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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 13, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. our headlines today: warnings of travel disruption and floods as storm callum brings a second day of heavy rain and strong winds to parts of the uk. residents of one welsh village spend the night on evacuation watch as water levels rise. good morning. there is more rain to come today, particularly for wales we re we come today, particularly for wales were we still have the amber warning. it is another windy day. meanwhile across eastern parts of england, we could see temperatures up england, we could see temperatures up to 25 celsius. all of the details in 25 minutes. the head of the united nationsjoins calls for a proper investigation into the disappearance of a saudi journalist at the country's consulate in istanbul. the sound of silence on and off the pitch as england draw 0—0, with croatia in front of an empty stadium. all part of a punishment to the croatian fa. for the duchess of york. —— and the awkward question at the royal wedding for the duchess of york.
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more on all of that little bit later. morning. it's saturday 13th october. our top story: parts of the uk are facing a second day of travel disruption and flood warnings as storm callum continues to bring heavy rain and strong winds to many areas. one village in south wales has spent the night on evacuation alert because of rising floodwaters and passengers had to be rescued from an train yesterday after it became stranded. ben ando reports. gently, a man in his 90s is stretchered up a steep rank by firefighters, last passenger to be rescued from a train left stranded by flooding after the river kannan burst its banks and pembroke kuitpo near aberdare. earlier those on the plane had recorded the waters rising around them as they waited for help. very dangerous for the train to move forward or backward at that point in time. the rail incident officerfrom
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network rail quickly assessed the validity of the line and made a decision at that point that it was wiser to evacuate the passengers rather than attempt to drive the train through floodwater. south wales over the worst of storm callum so wales over the worst of storm callum so far. roads are closed, trains are cancelled, thousands of homes have been hit by power cuts as high winds and heavy rain caused waters to rise and heavy rain caused waters to rise and trees to fall. residents of this i’ow and trees to fall. residents of this row of houses and have been advised to leave and the rest of the village is on standby to evacuate too if conditions worsen. there were high winds and high seas elsewhere too. here at cornwall, and on the west coast of ireland. the forecast and emergency services are continuing to monitor storm calum on its slow journey north and there could well be more delays, disruption and damage to those on the west side of the british isles —— storm callum. ben ando, bbc news. saudi arabia has again rejected claims it was responsible
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for the disappearance of journalist jamal khashoggi from the kingdom's consulate in istanbul. the country's interior minister has called the allegations "baseless lies". turkish sources say they have documentary evidence that mr khashoggi was murdered. speaking to the bbc, un secretary—general antonio guterres says he's worried incidents like this will become the "new normal". our reporter bill hayton has the details. jamal khashoggi walked through this door 11 days ago and was never seen again. links to localjournalist suggest turkish police have documented evidence that he was interrogated, tortured and murdered within these walls. probation at government officials say they are going to publish the evident soon. a list of all the evidence except one thing. where is the body? that is
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what they are investigating. as investigations continue into what happened in these buildings, senior saudis have denied the claims. interior minister prince abdelaziz called them baseless allegations and live that the head of the united nations says he is concerned about a breakdown in international law and order. i'm feeling worried with this apparent new normal. because these kind of incidents are multiplying and it's absolutely central to make sure that the international community says clearly that this is not something that can happen. and the fact that mr khashoggi was an american resident has also put the us government in a difficult position. donald trump has said he will not cancel the $110 billion arms deal with saudi arabia, despite the allegations. the country is an important part of a western governments, many will attend a big investment summit there later this month. however there are several
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major media organisations and business leaders have already pulled out, more may follow, depending on the news from istanbul. an amnesty is being launched by the nhs to stop thousands of nearly new crutches and wheelchairs going to waste. patients will be able to return equipment for re—use or donation to charity. hospital bosses say it's to reduce costs and impact on the environment. jo black reports. crutches, walking frames, wheelchairs, if you're injured or struggling to walk, they are invaluable, but many of us are hanging onto these devices and cluttering up our homes. now we are being encouraged to give them back. health bosses say returning equipment like this not only save the nhs money but also helps to reduce waste. within our budget it is 125 will be in pounds and today could perhaps has been seen as a small value item that the cost of things like crutches is relatively
