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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 12, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's friday october 12th, it's 9 o'clock. i'mjoanna i'm joanna gosling, welcome to the programme. this programme can reveal that an immigration enforcement hotline received 68 calls from mps and their staff last year — and now a group of charities is calling on all mps to pledge not to inform on their constituents. us media reports say the turkish government has audio and video recordings that they say prove that the missing saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul last week. we'll speak to a close friend ofjamal‘s who had dinner with him just two days before he went missing. saudi arabia has denied any involvement in the disappearance. "unimaginable destruction." florida residents return to find out what's left of their community after hurricane michael. so many lives have been changed forever. so many families have lost everything. homes are gone, businesses are gone. and another royal wedding.
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we'll be live in windsor, as celebrities and royals arrive for the marriage of princess eugenie to jack brooksbank. five months on from the last royal wedding and we are back at st george's chapel. the first of the 850 strong congregation are starting to arrive. celeb spotters have their binoculars ready! hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. have you ever been stopped from visiting a relative who lives in a care home? deprivation of liberty orders are restrictions placed on people for their own safety. it can include things like giving them drugs to calm them down or stopping them receiving visits. changes are being proposed which would mean care home managers — instead of external authorities — would be responsible for carrying out assessments to determine whether an order is imposed. has this ever happened to your relative?
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if so, do you think it was done fairly? do get in touch. also today — it's another royal wedding! princess eugenie is getting married in windsor today — at the same place prince harry married meghan markle in may. how interested a re you in today's event? and should a woman who is only ninth in line to the throne have such a big do? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you — and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. it is looking quite windy in windsor. more coverage later. our top story today... downing street has said theresa may will stick to her position, of putting a limit on the time the uk could remain in a customs union with the eu, after brexit. it's understood several cabinet ministers expressed concern about the issue, and at least one is considering whether they could go along with the plan. with us now from our westminster
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studio is our political correspondent jonathan blake. bring is up to date? a firm line from number ten this morning that the position they set out injune when the government gave details of its preferred backstop plan to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland ifa ireland and the republic of ireland if a trade deal cannot be made ready in time, that should be time limited up in time, that should be time limited up until, it was thought, around december 2020. there are members of the cabinet which are concerned that might not be the case, whether they have been given any indication that the prime minister will shift her position or not we do not know, but it is on the eu side, certainly, their preference and a demand in fa ct their preference and a demand in fact that that arrangement should not be time limited. that is the
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main sticking points in the negotiations as things stand, and it seems neither side is willing to budge from what we're hearing this morning on downing street to unlock that critical issue and allow both sides to demonstrate they have made some progress before a summit in brussels next week. how negotiations going? chancellor philip hammond was asked for his view in an interview this morning. there's a real sense now of engagement from both sides, shared enterprise in trying to solve a problem rather than posturing towards each other. so a really important step change. but that shouldn't conceal the fact that we still got some big differences left to resolve. so process is a lot more positive this week, substance is still very challenging. cautious optimism from chancellor philip hammond, speaking to our economic editor kamal ahmed a little earlier. talking, good atmosphere is
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all well and good, but as he said the substance is still a big sticking point. thank you. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. thank you very much, joanna. an immigration enforcement hotline was called 68 times by mps or their staff last year. a group of charities have now written to commons speakerjohn bercow asking mps to pledge not to inform on constituents, arguing people should not have to fear being reported on by their mps — so far the pledge has been signed by 107 mps. of the calls by mps to the hotline, 3a were from conservatives, 32 from labour, one from the dup and one from a liberal democrat. us media is reporting that the turkish government has audio and video recordings that they say prove the missing saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul when he disappeared ten days ago. us and turkish officials are reported as saying that the recordings provide graphic evidence that a saudi security team detained mr khashoggi,
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before he was killed and his body dismembered. saudi arabia denies any involvement in his disappearance. search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit the united states. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2,000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. eliza philippides reports. mexico beach, showcased online as a perfect holiday destination, where the sand is as white as snow — now described as ground zero, the place that bore the brunt of hurricane michael as it slammed into florida. florida's governor flew across the state to see the extent of the destruction for himself. especially the damage at mexico beach, it's devastating. you just pray to god that everybody survived that. crews from the coastguard worked tirelessly, rescuing 27 people
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during ten missions. this survivor was found and brought to safety by a helicopter team scouting the devastation in alabama. some homeowners in florida, returning to look over what can be salvaged from the ruin, say it will be months before life returns to some sort of normality. i think there is a lot of, you know, anger and shock. just emotion, you know, that is at its peak right now. so, i think we just need a few days to just digest what has happened and see how the rebuilding is going to happen. but for many, life will never be the same again. eliza philippidis, bbc news. senior high courtjudges in england and wales could be in line for a 32% pay rise — meaning they would earn up to £240,000 a year. the senior salaries review board has recommended the increase to address low morale among judges,
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which has led to a sharp fall in applications for the job. the government has not yet decided whether to accept the proposals. the boss of a medical waste disposal company has defended its conduct after it was stripped of its nhs contracts, and the environment agency began enforcement proceedings and a criminal investigation. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, garry pettrigrew of healthcare environmental services said his company had been vilified. he blamed a lack of incineration capacity for the backlog of waste and said it did not include body parts. the environment agency said it wasn't true that there was insufficient capacity and the rest of the sector was performing well. eugenie's royal wedding, —— final preparations are being made for princess eugenie's royal wedding, which takes place later this morning at windsor castle. the queen's granddaughter, who is ninth in line to the throne, will wed her fiance jack brooksbank in front of 850 guests and 1200 members of the public.
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the families are paying for the private aspects of the wedding, but there's been some criticism after it was revealed the cost for security, which is thought to be £2 million, will be picked up by the taxpayer. you can see the live pictures from windsor. the ceremony is due to get under way injust two hours. the rap star kanye west, who recently said he wanted to be known simply as ye, has met president trump at the white house to discuss mental health and prison reform. the rap star, one of the best—selling music artists of all time, declared himself a huge fan of the president during his half hour visit to the oval office. the pair discussed education, north korea and the welfare of black americans. this is our president! he has to be the freshest, the flyest — the flyest planes, the best factories — and we have to make our core be in power. we have to bring jobs into america, because our best export
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is entertainment and ideas, but when we make everything in china and not in america, then we're cheating our country. and we're putting people in positions to have to do illegal things to end up in the cheapest factory ever, the prison system. i'll tell you what, that was pretty impressive. laughter. five koala bears have made conservation history by being flown 10,000 miles from their natural habitat in australia to their new home in england. the hope is british scientists can create a back—up population here in the uk to protect the vulnerable marsupials, as our science reporter laura foster reports. tree hugging, eucalyptus munching, sleep needing koalas are like nature's cuddly toy. in fact, they spend up to 20 hours a day asleep, which is handy when some of them have had to catch a long flight. yesterday, five southern koalas landed at heathrow airport. it's the first of its kind,
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obviously it's the first individuals within europe. so, it's a big, big step towards helping the species survive and also helping other species which need help. there's definitely a fair few in australia which need it. in each of these crates is one of the koalas. each blissfully unaware of all the work and effort it's taken to get them here. now, they're going to be checked to see if they're all right and then we'll go on to their new home in wiltshire. after some initial checks on their well—being, the four females and lone male are off to their new home at longleat safari park in wiltshire. here, scientists will study them to try and find out how we might be able to help protect this species, which is vulnerable to extinction. the site has been growing its own eucalyptus plants in preparation, all part of the plan to create a back—up population of southern koalas in this part of the world. we're hoping that longleat will act as a hubfora breeding programme,
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which would also, hopefully, in time, act as a back up, should we need to have it. to stop the koalas from getting stressed, they'll be kept out of sight from the public for the next six months, to allow them to settle into their new home, and it's hoped that soon after they will breed and there will be even more of them hanging about. laura foster, bbc news. and they are definitely marsupials, they are not bad, just to correct that little error that crept into the script! —— they are not bears. the buyer of the banksy print that was partially shredded immediately after auction will go ahead with the purchase. the woman, who's not been named, successfully bid more than £1 million for the picture, girl with balloon. she said she was shocked at first when it was shredded, but she now wants to keep what she believes is a piece of art history.
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and no doubt claims that its value may have doubled will have helped her make that decision! some newsjust in. bbc news understands staff at lindholme prison in south yorkshire are refusing to work after a prison officer was strangled unconscious. the officer was attacked last night, according to sources, and taken to hospital. prison staff arriving for their day shifts at 8am have held a meeting in the visits centre and have not taken up their posts. they're due to hold a meeting with the governor shortly. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9:30. letters know what you think about the royal wedding today. eugenie and jack are getting married in windsor at the same place that meghan and harry got married. it will be a grand scale events, the guests have started to arrive. it is overcast and slightly windy but there will be lots of people turning out for this
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wedding. 1200 ordinary members of the public are allowed into windsor castle to see and hear all the goings on. let us know what you think. she is officially seen as a private citizen by buckingham palace, but this is a big scale wedding. would you be watching? let's get some sport — john watson is at the bbc sport centre. not a great night for scotland or wales who were in international action? good morning. defeats for both nations, the scottish fans in particular will not be happy. not a good night for scotland and their fans, who made the trip to israel for their nations league match losing 2—1 despite taking the lead. their only goal came from the penalty spot, charlie mulgrew firing home. but israel scored a brilliant equaliser, the scottish defence sliced open. 1-1 at 1—1 at this point. john souttar was sent off, before a kieron tierney own goal earned victory for a side ranked 55 places below them. a long way back for the scottish
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fa ns after a long way back for the scottish fans after the defeat. it wasn't good enough. started well enough. got in front. then it was all downhill from there. a very tough night. getting a man sent off, it was not aour night. it was not our night. at the end of the day, the performance wasn't good enough for three points. that is very disappointing. we need to dust ourselves down and get back on track straightaway. we don't have time to dwell on this result. as will wales, who were beaten 4—1 by spain in a friendly in cardiff, the spanish given plenty of tiem and space to open the scoring, the spanish have beaten both england and croatia in the nations league, continue to look the part. disappointment then for wales, who were hoping to put on a show as more than 50,000 packed into the prinicpality stadium in cardiff to see them play. —— in the principality stadium. just brush ourselves down, take it on the chin.
