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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 12, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: "unimaginable destruction" — florida's governor warns that hurricane michael has left entire neighbourhoods uninhabitable. rescuers are still searching for survivors. a pay review for judges. they could be in line for a £60,000 rise. the second royal wedding of the year will take place in windsor today, as princess eugenie and herfiancee jack brooksbank tie the knot. and it will take place here at winds are and it will take place here at winds a re castle and it will take place here at winds are castle at 11 o'clock this morning, in saint georges chapel just be hony —— winds are castle. storm calen is really coming across oui’ storm calen is really coming across our shores now, bringing heavy rain and gales to the west. that will be moving north—east was true because of the day. more details on minutes. 19 hours on a plane — the stuff of dreams or your worst nightmare? the world's longest non—stop flight is back. it's a long way back from israel,
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for scotland's footballers after a shambolic second half, in which they threw away the lead in the uefa nations league. good morning. it's friday the 12th of october. our top story: search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit america. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. eliza philippidis reports. mexico beach, showcased online as a perfect holiday destination, where the sand is as white as snow. now described as ground zero. the place that bore the brunt of hurricane michael as it slammed into florida. florida's governor flew across the state to see the extent of the destruction for himself. especially the damage at mexico beach, it is devastating. you just pray to god that everybody survived that. crews from the coastguard worked
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tirelessly, rescuing 27 people during ten missions. this survivor was found and brought to safety a helicopter team scouting the devastation in alabama. some homeowners in florida returning to look over what can be salvaged from the ruin. it will be months before life returns to some sort of normality. i think there is a lot of, you know, anger and shock. just emotion, you know, that is at its peak right now. i think we just need a few days to just digest what has happened and see how the rebuilding is going to happen. but for many life will never be the same again. eliza philippidis, bbc news. seniorjudges in england and wales could be in line for a pay rise of up to £60,000, taking the annual pay of a high courtjudge to £240,000 a year. the recommendations by the senior salaries review board
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aims to address low morale among judges and to compensate them for changes to their pension scheme. ben ando reports. since the middle ages, the start of the legal year has been marked by a procession ofjudges from temple bar to westminster. but amid the pomp there is a problem, not enough lawyers bea ke want to there is a problem, not enough lawyers beake want to become judges. a report last year found lawyers beake want to become judges. a report last yearfound high workloads, long hours, and pension changes to blame. the answer, according to the government's senior salaries review board, is more pay. at the moment, a typical crown court judge receivesjust at the moment, a typical crown court judge receives just under £135,000 per year. under these proposals that would go up to 106 5000, which is more than the prime minister, may's salary of 150,000, mrs may does
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enjoy significant perks like a free house in a central location. and nhs england nurse, with five years experience can expect to take home around £28,000 per year. and it is that perceived inequality that could give the ministry ofjustice pause for thought. in a free—market economy it should be easy to attract more recruits, you simply pay higher wages, but it is never that simple when the taxpayers footing the bill and when other public sector employees, lay teachers, nurses, soldiers, or officers, have been given far smaller pay rises —— lakh. the governance as it is considering these recommendations and will decide soon whether to accept them. ben ando, bbc news. final preparations are being made for princess eugenie‘s royal wedding which takes place later this morning at windsor castle. the queen's granddaughter, who is ninth in line to the throne, will wed her fiance jack brooksbank, in front of 850 guests and 1,200 members of the public. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell is in windsor for us this morning. good morning to you, sarah. good
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morning. in the last few moments of the super—sized royal standard flag has been raised above windsor castle, signifying that this is a significant royal event. almost all of the senior royals, apart from camilla, the duchess of cornwall, will be in attendance today. the queen, of course, and a rare appearance from the duke of edinburgh. in the bridal party will be prince george, who is now five, and princess charlotte, now veterans of weddings. there will be a smattering of celebrities expected to turn up, theodora williams, the daughter of robbie williams is one of the bytes brad scott —— bridesmaids, there are singers, andre bocelli will provide music during the service, and the archbishop of york has written the couple a special prat. after the
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service, there will be a carriage ride around the centre of windsor —— naga. the service is due to start at 11 o'clock this morning —— prayer. we will speak you throughout the. the boss of a medical waste disposal company which was stripped of its nhs contracts for allowing hospital waste to pile up, has defended its conduct. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, garry pettigrew from healthcare environmental services blamed a lack of incineration capacity for the backlog and added it did not include body parts. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. following the news that there was a backlog of wet medical waste disposal sites, 15 nhs trusts in england terminated the contracts with healthcare services. the recoleta, the burramine agency, had said the company was in breach of permits and enforcement action was under way. but now in an exclusive
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bbc interview, the managing director, garry pettigrew, said he had a plan to reduce the backlog and his company was treated unfairly. had a plan to reduce the backlog and his company was treated unfairlylj feel his company was treated unfairly.” feel that this company has been vilified, severely, for providing an excellent service. we have been a success excellent service. we have been a success story up until last week. all of a sudden everyone sees this asa all of a sudden everyone sees this as a horror story. we feel it is a horror story, but purely because, in reality, we have told the truth and in reality, at the moment, we don't feel that the news is getting out there in the way we'd like to. if people want to see this, i can give this to anyone. it is there in black and white. he went on to argue that the access west had accumulated because they lack of incineration facilities and he had repeatedly warned the environment agency about that. ‘s a lack. if their body parts was a small proportion of the ways the company handled and it was dealt with properly. the moment agency
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says this is untrue and the rest of the sector was performing well. hugh pym, bbc news. —— environment agency. several members of the cabinet are understood to have raised concerns about potential compromises with the eu over brexit at a number ten meeting on thursday. it's understood some cabinet members are worried about the so—called "backstop" — which would ensure there is no hard border between the irish republic and northern ireland if no trade deal can be reached. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has more. good morning. yes. a lot of discussion but no decision among ministers in cabinet yesterday. it seems as if the prime minister was adding them out about that backs up land. until now, the uk has said that if a trade deal can't be done than the uk will stake in a customs union with the eu for a time limited period. bat will stay. the eu does not want that, it wanted to be open—ended. it seems theresa may may
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be prepared to give ground there. there were serious concerns raised by senior ministers about that potential prospect yesterday. if the prime minister is prepared to make that compromise, when negotiations are ata that compromise, when negotiations are at a critical stage, to unlock that tricky issue of the border in northern ireland, it won't happen without an almighty row. indeed. 0k. jonathan blake there. russia has suspended manned flights to the international space station while it investigates what went wrong with a soyuz spacecraftjust after ta ke—off from kazakhstan. the crew of the rocket, a russian and an american, are said to be safe and well after being forced to make an emergency landing just two minutes after launch. and after 7:30 we'll speak to the first briton in space, helen sharman, about this incident. it's not often that president trump holds a meeting and it's the other
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person stealing the show but that's what happened when kanye west visited the white house. the rap star, one of the best—selling music artists of all time, did declare himself a huge fan of the president during his half hour visit to the oval office. 0ur washington correspondent chris buckler reports. over and over and over again... with his appearance in the white house, kanye, truly made this the west wing. how does it feel to be in the oval office? oh, it is good energy in this. and he had a fair amount of energy himself — he talked enthusiastically about criminal justice he talked enthusiastically about criminaljustice reform. of a hydrogen—powered plane he thinks should replace air force 0ne.
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but perhaps most memorable of many memorable moments came when he talked about the superhuman qualities of donald trump's signature make america great again campaign caps. it was something about when i put cap on that it made me feel like superman. you made a superman. that was — that is my favourite superhero. kanye west is one of the world's most famous entertainers and there is a serious political point to all of this. trump doesn't poll well with african—america ns, and kanye is his most high—profile black supporter. judging by his performance in the white house, possibly his most enthusiastic one. it's a sign of this era of personality politics in america that kanye even referenced his own presidential ambitions, although he made a pledge not to run against the man he called his bro, and there seems to be quite a bromance. i love this guy right here. 0ften critics compare this presidency to reality television. but if anything, this meeting of two self—proclaimed geniuses verged on the surreal.
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and it was kanye west who stole the show. chris buckler, bbc news. five koala bears have made conservation history by being flown 10,000 miles from their natural habitat in australia to england. the hope is british scientists can create a back—up population here in the uk to protect the vulnerable marsupials. while northern koalas can be found at edinburgh zoo, this is the first time southern koalas have been brought to europe. longleat safari park will be their new home. i'm sure it is deliberate putting the southern koalas in the south of the southern koalas in the south of the uk and the northern quarless in the uk and the northern quarless in the north of the uk. quite possibly. —— koalas. this is where they will be living. i wonder how they will cope with the change of climate. they cope with the long flight because they sleep at least 18 hour was per night. it will be a case of wa ke was per night. it will be a case of wake up, you are here. they won't even notice that. where did you get
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that koalas at? i was in australia for the commonwealth games. can we see the koala face? do it gradually waking up. bbva hostess, the air steward, and of the long flight. —— uvb. guica walla, please wake up, we have arrived in london. —— dear koala. that was a bit weird. then you put the pressure on me to repeat it. it doesn't work the second time around. talking about long journeys. the nations league, or one happened there, then an own goal. the manager said they will get some stick from this from there scottish fans. think about the tartan army heading back with long faces after a long night watching scotland lose 2—1 to israel in tel aviv last night. a penalty gave scotland the lead but israel equalised before this kieran tierney own goal earned victory for a side ranked 94th
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in the world. look at the faces of those scottish fans. not much betterfor wales. ryan giggs says his wales team have to forget about their match against spain. 3—0 down inside half an hour in cardiff, they were beaten 4—1 in a friendly. they next play republic of ireland on tuesday tonight, england will play to the sound of silence, behind closed doors, in croatia, in the nations league. no fans will allowed in. it's part of a punishment for the croatian fa. about 500 england fans have travelled over — they might be looking at some of these spots outside the stadium to catch a glimpse. and what about this for a shot — and possibly a future question of sport what happened next teaser. a stunning hole—in—one for eddie pepperall at the british masters. he's currently leading the tournament alongside matt wallace and ryder cup favourite tommy fleetwood. talking of tommy fleetwood, one of
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my paper stories i will go through ina my paper stories i will go through in a moment, he hit a golf buggy, but not only that, with the ball, not with the club, the ball landed in the cupholder, butjust missed someone's drink. it actually landed in the cupholder. did eddie pepperell win anything for that hole in one? sometimes they put a car in there. i will find out. in one? sometimes they put a car in there. iwill find out. iam in one? sometimes they put a car in there. i will find out. i am sure he would have. the british masters is going on at the moment. english players doing well there at the moment. you'll be back with the papers injust moment. you'll be back with the papers in just a moment. you'll be back with the papers injust a minute.” moment. you'll be back with the papers injust a minute. i love moment. you'll be back with the papers in just a minute. i love the fa ct papers in just a minute. i love the fact that he thinks it has probably hippie flag and dropped back out and thenit hippie flag and dropped back out and then it rolls back in. that was great. have you ever done at? had a hole in one? get to flag have it rollback in. it did not hippie flag first. —— ep. there's a big event going on in windsor,
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as we've been telling you this morning, a royal wedding. carol's there to tell us what the weather's going to be like for the couple's big day. morning. good morning, all. quite exciting to be here this morning. there's a royal wedding this morning, princess eugenie of york and also mrjack brooksbank getting married in st george's chapel right behind me at 11am. the service is expected to last for an hour and the couple will come out, stand on the steps for the photograph, hopefully for the kiss as well, and then a trip around windsor. they're not going along the long walk long walk, but they will follow a similar route to the earl and countess of wessex that they took on their wedding day. we're looking forward to seeing what the bride will be wearing. windy at windsor this morning. also rather damp but an improving picture. however, storm callum is
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upon us already, bringing in heavy rain and gale is to the west. we've already had a gust of wind 76 mph across the isles of scilly. the met 0ffice across the isles of scilly. the met office has an amber weather warning for south wales for notjust office has an amber weather warning for south wales for not just today but tomorrow for heavy rain, which could lead to some disruption. if you're travelling, bear that in mind. you can see on the pressure chart, callum is the low pressure area to the west and look at the isobars, they are so squeezed. it will be windy wherever you are, plus we got the rain. we've got the rain and gusting winds coming in from the west, gusts currently 50—60 mph, that rain will move across us during the day but not in the south—east, staying mostly dry here, and some sunshine so here it will be a pleasa nt sunshine so here it will be a pleasant afternoon and quite warm after the damp start we've had. the heavy rain could be problematic, lots of servers water and spray around and couple that with strong winds —— surface water. bear that in