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low compared to any of the other thing is that the nhs is dealing with the way don't think it had sufficient priority within the nhs. a set of crutches cost approximately £7. a walking frame, £18. figures provided by the department of health show that last year, 212 truss spent £6.4 show that last year, 212 truss spent £61; million on walking aids and half of that was on crutches. here at the mid essex hospital trust, reusing and recycling equipment is a big thing. around 2000 pieces have been returned this year, that is a saving of £25,000. but returning nhs equipment can be confusing. there is no national policy. some hospitals tell people they do not need the items brought back and quite often, patients forget they have even got them. yes, they are some of the cheaper and smaller items used by the nhs but if returned, they could make a big difference. jo black, bbc news. we will talk about that later and
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how it could work in practice. thousands of incurable breast cancer patients are being denied a dedicated specialist nurse, according to a leading charity. three years ago, the government promised all cancer patients would have access to a designated nurse by 2020, but figures from breast cancer care show that almost three quarters of nhs trusts across the uk are not providing them. the department of health said it is "committed to increasing the capacity" of specialist cancer nurses, but the charity says more needs to be done. people with incurable breast cancer are going through a lot of different treatments with a lot of different departments within the nhs and what they need is a single point, single person that can support them through the journey. they need someone who they can call out of hours whenever they can call out of hours whenever they have a question and they need someone they have a question and they need someone who can provide the emotional support around the medical treatment that they are also getting. without this unfortunately
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people are being left in the dark. an outbreak of the disease myxomatosis is being reported in british hares for the first time. i knew i couldn't say it. myxomatosis. yes, myxomatosis. scientists fear it could infect hares in a similar way to rabbits, killing huge swathes of the population. tom heap reports. myxomatosis is a viral disease causing inflammation of the eyes, ea rs causing inflammation of the eyes, ears and lungs with step following extensive convulsions. it has been present in uk rabbits in the 1950s, often killing 99% of the population in and infect that area. but now similar symptoms have been seen in brown ha res similar symptoms have been seen in brown hares in different areas across east anglia. with hares in distress, dying and unable to run from humans. britain ‘s leading authority on hares and rabbits doctored by annabel from the university of east anglia is the investigations. i was not expecting
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myxomatosis in hares. and i really hope that hares have protection in this country on the continent their river closed season of shooting ha res, river closed season of shooting hares, not in the uk, so what i would hope for is an immediate ban on hunting. scientists are awaiting postmortem confirmation of the virus. it could tell them how it jumped from one species to another and, most importantly, how old are elliptic it could prove. tom heap, bbc news. fracking for shale gas could begin today in lancashire after a failed legal challenge against energy firm cuadrilla. campaigner bob dennett took his fight to the high court but lost the case. it will be the first instance of fracking in the uk since 2011 when it was linked with earthquakes. wedding celebrations will continue today for princess eugenie and jack brooksbank, who married yesterday
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i thought i was going to struggle with eugenie but i cannot sayjack. wedding celebrations will continue today for princess eugenie and jack brooksbank, who married yesterday at st george's chapel in windsor. the queen was amongst 850 guests at the ceremony and watched as the ninth in line to the throne was given away by her father, prince andrew. daniela relph has more. the very public first kiss as husband and wife. fork princess eugenie and jack brooksbank. and the young bridal party coped well with all attention. what with the blustery berkshire day. looking on was the bride's mother sarah duchess of york, the ripper —— back in the midst of the royal family in her daughter ‘s wedding day. with the merimee was a mix of royalty. along the queen and duke of edinburgh at st george's chapel were younger members of the royal family and show business friends of the newlyweds. i. business friends of the newlyweds. i, eugenie victoria alina... i, eugenie victoria alina. this is a
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wedding of several receptions and parties. yesterday, the couple left their first reception hosted parties. yesterday, the couple left theirfirst reception hosted by parties. yesterday, the couple left their first reception hosted by the queen in an aston martin. clearly not designed to accommodate a wedding dress. the car is one of just eight major the james bond film spectre. there was an evening party hosted by prince andrew. it was winter's second royal wedding of the year and winter's second royal wedding of the yearand a winter's second royal wedding of the year and a more low—key affair would afamiliar year and a more low—key affair would a familiar choreography and it isn't quite over. today comes the final celebration a more informal party room and to have a fairground theme. as we saw in that film, robbie williams was one of the celebrity guests at yesterday's service, but it was his daughter theodora who made the headlines. yes! she was clearly enjoying her big day at the royal wedding as a flower girl and was involved in a cheeky exchange with sarah,
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duchess of york. i love that! the audacity! the daughter of robbie williams, who would have thought it? well, argue her or not? first let's look at the front pages. a picture of princess eugenie and her husband jack brooksbank kissing outside st george's chapel dominates the daily mail's front page. the guardian reports that there is a "huge concentration of toxins" around the site of the grenfell tower fire. the daily mirror focuses on the seann walsh and katya jones story about the strictly couple sharing a kiss. the pair will return to the dance floor for the first time since the incident on saturday night.
