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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 14, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with victoria fritz and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: a man is killed in a landslide as storm callum brings flooding and disruption to large parts of the uk. good morning. there is more rain in the forecast today but it is moving away eastwards, so things turning dry vertically across wales and we will see spells or sunshine coming from the west. i will have all the details in about 15 minutes. a crackdown in england on people who wrongly claim free prescriptions. pharmacists say the measures could harm patient trust. space industry insiders say satellites could be launched from british soil as early as 2020. and in sport, it's lift—off for wigan — a fifth grand final victory after they beat warrington wolves at old trafford. and the first official photos are released from friday's royal wedding. it's saturday the 14th october.
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our top story — a man's died in a landslide in south—west wales following torrential rain and heavy winds across large parts of the uk. storm callum left thousands of homes and businesses without power. flooding and fallen trees left roads and rail lines blocked. the met office says the bad conditions will ease off today. chi chi izundu reports. wales haven't seen floodwater like this the decades. overnight, more rain, more flood defences breached. police remain at the scene of a landslide. a man was killed here. officers are working —— warning against all but essential travel. wales bore the brunt of storm callum. torrential rain and wind have the homes and some without power. i have been here 26, 27 yea rs. power. i have been here 26, 27 years. i have never seen it is bad.
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some of the smaller cars are trying to get through, and the water is deep on the road. either how long it will take three to go down. waiting is everything to dry out and see what happens from there. i know a lot of people on the street, i don't know what they are going to do what lam going know what they are going to do what i am going to do. the force of the storm has been felt across much of the uk. in brighton, a man died after being swept out to sea in the early hours of saturday morning. last night, train services on the west coast main line between preston and carlisle were stopped at a landslide. forecasters say the worst of the rain has now passed, but warnings of flooding looks set to remain in place much of the day. hurricane—force winds have hit parts of portugal, bringing down trees and leaving more than 15,000 homes without power. people were urged not to go outdoors overnight as storm leslie swept towards the centre and north of the country.
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it's a rare example of an atlantic hurricane striking continental europe. winds of more than 100 miles per hour were recorded overnight. a crackdown on people who wrongly claim free prescriptions is being announced this morning. the nhs in england will also target rogue pharmacists and dentists who defraud the health service. england is the only country in the uk where patients are required to pay for prescriptions. health secretary matt hancock has warned the nhs will no longer be an easy target. richard galpin reports. every year nhs england loses more than £250 million as a result of prescription fraud. people either deliberately or by mistake claim they are eligible for pre— —— free prescriptions. not for much longer if the government crackdown is successful. the campaign has been launched by the health secretary
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today. he is claiming the nhs will no longer be an easy target. those who steal from it will face the consequences. and technology is a big part of the solution. a computer database of everyone in england again from paying prescriptions will be created, so pharmacists can quickly check before the medication is handed over to patients. there will be a focus on pharmacists and dentist who claim payments and services they have not carried out. after pilots starting next year, the antifraud campaign is due to be rolled out across nhs england. the government is hoping the health service will be saving up to £300 million a year by 2020. the bbc has learned britain and the us could be set to boycott a major investment conference in saudi arabia following the disappearance of journalist jamal khashoggi. it comes after president trump threatened saudi arabia with severe punishment if it were found to be
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responsible for mr khashoggi's death at the kingdom's consulate in istanbul last week. eliza philippidis reports. president trump is under international and domestic pressure to help determine what happened to mr khashoggi and punish saudi arabia if investigations show its government had him killed. and though he's promised severe punishment, sanctions on arms don't seem to be on the cards. when we take away $110 billion of purchases from our country, that hurts our workers, that hurts our factories, that hurts all of our companies. you're talking about 500,000 jobs, so we do that, we're really hurting our country a lot more than we're hurting saudi arabia. the turkish authorities say they have evidence of the washington postjournalist being murdered by a saudi hit squad at the istanbul consulate, but so far, hard evidence has not been produced. pressure is now growing