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the last time we were in cardiff we won 4—1, we were magnificent. tonight we were disappointed. the good thing about football is you always have the next game. that can't come quick enough. and it will be a strange one tonight for england, playing behind closed doors in croatia. fans wont be allowed in the stadium after the croatian team were punished for mowing a swastika onto their pitch three years ago. england fans have still travelled there, and will attempt to try and get a glimpse of the action. next week marks the 50th anniversary of american athlete tommie smith, and his gold medal, at the mexico city olympics, and more famously — the black power salute, with his team—matejohn carlos stood on the podium. taking a stand against racial injustice in the us, and he's been saying how proud he is of the simlar stand the american football player colin kaepernick has been taking.. he told the bbc that his protests and by other american
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players taking a knee, made him cry. i would have wanted to meet him had he not taken a knee, but because he did, i recognise the fact that these guys did the same thing, i wonder what they were thinking. and the sacrificial dance that he took revealed his upbringing the need to be better socially. tommie smith, basically the same thing, 50 years later, it will be like that in another 50 years. and, interestingly, colin kapernick has just been awarded a prestigious award for his contribution to black history and culture, and he's called on more protests from players to continue the fight for racial equality which, of course, tommie smith was massive part of. that's all the sport for now. more at around 9:30am. studio: thank you, see you later. us media reports say the turkish government has audio and video recordings that they say prove that the missing saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate
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in istanbul ten days ago. the journalist entered the saudi arabian embassy in istanbul on tuesday last week, and hasn't been seen since. the saudi government maintains he left through the back entrance, but turkish officials claim mr khashoggi was murdered inside the consulate walls. the recordings are said to provide graphic evidence that he's been killed. king salman bin abdulaziz al—saud is the official ruler of saudi arabia, but his son crown prince mohammed bin salman is considered to be in charge after being named first in line to the throne last year. since then, he's ushered in major social forms in the strictly conservative state — like allowing cinemas to operate and women to drive. but the reforms haven't stretched to allowing criticism of the ruling family at home or abroad. in fact, many saudi nationals critical of the regime and living in exile have disappeared, some of their stories bearing stark similarity to that ofjamal khashoggi, as detailed in a bbc arabic investigation. let's take a look at a short extract from that documentary.
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this is prince sultan bin turki. he's one of the grandsons of king abdulaziz bin saud, the founder of saudi arabia. he's also a fierce critic of the ruling elite in the kingdom. injanuary 2016, he was preparing to travel to cairo on a private jet offered to him by the saudi consulate in paris. two of his staff tell us what happened on that flight. their identities are hidden to protect them. it wasn't untiljust before we landed that we realised we were in saudi arabia. as soon as the prince realised where we were, he got up without his walker and was trying to get towards the door. they were about to land in riyadh. we looked out the window and we just saw a bunch of people get out with their rifles slung over their chest and surrounded the plane. the soldiers and cabin crew dragged
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sultan from the plane. he was screaming at his team to call the us embassy. it was an astonishing situation. a saudi prince and his team of european and american nationals were kidnapped and taken to saudi arabia. the foreigners were allowed to leave three days later. sultan has not been heard from since. well, let's get more now on those us media reports saying that the turkish government has audio and video recordings apparently proving the saudi government are responsible forjamal khashoggi's disappearance. we can talk to those that know jamal as both friend and colleague. we'rejoined by the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner, lyse doucet, the bbc‘s chief international correspondent, michael stevens is an expert in middle east politics and a friend ofjamal's, and dr daud abdullah,
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a close friend of jamal‘s who had dinner with him just two days before he disappeared. welcome, all of you. what is the latest, frank, on these extraordinary reports that it is being claimed their recordings from inside the embassy that prove he killed? the media is braced to hear exactly what this recording actually tells, what it will tell us. there are two explanations of how it could have come about, if it exists, as the turkestan officials claim. one is that jamal khashoggi was wearing an apple watch in communication with the mobile phone held by his wife outside. that was in communication until it stopped. it is possible a recording can be downloaded from a server that would indicate what was going on inside the consulate building. the second, and hear the turks have been slightly equivocal,
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is there is a possibility that they had some kind of access to what was going on inside the saudi consulate in istanbul, either monitoring or a human informant. neither of these is confirmed. it has been ten days and although the onus is absolutely on the saudis to explain what has happened to this man, there is a lot of hyperbole going around which is unsubstantiated. it may turn out to be crew, but let's hear it. the descriptions we are hearing are pretty gruesome. are they going to have to put something out to prove it? frankly they are running around like headless chickens, trying to decide what on earth they tell about this story? ten days of silence, this story? ten days of silence, this story? ten days of silence, this story is not going away, it is a crisis for saudi arabia's public image. the saudis don't normally do
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murder, it is not their way. they might bomb people from 20,000 feet in yemen as part of a war but it is not their way to assassinate somebody like this. if they were after khashoggi, they would have wa nted after khashoggi, they would have wanted to abduct him and render him back to saudi. it is possible they we re back to saudi. it is possible they were trying to do that and it went badly wrong. lyse doucet, why would the saudis or anybody want him dead? he was living in self—imposed exile in the us, what was he writing about? about that is the question eve ryo ne about? about that is the question everyone is asking. frank mentions the media, and people around the world, there has been such a cascade of interest in this by states, journalists, friends of jamal khashoggi, and he has friends everywhere because he was widely read and widely respected. he says i was not a dissident, i was simply a loyal, proud saudi citizen who wanted to have a say in what happens
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in my country if they are going to spend money on a road all dam, i wanted to write freely. he was a prominent newspaper editor in saudi arabia, lost his job, prominent newspaper editor in saudi arabia, lost hisjob, then shortly after the rising power of crown prince mohammed bin salman, he decided he could not live and work asa decided he could not live and work as a journalist in saudi arabia and began what you described as his self—imposed excel. what may have started to bother the saudi authorities right up to the top was that his writings became more and more sharp. there have been reports, maybe you will be able to tell us more, that he had plans to form a new human rights organisation, to promote human rights across the arab world. the accusation is that he's close to the muslim brotherhood, which is anathema to the saudis and any of the monarchy is in the gulf, the
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political form of islam, i think that charge is dubious. but he wanted a greater freedom for this generation of saudis and arabs across the middle east. that might have set alarm bells ringing. he himself said that the crown prince was trying to urge him to come back to saudi arabia to be an adviser. given the intercepts that have been leaked, was that a ruse to get back to the kingdom and keep him back? there was a suggestion that what happened in the console was a back—up plan, that ofjamal khashoggi did not go himself to saudi arabia to take up this offer, which perhaps was journeyman, saudi arabia to take up this offer, which perhaps wasjourneyman, that they would get him back however they could —— they would get him back however they could — — but they would get him back however they could —— but what happened in the consulate was a back—up plan. if the story is true then it underlines that there is zero—tolerance for criticism, political criticism, of any kind. there has been a social and economic liberalisation, but when it comes to politics, the door
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is shut shortly. daud, i mentioned you were out for dinner with him just two days before he disappeared, what are your theories around this? that is saturday the 29th, he spoke at our conference on saudi policy in the region. he made a clear distinction between the policies of the regime and the attitudes of the people, the saudi people as a whole, towards the regional crises. now during the night while we were having dinner, he showed me some of the tweets from his critics back in arabia who were saying very negative things about him because of his participation in the conference. he had stepped on some toes, during the day he had caused some discomfort, participating and speaking in the manner in which he did.
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did he say anything to you indicating he was concerned for his safety? there was the issue of his going to the embassy, of course given the wife a mobile phone telling her if i don't come back at a certain time then raise the alarm. but he did not seem overly concerned, scared, that he would be abducted. he had been into the building once and it had all been fine, and on the basis of that he felt was ok? they gave him an appointment to come on october the ist. during that time the plan was made, we had these 15 security people who came to arabia on the very day of his appointment. they booked into the hotel for four days,
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but it turns out that on that very day they left turkey. they were supposed to be tourists coming to turkey for four days, leaving on the same day they arrived. that set the alarms. also these people had some very sinister intent. michael, what is your perspective? i think over the last week there has been a lot of speculation, there has been a lot of speculation, there has been a lot of speculation, there has been a little time been much speculation, but the evidence is building and the saudis are not answering some serious questions. why were the cctv cameras not recording in a consulate in istanbul, a place where you have an isis insurgency at times, it is not fully secure? last i worked as a diplomat in istanbul and our security protocols were pretty tight. peshmerga last year i worked.