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and the front page of the i is about a landmark ruling which means fracking is set to resume in the uk for the first time since 2011. we will have one of the dancers from strictly with us later. shall we talk about antiques roadshow? it is complicated but basically there was a painting, started way back when the show started way back when the show started 30 yea rs started way back when the show started 30 years ago, a painting was on the show and went missing, was stolen shortly afterwards, and it is a long—winded story but basically it has been found and has been sold for a lot of money but what they are saying, and i've heard this a couple of days ago, the former head of art and antiques of the metropolitan police says criminals to tune into the show. when i was at the yard it was stated that antiques roadshow
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was stated that antiques roadshow was what criminals watched on television, more to appreciate what things were and their values if they we re things were and their values if they were ina things were and their values if they were in a house they would be able to richard eisen. there you go. i should start watching! there are quite a few million people watching. maybe there is a curse of strip thing —— strictly come dancing as well is antiques roadshow! very warm in some places. how are you? good morning. you're absolutely right. it is all on today. we started off at averages around 20 celsius. east anglia and south—east england. we have further wet and windy weather to come. we still have this amber warning in place across south—western parts of wales, which already saw a loss of rain yesterday. it is all connected to this very slow moving front. storm callu m this very slow moving front. storm callum is away to the north of the uk. it has left is almost stationary
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front right across southern scotland, down through wales, into south—west england. it is south—western parts of wales we are most concerned about. more heavy rain to come, perhaps up to 106 in millimetres by the end of the day. here is the earlier rainfall radar. you can see how that has been piling in. slowly through the day it starts to move its way a little further northwards to the central belt of scotland, into northern ireland, northern england, ahead of at we will see some showers, more persistent rain for the far south—west of england. southern parts of wales in particular that will see further heavy rain through the day. also, note is the strength of the wind. another windy day. these are expected gus. not as strong across northern ireland and scotland. —— gusts. ahead of our band of rain an entirely different story. we have some sunshine, it is windy, gusts of up to 50 mph. potentially we will see temperatures up potentially we will see temperatures
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up to 2425 celsius across central and eastern parts of england. further west, 19 or 22 —— 24— 25. through the evening, the band of the rain works northwards. it is as off for a time. don't be full. another band is coming up from the near continent as we go through the early hours of the muggy —— fooled. another warm and muggy night, not as warm as the one just gone. here we are into sunday. the front is still with us. by this stage it is getting to move eastwards. the dividing line between the walk to the east and something cooler for the west. between the walk to the east and something coolerfor the west. we will start to see a dip into project —— warmth. soggy day across central and eastern england, gradually seeing an improvement across wales and south—west england. showers across northern ireland, northern england, and scotland. notice the dip in temperature. 11— 16 celsius
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tomorrow. the rain lingering across the far east of england. it could still be there monday morning. behind it, spells of sunshine. then showers from the north and west. something drierfor the showers from the north and west. something drier for the south and east. i want to talk about what is happening further south in the atlantic. this is hurricane leslie. it is heading towards iberia through the evening. it will bring strong winds. very heavy rain across portugal and spain. moves through really quickly and the high building behind it so things settle down a little bit. it is all going on in the weather world at the moment. back to you. it really is. you will have a busy morning, alina. headlines coming up at 6:30. now though, it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's releases is mark kermode. good to see you again. what have you been watching? we have first man, a film about the moon landing. mandy, a hallucinogenic horror thriller, with nick cage, which i'm not going to get you to try and watch that. wow. and bad times at the el royale, a kind of mystery retro thriller. first man, one of the big films of the week. i really liked it. it's the la la land director and his leading man ryan gosling, telling the story of neil armstrong's moon landing. it is a picture of space exploration and it's not the kind of elegant dance of the stanley kubrick 2001. this is a nuts and bolts and rivets affair in which we are made very aware of the fact these are people trying to do things in flying tin cans, that danger and death lurks at every corner. here's a clip in which we see our hero attempting to try out
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a prototype lunar module. here we go. 1,000 feet. switching to lunar mode. landing approach. you're too low, climb. slow your rates. do you read? neil? panting. i've just winced all the way through that.
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on a very big screen that would look terrific. the whole film tries to put you in the position of the pilots and astronauts seeing this stuff rushing by from inside the tin can orfrom that module, on the one hand it is a very practically involving film about the nature of space. obviously it owes a debt to the right stuff. test pilots. however, in the same way thatjaws isn't a film about sharks, this isn't a film about moon landing. this is a film about grief and loneliness. 0ur central character, neil armstrong, is almost pathologically introverted and unable to express his emotions. the way the film tells the story is he is basically living in the shadow of loss — he has lost his young daughter. when the time comes
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to speak to his sons, he has to be forced by his wife, brilliantly played by claire foy. it's almost as if what he's doing is he's looking toward outer space to look toward inner space. he's trying to find redemption. at the very beginning, we see him almost flipping a test plane out of the earth's atmosphere, and the suggestion is that he's a danger to himself because he is haunted by grief. the film takes this very practical space travel story, but turn it into a kind of metaphysicaljourney. and a story you think you know. absolutely. which everybody has archetypal memories of the images that came back from the moon. i thought it was really beautifully done. i think gosling's performance is terrific. we need claire foy there to lead us into the emotion world, otherwise it would become alienating. it is shot interestingly, they used 16mm for the intimate stuff, 35mm for the nasa industrial stuff, and then horizontal 65 imax for the moon sequences. the film evolves as the story evolves.