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mind if you're in a light or high sided vehicle. temperatures academic but cooler in the wind and rain obviously. through the evening and overnight, we'll still have this rain. it's a front draped across the uk through the central suede. to the north of it, in parts of scotland, we're looking at showers and to the south of it, still largely dry —— central suede. look at the temperatures, 17, 18, remarkable for this stage in october. drifting a little bit further north, the weather front, so the north and west will see the heaviest rain and don't forget the amber warning for south wales. temperatures in the sunshine in central and eastern england could get up to 2a, possibly 25. again, unseasonably warm. 0n sunday we see the rain move away into the north sea with brighter skies behind with some sunshine, dry conditions but in scotland, showery
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rain and in persistent showers we could see snow on the tops of the grampians. and on sunday it will feel much cooler, for some, 8—10 cooler than saturday. the weather is really to psy—tu rvy. cooler than saturday. the weather is really topsy-turvy. a 10 degrees difference over a week. it feels like it is up and down, up and down. 0ver like it is up and down, up and down. over a day. and if you think about the overnight temperatures tonight, 17s, 18s, incredible, not a record, that's 19.4, 17s, 18s, incredible, not a record, that's19.4, that's 17s, 18s, incredible, not a record, that's 19.4, that's the overnight that's19.4, that's the overnight record for october, we don't think we will do that but still. it's like you need a whole wardrobe of different bedding every night. carol, thanks very much! see you later! let's take a look at some of the front pages. the times claims charities and companies working with universal credit claimants have been banned from criticising the work and pensions secretary. the mail leads with the story
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we're reporting this morning that seniorjudges could be in for a pay rise of about £60,000 a year. it would take their pay up to around £240,000. and the smile of princess eugenie, who is marrying jack brooksbank at a. m. today. eugenie, who is marrying jack brooksbank at a.m. today. —— 11am today. the independent has a picture of that extraordinary meeting between donald trump and the rapper kanye west. not dull, that meeting! certainly not! and finally the guardian claims a kent motorway is undergoing closures so it can be turned into a potential lorry park to deal with the impact of a no—deal brexit. this is the m26, which will be
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closed through the night until next week for site service before another set of closures in the month before christmas. sean, what have you got? good morning, the front of the times, you mentioned the main story, but the story at the top is pretty interesting, restaurants ordered to frank peters and pies to fight obesity. no! -- to shrink pizzas. this is about the relationship between regulators and the industry, public health england. we see most restau ra nts public health england. we see most restaurants showing calories... you can get pizzas now in certain re sta u ra nt can get pizzas now in certain restaurant is with a hole in the middle where they put a whole load of salad. it isn't pizza, though, is it? a poor excuse for a night out! a pie should be limited to 695 calories, doesn't sound like much. you're looking at me like i'm an
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expert in pies! that is on the cusp ofa expert in pies! that is on the cusp of a half—time match day pie! can they tell restaurants to do this? history tells us it would be more like a sugar tax, they might have to force them, it's unlikely you will see a law implemented that will save your pizza can only have eight pieces pepperoni. i didn't realise a pizza couldn't contain more than 928 calories. i know that's the limit, i thought pizzas would have contained loads of calories. 928 is quite a lot, but fair enough. mike? no pizza for the england cricketers in sri lanka, a day off, they went on safari, an elephant came in from the bowler's end, then their vehicle got stuck in the quagmires. it is the rainy season! they had fun looking at the wildlife in sri lanka on their day off. and england footballers, very odd, playing in
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this silence in croatia because the croatian fa were published, punished when a swastika was burned into the grass for a euro 2016 qualifier against italy. arab southgate says to mind their language, there will be no cheering, because everything will be picked up. very odd, no proud —— and gareth southgate says. we have michael carrick after 8:30am andy moran 20 minutes put —— and in around 20 minutes we have a world speedway champion. dwindling pupil numbers and transport costs are just some of the unique challenges that rural schools face, that's according to teachers working in england's countryside. the welsh government is tackling the problem by launching a rural education action plan to support their pupils, as tim muffett's been finding out for brea kfast‘s latest educating uk report. head teachers need many skills. for
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steve woodhouse, they include washing up and serving lunch. today, for instance, i'm going into the school kitchen because we've got some staff absent, which is difficult to cover. if i was to bring in extra staff that would copy obviously have a cost implication. steve says he typically does this twice a week. he is head in the east riding of yorkshire.” twice a week. he is head in the east riding of yorkshire. i don't mind. it's always enjoyable to work with the rest of the staff. i just worry when i get back to the office there are things i haven't got done that i should have been focusing on really. why are you just anning near? why was i just why are you just anning near? why was ijust anning here? because i was ijust anning here? because i was busy talking, now i'm doing the job. more than 500 rural school head teachers in england have been surveyed as part of a new report published today. 4096 of our survey teachers said they had fewer children in role than they had
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capacity for, and that affects their budget in every way because obviously every child that comes into the school attracts funding. there's also the added expense of providing transport for pupils that live far away and sometimes higher salary because the survey found staff in rural schools tend to stay in theirjobs for longer. there are more experienced, but more expensive. the situation‘s described asa expensive. the situation‘s described as a perfect storm. some challenges seem as a perfect storm. some challenges seem very as a perfect storm. some challenges seem very hard to solve the. some schools will always be isolated, and in ruralareas, it schools will always be isolated, and in rural areas, it can be very hard to move people quickly from one place to another. but here in south—west wales, a new project is using technology to try to tackle the problem. dyla n the problem. dylan jones is the problem. dylanjones is teaching further maths a—level at a school in terry liddy and. 0bviously liddy and. obviously the main idea is to stop
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the travelling. depending on the internet connections and things in the area, with things like that obviously working fine, i'm sure it isa obviously working fine, i'm sure it is a way forward. this project's pa rt is a way forward. this project's part of the welsh government's educating uk, which will be launched today, it will be trialled across the area. it's pretty much exactly the area. it's pretty much exactly the same —— educating uk. it broadens possibilities —— rural education plan. it's part of a similar the department of education in england says it recognises the importance of oral schools and the challenges they face. it said an extra £25 million had been set aside to support them. but in the east yorkshire, head teacher steve woodhouse says he has to make more savings to his budget next year, and right now, he doesn't know how he'll do it. tim muffet, bbc news. still to come this morning: time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we would just like to apologise to viewers in the south—east and london for any technical problems you witnessed. we will try to get that sorted out as soon as we can. it is just after 6:30 a.m.. lots of news and sports on the programme. but also on breakfast this morning, images of the russian rocket malfunction have led to us wondering what it's really like on board a spacecraft. we're talking to a woman who knows. helen sharman, the first briton in space, is here after 7:30. he was the england player at the top
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of his game but behind the scenes footballer michael carrick was dealing with difficult mental health issues. he'll tell us how he coped. it is power. language is what defines us. and gyles brandreth is a man on a mission to improve our grammar and bring back punctuation. we'll get him checking our scripts later. hejoins us on he joins us on the sofa. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit america. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. michael weakened to a tropical storm, but people across the us have been warned of ongoing danger from downed power lines, flash floods and landslides.
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senior high courtjudges in england and wales could be in line for a 32% pay rise — meaning they would earn up to £240,000 a year. the senior salaries review board has recommended the increase to address low morale among judges, which has led to a sharp fall in applications for the job. the government has not yet decided whether to accept the proposals. the boss of a medical waste disposal company has defended its conduct after it was stripped of it's nhs contracts and the environment agency began enforcement proceedings and a criminal investigation. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, garry pettrigrew of healthcare environmental services said his company had been vilified. he blamed a lack of incineration capacity for the backlog of waste and said it did not include body parts. the environment agency said it wasn't true that there was insufficient capacity and the rest of the sector was performing well. their concerns for a british student
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detained in the united arab ehmer it is detained for the past five months. —— united arab emirates. he matthew hedges was researching he the country's foreign and security policies when he was arrested at dubai airport. the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt has said he's "very worried" and has spoken to uae officials. his wife, daniela, has said she's concerned about his well being. we'll be speaking to matthew's wife, daniela, at 08:10. several members of the cabinet are understood to have raised concerns about potential compromises with the eu over brexit at a number ten meeting on thursday. it's understood some cabinet members are worried about the so—called "backstop" — which would ensure there is no hard border between the irish republic and northern ireland if no trade deal can be reached. russia is investigating what went
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wrong with the soyuz spacecraft. the russian and american are said to be safe and well after being forced to make an emergency man “— safe and well after being forced to make an emergency man —— landing two minutes after launch. and after 7:30am we will talk to the first briton in space about that incident. today sees the second royal wedding of the year — the queen's granddaughter princess eugenie and jack brooksbank are tying the knot in windsor. the couple will be wed at the same venue that hosted the nuptials of the duke and duchess of sussex back in may but this wedding is expected to have a different feel. roya nikkhah, the royal correspondent for the sunday times joins us now from windsor. a very good morning to you. i know it is early in the morning. it is ha rd to it is early in the morning. it is hard to get the sense of a wedding date when it is not yet light. we can see the castle behind you —— wedding day. give us a sense of what you think this wedding will be like.
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well, i think it certainly, from what we have heard and seen in the past weeks and days be on a pretty grand scale. it will be an enormous congregation of more than 800 guests. a of military involvement, a lot of celebrities. i don't think it will feel like the wedding of the night in line to the throne. it will feel like a spectacular occasion —— nine. people are saying the same thing. we should not be comparing the two things. she is the queen's granddaughter and there will be so many faces there that people will wa nt to many faces there that people will want to see. it will be a very special occasion for the two individuals involved, and those alongside them, their family, individuals involved, and those alongside them, theirfamily, there will be fascination as to who is that, what they were in, the atmosphere, all of those things will stand. absolutely. it is difficult not to try to compare the two weddings because we have a wedding in may. this is a different wedding. interesting to see things like
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sarah, duchess of york, coming back into the family fold. we have not seen into the family fold. we have not seen her in front of house for some time. we know we have andre bocelli performing during the service. it will feel different, we got the order of service through last night. much more traditional than harry and meghan. printers —— princess beatrice is doing a reading from the great gatsby. much more traditional than what we saw in may. have you noticed, i remember from than what we saw in may. have you noticed, i rememberfrom the previous royal wedding, huge international interest. aisyah getting the sense of that on this occasion to? —— are you getting? slightly less so than with harry and make an's wedding. that was extraordinary. all the broadcasters from america and canada descended on windsor. i felt less interest from america and canada descended on windsor. ifelt less interest this time around. that is because eugenie does not do public duties, they are not as aware of her as they are harry. i think,
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not as aware of her as they are harry. ithink, later on, we will see the crowds gather. there will be people who will want to see the queen, most numbers of the royal family. iam queen, most numbers of the royal family. i am sure there will be a fairamount of family. i am sure there will be a fair amount of public interest and public interest later on. the duke of edinburgh is also expected to be attending. well, we hope he will be attending. well, we hope he will be attending. it wasn't marked in the order of service last night as attending the queen. what buckingham palace has said is that he will wake up palace has said is that he will wake up this morning and see how he feels. the good sign that he may well just feel he feels. the good sign that he may welljust feel he is up to is that yesterday he did a brand engagement at windsor castle, he held an audience with some military people —— a rare engagement. it is perhaps a sign that prince philip is filling up a sign that prince philip is filling up to attending is granddaughter‘s wedding. thank you very much for your time this morning. as it gets like their it will be interesting to see how it looks. thank you for your
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time this morning. it is great to see the standard there. we will have coverage throughout the morning. five koala bears have made conservation history by being flown 10,000 miles from their natural habitat in australia to england. the hope is british scientists can create a back—up population here in the uk to protect the vulnerable marsupials. while northern koalas can be found at edinburgh zoo, this is the first time southern koalas have been brought to europe. longleat safari park will be their new home. as long as there is eucalyptus i am sure they will be happy. michael, good morning. a place to sleep. i think they are fascinating to watch. a little bit smelly. how did scotland's football fans
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feel? at half-time they will one up against israel. then talk about things going pear shaped, sending off and own goal. matt machan own goal. it's been a long journey back for the tartan army who went to watch scotland lose 2—1 in israel last night. a charlie mulgrew penalty gave scotland the lead in the nations league match but israel deservedly equalised. john souttar was sent off before a kieran tierney own goal earned victory for a side ranked below the likes of luxembourg and the faroe islands. it wasn't good enough. started well enough. then it was all downhill from there. a very tough night. getting a man sent off, it was not a night. at the end of the day, the performance wasn't good enough for three points. that is very disappointing. we need to dust ourselves down and get back on track straightaway. we don't have time to dwell on this result. wales were also beaten, losing 4—1 to spain in a friendly in cardiff. the spanish have beaten both england and croatia in the nations league, and continued to look the part,