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why coming togetherjamal khashoggi leaving the embassy, why can they not account for who these 15 people were? the only thing we have had is a statement from coloured bin salman, the brother of the crown prince, who has been churlish and said he did not care what the accusations were “— said he did not care what the accusations were —— a statement from khalid bin salman. denying it in a way that almost seemed like they we re way that almost seemed like they were angry about the accusation rather than trying to take each of these points one by one and refuting them. it has not been helped that them. it has not been helped that the country in which this has happened does not have a great record —— record at treating journalists well, has been releasing contradictory evidence of the last few days and some of the story is not matching up. i am afraid there has been a grey area that nobody is able to verify. it comes down to the basic point that there needs to be evidence released by the saudis or the turks as to when and where he was 20 minutes after his supposed appointment when he is supposed to
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have left? why has nobody been able to release that evidence? if the saudis cannot produce it, the burden of proof is on them. frank, why does this leave saudi arabia, at least saying there is zero—tolerance of political dissent? this has shone a spotlight in the way that there just has not been before? i think the scales have come off some peoples eyes when they thought what a reformer and moderniser, in some ways he is, but the true face has shown itself here. this is someone who and seen by most of the west, people in the west, has been quietly locking up women, activists, people who have tweeted something, he's incapable of tolerating any criticism. there was the visit of donald trump last year and you could see there was a really warm relationship between president trump
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and the saudis generally, but the fa ct and the saudis generally, but the fact that president trump has actually said he is personally concerned about this and is taking an interest in it, albeit he doesn't wa nt an interest in it, albeit he doesn't want to lose the $10 billion of saudi investment, because he knows they will turn to china or russia as and suppliers if need be, but the fa ct and suppliers if need be, but the fact is this is potentially a crisis the us and britain. saudi arabia is that ally, they backed them with not just diplomatic and military support, but there are thousands of jobs at this is a crisis for them. their ally has embarrassed them. the uk cannot have a two track policy, where it crams the —— slams the kremlin for killing someone on the streets of salisbury but turned a blind eye to what they have a apparently done in istanbul. where
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ever you are you will not be so. this echoes of the accusations against russia. this is a time where people can get away with things. we have all been emphasising, we have to wait for the facts. was it a rendition that went badly wrong? it's absolutely clear something went tragically wrong. there has been no sightings for ten days, so the sooner we hear about it the better but the next question will be, what will be the consequences? there should be legal action for this, lest others watching say, well, i guess it ok to murder a genderless, ifa guess it ok to murder a genderless, if a journalist has indeed been murdered. thank you all very much. —— to murdera murdered. thank you all very much. —— to murder a journalist. time for the latest news — here's annita mcveigh. cabinet ministers raised concerns about potential compromises
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with the eu over brexit at a no 10 meeting. there is talk of the uk staying in a form of customs union with the eu for an unlimited period, if a post—brexit trade deal cannot be done in time. no 10 has insisted that any such arrangement would be "time limited". an immigration enforcement hotline was called 68 times by mps or their staff last year. a group of charities have now written to commons speakerjohn bercow asking mps to pledge not to inform on constituents, arguing people should not have to fear being reported on by their mps — so far the pledge has been signed by 107 mps. of the calls by mps to the hotline, 3a were from conservatives, 32 from labour, one from the dup and one from a liberal democrat. us media is reporting that the turkish government has audio and video recordings that they say prove the missing saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul, when he disappeared ten days ago. us and turkish officials are reported as saying
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that the recordings provide graphic evidence that a saudi security team detained mr khashoggi, before he was killed and his body dismembered. saudi arabia denies any involvement in his disappearance. search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit america. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. michael weakened to a tropical storm, but people across the us have been warned of ongoing danger from downed power lines, flash floods and landslides. bbc news understands that staff at lindholme prison in south yorkshire are refusing to work after a prison officer was attacked and "strangled" lost consciousness. the officer was attacked last night, according to sources, and taken to hospital. after a meeting held this morning, prison staff decided not to take up their posts. they're due to meet
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with the governor shortly. final preparations are being made for princess eugenie's royal wedding which takes place later this morning at windsor castle. guests, including many of the celebrities, have begun to arrive. the queen's granddaughter, who is ninth in line to the throne, will wed her fiance jack brooksbank in front of 850 guests and 1200 members of the public will be watching the service. this is the cena live. a slightly blustery day. more from windsor throughout the morning. yes, a bit of a shame, the wind taking some of the hats off, as guests arrive for the second royal wedding of the year. ian and e—mails those who are these people and why did they need protection? it's a huge
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miscalculations such a display of such an earned opulence and wealth ata time such an earned opulence and wealth at a time of austerity, showing all the arrogance of mary antoinette. when the head of state dies, there should be a massive coal from the top to the bottom of all these people. their time is up, the only ones unable to see that is them. george says, the family is paying for the wedding, we are paying for the security but don't we pay for the security but don't we pay for the family? so in fact we are paying for the lot. sharon says, yes, yes, yes, lovely to have some happy news, brexit and a donald trump world gone mad. what will you be doing, will you be watching? are you as excited as you've been about other royal weddings? she is seen as a private citizen by buckingham palace, doesn't a royal engagements get money from the privy purse, and the wedding is being paid for by the family, but the security will be covered by the taxpayer. what do you
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think? we will be back in windsor for more rivals a little later. here's some sport now with john watson. hello, again. defeats for scotla nd defeats for scotland and wales. scotland in their nations league match with israel last night, despite taking the lead they lost 2—1, kieran tierney‘s own goal giving them the win. it's one win and one defeat for the scots so far in their campaign. some rather glum faces from the fans and players after that result. wales will need to dust themselves down according to manager ryan gigss, after losing 4—1 to spain, who scored three goals inside 30 minutes, the welsh did get a consolation in last night's friendly at the principality. kyle edmund's run at the shanghai masters is over. he was beaten by alez zverev in the quarterfinals, edmund yet to win an atp tour title. and eddie pepperell will hope his luck is in today as much as it was yesterday. this shot of the day a hole in one at the british masters, which has given him a share of the lead. he's 5—under with matt wallace
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and tommy fleetwood. that's all the sport for now. more at 10am. thank you, very much. concerns are being raised about proposed changes to the way people can have their freedoms removed in care homes. deprivation of liberty orders are when there are restrictions placed on what someone can do for their own safety. it can include things like restraints or giving someone drugs that calm them down. even stopping visitors. at the moment, they're overseen by special officers in local councils. but a big backlog of more than 120,000 cases has prompted the government to try to change how it works. the new proposals are meant to require less paper work, with care home managers now responsible for carrying out the initial assessments before being approved by councils or health bodies. but there are concerns that this could lead to a conflict of interest. the proposals are being discussed in the house of lords next week. we can speak now tojudy downey, chair of the relatives and residents association which represents people in care homes.
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helene thomas, she says she was prevented from seeing her father when he was in a care home, when the manager used a deprivation of liberty order. and in our kent studio, we have nadra ahmed from the national care association which represents privately run care homes. welcome to all of you, thank you for joining us. judy, would you tell us exactly what these orders are and why and when they use?” exactly what these orders are and why and when they use? i first have to say i'm not a mental capacity expert, but we know the impact of being deprived of your liberty when we hear people who bring our helpline to tell us they are not allowed to see their relatives and they are not quite sure why. or their visits have been restricted. sometimes there are disputes within a family, so one member of the family wants the person to stay where they are and another member
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thinks there is somewhere much better for them, thinks there is somewhere much betterfor them, and thinks there is somewhere much better for them, and perhaps thinks there is somewhere much betterfor them, and perhaps a third member thinks they should be at home. what's so brilliant about the current system is there is access to independent expertise, and these are trained people, who have had to be trained people, who have had to be trained social workers and there may have had to do an additional qualification so that they understand about people's mental health and when they lack capacity and how to interview them and how to get, even if they lack speech, to understand what those closest to them knew about them and what they preferred before. and sometimes you can get people to indicate by their body movements and by their happiness or unhappiness, where they wa nt to happiness or unhappiness, where they want to be. so as far as possible, the ideal would be that someone feels that they actually have a say, rather than this is something that is being done to them? absolutely, and that as someone is acting not for the home, not for their
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relatives, but for the individual concerned, because they are in a very vulnerable position and often, when they express a choice, as in the case, will in which a man was autistic and ta ken the case, will in which a man was autistic and taken to a place and got very agitated and nobody could get him out, it was started because people are good and express their own views had some kind of protection. you've explained it really clearly, thank you. helen, i know you've been going through a terrible time with your father. he is 79. he has vascular dementia and went into a home earlier this year. one of these orders was put in place and he is now in a mental health environment. as from tuesday. tell us how things have unfolded, what
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has happened ? us how things have unfolded, what has happened? in march, my father had a seizure on the night and was taken to the local hospital. he had already been diagnosed with vascular dementia, so we knew it was a degenerative illness, but he was very lucid a lot of the time. while he was in hospital, after four days, they said that medically there was no reason for him to still be there, but it then became clear that there we re but it then became clear that there were plans for him to go into a home, a care home, ratherthan were plans for him to go into a home, a care home, rather than to go to his home. he was placed in a home. nobody was asked about homes, myself, my sister, who lives abroad, myself, my sister, who lives abroad, my daughter, who is 30, none of us had any input at all, even though we have friends who know about care
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homes which are suitable, which are better... nobody told us anything until he was actually taken from the hospital into a care home room, which had been beautifully furnished with his favourite painting from home and his favourite bits and pieces and a single bed, which he hadn't slept in for 50 years, a single bed. his frustration straightaway, which we predicted, caused him to self harm. so he started, he would bang his hands like this on his head and say "i wa nt like this on his head and say "i want to go home! i don't want to be here, iwant want to go home! i don't want to be here, i want to go home!" there were a couple of incidents with other residents, where they were and supervised particularly well and his frustration boiled over to involve other residents, and there are other
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relatives, i have to say, who are also not happy with the situation. then, whilst i was up in scotland on holiday, i received a telephone call, saying that the home had decided, along with psychiatric advice, that my father was to receive no visitors at all for a fortnight and they were going to tweak his medication during that time, to see whether they could settle him in a bit better. what was the explanation for why no visitors? because apparently he got more frustrated after visitors left. so it was easier to manage him if he had no visitors. that must have been awfulfor had no visitors. that must have been awful for the had no visitors. that must have been awfulfor the family. had no visitors. that must have been awful for the family. unbelievable. this was a home that said when my father first went in and i telephoned them, i said what is the visiting situation? they said 24
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hours a day, seven days a week. it's like homer, it's like home. i believed them. i was stupid and i believed them. i was stupid and i believed them. i was stupid and i believed them. was there anything you could do to challenge about, ? not at the time. they said at the time they couldn't force it but it was made very, very clear via hostility from staff that although they might not be able to enforce it, they could enforce it by making me feel my father would suffer if i was to go in. and then his frustration has grown. it has not got any better. he certainly hasn't settled on and at the end of that two—week period, there was another assault, a fight, basically, so clearly having no visitors didn't work. and he is now in a mental health unit? on tuesday of this week
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health unit? on tuesday of this week he actually, quite literally, we've all heard the phrase and found it quite amusing, he banged his head against a brick wall until he had a huge lump, with several layers of skin missing. he has a shape like this and the top of his head and he was sectioned and he's now in a mental health unit. he has vascular dementia? he has, yes. let's bring in nadra. from the national care association. what do you think about the fact that the decisions on whether visitors are allowed and other decisions which affect on in a home are going to be taken by the ca re home are going to be taken by the care home and arejust home are going to be taken by the care home and are just going forward because of this huge backlog?” think this is a huge challenge. the current system isn't working and we know that. the current system, it's inexcusable that people are waiting years for the approval to come from
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local authorities. so if we start from the premise of where we are, where we are is it's not working. what we need to create, we need to be absolutely clear that whatever comes forward now is sustainable. in order to do that, we have to make sure that whoever the responsibility goes to as the time and the expertise to deliver it. i think judy has explained it really well in the way it works currently, and that independence, which is really important. what worries us as a provider group is really that this shift in the responsibility from local authority, which has failed to be able to maintain this system, is being passed through to a sector which is already under a critical crisis. when you think about it, we have huge vacancies in our sector,
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110,000 at any given time. there are vacancies, 76,000 of those are in the social care sector. so i think we have to think about the registered managers that services are not able to attract. if you're going to put all the onus on the registered manager, there is also that worry, that hasjust been demonstrated, about the lack of independence and how we can have that implied conflict—of—interest with families. we have to have, as providers we have to have really good working relationships with a numberof good working relationships with a number of stakeholders. the most critical of those is the family. the family have do believe in us and trust us to be delivering the best possible care. so if we find ourselves in a situation, as has just been demonstrated, we are already breaking down layers of trust with providers, and you are leaving somebody 24 hours a day in
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theircare. i've been leaving somebody 24 hours a day in their care. i've been in that situation, because my mother was in a care home. i think we've got to think very carefully. there needs to bea think very carefully. there needs to be a pause button with this bill because it is creating something that needs to be sustainable, and notwithstanding the fact that the current system doesn't work, it is also worrying that it starts with the fact this is going... this is a money saving for local authorities, which by the very fact, it's notated in that way, indicates that saving will come from the providers picking up will come from the providers picking up that financial burden. thank you, thank you all very much, thank you. i hope things improve with your dad. just have to keep fighting. she's the agent behind stars like florence and the machine, red hot chilli peppers and katy perry — but you've probably never heard of her. emma banks is a woman at the top of the music industry and she's being honoured for 28 years in the business tonight, with a music industry trusts award.