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on the saudis to prove that mr khashoggi left the embassy alive after he went to get papers for his wedding. if they can't, the international community say they will boycott a high—profile investment conference in riyadh later this month. diplomatic sources say both the us treasury secretary and the uk international trade secretary may now not attend. this would amount to a huge snub by two of saudi arabia's key allies. eliza philippidis, bbc news. prime minister theresa may could faces a rebellion in her own party and increased pressure from her dup allies over brexit as a key summit with eu leaders looms. writing in the sunday times, former brexit secretary david davis said that the prime minister's plan was "completely unacceptable" and he urged cabinet ministers to "exert their collective authority." it comes ahead of a crucial meeting of eu leaders next week, which will determine
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whether a deal can be struck. princess eugenie and her new husband jack brooksbank have released a set of official photographs from their wedding day. one of the pictures shows eugenie in a silk evening gown by the american designer zac posen as she attended the evening reception. a group shot shows the bride and groom's families, with eugenie's mother, sarah, standing between the duke of edinburgh and her former husband the duke of york. and a black—and—white shot shows the newlyweds sharing a kiss in the scottish state carriage, which took them back to windsor castle after the service. around three million people watched the wedding on friday. talking about sharing a kiss... it was all about the dancing as seann walsh and katya jones returned to strictly come dancing for the first time since they were pictured kissing on a night out. somewhat more controversial. they
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gotjust as somewhat more controversial. they got just as many somewhat more controversial. they gotjust as many headlines as the wedding. there was no direct reference to the controversy on saturday's show, which saw a warm crowd reaction for their charleston and a score of 28 points from thejudges. the couple will learn whether they've survived the public vote tonight. we will talk about that later in programme. that was quite lift, wasn't it? let's move on. now, how do you save a leopard from a well? throw it a ladder of course! obviously! of course you would! that's exactly what this team of wildlife rescuers in india had to do after the 7—year—old big cat fell 9 metres into an open well in a rural village in india. as he sat perched on the ladder, they sent a crate down and managed to scoop him up. a pretty smart leopard to realise this crawl into the crate. i would put ring what you do when it comes back up. run! —— i was wondering.
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they did well to spot him! one of his nine lives used up the shore. you up—to—date with all the stories. —— used up for sure. here are the graphics are the papers. the sunday telegraph says theresa may is facing a "growing rebellion" over her brexit proposals. it also has one of the official photos released from princess eugenie's wedding. the sunday times says former brexit secretary david davis is calling for ministers to rebel against the prime minister and plan for leaving the eu which he describes as "completely unacceptable. " the observer also leads on brexit. it says the dup leader arlene foster believes a no—deal brexit is the most likely outcome. it's also got a picture of strictly‘s sean walsh and katya jones on the front.
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and the mail on sunday says a "plane mutiny" prevented the deportation of a somali man who was a convicted sex offender from britain. it's also got another picture there of princess eugenie, this time at her wedding party. the lovely gown she has on there. very elegant. very beautiful. there was a picture of her on the front of the mail. the first rocket launch into space from british soil could happen as soon as 2020. it's thought it could be sent into orbit from a spaceport in the north of scotland. the uk's space industry is booming thanks to a huge surge in demand for tiny satellites made here. joe miller has more. when the space race began, back in the 19505, britain was rome at a pa rt the 19505, britain was rome at a part of it. skylark managed almost 450 part of it. skylark managed almost
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a50 launchers and its successor even managed to put a satellite into orbit. at space exploration wa5 managed to put a satellite into orbit. at space exploration was all but abandoned in the uk after politicians decided that taxpayers money was better spent elsewhere. now, eight million —— booming demand for satellite technology is bringing the fact that lie. you might not immediately a55ociate british bu5ine55 immediately a55ociate british business with the space industry, but the fact is the uk is they've world leader when it comes to manufacturing these, micro5atellites that are usually the size of a washing machine. around a0% of these are made here and very soon they will give us the ability to look at detailed video footage of earth, and the only question is, will it be launched from british soil? the countdown has already begun. in cornwall, virgin galactic i5 planning to use a 7a7 to launch a rocket from the upper atmosphere. but written's an5wer
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rocket from the upper atmosphere. but written's answer to cape canaveral i5 but written's answer to cape canaveral is likely to be built at the other end of the country, much to the bewilderment of locals. this landscape has be part of my life all my life. i have worked here, gathered 5heep this landscape. the idea of a space programme was thought of 2.5 years ago when they 5aid thought of 2.5 years ago when they said this had the —— this location was ideal. the location was not only chosen for its remote and wild landscape... from our perspective, it is landscape... from our perspective, it i5a landscape... from our perspective, it is a good location for access into the orbit i5 it is a good location for access into the orbit is that we are most interested in. specifically, that is the polar orbit, which are the telecoms and telecommunication5, small satellite, they fell over the polar regions, it also some synchronous orbit which is rarely good if you are trying to observe the world or observe the earth. armed with government grants, they are hoping to grab a slice of the rapidly growing space economy, which