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scoring three goals inside the first half an hour. burnley‘s sam vokes, did score a consolation goal but it was a heavy defeat for ryan giggs side just brush ourselves down, take it on the chin. the last time we were in cardiff we won 4—1, we were magnificent. tonight we were disappointed. the good thing about football is you always have the next game. that can't come quick enough. and england under—21s, have thrashed andorra in chesterfield to qualify for next year's euros. they only needed one point to qualify, but the whistle blew, at 7—0. liverpool striker dominic solankey, here with the final goal. elsewhere northern ireland beat iceland 1—0. england's senior team, will play their first game behind closed doors in croatia, in the nations league tonight, with no fans allowed in, because of sanctions against the hosts. the punishment comes after a swastika, was marked on their pitch three years ago. some england fans will be looking
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at some of these areas around the stadium as a vantage point. 500 fans are said to be in croatia, despite not being able to get in. it will be a strange experience. i guess we effectively do that every day of our lives, we play football in front of a handful of people watching. so it's not totally unique. but for a match situation and an international, very different. i am sure croatia feel the same. do you remember the fashion of 2005? the fashion? wayne rooney has been getting nostalgic about manchester united. but not about the football, it was about the fashion. they look like a boy band. from the left is paul scholes, rio ferdinand, rooney himself, alan smith and john 0'shea. new kids on the block, isn't it? rooney simply posted it
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with a crying laughing face. how times change! next week, marks the 50th anniversary, of athlete tommie smith, famous gold medal, at the mexico city 0lympics, and more famously — the black power salute, with his teammatejohn carlos. the pair wanted to take a stand, against racial injustice in the us, and he told the bbc that recent protests — including that, by american footballer colin kaepkernick, and others taking a knee, made him cry i would have wanted to meet him had he not taken any, but because he didn't recognise the fact that these quys didn't recognise the fact that these guys did the same thing, i wonder what they were thinking. and the sacrificial dans that he took —— dance that he took revealed his upbringing the need to be better socially. tommy smith, basically the same thing, 50 years later, it will be like that in another 50 years. tommy smith 50 is on talking to the bbc. and don't blink. you won't want to miss this one. and possible one to appear
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on question of sport's what happened next soon. eddie pepperall surely with the shot of the day for this fantastic hole in one at the ninth in the british masters. quite how it defied physics to go in i'm not quite sure — but a bit of help from the pin and some spin and in it popped. he's leading the tournament alongside matt wallace and tommy fleetwood. last weekend saw speedway champion tai woffinden, ride into the history books. he became the most decorated british rider of all time after winning his third world title in poland. tai willjoin us on the sofa, in a moment, but before we speak to him, let's take a look at him in action. music plays. and great britain's
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greatest in speedway history. music plays. what a moment. congratulations. so many records are broken, the first british rider to win three titles. was this more special than the others? they say it is harder to win the trophy again? i think winning it, i have not retained it yet, like back to back. i think winning it, the first one was the best, 2013. the second one was just business as usual. the same with this one. you have got to sit down and actually make yourself appreciate it, because
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the time goes so fast. you start to focus on the next one. it is like i am having a week off now and eating what i want, it is amazing. when you say you're eating what you want, what did you have for dinner yesterday? a chinese, we live next door to a chinese. stuff your face? exactly. i've been on a speedway bike and it can be terrifying. no breaks, no gears and to accelerate faster than f1. this is me physically... you were very impressed, this is with robert lambert, one of your guys. for anyone trying it, it will seem like the hardest thing in the world but i've done it for so long, it's like you guys walking down the street or sat here doing this now. so much power to control, one slip and you're into the wall. no breaks, no gears, accelerate faster than formula 1 and that's the british grand prix, 45,000. that's you, not
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me to be clear! how do you slow down? it's got a lot of engine brake, if you're in a car and it is second year, it is really revving and it is... essentially it is like that. we talk to sports stars often about nerves and anxiety, more sports people have been open about how they feel through their career, there's so little time in your sport, the way you take off at the start, it's very quick, do you have time for nerves? i know other riders do, i've never struggled from nerves. when the pressure is on i seem nerves. when the pressure is on i seem to raise my game a little bit. whenever i'm put in that situation when i have to do it i always do it when i have to do it i always do it when i'm on the bike. i train with alex lowe, sam from world superbike moto gp, we have a good team we train with and they have a tough race, they have a two or three week break to think about before their next event and with me, if i
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struggle in the first race i am out in ten minutes. motorcyclists and jockeys, we've had a few coming in here, they give us a list of the damage done to their body. my list probably... i've had a few. you break your collarbone in 2013 when you won? i broke my collarbone twice when i won the championship in 2013, i raced two weeks after i broke it. what about the sport, huge in places like poland, it is big here to a certain degree but it needs to get back to that peak, and this will surely help? any media stuff for me being successful on the track will help the sport. i try to do all my bit to help boost the profile. it's one of those things where i'm lucky in this situation and i have to take everything with both hands. do you get to keep it? i get a replica. the bikei get to keep it? i get a replica. the bike i won the championship on, that gets washed. the boys build it back
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up gets washed. the boys build it back up and it's my trophy. i have three bikes. its mooring sighting than a trophy! you are off to wolverhampton next week —— it's more exciting. you are going to go to the track? yes, they have an event, the olympic, they have an event, the olympic, they handicap the riders based on your first race. it's a great race, watching the guys coming from the back. the 21st of september next year, british grand prix. great stuff, date for your diary. nice to see you, thank you very much. enjoy your food! there's a big event going on in windsor, as we've been telling you this morning — a royal wedding. it begins at 11am. carol's there to tell us what the weather's going to be like for the couple's big day. morning. storm callum is mooching around but hopefully it won't spoil this lovely day? indeed, naga. showing its hand in northern and western areas. damp in windsor this morning, already pretty
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windy, the marriage takes place at 11am between princess eugenie and mr jack brooksbank. there will be 2500 people in the castle grounds, 1200 of them will be here in the loe ward. they've applied for the position with a ballot. according to the palace, over 100,000 people applied for that position, so they we re applied for that position, so they were the lucky ones. quite chilly in the wind at the moment but today it will generally be wet and windy. we've already had gusts in the west in excess of 60 mph, some closer to 70. .net office has an amber weather warning enforced for south wales, this is for rain today and tomorrow. it could lead to destruction, power cuts, travel disruption as well and that kind of thing so be prepared for that if you're heading out in the next couple of days. we have two weather fronts across us at the moment, one heading north and the
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second wrapped around storm callum, that the area of low pressure is bringing the heavy rain and it's going to push north—east through the day, taking its heavyweight with it. windy wherever you are today. —— heavy rain. heavy rain in scotland, northern ireland, england and wales and light rain into the south—east. that will continue through the day, eventually clearing parts of the west. you will also notice the gusts of wind, you can see them in the black circles. 60 mph gusts out to the west, 48 mph inland, for example. heading on through the evening and overnight, it is going to be cool behind a weather front, relatively mild ahead of it in any sunshine and that rain will continue to be with us. you can see the weather front draped across the central swathe of the country. for scotland, in the north—west, showers, quite a bit of cloud around in the south—east and mainly dry.
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but the remarkable thing about the weather tonight is mild for this stage in october, 17 or 18. the overnight low record for october is 19.4, we don't expect to beat that but you'll certainly notice it but for scotland behind a weather front, cooler. we'll have that weather front still with us tomorrow, if anything it goes to the north and west so the north and west will have the rain and it will be windy, but not as much as today. in central and eastern england, it will be like the summer again. eastern england, it will be like the summeragain. in the eastern england, it will be like the summer again. in the sunshine, highs of 24 or maybe 25. our weather front tomorrow goes off to the north sea, leaving brighter skies and sunny conditions, but also showers across scotla nd conditions, but also showers across scotland and in some more persistent ones, we could see snow on the tops of the grampians. feeling much cooler. we've got every type of weather in the next couple of days. carol, thank you. we are now enjoying... dawn is breaking,
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windsor castle, royal wedding day, starting to look rather magnificent, isn't it? awoke it is, lovely. when you see it in all its glory later on, spectacular. quite a few people lined up to see the bride and groom later. carol, thank you. if you like flying or not, either way this will interest you. the world's longest non—stop flight has taken off and sean has been tracking it for us. keeping a very close eye, still in the air, glad someone is doing it! that's right. the flight remember is going from singapore to new york and it is expected to take nearly 19 hours. let's have a look at how it's getting on. i can tell you it took off about 24 minutes late and right now sq—22, as it is known, has covered around 7,000 miles. it has got about 3,000 more to go and we can see from this radar it is just about over northern canada now. one man i'm surprised isn't actually
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on it is the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. but thankfully he's on the roof of our london studios looking out for it. did it sell out, that's the big question. they certainly did. there may have been one empty seat i understand but they will be happy with the payload on this. bear in mind, there are no cheap seats on this flight. mind, there are no cheap seats on this flight. there are 67 business class flatbeds, and then there's another 94 premium economy, with lots of leg room, not as much as charlie and naga get but quite enough for the long haul. they believe that people will pay a lot of cash for this, which is just as well because it's an incredibly expensive undertaking. you've got two sets of pilots, extra cabin crew, because they need to get some rest along the way. you're all so burning stupendous amounts of fuel. this plane, as you will have seen,
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went over anchorage, alaska. if they'd stop the there they could probably burn 30% on the journey i calculate, they will be burning around 120 metric tons —— stopped their. it's better than it used to be, but it is an affordable for most people, where are we seeing this kind of technology in this long haul flight kind of technology in this long haul flight in other more affordable parts of the airline industry? the big opportunity for british travellers has been flying from london to perth. i was on the originalflight, london to perth. i was on the original flight, and unlike london to perth. i was on the originalflight, and unlike this one, they've got genuine economy class their. i know to my cost! but the big... big developments we're seeing with the airbus a 350 ul are, this new aircraft, developments in the boeing 77/7, they're going to transform long haul flying. the boeing 77/7, they're going to transform long haulflying. the key route everyone wants to see, or at least qantas does, their putting lots of money into this, is from
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london to sydney, australia, which is going to beat this current flight bya is going to beat this current flight by a couple of hours —— they are putting. one last thing, is there a length of flight where it becomes a health concern? of course, you've got to move around. this is a great opportunity not just for well—heeled business travellers going from singapore to new york really quickly, but a good opportunity for people who are less mobile who don't wa nt to people who are less mobile who don't want to change planes. you need to have a good health regime in place. if you think about everything you've done since 5pm last night british time, and you still got another three hours buying time, that is what is facing the people on there. they have to keep healthy. 0nce what is facing the people on there. they have to keep healthy. once we can do london to sydney, there are no more great and long haulflights left and qantas thinks they will be doing that by 2022. simon, thank you bromance, sorry to interrupt you, a bit short of time this morning. simon calderfrom the independent,
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once sydney to london is done, that's it, i'm off! so much in the programme, that is why we are short of time. thanks, sean! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a murder investigation has begun in north west london after the death of a man who was found in a car with a gunshot wound. the man in his 20s was a passenger in a mercedes that police say hit a number of parked vehicles in west drayton road in hillingdon. he was pronounced dead at the scene. the driver of the car has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving. it's been revealed that £15,000 worth of contra band, including drugs and mobile phones, were seized in a single month from chelsmsford prison. a report from the prisons inspectorate also said levels of violence at the essex jail were far too high, and the response to self—harm and suicide had been "inadequate. and the response to self—harm and suicide had been inadequate. the chief inspector of prisons says progress has been made since the inspection in may, with problems actively being addressed.
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an east london barber who started cutting hair in his bedroom as a teenager says he hopes he can inspire others after winning a prestigious business award. mark maciver now cuts the hair of london celebrities including tiny tempah and stormzy. he won the barber entrepreneur of the year award at the recent black beauty and fashion awards. asa as a barberfor a as a barber for a trade that isn't traditionally respected like that, and even seen as traditionally respected like that, and even seen as a traditionally respected like that, and even seen as a business, to win that award is a special moment for me. it's more than a special moment, it was a special moment, it was a special thing to me. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the northern line. otherwise it's a good service. 0n the trains, there could be disruption to stansted express and greater anglia services between broxbourne and stansted airport because of a faulty train.