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previous female winners include kylie minogue and annie lennox but emma is the first woman who's not an artist to get the award. we can talk to emma now. congratulations. was it a big surprise when you got it? oh, yes. it's an event i've been to for many yea rs. it's an event i've been to for many years. i always thought they are grown—ups, the people that when these are top of their game, they are people i respect and look up to andi are people i respect and look up to and i think if you ever think about yourself like that, you're probably on may pretty slippery slope. so it came as a huge shock when i got the phone call. but i am deeply honoured to be receiving the award and obviously one of the primary functions is to raise money for charity from it. so really happy to be participating. tell us about your 28 year career, obviously incredibly well respected, even if you are not household name, which sounds like a horrible thing to say! obviously you have achieved a great deal in your
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industry and everybody knows who you are there and that is why you were being honoured. tell us about the career and what the highlights have been over that 28 years. i've worked very hard. i started at the bottom, came intoa very hard. i started at the bottom, came into a company and literally booked anything i was told to do. over the years, i've grown, the client side got have grown. i've had that little bit of luck that you sometimes need and i've put my head down. highlights for me... working with the red hot chilli peppers, and i've worked with them for i think of it -- i've worked with them for i think of it —— over 20 years. they played hyde park quite some years ago now, but it really was the point where they went from a cool band to being a major headliner. they sold three nights there, 85,000 people a night, said they did over 250,000 tickets in london. it's probably never going to happen again, frankly, in that venue. to happen again, frankly, in that venue. really special. you always
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think when you see someone like the red hot chilli peppers or anyone else when they are doing well, well, it's obvious they have this amazing talent that is not obvious at the beginning when they are going round of trying to get representation and trying to get a career the ground. they need someone to have that faith in them. what is it, is it always obvious to you when someone comes at the door that they have something, how much do you have to work at it? everybody has to work at it. i look at the songs they've written, eve ryo ne at the songs they've written, everyone is going to get better at what they do. we'll start off when we haven't done it before and years in the, you get confidence. i think when someone is charismatic onstage, when someone is charismatic onstage, when they have a confidence, when they believe in themselves, and i think that is a life lesson for anyone. if you believe in yourself, then any woody austin stow on the journey with you. that is important raw talent is what you look for. and probably something different as well. there are a lot of people with nice voices and a lot of people who
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can write a decent song but you have to have that little extra. the x factor. you have, that takes you to the next level. light is there anyone who has really surprised you that has come through your door and you have watched them grow? hopefully, when they come through my door i think there's that little colonel there. we've had some amazing success stories, be it florence and the machine, and how she's developed. she started off with two people on stage and now there is a cost of thousands onstage sometimes. the artistry she brings to her performance, the holbrooke, the feel of it. also, and artists like lorde, started so young. when you meet a 14—year—old in auckland, it's hard to believe that maybe they
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will be headlining festivals all around the world five or six years later, but she has achieved that. you are proud of them and they are proud of you. florence says emma banks has been a constant support of wisdom. her kindness and intuition are an inspiration to me and many other women in the industry. mr, we salute you, we thank you for everything. thank you. much as the industry changed in 28 years? it's changed a lot. the world has changed a lot with the internet. it's changed how people listen to music and how people buy tickets. it's made tickets scalping much easier for people. there are far more women in the industry now than there were when i started. it's always hard. when you try and remember 28 years ago, it's all a distant memory, but i don't think in the uk there were any female agents at that point. none that i knew of in contemporary music. now there are lots. what was
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it like being a woman in amman's world back then? i suppose if you constantly look at being a woman in a man's world there will always be a problem. i got on with it. i have two brothers, i have a father and i was treated the same as them. i didn't look for problems. there was one time where someone didn't get what they wanted on the phone and they said, i want to talk to an age. i said i and the agent. they said, who is your boss? i said you can talk to who you want but the a nswer you can talk to who you want but the answer is the answer. but i think now, there's far more opportunity for everybody. it's a much more diverse business. it has to be. there hasn't been much all metoo in the music industry, are you surprised, are you waiting for it come out? maybe. maybe i've been lucky, maybe i haven't noticed it. i think sometimes, as i said, if you look for a problem, sometimes you
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can find it. i'm sure there's been sexist comments, maybe sometimes inappropriate behaviour, but i brush it off because it hasn't affected me, and! it off because it hasn't affected me, and i think i probably look for it happening to other people more than i'm concerned about myself. if makes sense. so no, there's no doubt some horror stories out there and no doubt there are women that are scared to speak out, because of the fa ct scared to speak out, because of the fact it might impact on theirjobs, their relationships. a lot of us, we're re—employed by our clients. they have a lot of power. maybe there's things going on... as i say, maybe on one of the lucky ones that hasn't happened to, but, you know... metoo is everywhere, it really is. i think as women, we all need to look out for each other and speak up when we see something going wrong. thank you very much. enjoy your moment tonight. thank you. well, it's not long now until windsor‘s second royal wedding
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of the year gets under way. princess eugenie will marry jack brooksbank at st. george's chapel at 11am this morning. members of the royal family will be arriving soon. let's cross live now to daniela who is outside windsor castle. looks a bit cold and jilly. yes, it is. this is where you will get a good vantage point of their new married couple. in terms of the crowd at the moment, if we look at how many people, it isn't the sort of numbers that we saw back when the duke and duchess of sussex got married. probably a few hundred in windsor town centre waiting to see the royal couple a little later this morning. it is a significant event in the royal diary. with me as royal commentator victoria murphy. you had a sneak preview inside the chapel and just outside. can you tell us about the flowers on what is going on on the steps of the chapel?” about the flowers on what is going on on the steps of the chapel? i was lucky enough to go to the west steps
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of the chapel, where the bridal party will arrive and depart. they have been quite transformed. beautiful floral arrangements. buckingham palace announced this morning they have been done by rob van holden. incredibly colourful, autumn colours, pinks and oranges, roses and hydrangeas and berries. there are trees, maple trees, which we understand will be planted in frogmore house afterwards. and the setup inside? different to the last one? they don't want too much specific information revealed just here but what i can say is i went on before harry and megan's wedding and it was clear from the way everything was arranged that there were more guests. they had 600, we believe there will be 850 at this wedding. what's also nice to note, the chapel is divided into two parts, the choir at the front where there are rather fixed seating and queues and then the nave, where they have brought seats into. the couple are going to
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stop halfway at the organ screen and conduct part of their service there, so people don't get the opportunity to see everything and then they are going to go through to the choir, where they will say their vows. we have seen some guests arrive, jimmy carr, artistry siemian and model kate moss. what sort of wedding do think this will be question much he has quite a glitzy list of friends, what is the mood? clearly a glitzy list of friends. george clooney founded the tequila brandy works. i think we're seeing a mixture of this royal celebrity set and a lot of guests. this wedding doesn't have the significance of the previous wedding had, harry is sixth in line to the throne and eugenie is ninth. in terms of scale of the actual wedding itself, and of the size of the celebrations, this is actually a very big wedding. victoria murphy, thank you very much. we will have a
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chance to see the royal couple after midday, once a leading spanish. thank you very much. spotlight in the way that there just has not been before? simon has the weather. it is not looking very warm and windsor for the wedding? very windy, the guests are holding onto their hats and dresses. it is because we have storm calllum sitting to the west of the united kingdom. there is quite a deep area of high pressure and we have some really quite heavy rain which will continue to come from the south and the west. those winds have been strong, gusting 60 to 70, perhaps even higher in north wales already throughout the morning. the rain will keep coming across parts of the south—west. already quite a bit of heavy rain moving north—eastward, this next batch of rain is moving
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from the south—west and it is rain over the next two days, today and tomorrow, that the met office are concerned about. an amber weather warning is in force, the risk of flooding and some disruption. as the rain moves further north through today, the dark blues and greens are indicative of some really quite heavy bursts of rain pushing northward and the strong winds will continue throughout this afternoon. even when you have sunshine and eastern areas there are winds, gusts of wind of 30 to 50 mph. further west, you will see the strongest wind. 60 or70 mph. accompanied by heavy rain. drier conditions for northern ireland but very windy. temperature wise, around 16 to 19 celsius. further east, temperatures into the 20s. overnight, the rain will be relentless across south—west england, wales, northern england. the main feature for many of us is how warm it will be tonight, near
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record—breaking warmth, 17 or 18 celsius for england and wales, chilly in scotland and northern ireland. saturday, the weather front is still with you across northern and western areas of the uk. this will continue to bring the rain. by the end of saturday across south wales in particular you could see as much as 160 millimetres of rainfall, that is why there is the concern of flooding. but across scotla nd concern of flooding. but across scotland western areas you will see rain. in eastern areas, sunshine and quite a lot of one. in 225 celsius. by quite a lot of one. in 225 celsius. by sunday lots of wawrinka veers towards the east. there could be snow in high points of scotland. chillierfor snow in high points of scotland. chillier for us snow in high points of scotland. chillierfor us all on snow in high points of scotland. chillier for us all on sunday, highs of about 12 to 17. hello, it's friday, it's ten o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. this programme can reveal that an immigration enforcement hotline received 68 calls from mps and their staff last year — and now a group of charities is calling on all mps to pledge not to inform on their constituents.
