of a possible four metre storm surge will . businesses have been battening down the hatches. evacuation or orders have been issued and it is a case of pack up and get out. orders have been issued and it is a case of pack up and get outm orders have been issued and it is a case of pack up and get out. if it was just the case of pack up and get out. if it wasjust the adults, case of pack up and get out. if it was just the adults, we would have wrote it out, but we have do be saved since they are with us. long traffic jams have on saved since they are with us. long trafficjams have on —— have formed as people head inland. good working order. usually -- we are just picking up some water. authorities are warning people not to take chances. you cannot hide. you cannot hide from a storm surge will stop it is impossible. get prepared and get out if an evacuation order is issued. every family must be repaired now. some are determined to
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stay put. peoplejump repaired now. some are determined to stay put. people jump and repaired now. some are determined to stay put. peoplejump and run repaired now. some are determined to stay put. people jump and run and they should do that. we have just been through so many that we are culpable saying, so we will. we have enough food, and a generator, so we will be fine. it has a wedding reportedly left a dozen people dead in central america. this is not what you would hope for an eight caribbean cruise. this ship on the way to cuba got caught up in the storm, forcing passengers to ride it out. back in florida, emergency services are bracing themselves for a difficult 24 hours. reinforcements have been brought in from as far away as pennsylvania. the worst of hurricane michael is still to come. we canjust hurricane michael is still to come. we can just show you the scene live
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now on the coastline of florida. pretty stormy waves and skies, as you can see, with that state of emergency being declared across three us states, with hurricane michael now described as extremely dangerous, a category four hurricane set to make landfall later today. florida's governor drafted in troops and ordering the evacuation of hundreds of thousands of residents. those two people standing there don't seem too bothered. but it will get a lot worse. this will be an exceptionally dangerous hurricane, we are told. we will bring you more on that throughout the afternoon. the children's commissioner for england says she is seriously concerned about a rise in the use of segregation in young offender institutions and secure training centres. a report by the commission
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shows that some children are being kept separate for up to three months ata kept separate for up to three months at a time. here is our home affairs correspondent. what happens when young people in custody through danger to others —— ora custody through danger to others —— or a danger to others or themselves question would usually they are put in isolation for hours, days or even weeks as a report on segregation that it had been used in young offence to institutions 73 times per month. that is up from 51 times in 2015. the average length of segregation doubled to 16 days, with a total of 709 children kept in isolation in the youth custody estate in the first six months of this year. the children's commissioner says there is a growing consensus that segregation is unsuitable. there is evidence that it increases long—term harm to
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mental health, and campaigners are also concerned. the psychological experience of being kept from other human beings in such a way on children as young as if team, is very damning, very serious was the potentially very damaging. the ministry ofjustice says there are strict safeguards on segregation and says it is only used as a last resort. jersey has some of the fastest broadband speeds in the world after the installation of a direct fibre—optic connection to 40,000 homes and businesses injersey. it is hoped the investment will feature proved the island, allowing instant access to the internet for everyone from schools to dairy farms. here is our technology correspondent. they have all got it. from a castle where it arrives down a causeway thatis
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where it arrives down a causeway that is underwater at high tide. la pto ps that is underwater at high tide. laptops out. to a girls school where all students and teachers rely on it in lessons. to the farm where these jersey cows are arriving at a high—tech milking parlour. they have all got fast fibre broadband, now available everywhere on the island. that is becausejersey has gone down a different route from the uk, taking fibre right into the home rather than relying on a copper cable for the last stretch. in the uk, the fibre is to lead connected. injersey, it goes all the way to your home. having a future proof broadband connection will have all kinds of businesses like this farm with 200 dairy cattle. it is definitely improved our
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profitability. as poppins arrives, we can sort it out within seconds. at beaulieu school, every pupil has a small laptop connected to the fast wi—fi network. as you can see on your google classroom, you are going to be working in groups, 0k, small groups. all the lessons are stored online, accessible at home as well as at school. and the whole system is now cheaper to run. it hasn't been cheap to dig up the roads and lay fibre—optic cables everywhere. but with the main telecoms company owned by the island's government, they have been able to take a long—term view. nowjersey thinks it can teach the rest of us a few lessons about the fast fibre future. rory cellanjones, bbc news, jersey. the winner of the royal is to give
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british architects' most prestigious award will be announced later this evening. we will have full coverage of that from 8:30pm. our correspondent has been looking through the shortlist for us. so if you could put yourfinger on one thing that makes a place a place, what is it? we're in cambridge to see a village hall. but storey‘s field is a community centre with a difference. my guide, daisy, helps communities get the best buildings for their needs. and this, she thinks, is one of the best she has ever seen. so we're into the reception of the building. it's quite a nice reception for a community hall? the whole building does not feel like a community centre in any way. also helping us test out the nursery were allegra and teddy. the architects have travelled around the
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world looking at what makes the perfect nursery. this is the sleeping room. even the colour of the nap room is said to be the ideal colour to aid sleep. and the main hall has been designed to do everything, from chamber music to funerals and children's parties, to dance. very spacious and one of the most spacious community halls i've seen. they can even change the acoustic in the room by lowering the blinds. just listen to the change in the echo. give me a clap. quite an echo there. another clap, please. it's really changed the sound, hasn't it? i think we're below half a second. it's around half a second. however, when it came to a public vote it was this billion pound office development, bloomberg's european hq, that topped the poll. i like that bit and that bit. and the roof. nevertheless, the odds—on favourite for tonight's stirling prize,
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britain's best new building, is this community hall, that will probably make every village in britain a bitjealous. david sillito, bbc news, cambridge. just as they once again, we'll be showing like a bridge that special architecture prize from 8:30pm to 9pm this evening on the bbc news channel stock that is when you will find out who has won that prize for british architecture. just outlining contenders on the shortlist there. now the latest weather it is absolutely glorious across most of the uk. first i would like to take you across to florida, what we have a major hurricane that is strengthening through wednesday
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before making landfall. that will make the most powerful hurricane to hit the panhandle, with tallahassee right in its firing line. because it is such a low—lying area, we could have storm surges of up to four meters high, the height of a double—decker bus. and powerful destructive winds. back here, it is warm. warm and sunny for the most part. temperatures reaching 24 celsius in some spots. one of the warmest october days we have had for a decade. the southerly wind which continues through this evening and overnight stop that averages falling to live, but we'll start to see showers lifting north. not for all, but there could be the odd shop was coming even a rubble thunder. by morning, those showers push northwards. we have a window of dry weather before the rain comes in
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mid—morning from the west. we will see some sunshine returning later in the day. no more than two or three hours of rain and it enough even reach in part until after dark and 21 or 22 celsius down on today, that still pleasant. not this video as on friday. —— not as windy as on friday. —— not as windy as on friday. this is storm calum, it has been named. it will give rain and autumnal gales. there could be some really lively winds across england and wales, strong and steady south—westerly wind blowing more and more rain in. that could just hang of rain through —— hang around through friday. clearly not a great day. not with the vein of ram. ahead of that, it could be pleasant enough. quite warm in southern and eastern areas, where it could stay
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clear. we have the vein that stuck across the country. it finally start their way. —— starts to clear away. you are watching afternoon live, i am ben brown. the bodyguard who shot dead the westminster attacker tells a court how he warned khalid masood to drop his knives before firing at him three times. cracking down on dirty money in britain — the wife of a former banker from azerbijan is told to prove where her wealth came from in the first case of its kind. a british couple are among nine people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of mallorca. the uk's highest court rules that when a christian bakery refused to ice a cake with the slogan "support gay marriage" it did not break discrimination laws. family businesses like ours are free to focus on giving all their customers the best service they can without being forced to promote other people's campaigns.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. where england at under way the first match of their one—day series with sri lanka, looking to underline their status as favourites for eczema ‘s cricket world cup. helen has got all the weather including that hurricane heading towards the us. quiet at the moment in the uk but this is a dangerous hurricane indeed, a category four and then it hits that will make it a record for the panhandle of florida. i'll have more on that later. also coming up for you. with hurricane michaeljust hours away from making landfall in northwestern florida, we'll bring you the latest from the region. hello, everyone, this
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is afternoon live. a minister's bodyguard who shot and killed the westminster attacker khalid massoud has described the events leading up to the moment he opened fire. look the close protection officer, known only by his call sign sa74, told the inquest into the deaths that day, how massood was coming towards him with two large knives covered in blood. he said he thought masood was going to kill him, and he fired three shots from his glock pistol. our correspondent helena lee was in court. these two close protection officers in court were visible only to the jury, the barristers and the coroner. they were out of sight from the public gallery and those of the media.