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if we turn to the roads, it's getting busy on the a4 talgarth road from barons court towards west kensington. in dartford, central road remains closed in both directions between riverside way and 0akes crescent due to a warehouse fire. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a rather blustery day of weather today. storm callu m blustery day of weather today. storm callum is affecting mostly the western pa rt of callum is affecting mostly the western part of the country but still strong gusts around at times. we're staying in the warm air, pleasa ntly warm we're staying in the warm air, pleasantly warm for this time of year, some afternoon brightness but also early rain around mostly affecting western home counties through the morning but we could still see showery outbreaks creeping into central and eastern areas for a time before clearing north to leave us time before clearing north to leave us with a dry afternoon, and probably brightening up as well. the brightness best to the gusts of wind, 40—45 mph in the afternoon, and up to bring down branches of trees and possibly cause further
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disruption but top temperatures in the best of the brightness, 20 or 21. through this evening and overnight, it is going to stay windy but it will be dry and it will feel ridiculously mild for this time of year. we ridiculously mild for this time of yea r. we start ridiculously mild for this time of year. we start tomorrow on around 17 or 18. tomorrow, even warmer. 24 or 25. sunny spells, still quite windy, early rain will clear on sunday to lead us with a cooler and mostly dry day. —— leave us with. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: "unimaginable destruction" — florida's governor warns that hurricane michael has left entire neighbourhoods uninhabitable. rescuers are still searching for survivors. strengthening again and now also
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causing flooding. join me here at windsor castle as the final preparations are made for the wedding of princess eugenie, granddaughter to the queen. wedding of princess eugenie, granddaughter to the queenm wedding of princess eugenie, granddaughter to the queen. it is a windy start today in windsor, very windy start today in windsor, very windy in the west. gales, even severe gales and heavy rain coming to us courtesy of storm callum. as russia urgently investigates the failed launch of the soyuz capsule which forced two crew to make an emergency landing. we'll ask the first briton in space, helen sharman, what impact it'll have. the high street cafe chain patisserie valerie is on the brink of colla pse patisserie valerie is on the brink of collapse today after citing fraud in its accounts earlier. a shambolic second half from scotland means a first ever defeat to israel in the u efa first ever defeat to israel in the uefa nations league. their manager says they can now expect a bit of stick. good morning. it's friday the 12th of october.
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our top story: search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit the united states. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2,000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. eliza philippidis reports. mexico beach, showcased online as a perfect holiday destination, where the sand is as white as snow. now described as ground zero. the place that bore the brunt of hurricane michael as it slammed into florida. florida's governor flew across the state to see the extent of the destruction for himself. especially the damage at mexico beach, it is devastating. you just pray to god that everybody survived that. crews from the coastguard worked tirelessly, rescuing 27 people during ten missions. this survivor was found and brought to safety a helicopter team scouting the devastation in alabama. some homeowners in florida returning to look over what can be salvaged
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from the ruin. it will be months before life returns to some sort of normality. i think there is a lot of, you know, anger and shock. just emotion, you know, that is at its peak right now. i think we just need a few days to just digest what has happened and see how the rebuilding is going to happen. but for many life will never be the same again. eliza philippidis, bbc news. final preparations are being made for the wedding of the queen's granddaughter, princess eugenie, and jack brooksbank, which takes place later this morning at windsor castle. they will marry in front of 850 guests and 1,200 members of the public. royal correspondent sarah campbell is in windsorfor us. slightly blustery by the look of it.
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but we have that wonderful backdrop. give us a sense of how the day will unfold. there will be some celebrity hairstyles getting blown about, i would imagine this morning. in the next hour, he on the grounds of windsor castle, they will start dealing with the dozen 200 members of the public who applied by a public ballot to get a space to see up public ballot to get a space to see up close here or in windsor castle. the lower area will be filled with charity representatives and schoolchildren from the two local schools that princess eugenie attended. the service starts at 11 o'clock, led by the dean of windsor, andrea bocelli will sing two songs are andrea bocelli will sing two songs a re comfy by andrea bocelli will sing two songs are comfy by the royal philharmonic 0rchestra. are comfy by the royal philharmonic orchestra. the service, which should last about an hour, then the married couple will go on a short carriage ride around the centre of windsor. that is the form for the day. then a reception, to be hosted by the queen. sarah, such a special day for
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the couple themselves. as always, with royal weddings, the real fascination with who will be there, who will be attending. what do we know? it will be attended by most of the senior members of the royal family. the duchess of cornwall won't be here, she is at an engagement in scotland. the queen will be here. it is expected that the duke of edinburgh will appear. the duke and duchess of sussex, the duke duchess of cambridge, in bridal party, prince george and princess charlotte, page and bridesmaid, there will be a smattering of celebrities. theodora williams, robbie williams because daughter, she will be a bridesmaid, george clooney and his wife are expected to come. ellie goulding is expected. plenty of people to look out for. there has been a criticism of this wedding and the costs. although the cost of the ceremony itself picked up cost of the ceremony itself picked up by cost of the ceremony itself picked up by the royalfamily, there has been criticism of the group, particularly the republic, that the
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wider security costs will be borne by the taxpayer. sarah, for the moment, thank you. seniorjudges in england and wales could be in line for a pay rise of up to £60,000, taking the annual pay of a high courtjudge to £240,000 a year. the recommendations by the senior salaries review board aims to address low morale among judges and to compensate them for changes to their pension scheme. ben ando reports. since the middle ages, the start of the legal year has been marked by a procession ofjudges from temple bar to westminster. but amid the pomp there is a problem, not enough lawyers want to become judges. in the last decade applications have halved. a report last yearfound high workloads, long hours, and pension changes to blame. the answer, according to the government's senior salaries review board, is more pay. at the moment, a typical crown court judge receives just under £135,000 per year. under these proposals that would go up to nearly 165,000,
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which is more than the prime minister, may's salary of around 150,000, though mrs may does enjoy significant perks like a free house in a prime central london location. as for other public sector workers, an nhs england nurse, with five years experience can expect to take home around £28,000 a year. and it is that perceived inequality that could give the ministry of justice pause for thought. in a free—market economy it should be easy to attract more recruits, you simply pay higher wages, but it is never that simple when the taxpayers footing the bill and when other public sector employees, like teachers, nurses, soldiers, or prison officers, have been given far smaller pay rises. the government says it is considering these recommendations and will decide soon whether to accept them. ben ando, bbc news. russia has suspended manned flights to the international space station
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while it investigates what went wrong with a soyuz spacecraftjust after ta ke—off from kazakhstan. the crew of the rocket — a russian and an american — are said to be safe and well after being forced to make an emergency landing just two minutes after launch. and after 7:30 we'll speak to the first briton in space, helen sharman, about this incident. the high street cafe chain patisserie valerie is on the brink of collapse today after reporting fraud in its accounts earlier this week. we heard about this early in the week. wet as it stand now? since it first broke about the financial regularities, they thought it was potentially fraudulent. they discovered a winding up order of hmrc with a high tax bill. those are the top of the company were not aware of it, the chairman was not aware of it, the chairman was not aware of it, the chairman was not aware of it. we heard yesterday that u nless aware of it. we heard yesterday that unless there is a significant cash injection into the business then,
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effectively, it will not be able to continue trading as it is. with other retailers, that would be going into administration. and then the business either has to find a buyer for the business or it ends up being wound down itself. a horrible day. there, who are waking up this morning really waiting for some news. there could be a cash injection. the entrepreneur luke johnson, a major shareholder in the business, he has been a big part of the chain's growth. will he put more of his money in? will anybody else? they are the questions that are really being looked at to date. patisserie valerie. it is a major presence on the high street. a lot of branches. more than 200 cafes around the uk. other brands as well, there is a v&a brand that others might be familiar with. it is not just patisserie valerie. —— v&a. 200 cafes. unlike a lot of retailers,
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there is one quote from an anonymous number of staff there saying are we going to get paid in three weeks time? they will have not had those updates that we normally have if a retailer is really struggling. this was out of the blue earlier this week. lots of uncertainty for staff there. those right at the top of the business scrambling to try to keep it alive. thank you very much. it's not often that president trump holds a meeting and it's the other person stealing the show but that's what happened when kanye west visited the white house. the rap star, one of the best—selling music artists of all time, did declare himself a huge fan of the president during his half hour visit to the oval office. 0ur washington correspondent chris buckler reports. over and over and over again... with his appearance in the white house, kanye, truly made this the west wing. how does it feel to be in the oval office? oh, it is good energy in this. and he had a fair amount of energy himself — he talked enthusiastically about criminaljustice reform,
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jobs and education — showed off a picture of a hydrogen—powered plane he thinks should replace air force 0ne. but perhaps most memorable of many memorable moments came when he talked about the superhuman qualities of donald trump's signature make america great again campaign caps. it was something about when i put this hat on that it made me feel like superman. you made a superman. that was — that is my favourite superhero. kanye west is one of the world's most famous entertainers and there is a serious political point to all of this. trump doesn't poll well with african—america ns, and kanye is his most high—profile black supporter. judging by his performance in the white house, possibly his most enthusiastic one. it's a sign of this era of personality politics in america that kanye even referenced his own presidential ambitions, although he made a pledge not to run against the man he called his bro, and there seems to be quite a bromance. i love this guy right here.
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that's really nice. 0ften critics compare this presidency to reality television. but if anything, this meeting of two self—proclaimed geniuses verged on the surreal. and it was kanye west who stole the show. chris buckler, bbc news. the buyer of the banksy print that was partially shredded immediately after auction will go ahead with the purchase. the woman, who's not been named, successfully bid more than one million pounds for the picture, girl with balloon. she said she was shocked at first when it was shredded, but she now wants to keep what she believes is a piece of art history. and no doubt claims that its value may have doubled will have helped her make that decision. it is often the way the art world
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works, that if something is unique and then gets damaged than the value goes up. it has already been copied online as well. it was a smart move by whoever thought of it. spot on the by the coming up later on. —— sport. the british military will be on the frontline of the fight against the illegal wildlife trade thanks to a £900,000 boost from the government. british soldiers have already spent time in africa's hunting hotspots training park rangers how to catch poachers. 55 elephants are killed every day according to estimates from the wwf. lieutenant alex wilson recently spent four months in malawi leading a counter—poaching taskforce, and he joins us on the sofa this morning. good morning. mayi good morning. may i call you alex? please do. what was it like. how did you get involved in this?” please do. what was it like. how did you get involved in this? i was invited tojoin you get involved in this? i was invited to join the counter poaching team, due to some skills i ready had. and i was passionate about wildlife. talk through some of the
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practicalities. some of this is about the skills you can bring in terms of logistics and co—ordination, but there is a very personal side to this as well. you have come face to face with some pretty grim sites because of the poaching that has been going on. yes. what we have seen is that our influence with the park rangers has been on a personal basis, what we have been up to, they have seen some nasty stuff. give us a sense of how this works. it is a breakfast audience, some people care a lot about this will stop what did you see? we have seen animals being snared, some pretty nasty injuries, essentially tying a wire around your leg or your head to trick you. we have seen a lot of data on elephant and small animals will stop part of your role, of course, is to help the animals. part of it is to educate as well and protect. what is the
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relationship like that you have with the rangers who are out there at the moment and considering what they are tackling as well? the range were phenomenally keen professional individuals, but they do not have that much time to do training for themselves —— ranges. they are busy patrolling and keeping the park say. we would try to give them breathing space and give them a dedicated focused team to develop their skill sets. what does that involve, day to day? we wa ke what does that involve, day to day? we wake up in the morning and go through our morning routines. we go out and find our rangers and go through training scenarios. at the start we developed and worked out what they needed to know and the level they were at, then we had training situations. patrolling through the bush and this would happen and seeing how they react and developing those reactions. alex, did you come face—to—face with poachers? we didn't in our time because the scale of the areas we're looking at... i was working 1800
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square kilometres in the park with about 36 rangers, one ranger per 56 square kilometres. it's difficult to come face—to—face with someone but what we were trying to do was remove the objects of poaching, they don't wa nt to the objects of poaching, they don't want to hang around, they want to leave a snare or a pit trap and get out because even being in the park isa out because even being in the park is a crime. we mention personally, when people hear these stories, they think what are these people doing? the cruelty of what they're doing, they carry on regardless, they think they're they carry on regardless, they think they‘ re untouchable. is they carry on regardless, they think they're untouchable. is it something that before you got there you felt strongly about? about the poaching itself or the poachers? about what goes on. i can understand it. it's a very easy thing for us to say how can they do this, but when you're offered $200, $300, $400 to do a drop essentially with nothing else, with no other hopes or prospects, i
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can completely understand it. it's when you get to the higher—level, the syndicates, the people funding this, at the tip of it, nobody is getting much money but at the top, people are paying exponentially more for the product. where does the effort need to go? you're on the ground, poachers are on the ground, but internationally with attitudes, where does the effort need to go to change the mindset? it needs to be multilayered, and that's what we're doing well. we're making it harder for poachers to work and operate but there will always be a way around that. teams like the ivory alliance, led by michael gove, these groups are working to reduce the amount of ivory able to be sold and to stop trading. is the british military's active involvement ongoing, will that carry on? as i understand it, yes, we'll be deploying teams back out to malawi to where we were and we're looking to maintain that. it's easy for us to drop in and say task
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achieved, we've done ourjob, but that's not what we're all about. we wa nt to that's not what we're all about. we want to keep it going. interesting point, did you leave thinking you'd achieved something? you explain the logistics of the operation, it must be hard to think you've made a difference? i have to think we've made a difference. the fact the rangers were so passionate and wa nted rangers were so passionate and wanted to get so much out of us, evenif wanted to get so much out of us, even if we leave with things 1% better, that's1% even if we leave with things 1% better, that's 1% better even if we leave with things 1% better, that's1% better than they we re better, that's1% better than they were “— better, that's1% better than they were —— rangers. better, that's1% better than they were -- rangers. good to speak to you, lieutenant alex wilson. thank you. there's a big event going on in windsor, as we've been telling you this morning — a royal wedding. carol's there to tell us what the weather's going to be like for the couple's big day. morning. if you're getting married, congratulations! it is brightening up, but still a congratulations! it is brightening up, but stilla bit congratulations! it is brightening up, but still a bit gusty? it is, that's in windsor, it is an brightening up in other parts, but you're right. brightening up a bit
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here, we could see some rain by the end of the morning. let me show you around, today, 2500 members of the public will be invited into the castle grounds. behind me on the lower ward , castle grounds. behind me on the lower ward, there will be 1200. they had to apply for their place in a ballot and the palace say over 100,000 people applied. they will be able to hear the goings—on in the chapel as they get married. they will also be able to see the congregation arrived, the celebrities and the members of the royalfamily, celebrities and the members of the royal family, and then watch the newlyweds leave in the carriage. 0n the other side, in front of this judo building, there is the horseshoe cloister, that's in front of the west door, that's where they will have their picture taken —— chewed building. 0thers will have their picture taken —— chewed building. others will get a good view of the couple —— to do building. they have been chosen from
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some of the couple's favourite charities. blowy in windsor this morning, quite chilly if you're standing in it. strong gusts of wind as callum approaches our shores and moves across them. in the west without an excess of 65 mph gusts, 70 mph in excess of 65 mph gusts, 70 mph in excess in the isles of scilly with heavy rain. the met office has an amber weather warning out for heavy rain in south wales. that's notjust for today but also tomorrow, and it could lead to destruction so if you're travelling, bear that in mind. 0n the pressure chart you can see that the area of low pressure, that's storm callum. the isobars indicating wind wherever you are today, the weather front moving across bringing the heavy rain that some of us are already experiencing. that will carry on through the day, moving east, brightening up a touch behind it temporarily but ahead of it in the south—east, we will see some rain but it will be lighter and by the afternoon we'll also see some sunshine but it will be windy.