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the score uses a theremin, an electronic instrument that was famously used in the 1950s science—fiction films. bernard herman used it in the day the earth stood still. it is this lonely sound. loneliness is the key to it. if you expect an action movie you're not going to get that. although you will get the feeling of being in the spaceship and encountering that danger. superb use of silence. i'm looking forward to it massively. unlike your second choice. if you're not recommending it to me, in your little way that you try to convince me to see horror films, then i'm quite worried. i've been told the images in this are not necessarily that pleasant. people might want to be aware of that. it is a hallucinogenic horror movie, starring nicolas cage. it had a retro'80s vibe. nick cage at his most nick cage. he is a logger living with his partner who draws graphic novel style, heavy metal, sci—fi inflected images, they are abducted by a manson—esque cult and this sparks a trail
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of increasingly surreal vengeance. the best way of describing it is, there was a film some years ago which was a really strange horror movie that almost played out like a dreamy nightmare. this is very much like that. one the one hand it is a blood—soa ked fable, there is violence, chainsaw battles. i know that won't work for you! you are not selling it. but there is a certain section of the horror audience who will love that stuff. what's most impressive is that's not what delivers the sucker punch, what makes it powerful is the feeling of trippy, awake, asleep, nightmarish atmosphere. very strange arty visuals. if you're somebody who's interested in horror, i think it has a lot to offer. if you're not, and believe me, i do know that you're not, i wouldn't advise it as a first go in the water. we've laid the groundwork there. goo.
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well, not good for me, but for anyone who likes horror. the third film, i have seen the trail several times and i cannot make head or tail of it. i have no idea what is going on. it looks completely bonkers. bad times at the el royale, i saw the trailer and i thought it didn't represent the film at all. it is by drew goddard who gave us cabin in the woods, it is another tale of a mysterious building which doesn't quite turn out what it seems to be. a bistate hotel that straddles the state line between california and nevada. a misfit, motley crew all turn up, one of them is the vacuum salesman, another is a priest played byjeff bridges. here's a clip. i am very sorry to keep you waiting. damn, boy, where you been? been waiting in this lobby so long i could use a shave. what's wrong with you? i am very sorry. what are you doing here, father?
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do i know you, son? no, but i mean, this is not a place for a priest, father. you shouldn't be here. we might need to work on your sales pitch, son. the el royale — no place for a priest. there are other hotels, father. maybe closer to tahoe, i could help you find one. i'm sure you would be happier there. miles, is it? if this is not a place for a priest, miles, then this is exactly where the lord wants me. from the trailer it looks like a zany interlocking story thing, certainly in terms of its structure. it has chapters, the chapters overlap, we see the same event from different perspectives and time periods. i thought it was actually rather deeper and darker than that. the reason it worked for me, it has some great performances. cynthia erivo is terrific as someone who is there as a singer who may have secret dreams.
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jeff bridges's character, we know he's not quite what he seems to be. as all of these forces draw together, we see how these stories interweave. i thought it was actually much more involving and engaging than i had imagined from the trailer which looked flippant and and a bit throwaway. it looked stylish but i didn't know what else. but empty. some of the reviews have said exactly that. but i didn't find it was. i thought the performances were really good. i found it engaging. i love the way the knotty threads of the narrative continue to wrong foot you right up until the last ten or 15 minutes. it was moving in ways i didn't expect it to. perhaps it's a little long, but i was really, really engaged in it. i went in thinking, 0k, this is going to be a couple of smart alec cinematic tropes. i thought it was much more than that. i know it hasn't had a great response from the critics but i think it is pretty decent. long, but not in a bad way. a star is born is your best out.
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i can't disagree with you. you just liked it more than me. you liked it up to a point and then you lost patience. i liked the first hour, and then i just thought it tailed off. i've now seen it twice, and i thought after the first hour it really picked up speed even more and the thing that i genuinely can't believe, i think bradley cooper is terrific, lady gaga is really, really good. the thing i can't believe it you didn't cry. i'm just grateful you're still talking to me because you looked so appalled because i didn't cry. it is so moving! did you also cry four times the second time you saw it? no, i cried twice. it is a narrative that works for me. somebody said, how does it end? i said, it's a star is born, that's how it ends. we'll leave that because i want to hear about your dvd choice. it sounds terrific. it is an interesting feature.
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it is basically a portrait of trauma as seen through the eyes of the child. the reason i want to flag it on dvd, this is a classic example of a movie which got very good reviews and a fairly limited release. if you didn't see it in cinemas, most people didn't, it is really well worth catching up with on dvd. check it out. it's a very, very touching piece of work. summer 1993, thank you. i'll let you go and watch a star is born for the third time. happily! a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/mark kermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. thank you for being with us. enjoy your cinema going, whatever you are up to. thanks for being with us. see you next time. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay.
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good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: it is exactly 6:30 am. storm callum is continuing to cause flooding and high winds as drivers and rail passengers in some parts of the uk are being warned not to travel. 0ne village in south wales is on evacuation alert because of rising flood waters and passengers had to be rescued from a train yesterday after it became stranded. around 3,000 homes are without power. the united nations secretary—general antonio guterres hasjoined growing international calls to know the truth about the disappearance of the journalist jamal khashoggi. turkey says it has evidence that he was murdered inside the saudi consulate in istanbul but the saudi interior minister described allegations that his country was responsible as lies. patients are being urged to return crutches, walking frames and wheelchairs to the nhs so they can be reused or recycled. £6.4 million was spent on new equipment last year. the department of health says the amnesty will help it save money
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and reduce the impact on the environment. thousands of incurable breast cancer patients are being denied a dedicated specialist nurse, according to a leading charity. three years ago, the government promised all cancer patients would have access to a designated nurse by 2020, but figures from breast cancer care show that almost three quarters of nhs trusts across the uk are not providing them. the department of health said it is "committed to increasing the capacity" of specialist cancer nurses, but the charity says more needs to be done. fracking for shale gas could begin today in lancashire after a failed legal challenge against energy firm cuadrilla. campaigner bob dennett took his fight to the high court but lost the case. it will be the first instance of fracking in the uk since 2011 when it was linked with earthquakes. an outbreak of the disease myxomatosis is being reported in british hares for the first time.