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but what they described in court was on that day they were in new palace yard, the area between the gates where keith palmer was standing and the members entrance, they were waiting for a minister to come out. at that point they heard a loud explosion. they then saw and heard people screaming and uniformed officers running towards them into the new palace yard. the close protection officer who ended up shooting khalid masood said, they were moving towards me trying to get away from something or someone. then, they saw khalid masood with two knives in his hand. that officer went on to tell the court, he was carrying two large knives and i could see they were covered in blood. at times during his evidence he had to pause at one point because he was upset and his voice was shaking. he then went on to tell the court how the jury was shown footage
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in court of khalid masood continuing towards these two close protection officers. he didn't stop, the officer shouted at him to drop his knives, he didn't. at that point the bodyguard fired at khalid masood twice. the barrister in court as the bodyguard, why do you think he was going to do? the bodyguard said, he was going to kill me. we then heard how both the bodyguards assisted in first aid, in resuscitation on khalid masood. they have finished giving evidence in court this afternoon and we will hear more evidence from others who helped with that resuscitation, the first aid on the attacker. and the timetable for the rest of the week the jury expected to go out on friday when they will consider deliberations. a woman who spent sixteen
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million pounds in harrods is fighting to keep her home after becoming the first target for a new uk anti—corruption order. she has been named as zamira hajiyeva, who's orginally from azerbaijan and is the wife of a former state banker. as well as her multi—million pound shopping sprees, she bought a house worth 11 million pounds close to the harrods store in knightsbridge and a golf course in berkshire. the high court has ordered her to explain the source of her wealth. if she can't she risks losing her home. investigators from the national crime agency say they believe there are billions of pounds of dirty money invested in british property — but it is almost impossible to charge the owners with a crime or seize the assets because of a lack of evidence. dominic casciani reports. a luxury home worth more than £11 million, in one of the most expensive and exclusive neighbourhoods of london. but it's also property
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at the heart of a ground—breaking legal battle to reveal suspected corrupt foreign wealth hidden in the capital. the owner and his wife are the target of the uk's first use of a new anti—corruption power, an unexplained wealth order, demanding they reveal how they became so rich. the court order targets this man's wealth. jahangir hajiyev, former chairman of the international bank of azerbaijan. jailed for 15 years for fraud and embezzlement, tens of millions of pounds disappeared from his bank. where did the money go? that's a question posed to the banker's wife zamira, referred to in court as mrs a. their home was just around the corner from harrods, and she has been one of the department store's best customers. armed with three harrods loyalty cards and 35 credit cards, mrs a went on a bit of a spending spree. the high court heard that over a decade, she blew £16 million inside.
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she indulged her love of luxury goods throughout the store. one day, £150,000 went on jewellery. the next, £1,800 topping up the wine cellar. and it's notjust her harrods big spending that's under official scrutiny. the national crime agency also wants to know how a company controlled by her could afford to buy this berkshire golf club, for more than £10 million. the couple's lawyers say mr hajiyev was, in their words, "a fat cat banker, but not a crook. he's the victim of a miscarriage ofjustice and his wife is seeking to overturn the unexplained wealth order." anti—corruption campaigners say the new power could finally turn off the tap of dirty money that's been poured into the british property market. the police themselves have estimated that money laundering through the united kingdom is in the order of hundreds of billions of pounds a year.
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these first unexplained wealth orders are an incredibly important test case. but we are going to need many more of them to pursue the proceeds of crime that have come to the united kingdom. and we're going to need a transformation in our attitude to dirty money from around the world. if the couple can't now prove a legal source for their wealth, the courts could seize the property. investigators are preparing to target other suspects. the battle to uncover corrupt cash has just begun. dominic casciani, bbc news. the supreme court has ruled that the christian owners of a bakery in belfast did not breach the law when they refused to bake a cake, decorated with a message supporting same—sex marriage. the judgement overturns two previous rulings that found ashers bakery had discriminated against the customer. emma vardy was in court. it's four years since gay—rights activist gareth lee walked into this belfast bakery to place an order. his purchase of a cake became a bitter legal
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row over the extent to which businesses can refuse to promote political views. the cake was to be iced with the message support gay marriage. today the supreme court ruled that the bakery‘s refusal to take the order did not amount to discrimination. this court has held that nobody should be forced to have our express political opinion in which he does not believe. the bakery‘s owners had previously been sued for discrimination and had lost their subsequent appeal. the decision of the uk's highest court to overturn a previous rulings marks a hard part vindication of their views. we did not turn down this order because of the person who made it but because of the message itself. thejudges have given a clear signal today, in fact, it could not be more clear, family businesses like ours are free to focus on giving all their customers the best service they can, without being forced to promote
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other people's campaigns. the customer, gareth lee, spoke of his disappointment that seen the judgment overturned. i paid my money. my money was taken and a few days later it was refused. based upon the beliefs of the business owners. that made me feel like a second—class citizen and the judgment today tells me that that is ok. i am concerned notjust for the implications for myself or other gay people, but for every single one of us. the supreme courtjudges said the conclusions reached today were not intended to diminish the need to protect people who are gay from discrimination, saying it would be an affront to human dignity to refuse someone service based on sexual orientation but that does not have that happened in this case. the original cake cost £36. legal bills are no more than 200,000. with me is our legal affairs
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correspondent, clive coleman. this is an absolutely fascinating case, isn't it, legally. what is at the heart of thisjudgment? it is about discrimination and it is about whether the discrimination was discriminating against gareth lee because of his sexual orientation. the court found it wasn't discrimination against mr lee as an individual, the whole case revolved around the message, support gay marriage. in effect, the court found, if the archbishop of canterbury had gone into that shop and asked for the cake that was iced with those words, they would have been treated in exactly the same way. so, there was no discrimination against mr lee as a person. the company made clear they have gay customers and they employ gay people.
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there was an interesting argument here that was put forward on behalf of gareth lee, you couldn't disassociate the way he was treated with the fact he was gay. here again, the court found the words, support gay marriage they are not limited to gay or bisexual couples. their relatives, friends, members of the wider community also support that so there was no discrimination against mr lee as an individual. his argument was he was being discriminated against on the basis of his religious or political views. this is where it gets interesting. the court said, as a service provider you can't have, if you like, forced upon you a message with which you profoundly disagree and with which you could become associated. this opens the door, although many people say it is great for freedom of speech, on the other hand what if you walk into a bakery and say, i want a cake that says happy bar mitzvah.
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can the bakers say, i disagree with fundamental ideas at the heart ofjudaism, so i'm not going to bake that cake. what about supporting brexit fox hunting. it opens up an area of debate here. there will be more cases that tests the boundaries are here. a lot of consequences. just as a footnote, this has cost hundreds of thousands of pounds in terms of legal costs. all about a cake which cost £3. 50. this is the most expensive cake in legal history. the issue at the heart of this are very important. you are balancing the rights of an individual, who feels they have been discriminated against against the rights of service providers to hold fast to beliefs they believe in. thank you very much indeed. the uk economy stagnated in august with the office for national statistics having recording 0% growth for the month. economists had been expecting a 0.1%
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month—on—month rise in growth. that is compared to the 0.4% growth in gross domestic product logged injuly. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines — the close protection officer who shot the westminster bridge attacker — khalid masood — breaks down in court as he described the incident. a court identifies the wife of a jailed international banker who spent more than £16 million at harrods as the first target of a new uk anti—corru ption power. a british couple are among 9 people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of mallorca. england reach 92—2 before rain stopped play in their first test against sri lanka. gareth bale is out of
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wales's friendly against spain tomorrow. ryan giggs, the welsh manager, says he is 50—50 fight the nation's league tie against the republic of ireland. johanna konta is searching for her fourth coach in three years after splitting with her coat. the british 11 has struggled to find the form that took to number four in the women's rankings. i will be back with more on all of those stories later. theresa may has urged mps to "put the national interest first" when deciding whether to approve a brexit deal in a crunch vote likely later this year. asked about the issue during prime minister's questions, mrs may said she was working to secure the best possible agreement that respected the 2016 vote. our assistant political editor norman smith has been following pmqs closely and joins us now. the moment of truth on brexit
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getting ever closer and political tensions rising consequentially. the pressure on mrs may is just being cranked up and up and up. we had mrs may got through her party conference despite the borisjohnson moment, she gets back to parliament, it all kicks off. we had david davies yesterday warning of dire consequences of mrs may pressed ahead with her chequers plan. we had the former chief whip saying you will never get it through parliament. we had the dup, on whom mrs may depends on her parliamentary survival, saying if mrs may places ahead with a brexit compromise, which could possibly see a regular checks impose between northern ireland and the rest of great britain, then they would consider voting down the budget. why that matters is they have the numbers to
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defeat mrs may on the budget. that is a huge, huge step because of the government can't get its budget through it is tantamount to a vote of no—confidence. the government can't get taxes revenues in and can't carry out the policies, they can't carry out its mandate. it is kaput. it is a huge threat by the dup to say, if you impose these regulartory checks, we will move to vote down your budget. the stakes have gone up massively for mrs may as has the timetable because the budget is october 29, not far away. mrs may has got some very, very hard thinking to do quickly. norman, thank you very much indeed. let's move on to the eu perspective. with intense negotiations taking place in brussels to try to reach a brexit agreement by november. every day we'll be checking
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in with our reporter adam fleming who is tracking the talks. let's speak to him now. we are expecting to hear from michel barnier, the eu negotiator later. he is doing a speech to business people, an event that is taking place at the european parliament in about an hour's time. i'm being told this is one of his standard brexit speeches where he just says how things are going, but the big issues are and what his aspirations are. we should not expect too much from this speech. in terms of a substance of what is happening with the negotiations, what is going to happen in the next couple of days. everyone is aware that anything that is said, or any documents published could have an affect on negotiations which are at a sensitive stage. that is why today we didn't see the publication as we are expecting of an outline of the political declaration about the future relationship which will accompany
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the brexit withdrawal treaty. we didn't see an updated set of guidelines from the european commission. the decision was taken by the bosses in that building there, there was two pieces of paper that were too sensitive to have the outside world for the likes of you and me to read when such sensitive talks are going on. michel barnier and his team know that any word that comes out of his mouth at the next hour will be interpreted and overinterpreted by the media. because you are a man who does a lot of interpretation, what is the mood music at the moment in brussels on these talks? the truth is, there is no mood music. the negotiators have put themselves in the tunnel. they do not want anyone to know what is going on. they are free to make tough decisions, hard bargaining and really get into the tweaking
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of the tax they are working on. we will get an idea of what is happening on monday because the sherpas will be in town, that is the name for the prime ministerial advisers, the rest of the eu, they are here on monday to prepare for that eu summit which will start at a dinner on wednesday night. that is the marker point from where progress has to be made. stay tuned. the prime minister has appointed the uk's first minister for suicide prevention and promised more support for young people to mark world mental health day. ministers and officials from more than 50 countries have gathered in london for what's said to be the first international summit on mental health, with experts warning of a global crisis. around 4,500 people take their lives every year in england, and suicide remains the leading cause of death among men under the age of 45.
