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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 11, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. finishing our week looking at populism in europe. we'll start here in germany. asago as a go through the programme, because these are really worth watching, they will offers a lot of clues about the ip layer two of the national government and. the bavarian election is this weekend. it'll will offer many clues about the popularity of of angela merkel‘s ruling coalition — and about the ability of her allies to fend off the challenge of the far right afd. the subject of migration is a topic in every country. in every european country. and it is always about the question of whether you like uncontrolled immigration? or do you wa nt to uncontrolled immigration? or do you want to limit? we'll update you on the two astronauts who successfully bailed out three minutes after their rocket blasted off. hurricane michael has been downgraded to a tropical storm — but the damage is already done. we'll report from florida.
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meanwhile kanye west meets president trump in the oval office and goes on an extended rant. this is our president! he has to be the freshest! we want your questions on the populist surge in european politics to put to our experts here, please get in touch using the hashtag bbcos. we're here in munich, we'll be bringing you all the day's news, but also. as part of the bbc‘s season on europe's identity crisis, we've gone on the road to look at the impact of the rise of populism on european politics.
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the culmination of our travels has seen us arrive here, you can also factor in a belief in strong borders and reduced immigration. we started off in my line at the north of italy, this report shows you have been doing since then. over the last four years, thousands of migrants of coming thousands of migrants of coming to italy. some got sent home, some state and others look to move on and for those that got as far as the station here verona, the train offered a way to austria offered a way to austria or to germany beyond, and i'm going to make the same journey. here in italy, it politics politics, immigration is part of the plan to ethnically replace italians and popularity and he is found kindred spirits in europe as well,
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that are hoping to find out. we're across the border and austria and in 2016 he saw clashes between the austrian police and protesters that it issue with their actions. they also deployed soldiers on the border. we got as far as queens broke and here in austria, you don't have to look hard for evidence that populism is impacting on the political discourse. translation: i am a foreigner, you see and that has a lot of change. austrians have a different image of foreigners, or people with a migration background. translation: it's mostly the case that with these hordes of refugees, you might call them that, it may not always be people with economic problems but also convict criminals he simply do not know who
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they are. is again used to the new government, producing a coalition which contains the far right freedom party in this year, the government announced new policies which means there are newer restrictions and the kind of support that migrants and refugees can access. we just stopped at rosenheim in germany, the damage is a place in the story of the migrant classes, at its peak, 2015, this place took far more people than they could cope with and had to build temporary accommodation. it was argued that the peak of the migrant crisis was an exceptional moment, one that will not be repeated. well this might be the perfect place to speak to about european politics, you are french, you work in austria, and you're heading back from austria to heading to munich, as i write we exactly. i am crossing borders every day, and we tell you about
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borders in europe which is funny. as you know, within this zone, the borders are supposed be invisible, are the invisible on thisjourney? on your commute? no, this train is almost late on a daily basis and always the same reason is crossing the international borders, international borders when they're supposed to be abolished a few years back. supposed to your german? supposed to correct. supposed to the government is moving global more right, it used to be, and i think that's why the people also changed their mind and opinion a little bit, i'm going i'm feeling bad, giving pretty scared about my future and the future of my family. populism is making itself felt and
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other politics as well. i'm sure you all remember those pictures from the station in 2015, locals turn out to greet migrants with applause and with gifts. and while those people are making their journeys with gifts. and while those people are making theirjourneys into germany were doing so to improve their lives for personal reasons. the ramifications have been profoundly political and you can see, as you can across profoundly political and you can see, as you can across germany profoundly political and you can see, as you can across germany how the migrant crisis created an opportunity for populism. there are three reasons why this election is worth looking at, what is federal give us clues as to how germans want their regional government to approach immigration. and maybe placing this is a referendum on what isa placing this is a referendum on what is a considered fragile government, and there is a really fascinating issue, the mainstream that the established parties, which is been in italy and in austria were parties
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which were a long way away from power, are not taking part in government. here in germany, we're something similar, have a look at the polling for the elections. we know it's going to win, but since the second world war, almost always it is won a majority. a look at this. it is pulling a big jump, pole again18%, this. it is pulling a big jump, pole again 18%, the social democrats, a big party in german politics holding close to 10% and the far right party, is on 12%. so those two to big established parties, you might be thinking, is mostly talk about politics. but a lot of their politics. but a lot of their politics plays out in beer halls and we would to another want to attend the rally. there are legitimate concerns that
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we have to take seriously, and those that allow themselves with the far right and neo—nazis as we have seen before. we oppose that very strongly, we do not want to have anything to do at that. do think some people who support them have reasonable concerns about immigration? the subject of migration is a big topic in every country. in every european country. and it is always about the question of whether you love uncontrolled immigration, or if you want to set a limit? we have three principles, people in need, we hope to integrate those people who stay, and we want to set upper limits. we can now talk to jeannette winter, journalist for the public broadcaster bayerischer rundfunk and johannes reichardt a freelance journalist who has focussed on the rise of the afd. regional elections in the south of
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germany, why should we be paying too much attention. why would you make the case that they should? the last strong hold of conservatives in germany, so if the populist gains more boaters here, then the question is what will happen to the conservatives? to the party was back would survive or lose even more influence not only in germany but in all of europe. get a be conservative party next the populist party? he could see the cranes are getting many boats, so there is a slight shift to the left. i just got an e—mailfrom someone shift to the left. i just got an e—mail from someone who is watching saying, ask your guests by the mainstream parties are not managing to cut through? why are they not getting the message across? that is a good question. not easy dancer.