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should they sign the pledge or not? we'll hearfrom mps on both sides — but do let us know what you think. reports in the us media say the turkish government has audio and video evidence that the missing saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul. a close friend of mr khashoggi tells us his criticism of the saudi regime at a conference just days before he disappeared, had not gone unnoticed. he had stepped on some toes. at least during the day he had caused some discomfort by participating and speaking in the manner in which he did. and it's royal wedding time again... guests have begun arriving in windsor for the nuptials of princess eugenie to jack brooksbank. it's a breezy day in windsor, the likes of kate moss, naomi campbell
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and holly vola nt likes of kate moss, naomi campbell and holly volant have taken their seats inside st george's chapel. —— holly valance. the royalfamily seats inside st george's chapel. —— holly valance. the royal family will arrive imminently. david hearn e—mail says the royal family are one of our greatest assets. by the way, hughes pays for the cost of policing football matches? nobody seems to complain about that. we have the live arrivals coming through, holding onto their hats in the wind. charles arnie mel says the wedding is overkill on press coverage and the cost of security to the taxpayer is wrong. a lesser venue should have been arranged. in times of austerity and food banks windsor castle should be open to the public for food and shelter, not another royal wedding. ido shelter, not another royal wedding. i do not think the majority of the uk public care about a privilege royalfamily uk public care about a privilege royal family and care about themselves more, which is there in. ehmer says people are so negative, they cannot see the reality. stop
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going on about who is paying for what, one text says. she is entitled and the security is notjust for the royals but everyone attending, including the public, which is much neededin including the public, which is much needed in the crazy world we live in. james and text says taxpayers' money squandered on this tobacco. we will be back in windsor as the guests continue to arrive. —— squandered on this debacle. james blunt and his wife, he went to meghan and harry podmore, as did many of the guests, as you might expect. there is ellie goulding, some celebrity guests among the congregation, friends of the young royals. we will discuss more about the royal wedding, what she might be wearing, what you think about whether it should be such a big event. let us know your thoughts before the conversation. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. good morning.
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cabinet ministers raised concerns about potential compromises with the eu over brexit at a number ten meeting. there is talk of the uk staying in a form of customs union with the eu for an unlimited period, if a post—brexit trade deal cannot be done in time. number ten has insisted that any such arrangement would be time limited. an immigration enforcement hotline was called 68 by mps or their staff last year. -- 68 —— 68 times. a group of charities have now written to commons speakerjohn bercow asking mps to pledge not to inform on constituents, arguing people should not have to fear being reported on by their mps. so far, the pledge has been signed by 107 mps. us media is reporting that the turkish government has audio and video recordings that they say prove the missing. saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul when he disappeared ten days ago. us and turkish officials are reported as saying that the recordings provide graphic evidence that a saudi security team detained mr khashoggi, before he was killed
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and his body dismembered. saudi arabia denies any involvement in his disappearance. search and rescue teams are continuing to look for victims of hurricane michael — one of the strongest storms to ever hit america. at least six people have died, and thousands have been left without power. in florida, the worst hit state, more than 2000 national guard soldiers have been deployed. michael weakened to a tropical storm, but people across the us have been warned of ongoing danger from downed power lines, flash floods and landslides. bbc news understands that staff at lindholme prison in south yorkshire have returned to work after a protest triggered by an attack upon a prison officer. the officer was attacked last night and strangled until losing consciousness. the ministry ofjustice says staff are now back in their roles after meeting senior managers. the owner of patisserie valerie has said its finance director chris marsh was arrested last night
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and then released on bail. the cafe chain is fighting for survival after revealing on wednesday that it had uncovered significant, and potentially fraudulent, accounting irregularities. the firm has more than 2,500 staff across 206 stores. final preparations are being made for princess eugenie's royal wedding, which takes place this morning in windsor. less tha n less than an hour now until the beginning of the ceremony. i think we just saw liv tyler. guests and celebrities have been arriving for the ceremony where the queen's granddaughter will marry fiance jack brooksbank. 850 guests and 1200 members of the public will watch the service. let's head back now tojoanna.
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i willjust get my ipad to read some of your comments, and let's stay on the pictures as i hurriedly get them. lots of you are getting in touch with your thoughts on the second royal wedding of the year, after harry and meghan's. it is at the same place, but some are asking questions about whether it is right that princess eugenie, who is not the same sort of public figure in that she does not do royal duties, she does not get money from the privy purse, questions for some about the scale of the wedding. it is being paid for as an event by the royalfamily is being paid for as an event by the royal family but the costs of the security are being met by the taxpayer. lindon text says i have no problem with eugenie marrying at windsor castle. as the queen's grandchild she is entitled. as she is a nonworking royal, the taxpayer should not be paying for any part of the wedding. lindon e—mail, i look at the royal family asa lindon e—mail, i look at the royal family as a business. i wonder if it
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is expected of them to marry publicly to encourage tourism and spending to keep the monarchy alive? treating it as a business, speculate to accumulate. another e—mail, the royal family works very hard, brings a huge amount of money into the country. we are the envy of the world having a fantastic monarch would such longevity. people should try living elsewhere and then come back and then you would appreciate our fantastic country, rule britannia. d nolan e—mail says i think the royalfamily d nolan e—mail says i think the royal family shows how out of touch the royal family is, royal family shows how out of touch the royalfamily is, inviting royal family shows how out of touch the royal family is, inviting 1200 people to the wedding of a minor royal and then giving the taxpayer bill for security it is scandalous. the bright‘s father, if he insisted on this, should pay for it himself. the guests continue to arrive. the queen, as always, will be the last member of the royal family to arrive, just before the bride. i think the queen arrives at 10:52am,
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the bride isjust a think the queen arrives at 10:52am, the bride is just a few minutes later. they are all getting in place for the event. we will be talking about it in the event. we will be talking about itina the event. we will be talking about it in a few moments. they have done the same thing around the entrance to st george's chapel as happened at harry and meghan's wedding. much more autumnal colours to mark the time of year, and the time of year is making itself felt, with the wind blowing in windsor. they need to hold onto their hats! we will leave that for now and go back later. now john has the sport. good morning. michael carrick, the former manchester united midfielder and now assistant coach at the club under jose mourinho, has been speaking openly and frankly about the depression he battled in his career, and the stress brought about at top level sport. the midfielder says defeat in the champions league final in 2009 prompted feelings of anxiety on and off the field. it had such an impact he says he didn't want to be away from home when he was selected for england at the world cup in south africa in 2010. when i was at south africa, i was
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using face time to contact home, i was really down. the football was not an issue. i didn't want to be there. i would not an issue. i didn't want to be there. iwould never not an issue. i didn't want to be there. i would never have walked away, i would never have made that decision to walk away from a world cup, buti decision to walk away from a world cup, but i said tulisa on the phone, ijust want cup, but i said tulisa on the phone, i just want to come home. cup, but i said tulisa on the phone, ijust want to come home. even now i am thinking, why did i think that? it is hard for me to understand. i am fine, i came through it and i am fine, even talking about it, i am fine, even talking about it, i am fine with it. but to understand, it just doesn't add up, you know? more from michael carrick on news throughout the day. it's been a long journey back for scotland who lost 2—1 in israel last night. a charlie mulgrew penalty gave scotland the lead in the nations league match, but israel deservedly equalised. john souttar was sent off, before a kieran tierney own goal earned victory for a side ranked below the likes of luxembourg and the faroe islands. wales were also beaten, losing 4—1 to spain in a friendly in cardiff. the spanish have beaten both england and croatia in the nations league,
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and continued to look the part, scoring three goals inside the first half an hour. burnley‘s sam vokes did score a consolation goal, but it was a heavy defeat for ryan giggs side. —— ryan giggs' site. england play croatia tonight. back to you, joanna. this programme can reveal that an immigration enforcement hotline was called 68 times by mps or their staff last year. a group of charities has today written to the speaker of the house of commons asking mps to pledge not to report on their constituents. catrin nye is the reporter behind this story and joins me now. what has been going on in terms of mps and their staff reporting on people? there are loads of interesting numbers in the story. we know about them because of questions to the home office by the labour mp david
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lammy. he posed these written questions, one answer revealed how many times mps had reported immigration abuse over the last six yea rs immigration abuse over the last six years entirely. from september 20 12th until may this year we know it happens 723 times. he then posed a further question looking for more detail about what parties were involved, and you just talked about the numbers we reveal today. the immigration enforcement hotline was called 68 times by mps in 2017, 34 of those were from conservative mps, 32 from labour, one from a dup mp and one from a lib dem mp. a letter has gone out asking mps to pledge not to do it? this letter is in reaction. it has been co—signed bya in reaction. it has been co—signed by a load of charities and organisations concerned with immigration and migration. one of them is called migrants organise,
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another is a joint council for the welfare of immigrants. been backed by welfare of immigrants. been backed by the human rights organisation liberty. it asks for mps to pledge they will not inform constituents no matter what their immigration status. if they come to them, they will give them help regardless of their status. the letter says mps have a responsibility to advocate for all constituents regardless of immigration status. it goes on, to report constituents to the home office in the present circumstances isa office in the present circumstances is a fundamental breach of trust, and it adds many migrants are fea rful of and it adds many migrants are fearful of contacting their mp, effectively excluding them from democratic representation. that letter is being sent to the house of commons speakerjohn bercow today, asking him to circulate it as quickly as possible, immediately, in fa ct. quickly as possible, immediately, in fact. these charities say that if