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sophie hutchinson reports. the duke and duchess of cambridge highlighting the importance of mental health at this week's world summit in london. today the government acknowledged more support was needed for those suffering. i recognise that the treatment on mental health in the nhs to date has not always been as good as it needs to be. and as we put in an extra £20 billion we are going to make sure we address those concerns foursquare. the 20 billion is for the whole of the nhs in england and it's not yet known how much will go to mental health. the government wants to tackle suicide, rates are falling but 4,500 people still take their lives every year in england. the government has announced new funding for the samaritans to ensure the helpline remains free for the next four years and a new title for the health ministerjackie doyle—price, to become the
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uk's first minister for suicide prevention. but some have questioned whether this is enough. we hear about people just suffering for months as they wait for an appointment. just this week a poll suggested a quarter of mental health patients were waiting at least three months to see a specialist in england, wales and scotland, and some say delays in treating patients are putting lives at risk. we are failing people at the moment, so what a minister will do without having money to change the services at the front line and employ more doctors and nurses and open more psychiatric beds, i don't see how we will prevent the loss of life. the government insists mental health is a priority, whether it is will become clearer when an nhs10—year plan is published next month. i'm joined by brian wood, who was awarded the military cross for his leadership in iraq and now campaigns to end the stigma
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surrounding male mental health, particularly in the military. thanks very much for coming in. tell us a little bit about your experiences in iraq and the problems you had as a result. thank you for having me on. when you join the military you go through the cycle. mental health, or the awareness, was spoken about back then. when we went operational and started to experience some violent situations which i was revisiting daily really, you kind of get on with it. nobody speaks about it. you are in an all—male organisation, 800 men, i was a decision—makers. i wasn't going to open up about my headspace because, one, i was scared about what people would think of me,
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was i going to demotivate my men? all of this was so much pressure within my head, ijust parked it all. i visited some serious trauma events. you witnessed savage violence. did you suffer from essentially post—traumatic stress, do you think? it took me eight years to pluck enough courage to knock on a door. it wasn't eight too late, it was eight years too long but i still did it. i did cause a lot of damage on the way but i did it. i'm mending some pieces and mending some bridges. it has changed my life. it is a game changer. through that ten years, i was subject to quite a lot of mental resilience.
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what were some of the symptoms, your mental health problems as a result of what you had been through in iraq? not reaching out and talking about it, people know who had been out there how violent it was, and war is brutal. but not having the coaching, the mentoring, it is getting better now. but it was not back in the day. we had to get on with it. i had a lot of anxiety. could swing into a depression. the transition coming out of the military can flick a switch because you come from an institution where people are around you, motivating you, to all of a sudden and not having that mutual support. that can trigger off a few things also. what i do say, you can have the best hopes, but you feel you are not willing
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to make that first step and understand you've got an issue and be brave enough to admit you've got an issue, it isn't even admitting, there is no help without mental health. it is important we keep raising the awareness. in the military, especially before a military campaign, there's quite a lot of testosterone. in a way, to talk about mental health issues that there might be or to prepare troops for what it might do to them mentally, it hasn't been done traditionally in the army or the military, that hasn't been a consideration. do the military are getting better about that now? i have been invited to give my experiences and my mental battle to a few different regiments which has been humbling for me. going back, if i was 16 months
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again walking through a gate and i was introduced to these weapon lessons, fitness lessons, mental health lessons, i would not be here now. i would understand it. it would be a normal thing. nobody likes to talk about it because there is a stigma around it. you want to be the best version of yourself but we're only human. we're not ironmen, we have people with a heart. tell us about some of the things you sort that were very traumatic particularly the fighting that you were involved in in southern iraq. i was a casualty of war myself. we got hit. i was up to my knees in diesel and there was a fire in the back. my platoon commander was
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unconscious and not responding. then an act of bravery was then to save our lives. i paid a compliment and saved his life when we were hit again. we got a direct hit in the face. i went in underfire and dragged him out of the vehicle. i acted on basic life support. i was involved in the battle of danny boy which was the first time soldiers had gone close quarter fighting. which was the first time soldiers had gone close quarterfighting. the aftermath of that was overly brutal with the recovery of bodies. that was the main thing. at the time, was the adrenaline kicking in so you just did what you had to do and then the mental repercussions came, what, days later, months later or years later? what is the timescale?‘ days later, months later or years later? what is the timescale? a year or so later. once things quietened down and you have your thinking space and you think about a lot of
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things, that trauma creeps into your head. i was exposed to so much, to then go into my second two of iraq. it was supposed to be quiet until a fellow soldier took his own life in the tent next door. seeing that was heartbreaking, really. and then, of course, the enquiry which turned a lot of things on its head. but you feel that talking to people has helped you. it has been a game changer. i wholeheartedly say that. speaking out is so important and it is such a release. when i knocked on the door in 2012, i was just sucked out of emotions. why didn't i do that before? why did it take me eight years? i felt like alive
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again. your message to anyone going through the same thing is to go and talk. yes, you have to talk about it. it has been too long now, we have to end the stigma. i have been involved in some campaigns and my men are driving one now, strong, not silent. mental health is so important. we really need to get behind these campaigns. it is very, very... it means a lot to me. very good to talk to so much were coming in and talking so honestly and openly about what you have been through. very good to talk to you. brian wood, who was awarded the military cross for leadership in iraq and now campaigns to end the stigma surrounding mental health. and to find out how your local services are performing you can visit the bbc‘s nhs tracker at www. bbc.co.uk/nhstracker. up to half a million
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people have been urged to evacuate their homes in florida as hurricane michael approaches. the category four storm is packing winds of up to 145 miles an hour, and could produce waves 13 feet high when it makes landfall later today. earlier today, florida governor rick scott warned the storm is the worst to hit the region in 100 years. this is the worst storm that the florida panhandle has seen in a century. hurricane michael is upon as, and now is the time to seek refuge. hurricane michael has already taken lives in central america, and the eye of the storm will make landfall on florida's panhandle in just a few hours. we expect conditions across the panhandle to begin deteriorating rapidly. we have spent the past few days travelling the areas that michael will impact, warning people to evacuate. now the storm is here,
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it is not safe to travel across the panhandle. if you are in a coastal area, do not leave your house. the time to evacuate in coastal areas has come and gone. there we are. that is the latest of the hurricane heading towards the united states to stop it seems an opportune moment to talk about the weather. absolutely devastating in majorca, but small—scale compared to michael. these are some of the pictures we have seen, and we have had about a month of rain in a short space of time. there is more to come. we have had over 200 millimetres of rain in six to 12 hours. you don't know exactly where the flash floods will strike. another pulse moves through.
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the concern now is that it heads towards italy and the central mediterranean islands, there are red warnings they're for that part of the world. that is how it is looking, but we will talk more about michael now. how dangerous is it can lead to previous hurricanes we have seen sweeping into the united states? for the panhandle, michael will be the most powerful to have ever made landfall, so it is a record. a category four. one last year made la ndfall category four. one last year made landfall in the south west of florida. the worst of the storm surge will be on the coast, the panhandle coast. prior to this, we have dennis which is a major category three. sustained winds of 145 mph. we talk about the storm coming later this week, gusts of
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about 70 mph. this is sustained steady wind blowing at 140 mph. it is incredibly scary for cause catastrophic damage. they are talking about an inundation from the storm surge of three to four metres, which is the hike of a double—decker bus. it whips across towards georgia, alabama and the carolinas. meanwhile, here in the uk, things are rather nice today, aren't they? it is beautiful. warmest october day since 2011. it does not last. it will last through the rest of the day ahead. the evening starts to see changes being brought about, the channel islands get some showers would come to the mainland as we head for this evening and overnight. not showers all, there will be scattered around. it is misty and mild, with increasingly humid air. the next rain band is waiting in the
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wind. get off to a soggy start in eastern areas. it will brighten up with some sunshine. the next area works its way into northern ireland and the western side of england and wales. on china to the east of that thought it is almost a weather sandwich. 21 celsius in the sunshine, not as one —— not as warm as today. this named storm, calum, will be coming in severe autumnal gales in some areas. probably the main concern is it will be a rain maker. when it comes in, it hangs around across central parts of the uk, northern england, wales and the south—west, it looks really wet. not just for friday. also windy. more rain off over the hills. it lasts through friday and into saturday before it finally clears away. either side of that some places will
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escape the rain, but not the win. it was a quite pleasant, but you can see the weather system moving around with the pressure system moving away. it eventually clears away that might hang around in the south—east to sunday. plenty going on without weather as well. thank you. the latest weather there. all of the sports news now with john watson in the sports centre. good afternoon. on the pitch, england reached 92—2 in theirfirst match of their one day series with sri lanka in dambulla before rain halted play. jonny bairstow and jason roy fell within five balls. england were 51—2, beforejoe root and captain eion morgan combined to move england to within100. this is one of only three series remaining before england host the world cup on home soil next summer. shane warne said he was left embrassed by the ball tampering scandal that saw former captain
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steve smith, david warner and cameron bancroft banned from cricket. both warner and smith were given 12 month suspensions and bancroft nine months for the part they played in changing the surface of the ball in the infamous series with south africa six months ago. i was embarrassed. i'm not sure how it gets to the stage in a test match where you say, we will take sandpaper to the middle and put it on the ball. that was terrible and very embarrassing and disappointing. the australian team need to gain the respect back of the cricket community. they need to regain the respect of the australian public especially, the only way they can do that is with how they conduct themselves. i hope they don't lose the australian dna, which is hard, tough but fair. after less than a year working together british number one johanna konta has split with her coach michaeljoyce. konta was as high as four in the women's rankings having reached the wimbledon semi finals last year but has struggled for form this season following early exits
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in all four of the grand slams. joyce had previously worked with maria sharapova for seven years. kyle edmund's impressive run continues, having reached the semifinals of the china open last week he's into the last 16 of the shanghai open following a straight sets win over andreas seppi. edmund the world number 14 closed out the match with his trademark forehand to set up a meeting with nicolas jarry of chile next, who knocked out fifth seed marin cilic. edmund is hoping to win his first atp tour title. in the doubles, jamie murray and his partner, bruno soa res, are through after beating argentina's diego schwartzmann and maximo gonzalez in straight sets. gareth bale is out of wales' friendly with spain tomorrow night. the real madrid forward was withdrawn in the 80th minute of saturday's loss with alaves. manager ryan giggs confirmed he won't feature at the principality and is 50—50 for the nations league
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match with the republic of ireland in six days time. he will be on the pitch before the game to receive a golden boot for the record 30 goals he's scored for wales. probably 50—50 at the moment. we don't want to take any risks, but if he's able to play, then good. if not, then so be it. we are preparing for both scenarios. my mind isjust on spain at the moment. and after spain, we will concentrate on ireland. england face croatia in the second nations league match on friday — the first time they will play behind closed doors, because of uefa sanctions against the hosts. that isn't stopping fans making the trip to ri—jeka. earlier i spoke to one fan who is making the trip despite being unable to get into the stadium to see them play. the england fans, we are not to blame in this. it is the croatia fans.