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one point for me is that traditional parties, they have no real on how to handle the populist parties. some of them tried to look for them, this did not work in a does not work. on the other side, the populist parties are very active in social media. they get through, get through their message with the internet. this is not happening at the traditional parties. so this is where the traditional parties are weak. parties. so this is where the traditional parties are weaklj parties. so this is where the traditional parties are weak. i also wonder, populism is based on the idea that the elite is based on exploiting the people and what is established parties are established as part of the elite, it almost does not matter what they say. that is right. and i think many people now think that they are interchangeable. many people are fed up with politics because they don't offer the solutions, and populist parties about strong narratives. like saying, we are not the elite and we
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listen to you and maybe we tell you what you want to hear. and with reference to immigration, many people came into germany came into bavaria, some stayed here, others with elsewhere. has it changed the nature of life and bavaria? keys is a difference in the past two or three years? on one side, we have a lot of refugee welcome groups, a lot of helpers who engage themselves. to give shelter to refugees, they train them. on the other side we have a lot of conservative people who are frightened by too many foreigners on the street. so we have both reactions and it is polarising the people. one other thing, we have a message saying that this is about globalisation. it does not work for everyone. when we're in it elite, we heard that time and time again. but the italian economy is a lot weaker than the german economy. but some feel that globalisation is not
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working for them. we need immigrants because we have a lack of qualified people, qualified personnel at work. but people are afraid of losing their identity. thank you very much. staying with us on outside source. if you have questions on any of these, talking about the elections or the broader ideas of populism and identity in how it plays into the politics here, and germany. send them my way. an astronaut and a cosmonaut had to make an emergency landing today after the soyuz rocket they were riding to the international space station malfunctioned. shortly after take off nick hague and alexey ovchinin reported a problem with the rocket‘s booster. they ejected their capsule from the booster and began what is called a ballistic descent, meaning it was much steeper than normal.
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according to astronaut anderson clayton, this is something they've trained for ff sot spending hours of training to understand the procedure. fortu nately, understand the procedure. fortunately, the scenarios automatic and computer control for the most pa rt and computer control for the most part and the crew monitors to make sure that those things are happening as they are supposed to. such that's if they need to intervene manually, they can. unfortunately for us today, everything worked well after the failure and got them back to work safely. the pair landed 400km away from their launch site in baikonur, khazakastan. here they are after being driven to a runway, so they can board a plane back to baikonur. russia now says it will open a criminal investigation into the matter. sarah rainsford in russia.
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russia's soyuz rocket hasn't failed on launch for 35 years. this is a major blow to its space programme. for american nick hague, it's also an abrupt end to his first ever mission. he's been training for years to spend six months on the international space station. currently russian rockets are the only way to reach it. now all flights have been suspended as an investigation is launched. it's not so good, but we hope we can immediately find the reason and then we can have another right as soon as possible. because we need it for the international space station. stay with us on outside source. we started the week in italy, and here we are in germany, keep your questions coming on populism, we will go back to those is a go to the hour.