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mps do not sign it, they will advise their contact not to speak to those mps or seek advice from them. what are mps saying? 107 mps have already pledged, only one is a conservative, heidi allen. some of those who have signed have said ourfirst heidi allen. some of those who have signed have said our first duty is to our constituents above anything else, so advising them comes first, but those who have said they don't wa nt to but those who have said they don't want to sign had said they would report immigration abuse to the home office in the same way that they would report another type of crime to the police, that is why they are not signing it. thank you. well we can talk a bit more about this story now with mps former lib dem leader tim farron, plaid cymru's hywell williams and conservative sir christopher chope. also here are elva brazier who was informed on by her local council and akram salhab who co—ordinated that letter. welcome to all of you. elva, you
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we re welcome to all of you. elva, you were reported, having gone to get some help, from your council. your mp in yourcase some help, from your council. your mp in your case has been very helpful. how did you feel when you realise your case had been referred on, having gone for hope? really disappointed. i felt it was unfair andi disappointed. i felt it was unfair and i could not trust anyone. i went there because i was sent there, not because i wanted to, i have always made them aware of my situation. i am ona made them aware of my situation. i am on a spouse v—sit, i have no entitlement to funds, i know this. ——iam on entitlement to funds, i know this. ——iamona entitlement to funds, i know this. ——iam onaspy entitlement to funds, i know this. —— i am on a spy was visa. it is really unethical to do this. are you facing deportation? no, i have a spouse visa, it is a ten—year spouse visa, so i have been punished for it. the letter has come about as a result of what has been going on with cases like elva's being
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reported. akram, tell us more about why you decided to come up with the letter? many people have approached our organisation and others seeking support with their casework. part of the background to this which will help people to understand some of theissuesis help people to understand some of the issues is the way the home office functions, it operates in such a way that it does not give due process to those applying for asylum, those applying for visas. the windrush scandal is part of a much broader problem with the home office and how it works which makes it not fit for purpose. it is under the circumstances that nmp reporting someone to the home office, first of all they do not know which dysfunctional part of home office procedures led them to be undocumented, they don't know to what fates they are sending that person, detention or deportation from the country. we are saying that mps should be representatives and advocates for their constituents,
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and the latter was saying we cannot in good faith suggest to people they approach their mp if we know there mp will report them to the home office. let's bring in the mps, how well williams, tim farron and sir chris choate. you have signed the letter and you have stopped one of your constituents being deported, mr williams. why? a constituent of mine was being deported three months before she took her final exams, she was going to get a first, which she eventually got. she was following the rules, going to the police station and signing on with her mum. eventually they work arrested. i raise the matter in the house with the immigration minister and the deportation was stopped. she has a first, she is actively employed in a very valuable occupation and it shows how the system can go very wrong for somebody who is quite
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legitimate. tim farron, you have signed? i am staggered this would even happen. when i was approached to sign it, my first reaction was to be gobsmacked that mps would even think of doing this, 723 cases in the last six years. we do not know the last six years. we do not know the details of everyone so i do not wa nt the details of everyone so i do not want to cast aspersions too much, but it strikes me that myjob is to fight for my constituents, and i cannot do that if any one of them suspect i might not be on their side. we need to remember what an illegal immigrant might be. they could be the victim of dodgy solicitors, administrative bungle 's comic human trafficking. the lake district is the biggest tourist destination outside of london, i represent that area, lots of people in hotels and hospitality from overseas. the opportunity for people to be in exploitative situations in a small minority of cases means you
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need somebody you can trust and come forward to if you might be one of those people. if you think the mp you go to for help would shop you to the home office then you might stay in an exploitative situation because you fear it could get worse. why have you not signed, sir chris choate? this whole debate is based upon false premise. it suggests that reports of immigration crime, submitted by members of parliament, relate to individual constituents who have come to that mp for advice. i have reported cases of immigration crime on behalf of constituents who have felt that their neighbours are engaged in illegal working when they should not be in the country, i have reported cases of a sham marriage, people who have been victims of what is called modern slavery. they were all going to the home office would
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be classified as reports of immigration crime from members of parliament. so why wouldn't we want members of parliament have the same responsibilities to report immigration crime as other members of the public? we penalised landlords and employers if they take on employees or give housing to people who are not entitled to be in this country. we have about a million illegal immigrant in this country, and the home office policy is very much to ensure that as far as possible life is made and comfortable for those! as possible life is made and comfortable for those 1 million illegals survey will be encouraged to go back to where they came from rather than be a burden on public services here. i understand you're making a distinction between someone reporting and immigration crime, as you put it, versus somebody coming for help. but of somebody came to you for help and you discovered
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through the course of the conversation that they were an illegal immigrant, would you report them? not in those circumstances, i would say that if they are an illegal immigrant they should be leaving the country and then applying for settled status from outside. where would you report them? invariably the case as i get are people who have arrived here illegally, in a clandestine manner, and have been living below the radar and have been living below the radar and the authorities have caught up with them, and i give them the advice that they should return to the place from whence they came because unless they are asylum seekers, that is the only way in which they will be able to have a proper chance of being able to settle in this country. why wouldn't you report somebody sitting in front of you and you know they are an illegal immigrant? i am confused at the distinction. there is no need to report them, people who come to see their mps are
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already on the radar. they come to see you because the police the home office have caught with them and are taking action against them, there is no need to report them, as such. as a lawyer by profession, i am very nervous about what is effectively... if they come along to see you, they expect to get confidential advice and that is what i give them. on the basis of what they said to me i would not go off and shop them, as has been said. sorry, ijust want to be clear, you said that if somebody comes to you... it is a false premise. what they are trying to do is add in all those reports of immigration crime, suggesting that when they are made it is individual
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mps saying to somebody who has come to see them on a confidential basis that they will report them to the authorities. that is not the position that i am in, but i cannot possibly sign this thread —— pledge because it talks about putting me in a position different from any other member of the public and that you report immigration crime. you are saying you would call the police hotline if someone comes in and says they want you to report on their behalf, but you would not breach that trust otherwise?” behalf, but you would not breach that trust otherwise? i don't call the police, the immigration hotline. i write to the home office about cases before me. how many times have you contacted the hotline or written a letter? i have never contacted our hotline for that matter. but if
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people have seen a lot of illegal migrants getting out of the back of a lorry and the police were dealing with them in a very relaxed fashion, thatis with them in a very relaxed fashion, that is the sort of case i would bring to the attention of the home office, because i think it is wrong that we should be enabling people to come into this country illegally, effectively with impunity. quite often the police say yougov and report to croydon and report yourself as a... and illegal migrant —— quite often the police say, yougov. we have a million illegal migrants in this country and we need to make sure they are discouraged from staying here and encouraged to go back. terence danny mills says the mps are reporting persons who are known to be legally, which is a crime, therefore asking mps not to inform is to ask them to be a knowledge of a crime and keep it secret —— terence on e—mail says. and you only mel says charities are encouraging mps to ignore immigration crime, surely that is a
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crime? iwant immigration crime, surely that is a crime? i want my mp to report all crime. the morally superior should open up spare rooms in their properties and keep quiet. tha nkfully properties and keep quiet. thankfully charities do not make the laws. tim farron, where would you draw the line? if someone comes into you and they have done something illegal or they are here illegally, how would you see your duty?” illegal or they are here illegally, how would you see your duty? i think the conversation you decide with sir christopher points out that we need to understand a bit small about those cases that were reported. if they represent people coming to surgery with currently nonlegal immigration status and the members of parliament are ringing the home office to report upon them, that is an appalling abuse, i think, of trust. my way of being a member of parliament, i am trust. my way of being a member of parliament, iam proud trust. my way of being a member of parliament, i am proud to serve more
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than 100,000 people in the last few yea rs, than 100,000 people in the last few years, i would not ever countenance somebody coming into my constituency surgery and then me shopping them to the police because of their status, because of what that would do to undermine a position of trust, not just between myself and an immigrants per between myself and a constituent of any kind. you come and see me, that matter is utterly confidential between us. if i felt that an individual was a physical danger to themselves or another person, i would do something about it. on one occasion i did that and it. on one occasion i did that and it had a good consequence, i will say no more. there are times i make a judgment, but in the end my most important role is saving the people of my constituency, being somebody they can trust and not be of any suspicion that i might be about to report them, even potentially, to whoever it might be.