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it is them, and the england fans that are travelling, we are going to try make the best of it. if we can see it, what a story it will be. england women's manager phil neville has criticised the standard of refereeing in the international game as several decisions went against his side in their draw with australia. despite opening the scoring through fran kirby, england were denied two penalties and had a goal wrongly disallowed for offside as asutralia equalised late on. there will be no var technology at the women's world cup next year. england will hope to improve on their third place finish from three years ago.. but neville said standards must improve. it is easy saying you can't criticise people within the women's game because it is the women's game, no, if the standards are not right, ijust criticised the players for not being ruthless enough and they have accepted it.
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i think for the women's game to get better we need to have conversations like this and be brave enough to come out and say that this needs to improve. the search is on for geraint thomas' tour de france trophy which was stolen from a cycling show in birmingham last month. the coupe omnisports, awarded each year to the winner of the race, was on loan from team sky to their bike supplier pinarello when at the end of the event, it was stolen. thomas has pleaded with whoever stole it do the right thing and return it. it may not have the prestige as some other big trophies, the world cup or the fa cup, but there is of course some emotional value, as thomas becoming just the third british rider to win the race. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much indeed. a british couple have died after their taxi was swept away during
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flash floods on the spanish island of majorca. eight people have been killed and nine are still missing after a huge wave of water engulfed the town following heavy rains. this report from our correspondent. a brutal and fatal flash flood. eight inches of rainfall injust four hours. that's three times the normal amount for the whole of october. two british people are believed to be among the fatalities. it's been reported they were travelling in a taxi when they were caught in the flood. the foreign office says it is in touch with the spanish authorities and seeking updates. hundreds of residents have had to leave their homes and seek shelter. translation: everything is destroyed. destroyed. it's a tragedy what's happened here. ijust can't believe it.
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translation: it's a disaster. at the moment we are cut off and waiting for the emergency services to tell us what to do. in daylight, the search for the dozens of people missing continues. as time passes there is growing fear that the death toll will increase. here, emergency teams lift out a car washed away by the flood. they think a victim might be inside. but the car is empty. the flood swept cars away over long distances. this resident managed to find his cousin's vehicle over half a mile away from where it had been parked. translation: it was taken by the flood. we live on the first floor and saw how the water washed away everything. the only thing we could do is go to another house to shelter. this is normally a calm, picturesque holiday resort. it's where the reality show love island is filmed.
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but for the residents here, it will take months to recover from the flash floods' impact. jenny kumah, bbc news. turkish television has been showing new images which are said to show a saudi journalist who went missing in istanbul. he was a critic of the saudi monarchy visiting the consulate in the city more than a week ago. he failed to re—emerge. turkish security sources fear that he was murdered inside the building. the saudi authorities deny that absolutely. our correspondent is murk lowen. the last timejamal khashoggi was seen alive entering the saudi consulate in istanbul last week
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to get papers for his upcoming marriage. there's nothing to show that he left. turkey alleges the journalist was killed inside the consulate by a saudi hit squad, this pro—government paper printing photos of the 15 men it claims comprised it. cctv shows their arrival in istanbul by private jet, hours before the disappearance of mr khashoggi. they're seen checking into hotels near the saudi consulate, their booking was for several days but they left early. blacked out vehicles are shown around the consulate, moving to the residence of the consul general around 90 minutes after mr khashoggi vanished. did they contain his body? the planes flew back to riyadh that night, one via dubai and the other via cairo. the high profile saudi dissident had been living in self—imposed exile in the us for the past year. critical of the new crown prince mohammed bin salman, he recently told the bbc he could not return. saudi arabia has called the turkish allegations completely false and baseless, claiming that mr khashoggi left
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the consulate that day. they provided no footage to back that up. meanwhile his turkish fiancee waits for news, urging president trump's support in an open letter. i do not know how i could keep living if he was abducted or killed, she said. if the claims are true there will be pressure on the west for a tough response to riyadh. mark lowen, bbc news, istanbul. up up to 500,000 people have been urged to leave their homes in florida as hurricane michael approaches. the category four storm is packing winds of around 130 mph and could produce waves of 13 feet high when it makes la ndfall waves of 13 feet high when it makes landfall later on today. jon donnison now reports. hurricane michael is whipping towards florida with full force. sustained winds of more than 130 kilometres an hour. in parts of the state, there has already been severe flooding.
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and forecasters are warning of a possible four metre storm surge. businesses have been battening down the hatches. evacuation orders have been issued to more than 300,000 people. and for many it's a case of pack up and get out. if it was just the adults we would have rode it out, but, you know, got to be safe since they're with us. long trafficjams have formed as people head inland. fuel is running low and supermarket shelves are emptying. this is the last thing we are picking up, just extra water. usually busy holiday resorts are practically deserted. but the authorities are warning people not to take chances. you cannot hide, there's no way to hide from storm surge. it is impossible. so get prepared, and get out if an evacuation is ordered. every family must be prepared now. some, though, are
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determined to stay put. the media sometimes gets things a little bit, you know, crazy. and, you know, peoplejump and run and they should do that, but we have just been through so many that we're comfortable staying. so we're going to. and we've got enough food and a generator, gas. so we'll be just fine. satellite images show the scale of hurricane michael as it tracks north. it has already reportedly left more than a dozen people dead in central america. this is not what you would hope for on a caribbean cruise. but this ship on the way to cuba got caught up in the storm, forcing passengers to ride it out. back in florida, emergency services are bracing themselves for a difficult 24 hours. reinforcements have been brought in from as far away as pennsylvania. the worst of hurricane michael is still to come. jon donnison, bbc news.
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we can show you the seen alive on the coast of florida. pretty stormy waves and skies as you can see, with that state of emergency being declared across three us states. hurricane michael now described as extremely dangerous, a category four hurricane set to make landfall later today, and florida's governor drafting in troops and ordering the evacuation of hundreds of thousands of residents. those two people standing there don't seem too bothered, do they? it will get a lot worse. this will be an exceptionally dangerous hurricane, we are told. we will bring you more on that throughout the afternoon. the children's commissioner for england says she is seriously concerned
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about a rise in the use of segregation in young offender institutions and secure training centres. a report by the commission shows that some people are being kept separate for up to three months ata kept separate for up to three months at a time. here is our home affairs correspondent. increasingly, those who are dangers to themselves or others are being held segregation for hours, days or even weeks. it had been used in young offender institutions 73 times per month, up from 51 times in 2014. the average length of segregation doubled to 16 days, with a total of 709 children keptin days, with a total of 709 children kept in isolation in the youth custody estate in the first six months of this year. the children's commissioner, who wrote the report, says there is a growing consensus
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that segregation is inherently unsuitable. she says there is evidence that it increases the risk of long—term harm to middle out and development. that's back —— to mental health and development. they may be children as young as 15. it is damning and serious. potentially very damaging. the ministry ofjustice says there are strict safeguards on segregation and it is only used as a last resort. jersey has some of the fastest broadband speed in the world, after the installation of a direct fibre roll tech connection to 40,000 homes and businesses on the island. there is instant access to the internet for everyone from schools to dairy farmers. he was our technology
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correspondent. they've all got it. from a castle where it arrives down a causeway which is under water at high tide... come on, ladies, laptops out! ..to a girls school where all students and teachers rely on in it lessons... ..to the farm where these jersey cows are arriving at a high—tech milking parlour. yes, they've all got fast fibre broadband, now available everywhere on the island. that's becausejersey has gone down a different route from the uk, taking fibre right into the home rather than relying on a copper cable for the last stretch. in the uk, the fibre is typically connected to a cabinet, a green cabinet in your street close to your home. it is as if a motorway is being built to the bottom of your road. whereas injersey, we are actually building the motorway all the way into your home. the hope is that having a future—proofed broadband connection will help all kinds of businesses, like lodge farm with its 200 dairy cattle. this may look like an old—fashioned kind of business, but it is benefiting from the fast fibre. because each of these cows is effectively online,
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sending data to the cloud. this afternoon she has given just over eight litres of milk. the cows are sending data, not just to the farm's computers, but to a company in the uk monitoring the performance of the milking equipment. it has definitely improved our profitability and our productivity. as problems arise, we can sort them out within seconds. at beaulieu school, every pupil has a small laptop connected to the fast wi—fi network. as you can see on your google classroom, you are going to be working in groups, 0k, small groups. all the lessons are stored online, accessible at home as well as at school. and the whole system is now cheaper to run. it hasn't been cheap to dig up the roads and lay fibre—optic cables everywhere. but with the main telecoms company owned by the island's government, they have been able to take a long—term view. nowjersey thinks it can teach the rest of us a few lessons about the fast fibre future. rory cellanjones, bbc news, jersey.