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iam sure i am sure you have been following the story of what what happened to saudi journalist jamal khashoggi who disappeared on october second after going into his country's consulate in istanbul still remains a mystery. and his disappearance threatens saudi arabia's relationships across the world. here's the saudi ambassador to the uk being challenged by the bbc‘s james robbins bates said that people can find them anywhere, where is the ambassador? we're concerned, because there is an ongoing investigation and it would be immature for me to comment until we find the results of the investigation. they say this is a very serious issue if they cannot be underestimated. yell like no one is underestimating it. know what is
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underestimating it. know what is underestimating it. know what is underestimating it. it is immature for me to comment on this. hopefully you will have an answer soon. we're here ahead of the elections and one thing is for sure, it is very accurate look at the germany's biggest parties in bavaria are going to take a hit in this weekend's election — as yet again, voters in europe turn against the established political order. a powerful cyclone is lashing eastern and southern india's coastal areas with winds of up to a hundred and fifty kilometres an hour. three hundred thousand people have been evacuated, many from fishing communities. bbc hindi. a new yorkjudge has dismissed one of the six criminal charges against movie producer harvey weinstein. he still faces five other charges in relation to alleged sexual assaults. mr weinstein, who is out on bail, attended the hearing and denies the allegations. chinese researchers say
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they've created baby mice with two mums and no dad. it took a substantial feat of genetic engineering to break the rules of reproduction. the scientists say the "bimaternal" animals were healthy and went on to have pups of their own. mice with double—dads were also attempted, but they died within days of being born. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. the issue of immigration is one that is dominating the election campaign. the number of people arriving has fallen sharply since it peaked at 890,000 in 2015. in contrast — the first half of this year saw 82,000 people claim asylum in germany. but many bavarians remain frustrated with the direction the federal in contrast — the first half of this
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year saw 82,000 people claim asylum in germany. let's try and understand how they are getting into german society. with me is bjorn schaller — the managing director of schlau who works with refugees. we work with director refugees. and that they given the status to be there as long as necessary? as long as they can process. a lot of them do not know if they can stay or not, but what we do is up and participate in order to show society that they bring something to the table and that it can actually participate in germany. duping society is listening? the polls say not eve ryo ne listening? the polls say not everyone is convinced to show it is a fa ct everyone is convinced to show it is a fact that these people are here and we need to deal with the fact and we need to deal with the fact and find a practise on how to deal
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with migration. migration is nothing new, it is on the since. what happened in 1115 2016 was new. was different. of course, it is dealing with change, and it is something that woke the society up to deal with something and deal with something annoyed to find a solution. can you tell a difference in tone? is the populism having an impact on the conversation driving? absolutely, yes. there was a lot of beer and a lot of angst that society will expand —— fear. we will lose contact will expand —— fear. we will lose co nta ct to will expand —— fear. we will lose contact to philanthropy for example. are in the students aware of the shift in tone? refugees of always been treated badly and there's
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a lwa ys been treated badly and there's always been this tone of, i do not wa nt always been this tone of, i do not want you when you're not welcome here, and the shift is that we actually talk about it and the fact that germany is a country of migration that people come here and we need to learn how to deal with it. are you worried about the election ? no. you likely need a clear picture on what migration means to this country and we have this controversial debate to talk and bring up arguments on the table into keep them under the table, they'll stay forever. but the leader of the group and bavaria, he wanted to turn some people away at the german border. and the end, that did not happen. would you want to do that, what are your thoughts? what is the number of people you could actually
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turn away because we have the human right of migration and asylum seeking aid cannot destroy them away. but people ask for asylum, you need to deal with that. and how cute do it in need to deal with that. and how cute do itina humanitarian way. and in accordance to the united nations human rights. we will turn back to german and european politics, once again, later in the programme, but let's look at what's been going on in the markets. some significant after we saw steep falls in both europe and asia. looking at the dowjones index — we can see it initially regained some of its losses — before going back into negative territory. investors are worried about the prospect of higher interest rates in the us. the federal reserve raised interest rates last month — with more rises expected. (pres) kim gittleson is in new york kim gittleson is in new york
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it look like wall street cannot make up it look like wall street cannot make up its mind, yesterday with the dow tumbling, questions on whether that would continue until today, i was in the exchange will markets opened and actually investors seem to quite happy because they got a bit of economic data that suggested that inflation was not rising as quickly as many had been fearing fear in the united states. investors like that because that means the federal reserve will not increase interest rates as fast as expecting, and marketing kind of happy early in the day that all was a raised by the time the markets closed, the dow was down 500 points for a total of 1300 points. i am interested in you keep interest rates, last summer talked
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about this it was all seeming reasonably predictable. we knew that it would be inching up interest rates, so why might that scare the market? there are two things are happening right now. the first is that president donald trump, he does not like it is much as i do. yes, today saying that he does not think that the federal reserve's process is good for the economy. he thinks the central bank is gone crazy, those are his words, not mine. he said he is not going to pirate the chair, but he does blame —— fire. the question is why would the correction be happening today if we are talking about interest rates a few weeks ago? the key thing is that fourth—quarter earnings season sta rts fourth—quarter earnings season starts tomorrow. and the increased cost of borrowing could hurt american business and that could be reflected in the earnings that will be reported started on friday and for many weeks into the month of october. the third—strongest storm
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in us history is moving across south—east usa after leaving a trail of destruction on florida. hurricane michael made landfall with similar power to hurricane katrina which killed 1800 people in 2005. it killed 13 people as it passed through central america and so far we know two people, including a child, were killed in florida. it weakened to a tropical storm and is now heading north—east towards the carolinas, which were hit by hurricane florence last month. have a look at this. the roof was ripped clean off the gym in this school like a tin of sardines. hundreds of thousands of homes are without electricity in florida, alabama and georgia — power lines torn down. rescue workers are still assessing the damage. obviously, we've got a huge tree down behind me.