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thank you all very much. we will leave this to go back to the wedding, i had to tell you, well we we re wedding, i had to tell you, well we were talking to you, tim harrop —— tim farron, we were looking at pictures of harry and meghan and william and kate arriving. let's see who is getting off this bus. i can't see. let's see. no, ican't who is getting off this bus. i can't see. let's see. no, i can't work out who that is, i am sorry. i need to bea who that is, i am sorry. i need to be a bit closer to the screen. all of the guests are now coming thick and fast because we are getting... 0h, and fast because we are getting... oh, it is princess michael of kent. i'm sorry, i could not see her clearly. she has just i'm sorry, i could not see her clearly. she hasjust arrived. they are all coming now, it is half an hour away. our correspondents sarah campbell is there for us. a rolls—royce pulling up, who is arriving? reaching the final stages of getting ready for the service, due to start
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at 11. you mentioned the duke and duchess of sussex, harry and meghan arrived, they probably had the biggest cheer of the morning going into st george's chapel. it's five months since their wedding, since they arrived here as bride and groom. a nice moment for them. they we re groom. a nice moment for them. they were followed swiftly by the duke and duchess of cambridge in the car behind. most of the senior royals here now. my thinking is we only have prince charles to go, and, of course, the queen, always the last to arrive. we are expecting her to be accompanied by the duke of edinburgh, a rare public appearance now for him. certainly a family event, this, a big royal event. princess eugenie is ninth in line to the throne, very much a part of the royal family. the youngest daughter of prince andrew and sarah, the duchess of york. the service due to start at 11. the royal philharmonic orchestra has been playing. they
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have just opt for the moment. they will be singing from and —— andrea bocelli. we have had cara delevingne, robber —— robbie williams. veseli model slash fashion field, miami campbell, kate moss, the artistry siemian is also in there. quite a reflection of the bride and groom's socialising. after the service, which is due to last an hour, much in the same way as harry and megan did, they are due to set out ina and megan did, they are due to set out in a carriage for a much shorter carriage ride round the centre of windsor before coming back here for a reception, hosted by the queen. thank you, sarah. we can see a car
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being escorted by police motorbikes. i suspect in that car, if my timetable is right, at 10.32 we expect sarah ferguson to arrive. we will stay with these pictures and see who hops out once it arrives at the church. i think it is, i think it was sarah ferguson. somebody wearing bright blue! we will stay across those pictures and whilst we watched them, bring in our guests in the studio. claudia joseph, royal commentator and biographer, alex longmore, royalfashion expert, and commentator poorna bell. welcome to all of you. back to those pictures... i think it is fergie and beatrice. pa rents of
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parents of the groom due to arrive before but we didn't see them arriving. talk us through the protocol of who comes one. the queen is the last to arrive, prior to the bride? absolutely. it's the one occasion, a royal wedding, when the bride arrives after the queen. normally, the queen is the final person. the royal guests arriving after the celebrities. then you have jack's parents and eugenie's pa rents, jack's parents and eugenie's parents, sister and mother, and then the bridegroom and the best man, and then the queen. is that the bridegroom? i think it is, yes. then the queen. is that the bridegroom? ithink it is, yes. got a quick glance! this is jack brooksbank. and his brother. they both have siblings as best man and
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bridesmaid. and, actually, a lot of little bridesmaids and page boys, including a showbiz element. absolutely. robbie williams' daughter, how did that happen?” think sarah ferguson, duchess of york, is great friends. i think they met on a cruise and she became great friends with robbie williams and his wife and they were spotted going shopping together, and then the families have got to know each other. quite a mix of showbiz royalty. yes, very glamorous. i think it is as glamorous as harry and meghan's wedding, perhaps even more so with the supermodels we have seen this morning. we saw liv tyler, james blunt, so it is a glamorous... it is also, from a fashion perspective, quite a hard time of year to dress for. it's not summer and it's not winter, so it is that
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thing of what do you wear? we have seenis thing of what do you wear? we have seen isa thing of what do you wear? we have seen is a very windy day, some beautiful hats. holding on to them! yes. what is, what other connections? there is stephen fry, as well. obviously they mingle in a wide—ranging showbiz circles. who are all the different friends?” think princess eugenie's mother at the duchess of york is prolific socially. also hugely known in the states as well as here, and the art world. the young set they mingle within london is also very society driven and they have holidayed all over the world, in the caribbean, so i think if people they have met throughout their life that have been gathered together. it's a really, it's now royalty mixes very much with celebrity. gone are the days
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where it was simply grand year and caught. it's now kind of a mixture of celebrity culture with the royal family. a lot of questions being asked about this wedding. should it be on this scale? because she is not a member of the royalfamily be on this scale? because she is not a member of the royal family that does royal duties. she doesn't get money from the privy purse. what you think about the scale of it, she is ninth in line to the throne? this issue always comes up around royal wedding, the taxpayer... i don't think they are mutually exclusive. sorry, i will interrupt you. i inadvertently identified some on earlier as the groom. this is the rumour! oh, dear! it is hard to tell because they get out quickly and then we get a quick glimpse. there is the groom, jack. it must be quite cold. and they are having to smile in their short leaves. for our benefit! sorry to interrupt, that is
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going against tradition. normally they go straight into church, they don't chat outside. that is very relaxed. that is not royal protocol is being straight up to the aisle, the formality. that is interested in. ithink the formality. that is interested in. i think we might see quite relaxed and happy service with that going on. let's see who is coming in this car. you were saying about your thoughts on the scale of it? the two things about where taxpayers money is going on the cost of a royal wedding. i know there has been a lot about how much the security must be costing. they are not really mutually exclusive. if we are going to go down that line, you have like 30 million taxpayers in the uk and. security is set to cost about £2 million. my maths is really bad but it's about 6p per person. i have spent far more on people's wedding is who i didn't really like, so... so, yeah. ithink
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is who i didn't really like, so... so, yeah. i think it's a wonderful celebration. there is sarah ferguson going in... with beatrice in the car. yes, there she is. is it going to bring joy to the nation, claudia? i think royal fans will obviously be watching and glued to the television. and fashion experts will wa nt to television. and fashion experts will want to see what everybody is wearing. there are so many celebrities. here, again, they are so relaxed about it all. kissing and chatting to people. we have to remember, it is the first time she has appeared on such a public occasion for a long time, so she must be very excited as well. ups and downs for her with her relations with the royal family. and downs for her with her relations with the royalfamily. divorced and downs for her with her relations with the royal family. divorced from prince andrew. but, by all accounts, very close. often talk about them remarrying. they have talked about
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that. i think the problem is, the duke of edinburgh is not best pleased with the way she behaved the first time round. so i think nothing is going to happen imminently between andrew and 30, but they get on very well as a family of spend a lot of time together. they go skiing together. both daughters adore both their parents, naturally, but they've had a amicable divorce, which has made things a lot smoother. the duke of edinburgh will be there today. he has said he will be there today. he has said he will be there, yes. is it right that they haven't actually been in the same room for a long time? they haven't. sarah ferguson, the duchess of york, hasn't really been a royal family gatherings for quite some time. she has been invited to the odd occasion and she's been up to balmoral, i
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think. but the duke of edinburgh side of been in the same room as her. this is a huge wedding. they are not necessarily, there will probably be a polite hello, hello, but that is as far as it goes. i imagine the duke of edinburgh is not going to be dancing at midnight tonight, is he? you never know! i think it's unlikely. i think the queen and the duke of edinburgh will retire after the lunchtime reception. that will be a formal occasion about parts will barely cross. we have to speculate about the wedding dress, alex. what are you thinking? she said i should soon as she knew she was getting married she knew the design and what it would look like. yes, a lot of talk... a lot of talk about vivian westwood. doing my research on looking addresses that she is one which doesn't actually wear long gowns at all, unless it's in
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photographed for magazines. my feeling is it might be amelia wickes bed. she is using a british designer. does she do wedding dresses ? designer. does she do wedding dresses? she has, and wedding dresses? she has, and wedding dresses of this calibre before. i think there has been chat about stella mccartney. i could be wrong but meghan was stella mccartney, so i think it's a bit out of the limelight. i think we are going to see something... she says she doesn't want orang, she doesn't want those shoulders. it looks relaxed. let's see what she might 04. i think we're going to see structure with tradition. we're going to bore the discussion because we're going to talk about something else. we're going to have a quick look before we leave the pictures. the sunnis coming out, which will be very welcome for the arrival of the bride. —— the
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sunshine is coming out. let's turn our attention to another story in the news today. we're going to pause our discussion on the wedding for a few minutes now to talk about another story. if there are any more big name guests arriving — we will show you the pictures live — and we'll be back to windsor shortly. but first, almost one in ten of the poorest areas in the uk haven't got enough places where people can cheaply buy fresh food, according to new research. a report by the social market foundation estimates that 1.2 million people live in what they call food deserts — where there are two or fewer supermarkets. with me to talk about the research is dr megan blake, an expert in food security from sheffield university. and in salford is emma mohareb. emma is from hattersley which is classed on this map as a food desert. what is your area like, emma? they
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rely on frozen food, it's hard to eat healthy meals and things like that. the bread—and—butter scheme that. the bread—and—butter scheme that has been introduced in our area is helping the most vulnerable families in ourarea. is helping the most vulnerable families in our area. how much of a struggle has it been to buy fresh produce, what are the issues?” think its affordability more than anything. to buy fresh fruit and veg each week, it goes off so fast. you are constantly topping up. it is expensive when you are buying strawberries at £2 ago and grapes at £2- £3 a strawberries at £2 ago and grapes at £2— £3 a go. strawberries at £2 ago and grapes at £2- £3 a go. so you don't bother because it's too much? exactly. the thing is, iwas because it's too much? exactly. the thing is, i was buying strawberries and things like that but i wasn't getting them as i wanted. dr megan blake, what do you make of this research?” think it's fabulous work by kellogg's that they have sponsored this. i think it is a really important issue. we know what people, i know people in my