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the winner of the royal is the british architects' most visages of wards will be announced this evening. we will have full coverage of that from 8:30pm on the bbc news channel. we have been looking at the shortlist. so if you could put yourfinger on one thing that makes a place a place, what is it? we're in cambridge to see a village hall. but storey‘s field is a community centre with a difference. my guide, daisy, helps communities get the best buildings for their needs. and this, she thinks, is one of the best she has ever seen. so we're into the reception of the building. it's quite a nice reception for a community hall? the whole building does not feel like a community centre in any way. also helping us test out the nursery
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were allegra and teddy. the architects have travelled around the world looking at what makes the perfect nursery. this is the sleeping room. even the colour of the nap room is said to be the ideal colour to aid sleep. and the main hall has been designed to do everything, from chamber music to funerals and children's parties, to dance. very spacious and one of the most spacious community halls i've seen. they can even change the acoustic in the room by lowering the blinds. just listen to the change in the echo. give me a clap. quite an echo there. another clap, please. it's really changed the sound, hasn't it? i think we're below half a second. it's around half a second. however, when it came to a public vote it was this billion pound office development, bloomberg's european hq, that topped the poll.
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i like that bit and that bit. and the roof. nevertheless, the odds—on favourite for tonight's stirling prize, britain's best new building, is this community hall, that will probably make every village in britain a bitjealous. david sillito, bbc news, cambridge. once again, we will be showing a live coverage of that special architecture prize from 8:30pm to 9pm tonight on the bbc news channel. that is when you will find out who has won the sterling price for british architecture. just outlining some of the contenders on the shortlist that. now we will check out the latest weather. a lot of surprises for the weather today, it is glorious across much of the uk. before we talk about the british
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weather, i would like to take you to the panhandle of florida where we have a category four hurricane making landfall. that is the most powerful hurricane to make landfall in the panhandle of florida, with tallahassee right in its firing line. there will be significant storm surges in such a low—lying area as well, with waves of up to four meters high, the height of a double—decker bus. add into that torrential rain and powerful destructive winds for notjust part of florida but into georgia and alabama. back here, it is warm and sunny for the most part. 23 or 24 celsius in some spots, warmest october day for a decade. the southerly wind that into news overnight. the temperatures from falling to load, but they bring a change. we will study see some showers drifting north, not for all but they could be the odd sharp burst or a bowl of thunder. by
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morning, those showers push northwards. we have a window of dry weather before more rain comes in mid—morning to northern ireland, across wales and the south—west as well. here, some sunshine later in the day. for most of us, no more than a few hours of rain. it might not even reach eastern parts until after dark. 21 or 22 celsius, still pleasant. not as windy as it will be by friday. the precursor of the rain here. this dominates the picture, it is storm calum, now named. it will bring some autumnal gales through the irish sea into northern ireland in the morning and then into scotla nd in the morning and then into scotland and continuing through the day. they could be some lively winds across england and wales as well, a strong and steady south—westerly wind blowing more and more rain in. that could hang a rain through friday, friday night and into saturday. clearly not a great day
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with the rain around. ahead of that, pleasa nt with the rain around. ahead of that, pleasant enough and warm in southern and eastern areas where the rain possibly stays clear. you can see on saturday we have the rain bad suck across the country for some tall areas. it finally clears away on sunday. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 4.00pm. the bodyguard who shot dead the westminster attacker tells a court how he warned khalid masood to drop his knives, before firing at him three times. cracking down on dirty money in britain. the wife of a former banker from azerbijan is told to prove where her wealth came from, in the first case of its kind. a british couple are believed to be among nine people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of mallorca. the uk's highest court rules that when a christian bakery refused to ice a cake with the slogan "support gay marriage", it did not break discrimination laws. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live. a minister's bodyguard who shot and killed the westminster attacker khalid masood has described the events leading up to the moment he opened fire. the close protection officer, known only by his call sign sa74, told the inquest into the deaths that day, how masood was coming towards him with two large knives covered in blood. he said he thought masood was going to kill him, and he fired three shots from his glock pistol. our correspondent helena lee is in court. the officer was with his colleague
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on that day. they were close protection officers to a minister. it had been prime minister's questions on that today, they were waiting in new palace yard for the minister to return to his car. both of these close protection officers described hearing a loud noise, what they described as aged explosion. that is where the pc keith palmer was on duty. they saw and heard people screaming, members of the public, and also uniform police officers running towards them. the bodyguard, who eventually shot khalid masood dad, said he then saw the attacker, he said in court that he was carrying two large knives and i could see they were covered in blood, he told the court. then the jury blood, he told the court. then the jury was shown the moment the bodyguard was confronted by khalid masood. the bodyguard shouted at him
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to drop those knives, khalid masood didn't react at all. he carried going on to was the attacker. the barrister for the council asked the body card in court, he said why did you think he was going to do? the bodyguard replied, he was going to kill me. he drew his handgun, he shot khalid masood three times. he fell to the ground and then he and his colleague both described in court how the assisted with first aid, they tried to resuscitate khalid masood as he lay on the ground. they finished their evidence for the day, court has finished for the day. the coroner has told the jury the day. the coroner has told the jury that tomorrow they will hear more evidence about khalid masood's background. and his plans for the attack last march in which five people were killed. on friday, the coroner will sum up the case for them and he will send them out to
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deliberate on their conclusions. thank you very much indeed. a woman who spent £16 million in harrods is fighting to keep her home after becoming the first target for a new uk anti—corruption order. she has been named as zamira hajiyeva, who's orginally from azerbaijan and is the wife of a former state banker. as well as her multi—million pound shopping sprees, she bought a house worth £11 million close to the harrods store in knightsbridge, and a golf course in berkshire. the high court has ordered her to explain the source of her wealth. if she can't she risks losing her home. investigators from the national crime agency say they believe there are billions of pounds of dirty money invested in british property, but it is almost impossible to charge the owners with a crime or seize the assets because of a lack of evidence. dominic casciani reports. a luxury home worth more than £11 million, in one of the most expensive and exclusive neighbourhoods of london. but it's also property at the heart of a
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ground—breaking legal battle to reveal suspected corrupt foreign wealth hidden in the capital. the owner and his wife are the target of the uk's first use of a new anti—corruption power, an unexplained wealth order, demanding they reveal how they became so rich. the court order targets this man's wealth. jahangir hajiyev, former chairman of the international bank of azerbaijan. jailed for 15 years for fraud and embezzlement, tens of millions of pounds disappeared from his bank. where did the money go? that's a question posed to the banker's wife zamira, referred to in court as mrs a. their home was just around the corner from harrods, and she has been one of the department store's best customers. armed with three harrods loyalty cards and 35 credit cards, mrs a went on a bit of a spending spree. the high court heard that over a decade, she blew £16 million inside. she indulged her love of luxury
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goods throughout the store. one day, £150,000 went on jewellery. the next, £1,800 topping up the wine cellar. and it's notjust her harrods big spending that's under official scrutiny. the national crime agency also wants to know how a company controlled by her could afford to buy this berkshire golf club, for more than £10 million. the couple's lawyers say mr hajiyev was, in their words, "a fat cat banker, but not a crook. he's the victim of a miscarriage ofjustice and his wife is seeking to overturn the unexplained wealth order." anti—corruption campaigners say the new power could finally turn off the tap of dirty money that's been poured into the british property market. the police themselves have estimated that money laundering through the united kingdom is in the order of hundreds of billions of pounds a year. these first unexplained wealth orders are an incredibly important test case.
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but we are going to need many more of them to pursue the proceeds of crime that have come to the united kingdom. and we're going to need a transformation in our attitude to dirty money from around the world. if the couple can't now prove a legal source for their wealth, the courts could seize the property. investigators are preparing to target other suspects. the battle to uncover corrupt cash has just begun. dominic casciani, bbc news. you may have noticed we have had a few technical problems over the last hour on bbc news. just a few computer glitches we are trying to sort out some do bear with us. we shall carry on with the rest of the day's news. the supreme court has ruled that the christian owners of a ba kery ruled that the christian owners of a bakery in belfast did not breach the law when it refused to bake a cake decorated with the message supporting same—sex marriage. the judgement overturns two previous
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rulings that found ashers bakery had discriminated against the customer. emma vardy was in court. it's four years since gay—rights activist gareth lee walked into this belfast bakery to place an order. his purchase of a cake became a bitter legal row over the extent to which businesses can refuse to promote political views. the cake was to be iced with the message "support gay marriage". today the supreme court ruled that the bakery‘s refusal to take that order did not amount to discrimination. this court has held that nobody should be forced to have or express a political opinion in which he does not believe. the bakery‘s owners had previously been sued for discrimination and had lost their subsequent appeal. the decision of the uk's highest court to overturn previous rulings marks a hard fought vindication of their views. we did not turn down this order because of the person who made it, but because of the message itself.
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thejudges have given a clear signal today, in fact, it couldn't be clearer, family businesses like ours are free to focus on giving all their customers the best service they can, without being forced to promote other people's campaigns. the customer, gareth lee, spoke of his disappointment at seeing the judgment overturned. i paid my money. my money was taken and then a few days later it was refused, based upon the beliefs of the business owners. that made me feel like a second—class citizen and the judgment today tells me that that's ok. i am concerned notjust for the implications for myself or other gay people, but for every single one of us. the supreme courtjudges said the conclusions reached today were not intended to diminish the need to protect people who are gay from discrimination, saying it would be an affront to human dignity to refuse someone a service based
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on their sexual orientation. but that that was not what had happened in this case. the original cake costjust £36. the legal bills are now more than 200,000. emma vardy, bbc news, at the supreme court. a british couple have died after their taxi was swept away during flash floods on the spanish island of majorca. nine people have been killed and six are still missing after a huge wave of water engulfed the town of sant llorenc following heavy rain. the spanish military has deployed more than a hundred emergency workers, asjenny kumah reports. a brutal and fatal flash flood. eight inches of rainfall injust four hours. that's three times the normal amount for the whole of october. two british people are believed
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to be among the fatalities. it's been reported they were travelling in a taxi when they were caught in the flood. the foreign office says it is in touch with the spanish authorities and seeking updates. hundreds of residents have had to leave their homes and seek shelter. translation: everything is destroyed. destroyed. it's a tragedy what's happened here. ijust can't believe it. translation: it's a disaster. at the moment we are cut off and waiting for the emergency services to tell us what to do. in daylight the search for the dozens of people missing continues. as time passes there is growing fear that the death toll will increase. here, emergency teams lift out a car washed away by the flood. they think a victim might be inside. but the car is empty. the flood swept cars away over long distances.