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our lives over here, you can see some noticeable work that is hanging from wires oversteer, or blown down billboard. this is a minor, relatively speaking to some of the other damage that we have seen across panama city beach. you know, where there have been reports of trains knocked off of their rail tracks and the like, so, there is a very big clean—upjob. there was a curfew in this area that was lifted earlier this morning, so that is why now we're seeing a lot of folks coming out, surveying the damage. we're in a neighbourhood right now, but there are a lot of residents cutting down trees and removing debris and the like from the yard. other priority here of course is the power restoration at this point in time, they are about 900,000 plenty to talk about and it is storm
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related. estevan we want to talk about tropical storm associate, still expected potentially to make la ndfall still expected potentially to make landfall in the next 12 to 2a hours. at the same time guessing hurricane michael is now no more, it is a tropical storm bringing flooding rains across the carolinas but it is moving it quite a pace and of the tracks up to the eastern seaboard it will ease up into the atlantic by friday. but then, interestingly enough, it will swing around to more ofa enough, it will swing around to more of a northern area and it could be an issue in terms of the appeal of the weather over the next couple of days, we've had a cold plunge of air across canada and that is been working its way down to the rockies but some of that cold air, obviously not quite as extreme will be making its way south and will impact the temperature. temperature is about a few degrees above freezing, still went to the area of dallas texas.
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further, we have a few cyclones around at the moment, one is already made landfall, the other expected to make landfall during the early half of the week, but significant storms of the week, but significant storms of costs and issues of flooding, so you can see it is moving up as we speak. this is tracking into the northwest direction, expected to potentially make landfall during the later stages of friday into saturday morning. close to the coast of yemen. we are looking at huge storm surges associated with the storm, significant rainfall and a lot of wind as well, lifted dust in this area and certainly that one is going to have an impact and we have to keep a close eye on. let's move towards south asia and will continue towards south asia and will continue to track its way steadily westwards and then pivoted back up into west
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bengal over towards bangladesh over the next few days and produce further spells of possibly flooding rain here. we would need to keep up close eye on that one, closer to home in europe, an area of high pressure sitting across eastern europe, keep things relatively quiet, a storm moving in the northwest and this will bring some wet and windy weather across the uk, severe winds as well, tracking up a south—westerly flow so we've got someone across france and into germany, usualfor this someone across france and into germany, usual for this time of year, images and to the mid—20s. a few showers at not out of the question and southern italy, and they will start to ease up over the next few days. this is outside source. welcome back to outside source. all week we have been looking at the impact of populism on european politics starting in the rest of
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italy. we are now in the south of germany. we stopped in munich because on saturday is the bavarian election. they will give thee a guide on how germans feel about the new coalition government and also get a read on exactly where they will bike that government to go on the issue of immigration. the subject of migration is a big topic in every country, bavaria, germany and every european country and there's always a question for the about uncontrolled immigration or whether you want to set a limit. we been told there's more volatility in the us stock market. the dow jones closed back in negative territory. meanwhile kanye west meets president trump in the oval office and goes on an extended rant. this is our president! it's true. he has to be the freshest, the flyest, the flyest planes, the best factories... in the minute we will interview a
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representative of the greens and alternative for germany live on outside source. we're here in bavaria, where a regional election is on this weekend. this garden has been teaming all afternoon, based in beautiful mid october sunshine. hundreds and hundreds of people enjoying food and beer and talking politics. it has to beer and talking politics. it has to be said, some people say a bavarian election, they are always boring because we know will win and the csu a lwa ys because we know will win and the csu always get the majority. they are not boring this time. i have this quote. he says: certainly you can feel not just a
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regional attention, the national and international attention being here in munich. let me show you a couple of the campaign posters we have seen over the last couple of days. this is the favourite, the csu. this is the csu — two hairdryers, representing the sdp and the green party, with the slogan ‘because the others produce a lot of hot air.‘ the csu members we spoke to last night seemed keen to position themselves as the ‘rational‘ party. and the afd is all too aware of that. this reads — ‘the afd delivers what the csu promises.‘ and then above — ‘take your country back‘. the far—right afg has launched a scheme online — urging school children to inform on teachers who are politically partial. condemned by katarina barley, german justice minister, "organised denunciation is a tool of dictatorships" adding that "a party using this to expose disagreeable teachers
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reveals a lot about its own understanding of democracy." the deputy party chairman of the afb in bavaria joined me. let me understand, you want children to go online and tell the authorities about their teachers? yes. first let me say of course we be leave that schools should be a place where it is taught, not ideology, but they should be allowed to read —— they should be allowed to read —— they should learn to read and write. now what be so often discover if some teachers use the possibility to teachers use the possibility to teach ideology, and that is not the right place in school. certainly teachers need to teach about ideology, considering germany's past it's necessary to talk about that isn't it's necessary to talk about that isn't a? of course, but not indoctrinate. there is the idea of a