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i5 rapidly growing space economy, which is estimated to be worth as much as £2 trillion in the next 20 years. residents of the peninsular are hoping benefit of the third intergalactic ambition5 will be felt closer to home. we are hoping it will be a prodigiou5ly young people. we don't have the expertise, we know that in space, in satellite production or satellite launching, but hopefully you can train young people and give them opportunities to see that as the future employment. the first ever rocket launched from uk 5oil could happen a5 soon launched from uk 5oil could happen as soon as 2020, but britain's space industry has half a century of catching up to do and it will take more than one 5ucce55 catching up to do and it will take more than one success to propel it back into orbit. some of those p i ctu res back into orbit. some of those pictures are fantastic. incredible. you can see more on this story on the sky at night, tonight at 10pm on bbc a. you can see it at ten o'clock. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the time is1a minutes past six.
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a man dies in wales a5 storm callum bring5 flooding, landslips and power to people across the uk. free prescription fraud co5ts the nhs more than £250 million a year. now, a new crackdown is launched. we will get the weather in just the second. have a look at these. amazing picture5. second. have a look at these. amazing pictures. this goes to show you how strong the wind was yesterday. this is on the isle of skye, the wind gu5t blew the water backup a waterfall, up the cliff face from where it came from. absolutely amazing picture5 doing the rounds on twitter. astonishing picture5. the rounds on twitter. astonishing pictures. the wind will not be quite a strong today. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. that picture really is heartbreaking
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fork over is involved in that car, but it is getting better. —— for. fork over is involved in that car, but it is getting better. —— forlj think the story through today is things are improving. hello everyone. you see, some torrential rain over the last a8 hour5, everyone. you see, some torrential rain over the last a8 hours, in excess of 200 millimetres over part5 of the brecon beacon5. this is in south wales yesterday, a typical picture in this part of wales. steel reign around, 5till heavy, but it will move eastwards and we will see something toure arriving from the west. story yesterday was the high temperatures, this was the afternoon high in parts of lincolnshire compare toju5t high in parts of lincolnshire compare to just eight in scotland. underneath the rain has been this slow—moving front, i wanted to pick out this area of cloud, storm leslie, which out this area of cloud, storm le5lie, which bring55 rain into portugal and spain. that rain is
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that with us, slow—moving developing a wave on it. that means the rain will waive eastwards and maybe come back we5twa rds will waive eastwards and maybe come back we5tward5 overnight. this is the rainfall radar in the last four hours a. some outbreak5 the rainfall radar in the last four hours a. some outbreaks of rain acro55 northern scotland and further rain arriving from the continent, pushing its way across the south—west into wale5. this will 5lowly slide its weight north and eastwards through the day, but we will see an improvement, already some 5un5hine acro55 northern ireland and that will extend across into wale5, north—west england and of scotland. the winds are much lighter today, notice the difference temperature, 13 or 1a celsius acro55 some parts of england and wales. a good your 5un5hine acro55 northern ireland, much acro55 good your 5un5hine acro55 northern ireland, much across scotland as it moves away, clearing into eastern counties of scotland and england through this afternoon into this evening. notice how that rain will try to push its way we5tward5 to this evening and overnight. north and west, a5ide this evening and overnight. north and west, aside from a few showers for the western isles of scotland, mainly dry, chilly night acro55
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rural pa rt5 of mainly dry, chilly night acro55 rural parts of scotland, temperatures close to freezing. here i5 temperatures close to freezing. here is this band of cloud and rain clinging to parts of east anglia, south—east england to the morning tomorrow. away from here for much of the uk it is mainly dry, spell5 of sunshine, to which is closer to the seasonal average, generally 11— 17 celsius. this area will stay co nsta nt celsius. this area will stay constant across more central and southern parts of england as we go through the early part of the week. noticed this front floating in from the north, that will introduce more showers, long spells of rain in northern ireland, western scotland, maybe the far north—west of wales but no one the amount of what we have seen recently. temperatures roundabout where they should be for this time of year. for the week ahead, the thing to take away from this is it is looking much quieter, what we as warm as it has been recently, try in the south and east and some rain at times in the north and some rain at times in the north and west. back to you. thank you very much a. will be back