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this resident managed to find his cousin's vehicle over half a mile away from where it had been parked. translation: it was taken by the flood. we live on the first floor and saw how the water washed away everything. the only thing we could do is go to another house to shelter. this is normally a calm, picturesque holiday resort. it's where the reality show love island is filmed. but for the residents here, it will take months to recover from the flash floods' impact. jenny kumah, bbc news. up to half a million people have been urged to evacuate their homes in florida as hurricane michael approaches. the category four storm is packing winds of up to 145 miles an hour, and could produce waves thirteen feet high when it makes
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landfall later today. florida governor rick scott warned the storm is the worst to hit the region in a hundred years. meanwhile president trump has declared a state of emergency in florida, with thousands of troops deployed to prepare for the hurricane's arrival. jon donnison reports. hurricane michael is whipping towards florida with full force. sustained winds of more than 130 kilometres an hour. in parts of the state, there has already been severe flooding. and forecasters are warning of a possible four metre storm surge. businesses have been battening down the hatches. evacuation orders have been issued to more than 300,000 people. and for many it's a case of pack up and get out. if it was just the adults we would have rode it out, but, you know, got to be safe since they're with us. long trafficjams have formed as people head inland. fuel is running low and supermarket shelves are emptying. this is the last thing
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we are picking up, just extra water. usually busy holiday resorts are practically deserted. but the authorities are warning people not to take chances. you cannot hide, there's no way to hide from storm surge. it is impossible. so get prepared, and get out if an evacuation is ordered. every family must be prepared now. some, though, are determined to stay put. the media sometimes gets things a little bit, you know, crazy. and, you know, peoplejump and run and they should do that, but we have just been through so many that we're comfortable staying. so we're going to. and we've got enough food and a generator, gas. so we'll be just fine. satellite images show the scale of hurricane michael as it tracks north. it has already reportedly left more than a dozen people dead in central america. this is not what you would hope for on a caribbean cruise. but this ship on the way to cuba got
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caught up in the storm, forcing passengers to ride it out. back in florida, emergency services are bracing themselves for a difficult 24 hours. reinforcements have been brought in from as far away as pennsylvania. the worst of hurricane michael is still to come. jon donnison, bbc news. our correspondent gary o'donoghue is on panama city beach in florida. today saw the first prime ministers questions after the recess. there is talk to our correspondent jonathan blake, our political correspondent in westminster. talk through the main themes of this prime minister's questions. the main focus of pmq 's todayit
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questions. the main focus of pmq 's today it was domestic issues. as you say, jeremy corbyn took the opportunity to try and point out time after time that after the prime minister had said in her conservative party conference speech, austerity was coming to an end, that was very much not the case. talking to cuts to police in taking the government ‘s's promises to spend more money. it wasn't until half an hour in that brexit was mentioned which is quite rare for pmq ‘s. when kenneth clarke stood up and he had one of the first of the series of brutal reminders for the prime minister aboutjust series of brutal reminders for the prime minister about just how series of brutal reminders for the prime minister aboutjust how tricky things are in the brexit negotiations. he said the prime minister should pursue a strategy to get a brexit deal which moderate mps in the house of commons could agree on, which would expose the fact right—wing nationalists and his party and hardline eurosceptics in
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labour would not vote for. after that, we then heard the dup, the democratic unionist party, the group of ten northern irish mps who prop up of ten northern irish mps who prop up theresa may's government, would be prepared to vote against the budget which is happening later this month. that is not some mere token gesture, it is saying, we do not support this government.. it'll render completely null and void the confidence and supply arrangement the government has with the dup to get anything done. in the last hour, we have heard michel barnier talking, the eu lead negotiator, on the brexit negotiations in some detail about the issues the eu has with the prime minister's plan which was agreed at chequers back in the summer. talking about the cheques he thinks would have to happen as part of the backstop arrangements, the
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fallback if a trade deal can be done. he says, those cheques he recognises customs and regulatory checks on goods going between great britain and northern ireland, they would have to be there. he recognises they are politically sensitive but the brexit was the uk's choice. several reminders today for the prime minister that although things appear to be going relatively smoothly with the negotiations, at least things have gone quiet which is sometimes a good sign progress is being made. it seems the rhetoric is going to ratchet up again. there is a radio simon is at the moment on progress of those talks. ford to reason may, the moment of truth is getting ever closer. we've got a summit next week in brussels where leaders of the remaining eu countries will meet with theresa may. we had expected the government
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to come forward with its new backstop proposal before then. one that it thinks is the key to unlocking that problem and getting the withdrawal agreement, which michel barnier said today, was 85% agreed. the terms of the divorce of britain's exits from the eu before they can talk about the future relationship. but now we don't know what the timetable is, we don't know whether government is going to come forward with that, all it is saying is it would do it in due course. thank you very much indeed. you are watching afternoon live on bbc news, these are our headlines. the close protection officer who shot the westminster bridge attacker breaks down in court as he describes the incident. court identifies the wife ofa incident. court identifies the wife of a deal international banker who spent £60 million on a shopping spree in harrods as the target of
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the first uk anti—corruption power. a british couple and among nine people who have been killed in flash floods on majorca. in sports, england's first match with sri lanka has been abandoned due to rain. the next matches on saturday at the same venue. gareth bale is out of wales's friendly with spain tomorrow because of injury. forced off by a club side last weekend, ryan giggs is 50—50 for tuesday's nation league tie with the republic of ireland. johanna konta is searching for her fourth coach in three years after splitting with hers. the british number one has struggled to find the form which took to number four struggled to find the form which took to numberfour in struggled to find the form which took to number four in the world. i will be back with more on all of those stories at around 4:30pm. there's take you back to the united states now where preparations are
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being made with hurricane michael. people are being urged to leave their homes. it is a category four storm, it got winds of up to 145 miles an hour, they are going to batter that state. let's go straight to bed to our correspondence who is in panama city beach in florida. describe what it is like at the moment. it looks like the calm before the storm. we are in the lee of building here so it isn't quite as bad as it is in the open. the winds and the rain has started to lash panama city beach. we're expecting the worst of it to perhaps hit in maybe three hours' time. the winds could be well in excess of 500 mph. let me bring in drew whitman, the chief of police here. what have you been saying to people? if they are in this city,
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they should hunker down, prepare for they should hunker down, prepare for the storm. we are trying to keep people prepared and help them out. too late to leave now? if you are at home you need to hunker down. we hear something like 50% of people have stayed, is that normal?m hear something like 50% of people have stayed, is that normal? it is normal for the storm like this. people don't want to leave their property. but you can't go out and help them weather the storm is hitting the sub no, we get ourselves and toa hitting the sub no, we get ourselves and to a safe location. for that period of time, they are on their own. that is anything we warned them about. what is that biggest risk? the biggest risk is the wind. they could reach 160 mph. the water surges are concerned. then with the wind began flying debris. with a
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water you've got a low—lying area here on the beach. yes, sir, we have. we are a low—lying area. here on the beach. yes, sir, we have. we are a low—lying aream the surge cams, it could be devastating. it would be devastating for our beach. what kind of help they are getting from the outside? we're getting help outside. the senator has called me twice. we got the power companies out there. we got 19,000 of them coming to as were the power goes out. the power will go out. we will bring them in and get the power back—up once it is clear. how prepared you think the area is? you haven't had anything like this, have you? the last one was in 1995. we have had a few little ones. thank you very much. we are expecting the main wins to start in two or three hours' time. if he drive the streets yet, they are
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deserted. just a couple of cars out with jerry cans full of gasoline. a lot of boarded—up businesses, boarded—up homes, we did speak to one man who was right on the beach with his new—build house. he was staying put and he said he had plenty of eyes were plenty of water and he was going to watch the show from his back. it is amazing how many people are prepared to just sit it out. despite all the warnings, these dire warnings they need to evacuate, i suppose they are battle hardened because they've been through a couple before. they'd rather stay put. it isa rather stay put. it is a bit of that. as the police chief was saying, then people who wa nt to chief was saying, then people who want to sit it out and there are people who have new—build houses. these specifications mean they have to be able to withstand winds of 150 mph and more. the man i was mentioning to you on the coast
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there, his home is about 20 feet above sea level. that should be ok in the storm surge. that should be 0k. a lot in the storm surge. that should be ok. a lot of people just believe that they can look after themselves for that period of time. it is quite a fast—moving storm. while the winds are going to be a really, really powerful and that is going to be a lot of rain and the water from the sea there will be whipped up, it will move over land pretty fast. by about nine o'clock this evening local time, they will expect to have seen the worst of it. gary, thank you very much. take care. indonesian officials say the search for victims of last month's earthquake and tsunami will end tomorrow, despite the fact thousands of people are still unaccounted for. the disaster struck sulawesi almost two weeks ago, with the city
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of palu worst affected. the official death toll is currently more than 2,000 but around 5,000 people are still missing, feared dead. our asia correspondent nick beake reports. after the horror, so many survivors fled without looking back. but others say they're going nowhere. that night after night, they will endure the misery inflicted upon them, until somehow it begins to fade. "i have a family." "what can i do?" this man tells us. "but no matter what, i will stay." "i will never leave palu." at the few homes not obliterated by the tsunami in this part of the city, they still won't go back inside. they keep watch, fearful of a repeat. when night falls here in palu, the extent of the destruction is still clear to see, because the wreckage and the rubble
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is illuminated by these fires, which burn all along the coastline here. but with the darkness comes fear. because it's the time of the day tabita watched the water pummel everything in its thunderous path. translation: it's scary. when night comes, like now, we fall silent and just stare towards the horizon. but it's empty, there are no more buildings. as well as shelter, the people of palu need food, medicine and ongoing psychological support. ten—year—old fasel says he just wants to play with his friends again and forget what he witnessed. translation: i am just so sad that i saw people crushed by the buildings, dragged away by the water, and buried by the mud.