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platform, and as long as it is transparent and democratic i don't see the issue. the justice minister suggesting it is not democratic, it is undermining the idea of democracy. democracy is for adults, school is for children, the two things are separate. ok, as long as it is legal, but why not to bring transparency into the process that is in transparent today. a little bit earlier you will have heard me saying we have been looking at populism in different parts of europe. are you a populist? in the positive way, yes. what does it mean in the positive way? when you feel positive about being a populist? we listen to the people, and we take their sorrows is seriously. i think a lot of us, they are now candidates for the parliament, they are not politicians before, they just for the parliament, they are not politicians before, theyjust came
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from jobs and they believe that we need a change. why do your supporters have sorrows? help me understand what is going so wrong for them? i think there are a lot of things. of course the migration issues, the money issues, the housing issues, and the people feel neglected. let's talk about migration. what is the problem here? the cost of looking after people or the fact that they are not right or the fact that they are not right or the fact that they are muslims —— white, the fact that they are not muslims —— they are muslims? migration should be legal and not illegal and what happened in 2015, a million people coming, most coming into the country illegally. what we wa nt into the country illegally. what we want is a legal migration, not illegal migration. there is a process , illegal migration. there is a process, wasn't there, where people we re process, wasn't there, where people were assessed in good where they had to leave. germany had a process. yes, but is not followed up. they have 500,000 that should leave the country and the government...m have 500,000 that should leave the country and the government... it is not just about numbers
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country and the government... it is notjust about numbers because you have posters saying no islam in in school, you have campaign promises saying we won't let any minarets be built. are you this is about keeping a certain type of person out of germany. notjust a certain type of person out of germany. not just about the cost a certain type of person out of germany. notjust about the cost or thejobs, is it? germany. notjust about the cost or the jobs, is it? of course, what we don't want here is to establish political islam. political islam wa nts to political islam. political islam wants to dominate most leave you look around the world, the society, thatis look around the world, the society, that is what we do not want. we want to keep our home, we want to keep our country and cities. we were at a demonstration last night, did you go? no, of course not. ithink, personally, i don't believe afd is something completely different, so i don't believe they are one thing, there are completely different. thank you forjoining us. the afd will be standing in the bavarian elections for the first time. we shall see how they do. i was
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mentioning that sugita demonstration. —— pegida. let me show you some pictures of a protest here in munich last night. it was held by a group which calls itself patriotic europeans against the islamisation of the west — which once attracted international attention with marches in dresden in late 2014. but last night, the crowd was small — and as you can see — they were pretty much drowned out by a counter—rally, who chanted ‘immigrants are welcome here‘ and blew whistles to stop pegida being heard. the greens have joined the greens havejoined us. to do it here. thank you for your time. that evening, ross thank you for having me. when we originally put in a request we said would you like to appear next to pegida and you said no, i prefer to appear next to pegida and you said no, i preferto appear appear next to pegida and you said no, i prefer to appear alone which we respected —— appear next to afd. two days ago, not a good look. why do you want to discuss the differences between the opinions we have just heard and the opinions you have? there's nothing to discuss. why not? if! addressed have? there's nothing to discuss. why not? if i addressed a panel of parties with a member of each party,
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in front of an audience, will of voters that is fine and i will do that. but not if i talk to a foreign tv station with two days to go, not a good look. some people think that if you block all populist parties like the afd... if you block all populist parties like the afd. .. we are not blocking them out. we are addressing the very issues in our party programme that they would like the audience to focus on. so, what we are talking about is integration, we are talking about is integration, we are talking about climate change, . .. about is integration, we are talking about climate change,... let's get into the details. if afd has major reservations about immigration and what happened, you approached it com pletely what happened, you approached it completely differently. yes, indeed. how do you think germany should deal with this issue? there is one issue with this issue? there is one issue with the refugees, there is another issue that gets jumbled up with this, which is immigrants that come for economic reasons and what germany needs if an immigration law,