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scientists at university of east anglia fear it could infect them in a similar way to rabbits, killing huge swathes of the population. they want members of the public to help by reporting sightings of obviously sick and dead hares. the celebrations continue today for princess eugenie and her husband jack brooksbank after the pair married at st george's chapel in windsor yesterday. the queen was amongst 850 guests at the ceremony, with a guest list that included a host of famous faces. later the couple will have a more informal party, rumoured to have a fairground theme. it could still be going on! for the first time in its history, britain's most remote community will finally have a reliable 24—hour electricity supply. fair isle has a population of 55 people and sits halfway between the islands of 0rkney and shetland. previously, lights went out between 11:30 at night and 7:30 in the morning but now, thanks to wind turbines and solar panels, power can last
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around the clock. it is so beautiful. look at it. that may mean they are watching these are the first time at 6:30 am! good morning. if you are watching, to get in touch! jewellery that once belonged to france's queen marie antoinette has gone on display in new york ahead of an auction next month. thejewels have been held in private collections for more than 200 years. it includes a 49—carat natural pearl and diamond pendant, as well as necklaces, brooches, and a monogrammed ring containing a lock of her hair. wait until you see it! sotheby‘s has described the lot as "one of the most important royal jewellery collections ever to come to auction" and estimates its value at almost £4 million. hopefully they will not be a bank
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the moment when it goes under the hammer! —— a banksy moment. the whole world was watching last night, a whole lot of supporters on a hill. we will explain why. england eventually won this one. england's first match behind closed doors was lacking in goals, as well as atmosphere, but they should have won their uefa nations league match in croatia. fans were locked out of the stadium, in rijeka because croatia were being punished for the appearance of a swastika on their pitch a couple of years ago. this was the scene, if you supporters perched on the hillside. —— this was the scene, a few supporters perched on the hillside.
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as for the match, england hit the post and the bar and twice, marcus rashford forgot how to finish when had only the keeper to beat, and so it was england's 21st century boy, jadon sancho, making his much—anticipated debut, who came on as a sub to add some late sparkle — the first england player to be born this century. i think the application and the players were superb really. you know, there was no letup in their work ethics throughout the game. defensively, they were really strong. showed good enthusiasm to play. and i thought our performance was really good. so the only disappointment is that we didn't ta ke disappointment is that we didn't take one of the chances that we had. but i'm really pleased with way that we played. northern ireland's nations league hopes suffered a major setback as west ham's marko arnautovic condemned them to a 1—0 defeat in austria, their second defeat in as many games. a day ago, it was an elephant, but this morning, it's was sri lanka's bowlers giving england's cricketers a surprise. joe root‘s side were put into bat in the second one—day match and jason roy was out without scoring in the first
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over. england found their feet before johnny bairstow was also dismissed for 26 and are now 92/2, after 17 overs — at least they're betting the weather this time after the first match was washed out. steady progress from england now, despite two wickets down. rugby union's european champions leinster have shown they won't give up their title lightly with a 52—3 mauling of wasps. the leinster fans didn't have to wait long for the first as sean cronin sprinted through the wasps' defence. in fact, the irish side ran in eight tries as they crushed wasps and secured a winning bonus point. jack mcgrath was the last to cross the line for the champions. it's the climax of the rugby league season today — wigan warriors, against the warrington wolves in the super league grand final. it could be some send—off for the wigan coach shaun wane — a final match some 36 years after he first played for the club. adam wild reports from old trafford. these two sides, the journey to old
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trafford has been bowled. the prize at the end is now within reach. for both warrington and wigan it is the path well trod. commentator: another whale moment at old trafford. they have met you before twice, both dave belonged to wigan but that is now in the past and some think some are keen to forget. what is gone to gone to concentrate on ourselves you have the buildup this is what we play for. 0ccasions like this week like this. you don't get many in your career. for others, history is on something easily left behind. shaun wane's 30—year association with wigan, first player and is now coach, comes to an end, and a grand final farewell to his hometown club. it has been perfect, it was perfection, been my dream, and i walk away a happy man. standing in their way is a warrington side that
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have proven they can beat the very best. their semifinal win over st helens was perhaps unexpected but thoroughly deserved. it is warrington who danced with it. their biggest challenge remains, improving on the past. the club has never won it so to be part of it would be massive for the club, for the players, and something that we are striving for and hopefully we can get thejob done. striving for and hopefully we can get the job done. so after a long, gruelling season and the intensity of both semifinals, it all leads here to old trafford in the grand final, 80 minutes of rugby league to decide who's journey ends with the ultimate prize. the stage is set. england's charley hull is currently leading the lpga event in south korea. approaching the end of her third round, she's on 11—under par, leading by a shot. while at the british masters, eddie pepperell has a 3—shot lead at the halfway mark. he followed up thursday's hole