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at 6.30 for the film review. —— we will. time now for the film review with mark kermode and jane hill. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's releases is mark kermode. good to see you again. what have you been watching? very exciting week. we have first man, a film about the moon landing. mandy, a hallucinogenic horror thriller, with nick cage, which i'm not going to get you to try and watch that. wow. and bad times at the el royale, a kind of mystery retro thriller. first man, one of the big films of the week. i really liked it. it's the la la land director and his leading man ryan gosling, telling the story of neil
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armstrong's epochal moon landing. the picture of space exploration and it's not the kind of elegant dance of the stanley kubrick 2001. this is a nuts and bolts and rivets affair in which we are made very aware of the fact these are people trying to do things in flying tin cans, that danger and death lurks at every corner. here's a clip in which we see our hero attempting to try out a prototype lunar module. here we go. 1,000 feet. switching to lunar mode. landing approach. you're too low, climb. slow your rates. do you read? neil?
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panting. i've just winced all the way through that. on a very big screen that would look terrific. the whole film attempts to put you in the position of the pilots and astronauts seeing this stuff rushing by from inside a tin can orfrom that module. on the one hand it is a very practically involving film about the nature of space. obviously it owes a debt
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to the right stuff. test pilots. however, in the same way thatjaws isn't a film about sharks, this isn't a film about moon landing. this is a film about grief and loneliness. our central character, neil armstrong, is almost pathologically introverted and unable to express his emotions. the way the film tells the story is he is basically living in the shadow of loss — he has lost his young daughter. when the time comes to speak to his sons, he has to be forced by his wife, brilliantly played by claire foy. it's almost as if what he's doing is he's looking toward outer space to look toward inner space. he's trying to find redemption. at the very beginning, we see him almost flipping a test plane out of the earth's atmosphere, and the suggestion is that he's a danger to himself because he is haunted by grief. the film takes this very practical space travel story,
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but turn it into a kind of metaphysicaljourney. and a story you think you know. absolutely. which everybody has archetypal memories of the images that came back from the moon. i thought it was really beautifully done. i think gosling's performance is terrific because it is so insular. we need claire foy there to lead us into the emotion world, otherwise it would become alienating. it is shot interestingly, they used 16mm for the intimate stuff, 35mm for the nasa industrial stuff, and then horizontal 65 imax for the moon sequences. the film evolve as the story evolves. the score uses a theremin, an electronic instrument that was famously used in the 19505 science—fiction films. bernard herman used it in the day the earth stood still. it is this lonely sound. loneliness is the key to it. if you expect an action movie, you're not going to get that. although you will get the feeling
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of being in the spaceship and encountering that danger. superb use of silence. i'm looking forward to it massively. unlike your second choice. if you're not recommending it to me, in your little way that you try to convince me to see horror films, then i'm quite worried. i've been told the images in this are not necessarily that pleasant. people might want to be aware of that. it is a hallucinogenic horror movie, starring nicolas cage. it had a retro ‘805 vibe. nick cage at his most nick cage. he is a logger living with his partner who draws graphic novel style, heavy metal, sci—fi inflected images, they are abducted by a manson—esque cult and this sparks a trail of increasingly surreal vengeance. the best way of describing it is, there was a film some years ago which was a really strange horror movie that almost played out like a dreamy nightmare. this is very much like that. one the one hand it is a blood—soa ked fable, there is violence, chainsaw battles. i know that won't work for you! you are not selling it. but there is a certain section of the horror audience who will love that stuff. what's most impressive is that's not what delivers the sucker punch, what makes it powerful is the feeling of trippy, awake,
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asleep, nightmarish atmosphere. very strange arty visuals. big throw—back vibe to it. if you're somebody who's interested in horror, i think it has a lot to offer. if you're not, and believe me, i do know that you're not, i wouldn't advise it as a first go in the water. we've laid the groundwork there. good. well, not good for me, but for anyone who likes horror. the third film, i have seen the trail several times and i cannot make head or tail of it. i have no idea what is going on. it looks completely bonkers. bad times at the el royale, i saw the trailer and i thought it didn't represent the film at all. it is by drew goddard who gave us cabin in the woods, it is another tale of a mysterious building which doesn't quite turn out what it seems to be. a bistate hotel that straddles the state line between california and nevada.