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and that has now also been discussed in berlin. what about the european union countries that will not take theirfair union countries that will not take their fair share union countries that will not take theirfair share of union countries that will not take their fair share of migrants who come and? what would you do about that? that is an issue that's being addressed in negotiations between governments and other countries is under way. that is nothing to do with us in bavaria. are you surprised how many people have only got..., the surprised how many people have only got. . ., the people surprised how many people have only got..., the people are going both to afd and you. they seem to be walking away from the main party?|j afd and you. they seem to be walking away from the main party? i think we‘re doing much better than afd and we‘re doing much better than afd and we are taking voters notjust the csu but also from the social democrats and from the liberals and other parties. thanks for your time. we appreciate it. thank you for joining us. don‘t forget you can get much more detail on our top stories on our web site there is full coverage on all our top stories bbc dot com forward slash news one of the things that has been
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striking as we have looked at populism all through the week in italy, austria and germany is the impact that donald trump is having. he‘s inspiring populists, both with his policies, the language he uses and simply his success by reaching the white house. let‘s go from this beer garden in munich to the white house, because the president has been hosting an unusual lunch. i think it‘s fair to say, not one we might have been able to predict three orfour might have been able to predict three or four years might have been able to predict three orfour years ago. might have been able to predict three or four years ago. kanye west has been visiting. let‘s hear what he has been saying. you know what i don‘t like about... it‘s not that i don‘t like... what i need saturday night live to improve on, or what i need the liberals to improve on is if he don‘t look good, we don‘t look good. this is our president. he has to be the freshest, the flyest, the flyest planes, the best factories, and we have to make our core be in power and we have to bring jobs into america because our best export is entertainment and ideas, but when we make everything in china and not
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america, then we are cheating on our country. we spotted the us comedian, tweeting: rajini is on the line now. sounds like it was worth tuning in for. it was the most extraordinary ten minutes or so of television. i have to say, we keep saying that we talk on this programme how there are extraordinary moment in this presidency, but i think this has to top it. really, i mean, the fact that very few people can keep donald trump silent for that long, but he had the attention of kanye west, we re had the attention of kanye west, were ka nye west had the attention of kanye west, were kanye west had his attention throughout that and it was quite a diverse monologue. some would say it was a rowdy talk about a range of
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things even his own personal mental health issues, how he felt like superman every time he wore to make america got to leave a great again at any rate some of the policy issues he was there to talk about england and chicago and some of the problems there and stop and frisk policy there —— really it was just a very random, unstructured monologue that left most of us here in washington quite baffled. nonetheless, a bit of a coup for the president. he has struggled for high—profile endorsements from the p0p high—profile endorsements from the pop and film world. taylor swift earlier in the week coming out for the democrats. this would have gone down well with donald trump. yes. it is interesting to note if you remember in the 2016 campaign donald trump criticised hillary clinton quite often for appearing at rallies with celebrities like katy perry, but clearly he‘s using that approach now. he was notjust with kanye west, he also had kid rock in the oval office in that encounter as well. of course donald trump is
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aware that kanye well. of course donald trump is aware that ka nye west well. of course donald trump is aware that kanye west has a huge following. kanye west as well is aware that donald trump is president of the united states, and therefore he is honoured to have such a platform but in a way what strikes me most about this entire episode is just how much politics in 2018 has changed. when we look back on the last two years, here you have a reality tv president sitting in the oval office with a rap star who used expletives, which i don‘t think we‘ve ever heard, in a government office like that on camera. it really was in an astonishing moment, which really tells us a lot about where politics in america is today. thank you very much indeed. it is undeniable donald trump has changed politics and look at europe right as european politics all this week i‘ve been able to see plenty of people who are excited by what the president is doing —— looking at european politics all week. mohammed dewji is believed to be africa‘s youngest billionaire. today he was abducted in tanzania. masked gunmen seized him
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outside a gym in dar es salaam as he arrived for his routine morning workout. let‘s get the latest from the bbc‘s africa‘s security correspondent. the incident happened on thursday morning in an affluent neighbourhood. eyewitnesses say a gang of gunmen arrived in a car. they fired in the air and seized their target, the billionaire businessman before speeding off. he was said to have come to the gym in his usual manner. it was a routine work—out that he had come for. you‘ve known to be a fitness enthusiast —— he is known to be a fitness enthusiast when he was taken. he‘s fitness enthusiast when he was ta ken. he‘s better fitness enthusiast when he was taken. he‘s better known for his business enterprise, running a pan african country that has interest in textile milling, edible oils and
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beverages and fought milling. he‘s also part owner of one of the biggest football clubs in tanzania. forbes magazine estimates his wealth at about $1.5 billion, making him the 17th richest african. he‘s also had a history in politics, spending ten yea rs had a history in politics, spending ten years as a member of parliament. putting all that together the tanzanian police saving of not found any motive yet, for his abduction, but they have arrested three people, including two foreigners who they say were involved or connected to this abduction. we‘re picking up all of your on german politics and populism and identity. we will get to them in two or three minutes. keep them coming in. before we get to those questions i want to reemphasize the reason why we are here. we‘ll cover every bavarian state election by these wa nts bavarian state election by these wants matter. the bbc correspondent