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the remotest of communities with the greatest of need and, as outside attention drifts away, they pray they won't be forgotten. nick beake, bbc news, palu. let's bring you the latest from the brexit talks. we are hearing from michel barnier. he has been talking about the negotiations and seven significant lines. he says agreement is within reach if we have the negotiations on october the 17th at the next council meeting, that is why we are into this in maximising an orderly withdrawal. we'll also from our political editor the cabinet are going to be called for a one—hour meeting at five o'clock
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tomorrow for an update on the eu negotiations. cabinet meeting tomorrow to hear about the latest on those brexit talks. michel barnier also saying a few other things, the uk cannot have the benefits of the single market membership a la carte. he said that kind of thing before. even with the deal, he says, business will have to adapt. i will not negotiate in the spirit of revenge with all respect, he says, for a country that remains our ally and partner. we will try to get the fa i rest and partner. we will try to get the fairest dealfor the and partner. we will try to get the fairest deal for the future, says michel barnier, but then also adding brexit has no added value, he says, it isa brexit has no added value, he says, it is a lose, lose game. after brexit it will not be business as usual. some different kind of message is coming there from michel barnier, the eu's chief brexit negotiator. we will be hearing from then in the next few minutes. the winner of the royal institute of british architects‘
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most prestigious award, the riba stirling prize, will be announced tonight. there are six shorlisted nominations to become britain's best new building and the entries include a student housing development, a cemetery, and a nursery school, all of which have sustainability and community at the heart of their agenda. let's get the latest from the stirling prize and the shortest and who thinks will win. what is the best colour to help a three—year—old get this will be getting somewhere that is good for chamber music and children's parties? how about marrying the needs of high finance with housing a roman temple? how about allowing some to take part in a funeral when someone is not allowed to go near a coffin. all of those have been sold
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by architects this year. the bloomberg building one the popular vote this morning, but the bookies favourite is a building in cambridge. so if you could put yourfinger on one thing that makes a place a place, what is it? we're in cambridge to see a village hall. but storey‘s field is a community centre with a difference. my guide, daisy, helps communities get the best buildings for their needs. and this, she thinks, is one of the best she has ever seen. so we're into the reception of the building. it's quite a nice reception for a community hall? the whole building does not feel like a community centre in any way. also helping us test out the nursery were allegra and teddy. the architects have travelled around the world looking at what makes the perfect nursery. this is the sleeping room. even the colour of the nap room
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is said to be the ideal colour to aid sleep. and the main hall has been designed to do everything, from chamber music to funerals and children's parties, to dance. very spacious and one of the most spacious community halls i've seen. they can even change the acoustic in the room by lowering the blinds. just listen to the change in the echo. give me a clap. quite an echo there. another clap, please. it's really changed the sound, hasn't it? i think we're below half a second. it's around half a second. however, when it came to a public vote it was this billion pound office development, bloomberg's european hq, that topped the poll. i like that bit and that bit. and the roof. nevertheless, the odds—on favourite for tonight's stirling prize, britain's best new building, is this community hall, that will probably make every village in britain a bitjealous. david sillito, bbc news, cambridge.
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if you want to know who has won, there is only one way to find out. join us live here on the news channel in a special half—hour programme beginning at 8:30pm tonight. many thanks. time for a look at the weather. the latest on hurricane michael, which we were discussing is fast approaching. it is packing a punch, isn't it? it is. it is scary to see a storm that powerful hitting the shores. we are expecting it to hit at around 1pm theirtime, are expecting it to hit at around 1pm their time, just a couple of hours away. already we are seeing the winds escalate and seeing the effect of the storm. we have storm force when is a major hurricane, the first category four to hit the
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panhandle of florida. we have had them elsewhere in florida, but not for this part. we have had three category three hurricane ‘s, but never a four. sustained winds of 140 miles per hour. strong enough to ta ke miles per hour. strong enough to take the roofs of buildings. it is a massive storm. not just take the roofs of buildings. it is a massive storm. notjust the panhandle of florida people are concerned about, it will affect parts of alabama and other parts of florida as well in the west. if that we re florida as well in the west. if that were not enough, we have destructive winds and the storm surge of three orfour metres, winds and the storm surge of three or four metres, but then also the rain. it heads into the carolinas which are barely recovered from florence, which is not packing the same winds, but the rain there caused catastrophic damage. this will cause damage in its own way. the rain is still a concern there as
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well as the wind. meanwhile, in the uk, it is more calm. we have a storm on the way as well. yes, it is the calm before the storm. the warmest october day since 2011. hopefully some have allowed themselves time was up we have at 24 degrees. you have rain waiting in the wings. showers coming up from the wings. showers coming up from the south, so it is all starting to change this evening and overnight with showers creeping across the channel coast. it will be warm and mild overnight, and we are picking up mild overnight, and we are picking up the moisture with some mist and hill fog. two aries of damp weather. either side of those, sandwiching between, we have some sunshine. one wa nts between, we have some sunshine. one wants the showers clear away. not pleasa nt wants the showers clear away. not pleasant in the rain, but mostly just two or three hours. a stiff
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southerly breeze as well, but at least that is warm. again, a precursor to what is coming, with storm calum, nowhere near the intensity or magnitude of michael, clearly. 50 or 60 mph quite widely, a good gale but severe gales will forming places, gusting to 70 or 80 miles per hour in a few places. this is the problem, the rain. it could be that this storm is remembered for the amount of rain it brings. we have a wet end to the weekend across scotla nd have a wet end to the weekend across scotland and perhaps it is now the turn of northern ireland and england and wales to see wet weather through friday into saturday. to the south—east of that, hopefully fine and dry and to the north—west as well, perhaps a little better. this is where the weather system grinds toa is where the weather system grinds to a halt. by next week, we're
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pushing it into the low countries. but it is stilljust hanging on across southern and eastern parts of england, and we have more showers coming into the west. the weekend is definitely a tale of two hearts. in between, a wet saturday and windy. we get to sunday and it looks as though that rain may well stagger and slowdown in southern and eastern areas while we have those showers to the north and west. we have had the warmest day of october since 2011. it is the calm before the storm, but the storm is nothing like what is about to bear down across the united states on the panhandle of florida. if you have concerns, stage and to the forecast would do the warnings from the website and we will try to keep you updated on the latest. that is it for me for now. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the bodyguard who shot dead the westminster attacker tells an inquest he warned khalid massood to drop his knives before firing at him three times.
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the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michael barnier, says a brexit deal is within reach by next wednesday. cabinet ministers will meet tomorrow to discuss the negotiations. the wife of a former banker from azerbijan, who spent more than £16 million at harrods, is told to prove where her wealth came from, after becoming the first target for the uk's new anti—corru ption law. a british couple are among nine people who've been killed by severe flooding on the spanish island of mallorca. another six people are still missing. the uk's highest court has ruled that a belfast bakery did not break the law when it refused to ice a cake with the slogan "support gay marriage" — a message they profoundly disagreed with. to the sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. the first one day
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international between england and sri lanka has been abandoned in dambulla because of rain. england had reached 92—2 before a lengthy shower rendered the outfield unplayable. in the hour of play that was possible, jonny bairstow and jason roy both fell within five balls. england were 51—2, beforejoe root and captain eion morgan combined to move england closer to 100. the next match in the five game series gets underway on saturday at the same ground, weather permitting. shane warne said he's been left embrassed by the ball tampering scandal that saw former captain steve smith, david warner and cameron bancroft banned from cricket. both warner and smith were given 12—month suspensions and bancroft nine months for the part they played in changing the surface of the ball in the infamous series with south africa six months ago. he's been speaking to my colleague olly foster and they started by talking about the future of test cricket. i don't think test cricket is dying.
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i think there is a lot more interest on the tv side of things than visiting the ground. in england and australia, it is popular with attending the matches. around the world, there are more people watching on tv. as long as the superstar players say that cricket is the pinnacle and they want to achieve things in the test match arena and they lead the way in that, it will always be there. we have to trust that the players want to wait test cricket. it is easy to take the money and play the 2020 side of things. but i hope that when we look backin things. but i hope that when we look back in ten or 15 years and look into the future, we say, wasn't it great that they all loved test cricket? it is the hardest form. you play for five days and the best he will always win. we have the ball tampering issue a couple of months ago. that has clearly damage the australian team and damaged test
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cricket as a brand as well?” australian team and damaged test cricket as a brand as well? i was embarrassed. i'm not sure how it gets to the stage in a test match where you say, we will take sandpaper to the middle and put it on the ball. that was terrible and very embarrassing and disappointing. the australian cricket team need to regain the respect of the cricket community and the australian public especially. the only way they can do thatis especially. the only way they can do that is with how they can conduct themselves. i hope they do not lose themselves. i hope they do not lose the australian dna, which is hard, tough but fair. they are struggling at the moment. the batting side of things at the moment is the weakest we have had in a long time, if not ever. shane warne talking to olly foster. after less than a year working together, british number one johanna konta has split with her coach, michaeljoyce. konta was as high as four in the women's rankings having reached the wimbledon semifinals last year but has struggled for form this season following early exits in all four of the slams.