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temperatures in the sunshine, up to 21, but behind the weather front moting is cooling down a touch and you can see the black circles indicating the gusts we expect inland. a very windy day. still the rain around tonight. also a windy night. temperatures are very interesting because behind the rain in scotland, they‘ re interesting because behind the rain in scotland, they're going to dip but ahead of it for central and eastern england, our overnight lows between 17 and 18 degrees. normally it would be nothing like that. the record overnight temperature in 0ctober record overnight temperature in october is 19.4, we don't expect to break that but a very warm night for some. tomorrow we start with the rain draped across the uk, not in the south—east, pushing a bit north and west. in the north—west will have the heavy rain tomorrow, still
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windy but not as much as today. where we have the sunshine in central and eastern england, again, note the temperatures, 24, more like summer than autumn. note the temperatures, 24, more like summerthan autumn. 0n note the temperatures, 24, more like summer than autumn. on sunday we eventually lose that rain into the north sea, behind it it brightens up and rise up, some sunshine around and rise up, some sunshine around and we see showers in the north of scotla nd and we see showers in the north of scotland —— dries up. some of the more persistent ones could produce snow in the tops of the grampians. you'll notice it will be colder. for some, where we've had 24 or 25, back down to 14. a real drop. the weather has something for everyone whatever you want in the next few days, charlie and naga. carol, what's going on behind you, who is jabbering? members of the public, i know lots have been entering the ballot —— have a ring. yes, members of the public. —— gathering. borisjohnson sitting down will be members of the public.
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i know you're going to take us through what is happening through the morning. —— those sitting down will be members of the public. dwindling pupil numbers and transport costs are just some of the unique challenges that rural schools face. now the welsh government is tackling the problem by launching a rural education action plan to support their pupils, as tim muffett's been finding out for brea kfast‘s latest educating uk report. chewed where am i today, louise? headteachers need many skills. for steve woodhouse, they include washing up and serving lunch. today, for instance, i'm going into the school kitchen because we've got some staff absent, which is difficult to cover. if i was to bring in extra staff, that would obviously have a cost implication. steve says he typically does this twice a week. he's head of holme upon spalding moor primary school in the east riding of yorkshire. idon't mind. it's always enjoyable to work with the rest of the staff. i just worry that when i get back to my office, there will be all the things i haven't got done that i should have been
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focusing on really. why are you just standing there? why am ijust standing here? well, i was busy talking. i know i should be doing thejob. more than 500 rural school headteachers in england have been surveyed as part of a new report published today. 42% of our headteachers in the survey told us that they had fewer children on roll than they had capacity for, and that affects their budget in every way because obviously every child that comes into the school attracts funding. there's often the added expense of providing transport for pupils who live far away, and sometimes higher salary costs for teachers. that's because the survey found staff in rural schools tend to stay in theirjobs for longer. they're more experienced, but more expensive. the situation's described as a perfect storm. some challenges seem very hard to solve. some schools will always be isolated, and in rural areas, it can be very hard to move people quickly from one place to another. but here in south—west wales, a new project is using technology to try and tackle the problem.
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recently we've been doing work on energy and work done... dylanjones is teaching further maths a—level at ysgol bro pedr in ceredigion. what we need to work out is... but some of his pupils are 30 miles away. obviously the main idea is to stop the travelling. depending obviously with the internet connections and things in the area, with things like that obviously working fine, i'm sure it is a way forward. this project's part of the welsh government's rural education plan, which is launched today. it will be trialled across ceredigion. it's pretty much exactly the same as having the teacher there, without the cost of the travel, and it just broadens the possibilities, especially in a very rural place like this. this initiative's based on a similar one launched by the scottish government in the outer hebrides two years ago. the department of education in england said it recognises
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the importance of rural schools and the challenges they face. it said an extra £25 million had been set aside to support them. but in the east yorkshire, headteacher steve woodhouse says he has to make more savings to his budget next year, and right now, he doesn't know how he'll do it. tim muffet, bbc news. still to come, so much coming up this morning, we talked to helen sharman, the first briton in space but also we talk about bats in the belfry, we find out how churches are learning to live in harmony with their unusual congregations of bats. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a murder investigation has begun in hillingdon after the death of a man who was found in a car with a gunshot wound. the man in his twenties was a passenger in a mercedes that police say hit a number of parked vehicles in west drayton road.
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he was pronounced dead at the scene. the driver of the car has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving. it's been revealed that £15,000 worth of contra band, including drugs and mobile phones, were seized in a single month from chelsmsford prison. a report from the prisons inspectrate also said levels of violence at the essex jail were far too high, and the response to self—harm and suicide had been inadequate. the chief inspector of prisons says progress has been made since the inspection in may. an east london barber who started cutting hair in his bedroom as a teenager says he wants to inspire others after winning a prestigious business award. mark maciver now cuts the hair of london celebrities including tiny tempah and stormzy. he won the barber entrepreneur of the year award at the recent black beauty and fashion awards. as a barber, for a trade that isn't traditionally respected like that,
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and even seen as a business, to win that award is a special moment for me. it's more than a special moment, it was a special moment, it was a special thing to me. let's take a look at the travel situation now. a good service. if we turn to the roads, it's getting busy on the a4 from barons court towards west kensington. in dartford, central road remains closed in both directions between riverside way and 0akes crescent due to a warehouse fire. finally, in croydon, tamworth road is partially blocked by a burst water main at the junction with north end. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a rather blustery day of weather today. now, storm callum is affecting mostly the western part of the country, but for us, still some strong gusts
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of wind at times. we're staying in the warm air, pleasantly warm for this time of year, some afternoon brightness but also early rain around mostly affecting western home counties through the morning, but we could still see showery outbreaks creeping into central and eastern areas for a time before clearing north to leave us with a dry afternoon, and it will probably brighten up as well. the brightness best to the gusts of wind, 40—45 mph in the afternoon, enough to bring down branches of trees and possibly cause further disruption too, but top temperatures in the best of the brightness, 20 or21. now, through this evening and overnight, it is going to stay windy but it will be dry and it will feel ridiculously mild for this time of year. we start tomorrow on around 17 or 18. tomorrow, even warmer. 24 or 25. sunny spells, still quite windy, early rain will clear on sunday to leave us with a cooler and mostly dry day. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to naga and charlie.
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bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit the united states. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2,000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. hurricane michael has weakened to a tropical storm, but people across the us have been warned of ongoing dangerfrom downed power lines, flash floods and landslides. senior high courtjudges in england and wales could be in line for a 32% pay rise — meaning they would earn up to £240,000 a year. the senior salaries review board has recommended the increase to address low morale among judges, which has led to a sharp fall in applications for the job. the government has not yet decided whether to accept the proposals. the boss of a medical waste—disposal company has defended its conduct after it was stripped
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of its nhs contracts. since then, the environment agency has begun enforcement proceedings and a criminal investigation. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, garry pettrigrew of healthcare environmental services said his company had been vilified. he blamed a lack of incineration capacity for the backlog of waste which he said did not include body parts. the environment agency denied there was insufficient capacity and said that the rest of the sector was performing well. there are growing concerns for the safety of a british student who has been detained in the united arab emirates, without charge, for the past five months. matthew hedges was researching the country's foreign and security policies when he was arrested at dubai airport. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has said he's "very worried" and has spoken to uae officials. his wife, daniela, said she's concerned about his wellbeing. we'll be speaking to matthew's wife, daniela, at 8:10. it is her first television
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interview. that is coming up shortly. russia has suspended manned flights to the international space station while it investigates what went wrong with a soyuz spacecraftjust after ta ke—off from kazakhstan. the crew of the rocket — a russian and an american — are said to be safe and well after being forced to make an emergency landing just two minutes after launch. and after 7:30 we'll speak to the first briton in space, helen sharman, about this incident. final preparations are being made for the wedding of princess eugenie in herfiance for the wedding of princess eugenie in her fiance which takes place at windsor castle. they will marry in front of 850 guests and 1200 manuas of the public. the family is paying for the wedding itself. because of security will be picked up by the taxpayer. the buyer of the banksy print that was partially shredded immediately after auction will go ahead with the purchase. the woman, who's not been named,
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successfully bid more than £1 million for the picture, girl with balloon. she said she was shocked at first when it was shredded, but she now wants to keep what she believes is a piece of art history. and no doubt claims that its value may have doubled will have helped her make that decision. coming up on the programme, we'll have the weather with carol in windsor today. it isa it is a little bit blustery on this wedding day at windsor. storm callum is being felt. i am not sure what can be blamed for the football result last night. shambolic scotland. you know it has been a bad night when your manager says it is doom and gloom we will get stick for this and will suffer for a bit. hard to explain, they had never lost before to israel. get a sending off, and own goal, and then it goes pear
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shaped. it is doom and gloom. a long way back for the tartan army who went to look watch scotland lose 2—1 last night. a charlie mulgrew penalty gave scotland the lead. israel equalised. john souter was sent off before that own goal. victory for a side that is ranked below the likes of luxembourg and the faroe below the likes of luxembourg and the fa roe islands. below the likes of luxembourg and the faroe islands. look at the faces on the scotland fans. it wasn't good enough. started well enough. got in front. it was all downhill from there. it was a very tough night. getting a man sent off. it was not a night. at the end of the day, the performance wasn't good in a pop records. that is very disappointing. we need to dust ourselves down. we cannot dwell on this result. they say top of their league group, which includes albania and israel. —— they stay. wales were also beaten, losing 4—1
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to spain in a friendly in cardiff. the spanish have beaten both england and croatia in the nations league, and continued to look the part, scoring three goals inside the first half an hour. burnley‘s sam vokes, did score a consolation goal but it was a heavy defeat for ryan giggs side and england under—21s, have thrashed andorra in chesterfield to qualify for next year's euros. they only needed one point to qualify, but the whistle blew, at 7—0. liverpool striker dominic solankey, here with the final goal. elsewhere northern ireland beat iceland 1—0. england's senior team, will play their first game behind closed doors in croatia, in the nations league tonight, with no fans allowed in, because of sanctions against the hosts. the punishment comes after a swastika, was marked on their pitch three years ago. some england fans will be looking at some of these areas around the stadium as a vantage point. 500 fans are said to be in croatia, despite not being able to get in. it will be a strange experience. i guess we effectively do that every day of our lives, we play football in front of a handful of people watching. so it's not totally unique.