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in germany is based in berlin and this is the report that she has made. isa is a country awash with tradition, but some have had their fill. october brings beer. and the ballot box to bavaria. in this conservative kingdom, angela merkel‘s sister party has rained supreme, but the csu's party has rained supreme, but the csu‘s majority is under attack from the far right afd. the family business began in 1732. this election will define bavaria‘s identity. it‘s hi matt... election will define bavaria‘s identity. it's hi matt... it means that i can live in peace and quiet with respect and tolerance for each other, but it does not mean that i had to adapt to the people who come here with their cultures. germany
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feels restless. migration politics, a source of protest. this anti—hate demonstration drew 20,000 to munich streets. we have a very special situation in germany, and for me, especially for me, it's important to show that we are for an open society. this issue happens to a lot of countries right now, because everybody is afraid of the refugees coming in and yet, i think that is also the reason why the right got so strong. but they will not rule the roost here. it is the green party who will collect the electoral prize. they are expected to come second, forcing the ruling csu into an unprecedented coalition. bavaria
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has changed. many, where there were those who were born here or those who moved here, don‘t feel that connected to its traditions. the csu missed the boat, did not change with the people in the tries desperately to reclaim in bavaria, but society has moved on. you cannot turn back time. what is happening here in the bay area at illustrates the complexity of the challenge faced by europe‘s political establishment. it is not just europe‘s political establishment. it is notjust the rise of the europe‘s political establishment. it is not just the rise of the far right, it is that voters aren‘t deserting big, traditional parties in favour of smaller, newer movements. the political landscape here used to be almost a certainty, now it is fragmenting fast. europe‘s politics are shifting with a forced the old centre can no longer resist. —— with a force. thank you very much tojenny. we have a few minutes to work through some of the questions you have been sending him through the week on
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populism and european identity and european politics. starting with this can we draw from correlations between the age of people in the south of germany and how they vote? i have been to a lot of meetings of the afd parties, and may there have been older people. let‘s be clear, young people vote progressive parties, and modern party is, but there are some young people who also vote for populist parties because of the bubble i guess that they are in with social media. the afd especially runs a successful social media campaigns, and that attract some young people.|j media campaigns, and that attract some young people. i guess with social media, people tend to create their own bubble on social media so if you have a message which is reaffirming some simple and clear
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state m e nts reaffirming some simple and clear statements or beliefs, that is going to perform reasonably well. exactly. they point out the single solution for complex problems like migration has problems, but they point out we don‘t want migrants for example, illegal migrants, and that is how they work in the do it in a very aggressive way that catches attention among the people in the internet and so that is how it works. a question from philip saying is their internal migration within germany which means that bavaria itself is changing and that explains the difference in the politics.|j think many young people come to munich especially or to bavaria because we've got big companies employing them, and so especially in the cities where the rent is high people will vote for the greens and maybe for the liberal democrats. we find that everywhere that cities tend to be more liberal and in rural areas tend to be more conservative,
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it is the same here, is it? yes of course. the concert of csu a lot of newcomers “— course. the concert of csu a lot of newcomers —— the conservative csu party is complaining a lot of newcomers don‘t vote for the conservatives but i think they should bring a better offer to those people who come from germany to bavaria and catch them with their ideas. it is not the fault of people coming in turn of people coming to bavaria. in italy it was very striking, there‘s a lot of argument around what you can trust and who you cannot trust with information of news. you are with a public broadcaster. are you noticing your role changing, that people are more sceptical about the quality of your information? yes, very much so. ten years ago everyone said oh, you are with bavarian public radio, that is great and now some people i meet they say oh, you are with bavarian public radio? are you csu? they think you are one—sided the argument. yes, or are you doing fake news? and some people think i am
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sitting with the eley all the time, driving home in a limousine, which i'm not. there is no limousine around the corner? that is interesting. we started this week talking about populism and the idea there is a homogenous elite, the media, politics, finance, judiciary all wrapped up into one command that you have to push back against that. you are experiencing that? kind of, yes. even in the public can we have a new department, verification, so we analyse all of the stuff going through the internet if it is true or if it is fake news. i think this isa or if it is fake news. i think this is a very important task that we are just right now beginning. let's talk about angela merkel because lots of people are staring at the elections because they want to understand the strength of her coalition and for those of you watching, it is the csu in bavaria, angela merkel cdu and also the social democrats. the relationship has got a bit more