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university research, where i have worked in communities and people are trying to get, trying to feed their family the best they can. when you have to go a long way to go and get food, the cost of that adds to walt aikens —— or takes away from your food budget, that this is important. what difference do you think it will make, the research? kellogg's is also supporting a number of projects to enable fresh fruit and veg, but there are other projects independently going on to help to bring low—cost, high—quality food into these sorts of communities. what are the practical solutions, in terms of bringing costs down? she is saying strawberries, £2 upon it. these things are expensive. and they go off quickly. there are several ways this can be addressed, firstly
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by reducing the cost of transport, another could be better planning in communities, better planning regulations are different kinds of rates. for offer fruit and vegetables. i'm working on a project at the university of sheffield with at the university of sheffield with a local fruit and veg grow at the university of sheffield with a localfruit and veg grow up, to provide vouchers to reduce the cost of food, cost of fruits and vegetables, so we can deliver it to a community in sheffield. there is surplus food. surplus food is not food that is wasted, it is surplus and comes from further back in the supply change and that is what the bread—and—butter scheme is using. there is good quality food out there. we're going to pause just for a moment because we are in windsor and we are seeing who is arriving. the latest guests to arrive for the wedding, which is at 11am. we know the queen will be the last member of the queen will be the last member of the royal family to arrive, just
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before the bride. the bride and her father, the duke of york, will arrive at 10.57. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are going to be arriving at 10.52. the bridesmaids, and... prince george and princess charlotte. there are several bridesmaids and page boys. they perform the same duties as they did at their aunt and uncle's wedding in the summer. harry and meghan. both prince george and princess charlotte, and they are joined by another little pageboy and... here they are, all in these two cars together, the page boys and bridesmaids. also amongst the ms robbie williams'., theodora. —— is
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robbie williams'., theodora. —— is robbie williams's daughter, theodora. having fun on the steps. enjoying this moment. the flowers looking pretty spectacular at the entrance to st george's chapel, beautiful autumnal flowers a nd george's chapel, beautiful autumnal flowers and colours. we can bring in sarah campbell, our correspondent in windsor. sarah, they are tripping... that is so sweet! tripping up the steps. it is so windy, it must be quite a thing for those little kids to be walking up in front of such a huge crowd in the wind. oh, dear! that was unfortunate for her. the wind has really got up in the last half an hour. we have seen quite a
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few wedding outfits, wedding hats blowing up over the windsor grounds. the most high profile has to be the five—year—old prince george on three—year—old princess charlotte. don't they look sweet! the other ones to tell you about, you mentioned theodora williams, the six—year—old daughter of singer robbie williams. there is also mia tindall, daughter of mike tindall and zara phillips. and the princess royan and zara phillips. and the princess royal's sun's daughter. quite a group to be managed. aged three, seven, six, four, five and six. they are seven, six, four, five and six. they a re pretty seven, six, four, five and six. they are pretty young. more arrivals here now. we will expect the final members of the royal family to take their seats now. there is prince charles. prince charles... there we
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go. the prince of wales. the duchess of cornwall the only high—profile member, senior member of the royal family who is not here today. she had a prior engagement at a school next to balmoral, so she said she had to attend, had to stick to that engagement but did apparently sent a handwritten note to princess eugenie to say she would not be there. shots again of the bridal party. i'm going to bring in vanity fair‘s royal commentator. the page boys and bridesmaids, always a highlight of these weddings. they are, and it is lovely that eugenie has done exactly what the sussexs didn't ask the little people. she has two stewards as well. lady louise, a little older, nine and ten. use one of the
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little pageboy is take a fall. it is so windy, it doesn't surprise me. the only thing that surprised me is princess beatrice is in one of the front pews with her mother. i thought she might have been with the young ones. but probably why she chose those stewardesses to help out. princess beatrice is the maid of honour. have seen blue as well. the queen arriving, in blue! with the duke of edinburgh. we were hoping the duke of edinburgh would be here this morning. we were told he would make a decision on the morning off. i think the fact he was photographed yesterday looking so fit and healthy, i was or is told he was fit and healthy, i was or is told he was determined to be here if he could. he adores his granddaughter and wanted to be here today. he is 97 and it is rare appearance. he is retired. we don't see the duke of edinburgh nearly as much as we used
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it. he was here at the last wedding in may but we have seen little of him since then. but clearly today is important. you can hear behind us the crowd cheering for the queen and duke of edinburgh. this is very much afamily affair, duke of edinburgh. this is very much a family affair, but also a fair smattering of celebrities, perhaps reflecting princess beatrice's life and jack brooksbank, his background. i think so. prince andrew was talking about why they needed such a big church, they had so many friends. there was a very colourful and eclectic and in touch with modern couple, that mix of glitterati, royals, celebrities. you do have plethora of high—profile people here today. i think we just got a glimpse of the back of the dress. i want to bring in a fashion consultant. the dress is what fashionistas will be looking out for, what do you think? very excited
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to see what is like. it's closely guarded secret who has designed it. the most likely is erdem. his romance and technical craftsmanship, he could be an amazing statement if she wears that. and if not, possibly vivian westwood ? she wears that. and if not, possibly vivian westwood? i would love to see vivienne westwood. an icon of the british fashion establishment. known for doing amazing course that tree, beautiful full skirts and i think it would really accentuate princess eugenie's figure. lots of interesting fashion here. the service is about to get under way. i think wejust have service is about to get under way. i think we just have a few minutes. we're just waiting now the arrival of the bride, as the queen and duke of the bride, as the queen and duke of edinburgh take their seats. this isa of edinburgh take their seats. this is a big event in the royal life but also a big family event as well,
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katie? it is, and if you are looking up katie? it is, and if you are looking up at the choir and front pews, they are packed with families. cousins, aunts and uncles. so wonderful to see sarah ferguson up there, back in the windsor family fold. it's been many years since she has been in that position. she looked resplendent in green, bear with her daughter, clearly a very proud mother of the bride. i love that she acknowledged the crowd. this is very much a family occasion, for all the celebrity smattering we are seeing, it's a family wedding, a big one at that but a family wedding! thank you for your insights. we await the arrival of the bride. thank you very much. the queen is there. the only person now to arrive is the bride herself, princess eugenie. she is going to be travelling with her father to the chapel in a rolls—royce phantom six, 1977
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rolls—royce. i understand it is the same car that catherine middleton travelled to westminster abbey in ahead of her wedding to prince william. we will keep an eye out for that car, as they head for the wedding. lots of speculation around the dress and who is going to have designed it. we still don't know, still waiting. we want a glimpse. we saw still waiting. we want a glimpse. we saw it was slightly off the shoulder and looked like an ivory silk, quite plain that the top with buttons down the back. it is a is around this time, the most exciting bit, who is the dress by? who is going to be? this is what we've been waiting for, the arrival of the bride. we have erdem, vivian westwood and emilia wickstead in the running. a british—based designer. wickstead in the running. a british-based designer. in terms of protocol and what happens, you also get news of the title bout will be bestowed on the royal bride or
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groom. no title will be forthcoming forjack. know, as per as we know. i think princess eugenie is going to stay with her current title. i don't think it's normalfor minor members. obviously, she's the queen's granddaughter but i wouldn't think a title would be forthcoming because they are so far down the line of succession. their crowd out there in windsor, maybe not the same levels of crowds though worth of the royal wedding earlier in the year, harry and meghan. too many royals! we area we are a minute away from the arrival of the bride. what are we
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expecting in the service? we know the archbishop of york is going to be reading a sermon, seen as a nod to the parents of the bride. yes. there will be a reading by princess beatrice, which i think will be lovely. all eyes will be on her. and jack blaauw, brother, i believe, is doing a reading. ——jack‘s brother. it's going to be a very personal wedding, a very family orientated wedding. all of the royals are there are parked from camilla. she had a private engagement. there has been some speculation about why she isn't fair but everyone else will be there for her special day. there is the bride and her father, for her special day. there is the bride and herfather, as for her special day. there is the bride and her father, as they head for st george's chapel. absolutely. and afterwards there will be a
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carriage procession through windsor we re carriage procession through windsor were just as there was for harry and meghan. yes. that is nice. you have to bear in mind, it is a different time of year. it's a lot colder out there. i was at harry and meghan's wedding on windsor. this time it's not quite the same. harry was hugely popular. a stunning dress, very stunning dress, isn't it? it looks very 50s, doesn't it? off the shoulder, calf collar, very elegant. —— cuff:. shoulder, calf collar, very elegant. -- cuff:. look at those beautiful long sleeves, so elegant. looks like a small tiara. we are about to see it in its full glory right now. oh,
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i think it is erdem. we can see a gentleman coming up... no, who is this? normally the designer is at the back. we can see a lady but i'm not sure... what a beautiful breasts. absolutely fitting her perfectly. and will —— what a beautiful. —— perfectly. and will —— what a beautiful. — — troest. perfectly. and will —— what a beautiful. —— troest. beautiful bodies which looks absolutely stunning on her. very elegant and regal. it is, funnily enough the shape at the top isa funnily enough the shape at the top is a bit like kate's. that's slightly. .. v shape is a bit like kate's. that's slightly... v shape at the back with buttons down. elegantly simple. not over the top. and the windies catching it, it was a bit of a shame earlier. —— the way food is catching
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like her mother's at the back, her mother had a big bow. it is that nod to the 80s. i don't know who that lady is going on. do we know who the designer is? no. to me it looks like emilia wickstead, but i have no idea. they have entered the chapel. the wedding will shortly commence. we can see those beautiful flowers outside the doors, which will shortly close on the wedding will get under way. some of the bridesmaids filtering out behind the bridesmaids filtering out behind the bride as she walks down the aisle with her father, prince bride as she walks down the aisle with herfather, prince andrew, heading towards her groom. more coverage on bbc news. you are watching these live images
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from windsor, where princess eugenie is just arriving for her wedding to jack brooksbank. members of the royalfamily jack brooksbank. members of the royal family arriving in the last few minutes, including just before the bride, her grandparents, the queen and the duke of edinburgh. also there, of course, prince harry and his wife, meghan. just a few short months ago st george's chapel here in winter the scene of their wedding. a royal wedding —— a second royal wedding for winter this year.

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