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but for a match situation and an international, very different. i am sure croatia feel the same. bit of a fashion a throwback for you now. we take you back to 2005. former england captain wayne rooney, now playing in america, has been getting all nostalgic, about manchester united. but not about the football, it was about the fashion. take a look at this. some brilliant clothing combinations, going on there, in the early noughties. from the left is paul scholes, rio ferdinand, rooney himself, alan smith and john 0'shea. rooney simply posted it with a crying laughing face. i know nothing about fashion, but it does not look that dated to me. you obviously don't know anything about fashion. the howls of outrage on the
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brea kfast fashion. the howls of outrage on the breakfast settelen said that. what we re breakfast settelen said that. what were you wearing in 2005 —— set. breakfast settelen said that. what were you wearing in 2005 -- set. we have michael carrick coming on. he joined not long after that. he talks a lot about playing with wayne rooney. i love when he joined manchester united and what he said, is it similarto manchester united and what he said, is it similar to chelsea? he got this alex astaire. we look forward to that. we should tell him that picture. —— sir alex astaire. to that. we should tell him that picture. -- sir alex astaire. he will know what it was like. what we re will know what it was like. what were they were wearing. in the last few minutes kyle edmund has been knocked out of the shanghai masters. victory would have meant a possible meeting with novak djokovic in the semi finals, but edmund was beaten in straight sets by fourth seed alexander zverev. next week, marks the 50th anniversary, of athlete tommie smith's famous gold medal at the mexico city 0lympics,
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and more famously — the black power salute with his teammatejohn carlos. the pair wanted to take a stand, against racial injustice in the us, and he told the bbc that recent protests, including that by american footballer colin kaepernick, and others taking a knee, made him cry. i would not have wanted to meet him had he not taken a knee, but because he did, recognised the fact that these guys did the same thing, i wonder what they were thinking. and the sacrificial dance that he took revealed his upbringing the need to be better socially. tommie smith, basically the same thing, 50 years later, it will be like that in another 50 years. he looks well. and don't blink. you won't want to miss this one. and a possible one to appear on question of sport's what happened next soon. eddie pepperall, surely with the shot of the day for this fantastic hole in one at the ninth, in the british masters. quite how it defied physics to go, in i'm not quite sure — but a bit of help from the pin and some spin and in it popped. he's leading the tournament
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alongside matt wallace and tommy fleetwood. the second round gets under way any time now. 0ne one for us all to try this weekend. i asked earlier if he won anything for that. usually with golf it is ca rs. for that. usually with golf it is cars. he won £20,000 but he gave it to charity. good man. for that it is more the memory, the pride in doing that. we will see later on. —— we will see you. russia has suspended manned flights to the international space station while it investigates what went wrong with a soyuz spacecraftjust after ta ke—off from kazakhstan. the soyuz ms—10 blasted off from the baikonur launch site at 8:40 yesterday. but less than two minutes into the flight the emergency escape system deployed and the crew capsule separated from the rocket. the astronauts were then forced to make a steep ballistic descent and land approximately 400 kilometres east of baikonur. it was dramatic and dangerous and it hasn't happened for decades, but the crew — a russian
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and an american — survived the emergency landing unharmed. we can speak now to the first briton in space, helen sharman, who joins us now. and, helen, you've been in one of these capsules. thank you. it is an absolute joy having you on the programme. thank you for talking to us today. what have you heard about what has happened and what can you tell us in terms of what might be happening now? i have not heard anything directly. it very much looks now like the russians will hunker down and do their investigations. i am hoping they will involve the americans and possibly other countries as well in the investigation. they will need to be open about what has happened. this is something that shows how robust the soy is spacecraft is. it really saved those two astronauts.
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the soy is spacecraft is. it really saved those two astronautsm the soy is spacecraft is. it really saved those two astronauts. it is interesting you mentioned about the investigation and what needs to happen. there is history when it comes to russian expeditions and russian ventures, of late, and what is told and what information is shared. is there friction when it comes to this international cooperation? every body has been very open. management has had to work hard together. it has taken a long time to build up a trust. the americans and everybody has been using the soyuz spacecraft for some time, since the shuttle was decommissioned. it is the only method of getting up and back from the international space station. it has been reliable. everybody has collaborated really well. they have had to to keep the iss going in the way it has done. let us hope that continues. we need to keep the iss going, notjust for continues. we need to keep the iss going, not just for itself, continues. we need to keep the iss going, notjust for itself, but it is the precursor to many future collaborative space projects that america really needs the russians and their technology to continue.
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what happens now, helen, to those who are still working on this mission, there are still three people in space working on the iss. what happens to those who are meant to be there, what happens in the interim? the three people up there will continue their work, though that will have to change. part of what they were doing would be to work with the two people arriving. there was space walks planned with one of the people who would have been with them. that will all have to change. there will be wondering about when they will return to her. although they have their own soyuz spacecraft they will use to return to work, it is robust and it will be all right, i am sure. they will be wondering what will happen. they don't want to be international space station to be left unmanned for very long, if at all. ideally, there will be another crew arrived. the question is how will it get there, will it go on soyuz? will be russians say that soyuz is off the cards for many months, in which case
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there needs to be a decision. will an unmanned soyuz go up and dock and allow another group of people to come down much later. they have about 200 days of lifetime beyond which they are not guaranteed. there needs to be some discussion about what has gone wrong and what we are going to do with the people up there and how we are going to keep that space station occupied, ideally, until the next commercial missions start to happen. they are already slated for 2019, it is not very long. if we could bring them forward just a few months then we are covered. indeed. that is a very optimistic thought. helen, one of the joys of being able to beat you is you are one of the few people on earth to have been displaced. you we re earth to have been displaced. you were the first briton in space, 1981 is when you joined the soviet mission on the soyuz spacecraft, orbiting the earth. tell us how the people on there, they are waiting now, it is dependent on the
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technology, what feelings, physical feelings would they be experiencing, the ones waiting for their collea g u es the ones waiting for their colleagues to arrive, but also the ones in that spacecraft where they had to be ejected. the ones are still on the ground at the moment he would have been looking forward to a long duration space mission, they will be gutted. they will be feeling relieved. i suspect the endorphins are starting to decrease in their bodies. that euphoria of having survived, that are starting to diminish. they will be gutted and disappointed, and wanting an much to know what happened yesterday. they will have been debriefed already. i imagine there will be many more debriefing to happen for them. and to make sure they are physically 0k. they looked fine yesterday, appeared to be ok when we saw the grass of them. we saw media pictures of them walking around. they did not seem to be in bad shape. a little bit of shock, possibly, afterwards. people have survived these g—forces before.
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astronauts are quite strong. they are trained to withstand more than that. the people on the space station have been in isolation for sometime. they flew in june station have been in isolation for sometime. they flew injune of this year, i think it was, there was a spacex and where there were already three people, they return to earth a few weeks ago —— space station. they will be getting quite low—level stoppages isolated up there. they have their gps phone and they can do skype connections, but it is that human contact. they would have been looking forward to the new crew arriving very much. helen, it has been a delight talking to you. thank you so much insight into what is happening. and the bigger picture with what is going on. helen sharman, the first briton in space, thank you. when you hear helen talking about the psychological side, it's extraordinary, the crew who are up there, the three left there for an
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indeterminate length of time, it has to be within 200 days, the psychology of new people coming in and how that changes your feelings. interesting. remember tim peake on the sofa and not so long ago, i think it's been about a year since he's been back down and he did that book on the tests you need to take before you become an astronaut and the psychology you have to have. he's one of the most measured people i've ever met. so in control. the relationships for the astronauts who thought they were going to space for a long period, low and behold, they're back on earth and talking of theirfamilies, they're back on earth and talking of their families, reunited when they didn't think they would be there. strange times. lots coming up, we will talk to former england and manchester united footballer michael carrick, he's been talking about his mental health and how he's been coping. lots of sportspeople talking about that, it's been world mental health
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day recently. that and lots more. some of england's oldest churches are to receive funding to help them learn to live in harmony with a rather unusual congregation of bats. £4 million of lottery money will be used to help protect the historic buildings from damage caused by the creatures, while also helping to maintain their habitat. breakfast‘s john maguire reports from norfolk. robbed, we put it up here... along with the orders of service and hymn books, here at the all saints in the norfolk village of thorn, they also lay out plastic sheeting because along with the local worshippers, there's a healthy congregation of bats here, around 250 of them. the most important thing is people don't not to come into the church because they don't like the smell or the dirt, they think it's damaging and we are a welcoming church and we like people to come in. so itjust puts people off and we can't hold big events in here in the summer. it's too much work. there's only a
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few of us to do the work, to clean... so wings just don't get done i'm afraid. their waste, especially their urine, is no respect of faith, history or culture. all species of bat in the uk are protected by law, so in churches, as elsewhere, people have to learn how to live with them. this is by far the principle species here, the sopranos purpose—build, almost identical, just a slightly pinker phase but the soprano picker stroll is a much smellier bat. when you get large numbers, they can create issues with smell. ecologists have come up with a plan, to encourage the bats into a corner of the church where the damagejustice brett kava naugh the church where the damagejustice brett kavanaugh i is the. how do you persuade them to the other side of the church? that's it, so the idea is rather bleak to use ultrasound ——
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where the damage can be contained. not all churches will need such a high—tech solutions, but £4 million worth of heritage lottery funding will be used across at least 100 churches in england to pay for the required work. what we want to do is bring people together to try and find solutions that work for everybody, the bats, protect them. work for the community, to protect them and protect this fantastic heritage as well. the number of bats has declined hugely as modern buildings leave them to options for roosting, so this scheme offers hope for great and small. john maguire, bbc news, norfolk. —— and so this scheme offers hope for all that's great and small. —— all bats great and small. there's a big event
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going on in windsor, as we've been telling you this morning — a royal wedding. carol's there to tell us what the weather's going to be like for the couple's big day. morning. what is the weather doing for this special day? it's going to be fairly blowy, fairly windy at the moment, if you're coming today, stick an extra couple of hat pins in your hat because you're going to need them. looking around, you can see, as charlie and naga were alluding to, members of the public have already arrived, getting the best position. those invited took part in a ballot and they were the lucky ones. 0n the other side where the railings are is where the wild family will arrive after 10:15am. where the wild family will arrive after10:15am. in where the wild family will arrive after 10:15am. in front of st george's chapel is where the celebrities and invited guests will come in for the wedding —— royal family. they will make their way behind the police officers inside the south doorstop you can't help but notice the floral display. rob van held and is the designer and he's created the design —— south dorset. —— rob van held in. ——
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southport. ... man dorset. —— rob van held in. —— southport. man south door. the princess was involved in the design of that. morning in windsor, it is blowy and a chilly in the breeze and. very windy in other parts of the uk, gales, even severe gales in the west, gusts in excess of 60 mph —— the breeze. as well —— chilly in the breeze. the met office has an amber weather warning out for south wales, not just for today but also tomorrow. this could lead to destruction and flooding. it could lead to some power cuts, so be aware of that ash disruption. we have storm callum coming our way —— disruption. you can see the sender of them indicated by the low pressure on the chart, surrounded by isobars and weather fronts —— centre. producing heavy rain, lot of
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surface water and spray on the roads, coupled with gusty winds, treacherous travelling conditions. the rain temperatures to be lighter in the south—east than any other pa rt in the south—east than any other part of the uk. we've got some drizzle here, not much more than that, and it should brighten up with some trying but wherever you are today, it will be windy and we can see the wind gusts, especially windy with exposure in the west, but inland we're looking at gusts in excess of 40 mph. temperature rise in the wind and rain, not feeling special but if you're in the sunshine in the east, temperatures up sunshine in the east, temperatures up into the mid—20s —— temperature—wise. through the evening and overnight, we'll still have the rain draped across the central swathes of the country. in scotland, in the north—west, some showers, showers in the south—east and remarkable temperatures for this stage in october and remarkable temperatures for this stage in 0ctoberfor our and remarkable temperatures for this stage in october for our overnight lows, easily 17 and 18. they won't break any records, the previous overnight low record for october is
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19.4. tomorrow we start with this rain through the central swathes of the country, pushing further north—west. the north and west of the uk will be wettest, don't forget the uk will be wettest, don't forget the amber warning the uk will be wettest, don't forget the amberwarning in the uk will be wettest, don't forget the amber warning in south wales and. windy but not as windy as today. —— in south wales. it will feel more like a summer's day. heading into sunday, that weather front pushes into the north sea, taking the rain with it, dry and right behind it. showery rain in the north of scotland and in the more persistent bursts we could see some snow on the tops of the grampians. what you will notice is where we've had 24 or 25 on saturday, back down to 14 or 15. naga and charlie, did you see the guards walking past? we saw that. did they salute as they came past you in the traditional way? you know what, charlie, iwas you in the traditional way? you know what, charlie, i was so focused on the weather they could have done anything. he is so cheeky extract
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the crowds are gathering in the grounds and the guards peaked around the corner after passing carol. the excitement is building, isn't it? about it absolutely is. it is a royal wedding, people are really excited and very much looking to see what the princess of york is going to be wearing. exciting news for some companies but not great news, share prices have been struggling a bit for some? they've taken a hit over the last few days and. looking at the uk's leading stock market —— they've taken a hit over the last few days. that was down 1.94% yesterday. it's been going down steadily over recent days and weeks. we've seen global stock markets doing something similaras stock markets doing something similar as well. it's all part of the same story.