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in one with another solid round at walton heath. the likes ofjustin rose, francesco molinari, and tommy fleetwood are well down the leaderboard. fleetwood slipping from the overnight lead, with shots like this. no wonder he is a little frustrated, it is in the trees all the rough. ruth rose? —— through norris? —— who knows? george russell will become the third british driver in formula 1 next year after signing to race for williams. he's 20 years old and is currently mercedes' reserve driver, as well as leading the formula 2, championship. russell will become the first full—time british driver at williams since jenson button back in 2000. to finally get this opportunity to join drivers looked up to the so many years is surreal. williams is a historic team with one of the greatest in the history of formula 1. greatest in the history of formula 1, they have so many great drivers in formula 1 over the years, button, coulthard, rothberg, so i felt like
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it was a fantastic place it is the one career. yes, we wish him well. it will soon be the end of an era on the slopes because 0lympic skiing legend lindsey vonn says she will retire at the end of the season. the american had previously said she would only stop skiing once she had broken the world record, of 86 world cup victories. vonn, so far, has 82. we all wondered. could it make it as a professional footballer?” remember the first day. so much speculation. he has his first goals! was there ever any doubt? no! he scored twice for the central coast mariners in australia, unsurprisingly leaving the defence standing as he claimed his first. different sport but same trademark celebration. the real football fans will spot this. all focuses on bolt. staying with football, of sorts, but a game played on a table tennis table, that's warped. and about to get rather damaged,
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isn't it? 0ur saturday sporting feature this week is on teqball. the second world cup, is ongoing, this weekend, with 40 countries competing in france. all four home nations are hoping for success today in the doubles. i've been to a session in manchester to find out more. when ping—pong met much of the day. table tennis with a football and headers and volleys. it all started in hungary in a garage in 2012 and it was three footballers getting on a bitand it was three footballers getting on a bit and couldn't get enough people for five a bit and couldn't get enough people forfive aside a bit and couldn't get enough people for five aside survey started this for five aside survey started this forfun in for five aside survey started this for fun in that go right on a table. they figured out this curved table would make to grow flow more and thatis would make to grow flow more and that is how it created and has turned into a bit of a bootstrapping success story. teqball world cup is taking place in france this weekend and playing to england is ben nuttall. any time, anywhere ben has
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got great control and a deft touch, skills that have helped him become a freestyle football world champion. we used to set up its call on a table and put bags in the middle and do that sort of things i am of familiar with it but i have to be in practice a bit more because of those curves, the bill comes faster at you so your knee—jerk touch is to be perfect and on point. it is three touches to a team and the ball has touches to a team and the ball has to be touched by both of you. just in! before you can get it back over the table. i have heard a goal hanging before but in this game i am debt hanging. the headers i am finding much easier than the footwork. after his warmup session with us, thousands are we watching bin this weekend in france with 100,000 euros prize for the winner and a growing number of professional clu bs a re and a growing number of professional clubs are now using this to enhance their training. in the premiership i think many clubs already have it. in europe we have an centreman and st petersburg. chelsea training to the
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rovers return although for the coronation street actor call since mr world cup may be a bit too soon. weird, obviously about first touch which is not one of my strongest point is, quite used to the head but it is different, good, you know, football, changing it up, it is good, i like it. the good thing about serving is you get a second serve if this goes totally wrong. like that. into the net. net! knees up. iam like that. into the net. net! knees up. i am over this time. and at this tryout session in manchester we all found it was more accessible than we at first feared. the first round is at first feared. the first round is a bit difficult and then it got a bit easier once you get going into the crowd started cheering us on.” didn't really play football in schools it was never be but it was good, challenging, and a good sport. challenging especially if you haven't quite got the rich. —— reach. get off the table! 0h! then,
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good luck of the world cup. —— benjamin. i feel a ifeel a bit guilty i feel a bit guilty because poor old benjamin has gone out of the singles, losing his matches at the world cup, but he has a chance in the doubles hope i hope i did not put a curse on him. he is with common meadow in the doubles he is from northern ireland. going for success today. it looks really fun. it is fun if you have a partner but singles is a different level but above —— doubles, because you three touches like volleyball, you can see it for each other and as long as you have someone good on your team can do good rally going. argue thinking what i am thinking? this is not slept enough borough. i can make its light. | slept enough borough. i can make its light. i will slept enough borough. i can make its light. i will bring a football on. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is all going on
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this morning. warm temperatures. 19 or 20 across east anglia and south—east england at the moment. further west, more wet and windy weather. to sum up today, windy and warm, but still some very heavy rain. all thai dean withers almost stationary front. storm callum is a way to the north of the uk. it has left some strong winds and heavy rain. we have an amber warning across southern parts of wales by the end of the day. likely to see in excess of 160 millimetres. here is the rainfall radar. the rain keeps feeding ina the rainfall radar. the rain keeps feeding in a long that fronts across south—west wales, england, and parts of northern ireland and scotland. it does not go very fast through the day. 0nly slightly moving north and west. a closer look through the morning. very strong winds. gusts up to 60 mph. 0utbreaks morning. very strong winds. gusts up to 60 mph. outbreaks of rain, heaviest across south—west england. southern parts of wales, north wales, edging into northern ireland,