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joyce had previously worked with maria sharapova for seven years. kyle edmund's impressive run continues. having reached the semifinals of the china open last week, he's into the last 16 of the shanghai open following a straight sets win over andreas seppi. edmund the world number 14 is hoping to win his first atp tour title. in the doubles, jamie murray and his partner, bruno soares, are also through to the quarter finals after beating argentina's diego schwartzmann and maximo gonzalez in straight sets. gareth bale is out of wales' friendly with spain tomorrow night. the real madrid forward was withdrawn early in saturday's loss with alaves. manager ryan giggs confirmed he wont feature tomorrow and remains a doubt for their nations league match with the republic of ireland in six days' time. he will however be on the pitch before the spain game to receive a golden boot for the record 30 goals he's scored for his country. yeah, he's probably
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50—50 at the moment. obviously we don't want to take any risks. but if he's able to play then good, if he's not then so be it. preparing for both scenarios, but obviously my mind is just on spain at the moment and after spain we will start concentrating about ireland. england face croatia in the second nations league match on friday — the first time they will play behind closed doors, because of uefa sanctions against the hosts. that isn't stopping fans making the trip. earlier i spoke to one fan who is making the trip despite being unable to get into the stadium to see them play. the england fans are not blaming its comic the croatian. we will try to make the best of it. we will not let
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it spoil the trip. if we can see, what a story it can be, let's do a behind closed doors game and saw some of it live. the search is on for geraint thomas' tour de france trophy which was stolen from a cycling show in birmingham last month. the coupe omnisports, awarded each year to the winner of the race, was on loan from team sky to their bike supplier pinarello when at the end of the event, it was taken. thomas has pleaded with whoever has it do the right thing and return it. it may not have the prestige as some other big trophies, the world cup or the fa cup, but there is of course some emotional value, thomas becoming just the third british rider to win te race. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. things are moving fast with brexit negotiations. borisjohnson, the
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former foreign secretary and an opponent of theresa may's brexit strategy, has been tweeting about brexit, saying it is an important moment. that is one of a series of tweets from borisjohnson, that is one of a series of tweets from boris johnson, the that is one of a series of tweets from borisjohnson, the former foreign secretary. that comes against a backdrop of michel barnier, the eu's chief brexit negotiator, saying he's doing his best to reach a brexit deal for an orderly withdrawal, warning that the cost of a no deal would be very high. in a speech in brussels mr barnier outlined the eu's proposals
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for arrangements to prevent a hard border in ireland. he also said that agreement was within reach if negotiations took place at the next council meeting on october 17, and he outlined the proposals. the uk wants to leave and will be the uk single market and the customs union. this means that a cheque that is between eu and uk, and those checks do not exist today. customs and vat checks and compliance checks with our standards to protect our consumers, how economic traders and to protect europe businesses. we have agreed with the uk that these
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checks cannot be performed at the border between northern ireland and ireland. a crucial question is therefore where they will take place. the uk has committed to respecting the integrity of our singer market, including ireland. —— our single market. just to mention the very right words a few minutes ago. therefore the u proposes to carry out these checks in the least intrusive way possible. for customs and vat checks, we propose using the existing customs transit procedures to avoid doing checks at a physical
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border point. let me be more specific at this point, because i think that many of your companies could be concerned by these future relations. companies in the rest of the uk who fill in their customs declarations online and in advance when shipping bulk goods to northern ireland, the only visible systematic checks between northern ireland and the rest of the uk would involve scanning the bar codes on the lorries or containers. that could be done on ferries or in transit ports. these arrangements already exist within eu member states. many of our countries in particular, those with
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islands, such as between spain and the canary islands. number two for britain at each checks on industrial goods, for instance, this could be carried out by market surveillance authorities. again, this would not need to happen at the border but directly in the market or at the premise ease of companies in northern ireland. this leaves checks for live animals and products of animal origin. the eu rules are very clear and i know them quite well as a former agricultural minister in france. such checks must happen at the border because of food safety and animal health reasons. that was the eu's chief brexit
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negotiator, michel barnier speaking in brussels will stop just to bring you up—to—date on what the democratic unionists are saying. they are propping up theresa may's government will stop they are planning to vote against the proposals if she breaks her brexit red that is what we are hearing from the dup. that cabinet meeting is tomorrow at 5pm on the latest progress of the brexit talks. we can bring you more on that throughout the evening here on bbc news will. a new study has suggested that a growing number of young people are turning their backs on alcohol. researchers looking at official health data found almost a third of 16— to 24—year—olds in 2015 said they didn't drink, compared with around 1 in 5 in 2005. non—drinking was found across a broad range of groups, suggesting
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it was becoming "more mainstream". with me is dr linda ng fat the lead author of the study and a research associate at ucl. quite a surprise that many young people are not thinking any more. iam familiarwith people are not thinking any more. i am familiar with this trend, but i can relate to the surprise because obviously there is the stereotype of young people, especially students going out and getting drunk, and thatis going out and getting drunk, and that is all they do. clearly this research shows otherwise when people are turning away from alcohol. what other reasons they are doing that? our study was purely data driven. we we re our study was purely data driven. we were not exactly able to pinpoint the cause, but we know that because the cause, but we know that because the increase was found across a broad range of groups, it suggests that the change is something that is
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happening culturally. there might be less pressure to drink. we also found trends among healthier groups, such as non—smokers, they were also more likely to not drink alcohol. it might suggest that young people are more health—conscious. might suggest that young people are more health-conscious. and the health implications then of drinking are hitting home for people. people of all generations, but particularly young people. that is also true. recently there has been more evidence showing the links between alcohol and cancer, and that any amount of alcohol might be harmful to health. that kind of moves the viewpoint across from the idea that alcohol in moderation may be beneficial. so there is a lot of coverage on the harms of alcohol.m that a trend that will continue? will more and more young people just com pletely will more and more young people just completely give up drink? it is extraordinary. i'm not sure. it is
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strongly influenced by culture and the culture seems to suggest a shift away, but we know in the past that drinking patterns tend to fluctuate. who is to say what may change going forward and what might be in fashion. for now, it seems like the trend is downward in terms of alcohol consumption. interesting to talk to you. thank you for being with us. you're welcome. let's go back to our brexit reporter who is in brussels. we have been hearing from michel barnier this afternoon. there was a radio silence around the progress or otherwise of the talks, but he has been pretty forthcoming. this was a speech that was in the diary for some time and then ended up diary for some time and then ended up being at an incredibly sensitive moment in the talks was doubly were told by one of his team that it would be one of his usual brexit speeches. it was partially the usual
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stuff, but it made more —— but it was more sensitive time this time. the thing that really did jump out at me that we did definitely understand was him talking about the fa ct understand was him talking about the fact you only get rid of lots of checks between great britain and northern ireland in the backstop if the ukjoinsa northern ireland in the backstop if the ukjoins a customs union northern ireland in the backstop if the uk joins a customs union with the uk joins a customs union with the eu. we know he has been saying the eu. we know he has been saying the similar things for some time. is he sending a big message to the uk, saying, don't bother with these other alternatives, this is the only way tojoin a other alternatives, this is the only way to join a customs union? that is controversial to those who support brexit in the uk. the other thing
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thatjumps brexit in the uk. the other thing that jumps out is brexit in the uk. the other thing thatjumps out is him saying that he would have around ten parallel negotiating work seems ready to go in april so, as soon as the brexit day comes on the 29th of march, there will be a weekend and then they will be raring to go to get the future relationship negotiated on day one. something of a stick to suggest you have to get real, but a carrot saying, once brexit has happened, we can negotiate. boris johnson has been talking seriously about what the strategy is and suggesting it is about to become a colony of the eu, and theresa may calling a cabinet meeting to discuss the progress of the talks. it all suggest that the technical talks are kind of reaching the end point and there will have to be some political input now. the prime
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minister or the brexit secretary really need to get involved in this process. what people are suspecting is that that is happening, there is a deal on paper somehow, ready to be signed off at a political level, so you are seeing people piling on that. boris johnson you are seeing people piling on that. borisjohnson worries that it isa that. borisjohnson worries that it is a stitch up, and arlene foster saying that the dup would vote against the budget in a couple of weeks if a deal has been stitched up ina way weeks if a deal has been stitched up in a way they do not like, that is people getting their arguments in now because they suspect that is what is happening. i bumped into arlene foster in the european parliament, she said he she is here for notes of meetings. she thinks that theresa may understands the redlines, but she would not confirm that her mps would vote because the budget. it may be a bit of a hollow
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threat. for the moment, thank you very much indeed for the three latest. let's get the latest weather now. while we have stormy weather elsewhere around the world, it continues to be dry and bright and warm in the uk, unusually warm for the time of year. through the evening and overnight, there will be some changes. it stays warm but we will pick up some showers. many areas have some rain as we go through the night, with temperatures dipping away very little. more rain waiting in the wings for thursday. we see a dry spell for several hours with someone and sunshine, but there will be a period of two or three hours of fairly heavy rain moving through. again, it brightens and drives behind. it will still be
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quite warm in the south—east, and elsewhere between the two weather systems. that is the precursor to what is coming our way. this is storm calum, coming out way and bringing some autumnal gales from friday into saturday. more later. today at five, the bodyguard who shot the westminster bridge attacker has broken down in court as he described the incident. giving evidence anonymously he said he warned khalid masood to drop his knives, before firing at him three times. we'll have the latest from the old bailey. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. a british couple are believed to be among nine people who've been killed in flash floods on the tourist island of majorca. the governor of florida warns that the massive hurricane bearing down on the united states' south east coast could be the most destructive storm to hit in a century. the uk's highest court rules that
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when a christian bakery refused to ice a cake with the slogan "support gay marriage", it did not break discrimination laws.
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