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difficult, hasn‘t it in the last few months? yes, many people did not agree with her migration policy. also conservatives in bavaria, but they have no other choice. they have to be together because they are both conservative parties or they have to govern together in berlin so they have no choice. they cannot do a position from bavaria and this is what populist alt delete often let‘s talk about identity. this broadcast as part of a broader series the bbc is running on europe‘s identity crisis. whether you look at brexit or donald trump you look at brexit or donald trump you can see politics morphing into a much more fundamental argument about what the uk or the us wants to be. can we say something similar is happening here? i think so. most political issues are about home, about identity, and about bavarian culture and our prime minister yesterday said in an interview that
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wa nt yesterday said in an interview that want to be an open country, has an open bavaria and friendly to migrants but we want to keep our identity, let's keep bavaria bavaria, whatever that is.|j identity, let's keep bavaria bavaria, whatever that is. i think the trump election and brexit were like protest, protesting by a vote, but here people discussed really if it is worth protesting by voting for populist, because at the end what cou nts populist, because at the end what counts is can we get to a better future or not? who is offering us good concept for the future? both of you, a pleasure spending time with you. thank you. for all of you watching thank you for watching the evening from munich and all week as we have explored populism. we‘ll be backin we have explored populism. we‘ll be back in london on monday. thank you very much. we have already packed a lot of noteworthy whether in this week, but more to come. courtesy of storm kallum, the uk‘s third named storm of the season so far. this deep area of the season so far. this deep area of low pressure passed to the
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northwest of uk during friday but i wa nt to northwest of uk during friday but i want to show you going into saturday although it is moving north away from us it still have a trailing weather front across the uk, so after the initial wind it will be rained that will become a greater concern going into the start of the weekend and particularly in south wales where the met office has an amber warning imports widely 40—80 mm of rain over 100 ounce outpacing hills so a risk of flooding as a result. let‘s take a look at how friday is shaping up. this is the initial pulse of rain moving through from storm kallum, the arrows indicating the winds, gales whiteley north and west but northern ireland, west of scotland, irish seacoast that with the guys around 60 kph or so, wherein a poser, this is a flavour of some of the wind gusts during the evening late, that evening was being dry without the spells. the best of the temperatures. this warm flow of air coming into the uk from a sow, nowhere is particularly cold but he
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does not feel great when he had gales and rain. as i hinted earlier, the rain continues to be an issue into saturday, still strong winds around, irish seacoast in particular but look at this rained during saturday. southern scotland, western parts of england into wales especially the south and racking up the higher rain totals here running the higher rain totals here running the risk of seeing deception from the risk of seeing deception from the rain after initial winds and look at the contrast on saturday. eastern areas staying dry and this still very warm, mid 20s but all change going through parts to love the weekend sunday, change wind direction, but by african aaron heller to something cooler and westerly from the atlantic. still some initial rain from those weather fronts from kallum in the east on sunday, little snow to the highest ground in scotland as cooler air tucked in and notice the temperature change that will be most noticeable across parts of eastern england on sunday by as much as 10 degrees. after kallum, what is next? this is what is left of hurricane michael
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quickly moving away from the usa later friday and through the weekend getting incorporated in a regular area of low pressure and moving towards the uk, going into monday. this is not going to be a big deal, certainly not as big a deal at kallu m certainly not as big a deal at kallum will be for some of us, but still what is left of michael i think will enhance some of this rained will stop this is a long way off still but it may not look like that but it has some of the rain going in especially towards northern ireland and scotland on monday. we will keep you updated on that. notice some temperature still into the mid—teens. as we go deeper into next week, just notice we see the areas of low pressure passing through the northwest so northwest of the uk closer to low pressure whereas in the south and east closer to high pressure and that brings a range of weather next week across the uk. the closer you are to low pressure, more than western parts of the uk you are most likely to see some spells of wind and rain, but not all the time. and occasionally
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some rain will move eastward but remember into higher pressure that tends to kill it off so that further south and east you are you may not see too much in the way of rain. throughout the week temperatures fairly close to average. nothing cold, certainly not as warm as it has been at times next week. tonight at ten: the pressure grows to pump billions of pounds into the government‘s flagship welfare reform. universal credit has brought together six welfare benefits, but the government admits some people will be adversely affected. some people could be worse off... how much? ..that‘s right, on this benefit. but what we also know, which we‘ve done, 1,000 people each and every day since 2010, each and every day, 1,000 people have gone into work. and, for some, the conflict over the poll tax nearly 30 years ago could be repeated if universal benefit isn‘t improved. you need to look at those people who in the short term are going to lose and protect them, or you will run into the sort of problems that the conservative party
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ran into with the poll tax. and the architect of the new benefit says it needs a £2 billion injection in the forthcoming budget.
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