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northern england, southern scotland. it is only the far north of scotland in terms of scotland staying dry today. ahead of the band of rain, some sunshine across many central and eastern parts of england. a windy day. gusts up to 50 mph. it averages up windy day. gusts up to 50 mph. it averages up to 24 or 25 celsius. the west, under the rain, averages up to 24 or 25 celsius. the west, underthe rain, more averages up to 24 or 25 celsius. the west, under the rain, more like 18 or 19. northern ireland and scotland 12- 14. or 19. northern ireland and scotland 12— 14. through the evening, the rain continues to feed as they northwards. easing off for a little time, perhaps, but more will arrive late in the night across south—west england and wales. not out of the woods yet. a fairly warm night across england and wales are not at all at the night just across england and wales are not at all at the nightjust gone. cooler further north. here is the front. starting to wriggle further eastwards through sunday. it is a dividing line between the warm air we have at the moment and something cooler behind it. you will see the temperatures sliding away through the afternoon. still quite across england and wales through the
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morning. slowly that rain clears away. we see some sunshine across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales, and south—west england. and improving picture. likely to hold onto the cloud and rain that east. notice that dip in temperature. going into monday, the rain may be slow to clear from south—east england. behind that spells of sunshine across much of the uk. 0n spells of sunshine across much of the uk. on tuesday we reverse it. rain arriving at the north and west. dry further and east. across spain and portugal deceiving. this is hurricane leslie. it will bring some strong winds into iberia through the evening. heavy rain as well. it moves through quite quickly and then quietened down. lots of whether going on, notjust here, but further afield. back to you. —— weather. we will see when about half an hour. headlines coming up at 7:00. now on breakfast, it's time for click. this month is adhd awareness month. this is a condition that is estimated to affect nearly 130 million children and adolescents worldwide and can continue into adulthood. now a new study from king's college london is looking including the disorder
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with different kinds of technologies, including gaming, which is ironic, because technology is often seen as an aggravator. we sent sarah emmett, who has had adhd since childhood, to meet the researchers behind the study. i'm sarah emmett, and i have adhd. adhd stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. now, like most people, i have thoughts buzzing round my head all the time. it's very much like trafalgar square. except with adhd it's very difficult to prioritise which thought should come first or which thoughts to focus on. it's usually the one that's most stimulating. so right now, stood here, it's definitelyjumping on the lion. it can become a vicious circle with more and more ideas and thoughts presenting themselves as the most important, until gridlock. studies of the brains of people with adhd show abnormalities in the right prefrontal cortex, the area responsible
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for self—control and attention. research is now using technology to affect neurological changes to this region. by activating this, which is often less engaged in the brains of people with adhd, researchers are hoping to improve concentration. stimulant medication, interestingly enough, also enhances the activity of this right frontal area. but the medication has the problem that has side—effects, people don't like the side—effects, of course. and it has — longer term effects have not been shown. it works fantastically well for a year. then we've shown that the brain adapts to the drug. when the brain adapts to the drug the drug does not work any more. yeah. so that's why we want to find alternative brain therapies for adhd. there are cognitive training apps, known as brain training apps, that you can buy off the shelf, but none of them are proved to help with adhd. but now pioneering new treatments are on the horizon. this is just to dampen the noise.
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so i volunteered myself to act as a guinea pig to test out the exercises the experts are coming up with. the research being done here affects the plasticity of the brain, meaning the ability to change by reorganising itself and form new connections. one possible consequences improved concentration and self—control. for the first experiment, i climbed into a brain imaging scanner that is calibrated to pick up the activity in the brain's right prefrontal cortex. the scanner is an mri machine connected to a game that sends a rocketeer up into space. when my mind is focused on the area of the brain being scanned, the rocketeer goes up. the more i use that area of my brain the higher he goes. so i'm enhancing my own brain activity. ready for the brain stimulation? yes. next up, a different exercise to stimulate my brain. the difference is this is a double whammy. at the same time as gaming, my brain will also receive external
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stimulations through small electrical signals that are delivered by bristles at the side of a helmet i'll have to wear. but like any good scientific experiment, i had to do a before and after test to see how much my concentration had improved as a result of the exercise. so first a baseline test to establish my current level of concentration. ifeel like my brain is trying to find a pattern. mm—hmm. and there isn't one. what was only a six minute test felt like an eternity. so i can only guess that my concentration on the before test is pretty appalling. now for the actual exercise. using small electrical currents to stimulate my prefrontal cortex, i was put through my paces once again. pirate. monkey. i am really bashing the ipad. sorry. it is definitely fun and games, ijust hope it is doing me some good. very good.