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let's have a look at this graph. earlier in the year we would have been sitting here in march saying there had been a fall in the markets, people thinking interest rates going up too quickly, increasing borrowing costs for businesses around the world, will it be set in all will it be bouncing back? it bounced back strongly and thenit back? it bounced back strongly and then it middle around a bit —— all wheel it —— or will it. why do we care? it's what's going on in the world, the global economy that many of our big businesses that employ many people in the uk rely upon to do well. how does it affect someone who doesn't have stocks and shares? it's the economy period. if you work in any way for one of the big banks, big pharmaceutical companies, big tobacco companies in the ftse100, or if your life is linked to them in
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some way, if they're not doing as well as before then all of a sudden that can have an impact on the british economy. it has come down to trade wars, worries about interest rates. you can guess who might have had something to say about this.” think that the third is making a mistake. they're so tight. guiding the fed has gone crazy. so you can say that's a lot of safety, actually, and it is a lot of safety —— the fed is making a mistake —— i think the fed has gone crazy. he is saying why has his central bank, the equivalent of the bank of england, put up interest rates and increase borrowing costs and created these concerns? they think it's because the economy is doing well. you said the economy is doing well. you said the phrase earlier it has been middling about. official term. the phrase earlier it has been
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middling about. officialterm. giles brandreth is in later on, a word meister, middling about? does that meani meister, middling about? does that mean i like it? it's not going up, not going down. i don't think you need the about, just it is middling. if you look at it... is middling a word? something in the medal. you've got all of that, lots of people's pensions and savings, if you've got an ice in the ftse 100, that can be reliant on this chart. —— isa. lots of the next few weeks will impact what happens. or indeed if it is middling about. who knows. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. a murder investigation has begun in hillingdon after the death of a man who was found in a car with a gunshot wound. the man in his 20s was
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a passenger in the car which police say hit a number of parked vehicles in west drayton road. he was pronounced dead at the scene. the driver of the car has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving. it's been revealed that £15,000 worth of contra band, including drugs and mobile phones, were seized in a single month from chelmsford prison. a report from the prisons inspectrate also said levels of violence at the essex jail were far too high, and the response to self—harm and suicide had been inadequate. the chief inspector of prisons says progress has been made since the inspection in may. isa isa an east london barber who started cutting hair in his bedroom as a teenager says he wants to inspire others after winning a prestigious business award. mark maciver now cuts the hair of london celebrities including tiny tempah and stormzy. he won the barber entrepreneur of the year award at the recent black beauty and fashion awards. as a barber, for a trade that isn't traditionally respected like that,
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and even seen as a business, to win that award is a special moment for me. it's more than a special moment, it was a special moment, it was a special thing to me. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the travel situation now. the travel situation now. victoria the travel situation now. victoria line the travel situation now. victoria line is the travel situation now. victoria line is part the travel situation now. victoria line is part suspe due the victoria line is part suspended due to a fire alert at bruce brixton and severe delays on the rest of the line. —— victoria line —— at brixton. 0n the trains, there could be disruption to stansted express and greater anglia services between broxbourne and stansted airport because of a faulty train. if we turn to the roads, it's getting busy on the a4 from barons court towards west kensington. in dartford, central road remains closed in both directions between riverside way and 0akes crescent due to a warehouse fire. finally in croydon, tamworth road is partially blocked by a burst water main at the junction with north end. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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a rather blustery day of weather today. now, storm callum is affecting mostly the western part of the country, but for us, still some strong gusts of wind at times. we're staying in the warm air, pleasantly warm for this time of year, some afternoon brightness but also early rain around mostly affecting western home counties through the morning, but we could still see showery outbreaks creeping into central and eastern areas for a time before clearing north to leave us with a dry afternoon, and it will probably brighten up as well. the brightness best to the gusts of wind, 40—45 mph in the afternoon, enough to bring down branches of trees and possibly cause further disruption too, but top temperatures in the best of the brightness, 20 or21. now, through this evening and overnight, it is going to stay windy but it will be dry and it will feel ridiculously mild for this time of year. we start tomorrow on around 17 or 18. tomorrow, even warmer. 24 or 25. sunny spells, still quite windy, early rain will clear on sunday to leave us with a cooler and mostly dry day. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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now it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... "unimaginable destruction" — florida's governor warns that hurricane michael has left entire neighbourhoods uninhabitable. it's strengthening again and now also causing flash flooding. it's just a few hours until the second royal wedding of the year, when princess eugenie and her fiancee jack brooksbank will tie the knot. the grounds of windsor castle are filling up with members of the public who won a ballot to be here to watch the queen's granddaughter get married. it is a bit breezy and damp in windsorat get married. it is a bit breezy and damp in windsor at the moment, but
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we have storm callum on our shores, introducing heavy rains and gales in the west especially. more in 15 minutes. the high street cafe chain patisserie valerie is on the brink of collapse today after reporting significant potential fraud in its accounts earlier this week. i'll have the details in a minute. a shambolic second half from scotland means a first ever defeat to israel in the nations league, and their manager says they can expect a bit of stick. good morning. it's friday the 12th of october. our top story... search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit the united states. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst—hit state, more than 2,000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. eliza philippides reports. mexico beach, showcased online as a perfect holiday destination, where the sand is as white as snow — now described as ground zero... the place that bore the brunt of hurricane michael as it slammed into florida.
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florida's governor flew across the state to see the extent of the destruction for himself. especially the damage at mexico beach, it's devastating. you just pray to god that everybody survived that. crews from the coastguard worked tirelessly, rescuing 27 people during ten missions. this survivor was found and brought to safety by a helicopter team scouting the devastation in alabama. some homeowners in florida, returning to look over what can be salvaged from the ruin, say it will be months before life returns to some sort of normality. i think there is a lot of, you know, anger and shock. just emotion, you know, that is at its peak right now. so, i think we just need a few days to just digest what has happened and see how the rebuilding is going to happen. but for many, life will never be the same again.
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eliza philippidis, bbc news. final preparations are being made for the wedding of the queen's granddaughter princess eugenie and jack brooksbank, which takes place later this morning at windsor castle. they will marry in front of 850 guests and 1,200 members of the public. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell is in windsor for us. sarah, set the scene for us in terms of who will be there and the order of who will be there and the order of the day? good morning. preparations, final preparations, happening. the people you can see behind me are some of the 1200 members of the public who applied in a public ballot, we are told by the palace that 100,000 people applied to watch in the low award of windsor castle. the area will be filled by local
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schoolchildren, charity representatives, and the service sta rts representatives, and the service starts at 11am. all the senior members of the royal family with the exception of the duchess of cornwall will be here to watch princess eugenie, prince andrew's youngest daughter, get married to her long—term fiance jack brooksbank. that will be music by andrea bocelli and the royal philharmonic orchestra and the royal philharmonic orchestra and then there will be a short carriage ride through the centre of windsor castle after the service has finished. there has been criticism of the amount of public money that will have been spent on this wedding. although the royalfamily cove rs wedding. although the royalfamily covers the cost of the ceremony, the public purse as to cover the security costs. this service is due to start at 11am. more coverage about the events and the build up a little later in the programme. seniorjudges in england and wales could be in line for a pay rise of up to £60,000, taking the annual pay of a high courtjudge to £240,000 a year. the recommendations by the senior salaries review board aims to address low morale among judges and to compensate them for changes to their pension scheme.
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ben ando reports. since the middle ages, the start of the legal year has been marked by a procession ofjudges from temple bar to westminster. but amid the pomp, there's a problem, not enough lawyers want to become judges. in the last decade, applications have halved. a report last yearfound high workloads, long hours, and pension changes to blame. the answer, according to the government's senior salaries review board, is more pay. at the moment, a typical crown courtjudge receives just under £135,000 per year. under these proposals, that would go up to nearly £165,000, which is more than the prime minister, theresa may's salary of around £150,000, though, mrs may does enjoy significant perks, like a free house in a prime central london location. as for other public sector workers, an nhs england nurse, with five years experience, can expect to take home around £28,000 a year. and it's that perceived inequality
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that could give the ministry of justice pause for thought. in a free—market economy, it should be easy to attract more recruits — you simply pay higher wages — but it is never that simple when the taxpayer is footing the bill and when other public sector employees, like teachers, nurses, soldiers or prison officers, have been given far smaller pay rises. the government says it is considering these recommendations and will decide soon whether to accept them. ben ando, bbc news. the former south african foreign minister, pik botha, has died in pretoria at the age of 86. he served as his country's foreign minister for 17 years until the end of the apartheid era in 1994. he was one of the most recognisable faces of the south african government during its years of international isolation over its apartheid policy. russia has suspended manned flights to the international space station while it investigates what went wrong with a soyuz spacecraftjust after ta ke—off from kazakhstan.
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the crew of the rocket are said to be safe and well after being forced to make an emergency landing less than two minutes after launch. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford joins us live now. good to see you. we were lucky enough to talk to helen sharman about half an hour ago, the first britain in space, talk to her about how people were feeling. 0ne britain in space, talk to her about how people were feeling. one of the things we spoke about was how russia was handling this now in terms of publicity and what may have gone wrong. as you can expect, there is huge relief that the two astronauts are safe and they executed that emergency landing without a problem. of course, there was a quite huge amount of g—force on their bodies as they made the ballistic descent, but they made the ballistic descent, but they have just landed back in moscow, the head of the space agency
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has published a photograph with them saying they will fly again. there is a report saying they could potentially be on another flight from the international space station —— to the international space station as early as next spring. trying to put a positive spin, if you like. but big questions about the russian space programme at the moment. this is the first manned flight moment. this is the first manned flight on a soyuz rocket has failed on launch, meaning there are big investigations into the russian space investigations into the russian space programme investigations into the russian space programme and space agency. thank you, sarah rainsford. the high street cafe chain patisserie valerie is facing collapse today after reporting potentialfraud in its accounts earlier this week. the story first emerged at the beginning of the week and there were concerns about how that might work out for the staff particularly. sean, there is the big story about the allegations of fraud and whatever, then there is the practical stuff concerns about what will happen next? it feels different
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to other retailers we have seen going bust or struggling, this really ca m e going bust or struggling, this really came out of the blue for staff this week when we heard about these financial irregularities, the company said they were not aware of them before, potentially fraudulent, them before, potentially fraudulent, the chief finance officer at the company has been suspended. since then the company has discovered that hmrc, the taxman, has got a winding—up petition in place against the company. there is a black hole at the company, effectively they thought they had millions and millions of pounds more than they actually do. so what we heard yesterday, this is the big decision for them to find from somewhere today, they need a cash injection otherwise it can continue as it is. 200 not cafes around the country, there are other chains as well, 2500 staff. 0ne there are other chains as well, 2500 staff. one person has said i do not know if i will be paid in three weeks. that encapsulates the feeling
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they will be waking up to. such a scary situation to be in for any employee? there will be some big decisions to be made today. thank you. carol is that windsor and will update is with the royal wedding, which takes place at 11am between princess eugenie and jack brooksbank. five koala bears have made conservation history by being flown 10,000 miles from their natural habitat in australia to their new home in england. the hope is british scientists can create a back—up population here in the uk to protect the vulnerable marsupials, as our science reporter laura foster reports. tree hugging, eucalyptus munching, sleep needing koalas, like nature's cuddly toy. in fact, they spent up to 20 hours a day asleep, which is
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handy when some of them have had to catch a long haulflight. yesterday 57, others landed at heathrow airport. it is the first of its kind, the first individuals within europe, it isa big, first individuals within europe, it is a big, big step to helping the species survive and helping other species survive and helping other species which need help. there are definitely a fair few in australia which needed. in each crate is a koala, blissfully unaware of all the work and effort it has taken to get them here. they will be checked to see if they are all right and they will go on to their luck —— to their new home. after initial checks on their well—being, the four females and lone male are going to their new home at longleat safari park. scientists you will study them to try to find out how we might be able to protect the species, which is vulnerable to extinction. the side has been growing its own eucalyptus plants in preparation, pa rt eucalyptus plants in preparation, part of the plan to create a back—up
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population of southern koalas in this part of the world. we hope longleat will act as a hub for a breeding programme which would hopefully in time act as a back—up should we needed. to stop the koalas from getting stressed, they will be kept out of sight for the public for the next six months to allow them to settle into their new home, and it is hoped that soon after they will be breed and there will be even more of them hanging about. it is 12 minutes past eight. for the last five months, british student matthew hedges has been held prisoner in the united arab emirates. he'd been researching the country's foreign and security policies when he was arrested. his wife daniela says she's had no official explanation why her husband is being held, and is appealing for more to be done to secure his release. shejoins us now from central london. daniela, thank you very much for your time this morning. you have
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chosen effectively to break your silence, it has been five months now, this is yourfirst silence, it has been five months now, this is your first television interview in connection with it. why have you effectively gone public with the story at this stage? thank you very much for having me. i hadn't actually gone to the media about this whole situation because i had been advised not to buy the foreign office, in matt's best interest, really, and i did not want to jeopardise the situation or his case in that matter. but once i hear he is going to court, i felt com pletely he is going to court, i felt completely outraged by the fact that he would potentially be tried for something he has not done. he is an innocent research are just doing legitimate academic questions in the uae, ijust felt legitimate academic questions in the uae, i just felt it was legitimate academic questions in the uae, ijust felt it was preposterous to even consider the possibility of him going to court for something he
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has not done. could you take us back a step to the time he was arrested? i know there is a lack of clarity about what happened, but the moment of his arrest and what happened subsequently? he was in the uae for two weeks doing his field research, and when he was heading back to the uk at the dubai international airport, he was detained. matt's mum was there at the time, she was dropping him off, she witnessed the whole situation unravelling. as far as we know, he was not given any explanation for why he was being detained and we didn't really hear anything from the uae authorities until about two and a half weeks after his detention. uae authorities until about two and a half weeks after his detentionm is clearly a very worrying time for you and your family. although there
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is no official information about what charges he may face, the suggestion is he may face buying charges? yes, and it is completely absurd, ifi charges? yes, and it is completely absurd, if i may say so. what kind of spy would go to a country with a set of questions and a dictaphone in order to us confidential information? i believe if he has had access to any confidential information he would not be the one to bejudged, it would be the person who shared it with him. he was doing legitimate academic research and he definitely does not deserve the treatment he has got for the past nearly six months. you said you were advised not to go public with your appeal and until now you have taken that decision, what help have you had from the foreign secretary or from the
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authorities in the uk? the foreign 0ffice involvement has been very active, from the moment the uae authorities notified the embassy of matt's arrest. however, my concern is the effectiveness of it. whilst they have been constantly advocating for matt's welfare, this has not been achieved entirely in nearly six months and, moreover, my main concern is that they haven't really gotten actively involved in advocating for his rightful freedom. ifi advocating for his rightful freedom. if i may, can i ask you finally what you know about how he is? have you had you know about how he is? have you ha d a ccess you know about how he is? have you had access to him at all?” you know about how he is? have you had access to him at all? i have been able to speak to him once a week sincejuly in two to four minnich calls, in most of his calls he has been incredibly distressed.
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—— in two to four minute long calls. he has had suicidal thoughts and has expressed that vomiting is his only mechanism to let go of his nerves, since he can't speak to anyone. he has been throwing up regularly for the last three months. his latest call this week, in it he said that asa call this week, in it he said that as a very call this week, in it he said that as a very recently he had been treated nicely and that the people who were keeping him prisoner were being very supportive. i don't know if he has been coerced into saying this but i feel like if they have been nice and supportive it comes as too little, too later. thank you for yourtime, too little, too later. thank you for your time, daniela. her too little, too later. thank you for yourtime, daniela. her husband matthew, a phd student, is being detained in the united arab emirates. that has been since may. carol is in windsor because princess eugenie and her fiance jeff
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brooksbank are marrying in around three hours. —— jack brooksbank are marrying in around three hours. ——jack brooksbank. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell is there as well. we are making sure we have the weather and the romance covered. let's get the weather for everyone. the crowds are building. yes, you are quite right. storm callum is upon us. but before we talk about the weather i want to introduce you to some lucky members of the public who have got ballot tickets to be on the grounds of windsor castle this morning. we have some princesses. good morning. daisy, you look beautiful in your tiara, how old are you? above five. have you come along way? good for you, you have a good seat. ciara and beatrice, beatrice isa seat. ciara and beatrice, beatrice is a very appropriate name.” seat. ciara and beatrice, beatrice is a very appropriate name. i am really excited to see the princess and the prince. what do you think she will be wearing? a beautiful
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long dress, hopefully. did you arrive very early this morning to get such a good seat? yes, we had to wa ke get such a good seat? yes, we had to wake up at five o'clock, we got here at seven. beatrice, your brother teddy is here. you look very dashing. good morning.” teddy is here. you look very dashing. good morning. i am really tired and really excited to see the queen. i really wanted to come here because we get to miss a spelling test at school! every cloud has a silver lining. you look lovely in your bow tie and you have a very good point to see the queen, where you are. we have sophie, you look beautiful. how long did it take to plan your outfits? two weeks. how did you choose such a beautiful colour? i saw this coat and i really wanted it because of the colour. and you have a lovely sparkly hairband and shoes, you look beautiful. dad
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andrew, did you apply to the ballot? sadie wrote a nice letter to the princess, due to her similar back operation, which sadie is due to have. you have a great view, thank you for chatting to us. under the white canopy of her majesty the queen and other members of the royal family will enter st george's chapel here. it is very windy across other parts of the country as storm callum makes his presence felt. the met 0ffice makes his presence felt. the met office has issued an amber weather warning for heavy rain across south wales, not just for today warning for heavy rain across south wales, notjust for today but tomorrow. this could lead to destruction, especially when coupled with the wind. we have a gust of wind in excess of 60 mph in the west. for some, in wind in excess of 60 mph in the west. forsome, in excess wind in excess of 60 mph in the west. for some, in excess of 70 mph in the isles of scilly. you can see the centre of the low pressure,
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storm callum, adds to the west of the uk. look at the isobars. this weather front is moving from west to east, taking heavy rain with it through the rest of the day. this morning we have heavy rain around, coupled with strong winds, treacherous travelling conditions. bear that in treacherous travelling conditions. bearthat in mind treacherous travelling conditions. bear that in mind if you are in a high sided or light vehicle particularly. in the south—east, although it is very windy here and has been damp this morning, it will brighten up and we will see some sunshine. wherever you are, you can see these black circles in the charts, they represent the wind gusts you can expect. windy inland. temperatures in the wind and rain nothing special, in the sunshine it will get up to around 20 or 21. through the evening and overnight, we will still have a weather front across the uk producing some rain, some of that will be heavy. still windy as well. there will be soon showers around in scotland, it will remain dry in the south—east.
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temperatures cool on the backside of that weather front, overnight lows of 17 or18, that weather front, overnight lows of 17 or 18, really unusual and warm for this stage of october. tomorrow we start with the weather front across the central swathes of the uk, producing heavy rain. it will move towards the north—west of the country through tomorrow, so the north and west of the uk will see the rain. not as windy as today. for central and eastern england, check out the temperatures, 23, 24, 25 is possible. 0n the other side of the weather front, much cooler conditions. into sunday, the weather front clears into the north sea, it dries and brightens up, there will be some sunshine and showers across the north of scotland and some in the grampians will have snow in the more persistent showers. it will feel cool on sunday, much cooler where we are looking at 24 or 25.
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thank you, carol, it looks like people are really looking forward to this. there is always a fascination around royal weddings, the dynamics within the royal family. every royal weddings, the dynamics within the royalfamily. every once in awhile we get a little insight, but the royal family today talked about when they talk to the queen about getting married. granny knew right at the beginning, she was one of the very few people the beginning. we left her this weekend and had a lovely time, she was very weekend and had a lovely time, she was very happy, as was my grandfather. what's did she say to you, jack? that she was incredibly happy. you, jack? that she was incredibly happy, and wished us well, which was amazing. it was very, very nice that she was so happy for us. what i love, whenever you see the grandchildren of the queen, when they call her granny. that is what she is. sarah campbell is in windsor. i remember when we chatted
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before harry and meghan's wedding, we we re very before harry and meghan's wedding, we were very excited, the sun was up. what is the excitement like they're now? it isa they're now? it is a beautiful setting, you can't really get better than windsor castle. carol is down there with members of the public, there was a public ballot for people to come into the grounds, to see the carriage ride which will happen when eugenie and jack have been married, come out to the grounds. let's get some more insights about the people coming and what we can expect, from vanity fair ‘s commentator katie nicholl. eugenie and jack, not that well known to the public. briefly, who are they? eugenie is ninth in line to the throne, ablett princess. in the 1980s we saw a lot more of beatrice and eugenie, we saw them growing up with their royal cousins, william and harry, but she is a private individual, she is not paid for by the royal family and does not carry the engagement is that the
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more senior royals do. jack, for wa nt more senior royals do. jack, for want of a better word, is a pretty regular prince, she met him five years ago on the slopes of verbier and fell in love with him. he is tequila brand ambassadors, he's spent years working in and out of nightclubs, the likes of mahiki where prince harry spent a lot of his youth. he is a very regular guy from a pretty ordinary backgrounds and happen to fall in love with a princess, in many ways it is a remarkably ordinary and very touching love story. this will be a very big events, who might be there. tequila might be the cluny connection? we are hearing that -- we are hearing that amal and george clooney might be here. it will be a bigger wedding than may, 850 people have been abated, packing the chapel
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to its capacity. we are told the bekh messi might —— we are told that the sunni david beckhams will not be coming. randy gerber, the other business partner matt tequila perm, might be coming with his wife cindy crawford. sarah ferguson has a lot of connections, it might be even more star—studded than the first royal wedding. we do not have time to long to wait. the guests had to be seated by 10:15am and the server sta rts be seated by 10:15am and the server starts at 11am. it is more blustery than in may, pretty nice weather here. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, there. storm callum has arrived at our shores and it's going to give us some very windy, very wet weather over the next
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couple of days or so. it's in south wales that the met office are particularly concerned with the risk of some flooding with that heavy rain, and there's an amber warning in force. now, this is storm callum. you can see it's to the west of ireland, but this weather front‘s having a massive influence on our weather today and over the next few days, and a strong south—westerly wind associated with that. heavy rain and pulses of heavy rain moving their way northwards through the course of today into scotland. potentially drier in the west of northern ireland and drier down towards the south—east of england during this afternoon. but it's in south—west england and across wales where you can see here by the wind gusts, we're looking at gusts of wind 60—70 miles an houraround exposed western areas. even further east where you've got some sunshine, those gusts will be 40—50 miles an hour. still some very strong winds to come and some heavy rain moving its way up through much of scotland. strongest winds, perhaps, around western areas of scotland. temperatures typically about 16—18 degrees,
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but down towards the south—east of england, with some sunshine, highs of about 20 or 21. through tonight, you can see pulses of heavy rain continuing to move northward across these western areas, but it's going to be a remarkably mild night. temperatures for england and wales near record—breaking for the overnight temperatures, 17—18 degrees celsius, for scotland and northern ireland, it will be chilly here, at about 10—11 degrees. let's go into saturday, and you can see again these weather fronts are still with you across northern and western areas of the united kingdom, and again, because it's a waving weather front, it means that we'll see heavy rain moving its way north from time to time. you can see these blobs of green and darker blue heading northward into scotland. by this stage, across south wales as well, we could see as much as 60—80 millimetres, perhaps up to 160 millimetres over some exposed higher ground, that could lead to some problems. but for central and eastern areas, well, summer returns —
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temperatures 24—25 degrees on saturday, with some sunshine. sunday, that rain clears away. a bit of snow over the grampians during sunday, but that will clear. lots of sunshine, a much drier day, lighter winds, but a chillier day, as temperatures dropping down to about 14—15 degrees in the south—east, compared to that 25 degrees on saturday. so, lots going on, a bit of everything over the next few days. stay tuned to the forecast. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news, with maryam moshiri and victoria fritz. stopping the sell—off... asia steadies the ship after another turbulent day on wall street, but is there worse to come? live from london, that's our top story on friday the 12th of october. it's been the toughest week
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on global markets for months amid concerns about rising interest rates and slowing global growth. so, can the worries be shaken off? also in the programme... yet again, china sells the us more than it buys, but as the surplus hits a new record high, will it create more tensions between the world's two biggest economies?
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