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i have earned a medal. now for the final test to establish whether my concentration has improved. before the stimulation you had almost 40% mistakes. yeah. after the stimulations and had only 25%. and on top of that you were much faster. for me, the way i felt was very important. i didn't really mind how the data showed, but actually looking at it, i feel really proud of myself. it's a huge difference. the neural feedback, like the one you did with the rocketeer, that is a pilot study and we found the effect lasts for one year. you are training the brain. it makes sense. it changes the brain and therefore it has a more lasting effect than an external pill, which you just, which is a positive thing, you get the pill next day the effect is back. it's like the first time that dorothy steps into the wonderful last week, we reported of the new full—frame mirrorless
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cameras being shown off in germany at the world's largest camera expo, photokina. dan simmons played with the latest creations from canon, nikon, sony, and panasonic's brand lumix. well, this week, dan's going to take us through another few other highlights from the show, including these. 0k, smile. you don't have to shake it, but it is part of the culture. it is really being driven by the youth market. so we have seen enormous growth in the last couple of years. and this year alone, we expect to sell 10 million instant cameras. it's not shared. it's something that is kind of away from the digital world that they are appreciating more. you can tell your phone down and really enjoy the moment, but still capture the moment. this does have a selfie mode. shall we give it a go? do you mind? shall we? a little bit closer... are you ready? there we go. a nice holiday snap from dan, who is with us now. so this is clearly a move away from digital.
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yeah. do you think it is a fad or do you think it will last? well, it's the only sector of the camera market that is actually growing, apart from those mirrorless cameras we saw last week. and what else have you got? a 100 megapixel camera. this isjust a model at the moment — it comes out next year. 0k, well it's actually a 360—degree camera when it's closed like that. but when the two wide—angle lenses pop open, it transforms into a 3d stereoscopic camera. but also does something that we have not seen any camera do on this programme. can you guess what that is? can it fly? yes, it can! seriously? well caught! what it did there was as it went through the air it is taking video, and then they can be slowed down — slow motion — and you get this beautiful arc shot of something that you have shot below. you can direct that,
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because it's 360, and you can say you point downwards, as opposed to something in the air. the only thing is that if it lands on the ground, it is a $400 piece of kit so you probably don't want to damage too much. $400 you say? yeah. they shall not grow old is a new documentary film about the first world war, directed by academy award winner sir peterjackson. using audio recorded in the 1960s and 70s, veterans of the western front recollect their wartime experiences. you knew what was going on within your vision, beyond that you hadn't got a clue. these stories are told over footage of the war which has been painstakingly restored, colourised, and converted into 3—d byjackson's team at wingnut films in new zealand. audio has been added in places, but the film develops entirely from the soldiers' perspective — in their own words. their stories are told in an imaginative and startling way.
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the film clips from the patriotic fervour of vetera ns' accou nts of their enlistment for war to the brutal and shocking realities of day to day life and death in the trenches. some of these stories are told in an amazingly matter—of—fact way. you lived like tramps. you didn't polish any buttons. you wore any uniform, bits that you liked and nobody worried. all they were concerned with was that you were fit to fight. peterjackson and his team trawled through over 600 hours of audio and 100 hours of film footage, provided by the imperial war museum's archive, in order to construct the film. vfx wizardry smooths the movements of images, removing any jerky pictures. it's a very unusual method of storytelling. that struck me straightaway. it feels different to almost any war documentary i've seen in the past. the brief that they gave me was, on the surface it was very simple and very wide open, itjust that
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you can do anything you want. but we would like you to use our archive film in a way that is unusual. so the first idea i had was i will get them to send me some 2k scans, material like three orfour minutes, send it to me in new zealand where we have our big visual effects department. i thought how well can we restore this film? that blew me away. we were able to restore it way better than i thought we could. it took us a while to figure out all the techniques, because we were taking it further than anyone had with the restoration before. how did you ensure that the colourisation process, the restoration process, and the 3—d didn't overwhelm the story, the stories that were telling, and enhance the stories you were telling? i wanted it to be in colour. they saw it in colour. we think of the war as a black and white war. but it wasn't a black and white war to them. they didn't see black and white, so why should we show it in black and white?
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so i thought, well, let's make it colour. in doing so, the same as we did the restoration, it had to be the best colourisation we have ever seen. what i found with colourisation is the longer you spend on it the better it gets. that led to the next thing, because once you restore it, the thing that happens is that this film becomes about people, about human beings, the faces of these guys and the nuances, the humanity. it comes out at you like a freight train. they shall not grow old will be shown in full on the bbc. it will also get an outing on the big screen as part of the london film festival. that's it for the shortcut of click this week. the full version is on iplayer. we live on facebook and twitter @bbcclick. we will see you soon. good morning.
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welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. 0ur headlines today: warnings of travel disruption and floods as storm callum brings a second day of heavy rain and strong winds to parts of the uk. residents of one welsh village spend the night on evacuation watch as water levels rise. good morning. there's more rain to come today, particularly for wales where we still have that amber warning. it's another windy day. meanwhile, across eastern parts of england, we could see temperatures up to 25 celsius.
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