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a misfit, motley crew all turn up, one of them is the vacuum salesman, another is a priest played byjeff bridges. here's a clip. i am very sorry to keep you waiting. damn, boy, where you been? been waiting in this lobby so long i could use a shave. what's wrong with you? i am very sorry. what are you doing here, father? do i know you, son? no, but i mean, this is not a place for a priest, father. you shouldn't be here. we might need to work on your sales pitch, son. the el royale — no place for a priest. there are other hotels, father. maybe closer to tahoe, i could help you find one. i'm sure you would be happier there. miles, is it? if this is not a place for a priest, miles, then this is exactly where the lord wants me. from the trailer it looks like a zany interlocking story
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thing, certainly in terms of its structure. it has chapters, the chapters overlap, we see the same event from different perspectives and time periods. i thought it was actually rather deeper and darker than that. the reason it worked for me, it has some great performances. cynthia erivo is terrific as someone who is there as a singer who may have secret dreams. jeff bridges‘ character, we know he's not quite what he seems to be. as all of these forces draw together, we see how these stories interweave. i thought it was actually much more involving and engaging than i had imagined from the trailer which looked flippant and and a bit throwaway. it looked stylish but i didn't know what else. but empty. some of the reviews have said exactly that. but i didn't find it was. i thought the performances were really good. i found it engaging. i love the way the knotty threads of the narrative continue to wrong foot you right up until the last ten or 15 minutes.
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it was moving in ways i didn't expect it to. yes, perhaps it's a little long, but i was really, really engaged in it. believe me, i went in thinking, ok, this is going to be a couple of smart alec cinematic tropes. i thought it was much more than that. i know it hasn't had a great response from the critics but i think it is pretty decent. long, but not in a bad way. a star is born is your best out. i can't disagree with you. you just liked it more than me. you liked it up to a point and then you lost patience. i loved the first hour, and then ijust thought it tailed off. i've now seen it twice, and i thought after the first hour it really picked up speed even more and the thing that i genuinely can't believe, i think bradley cooper is terrific, lady gaga is really, really good. the thing i can't believe is you didn't cry. i'm just grateful you're still talking to me because you looked so appalled because i didn't cry. it is so moving!
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did you also cry four times the second time you saw it? no, i cried twice. it is a narrative that works for me. somebody said, how does it end? i said, it's a star is born, that's how it ends! we'll leave that because i want to hear about your dvd choice. it sounds terrific. summer 1993, it is an interesting feature. it is basically a portrait of trauma as seen through the eyes of the child. the reason i want to flag it on dvd, this is a classic example of a movie which got very good reviews and a fairly limited release. if you didn't see it in cinemas, most people didn't, it is really well worth catching up with on dvd. check it out. it's a very, very touching piece of work. summer 1993, thank you. i'll let you go and watch a star is born for the third time.
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happily! a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. thank you for being with us. enjoy your cinema going, whatever you are up to. thanks for being with us. see you next time. bye bye. hello. this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a man's died in a landslide in south—west wales following torrential rain and heavy winds across large parts of the uk. storm callum left thousands of homes and businesses without power. flooding and fallen trees left roads and rail lines blocked, but the met office says weather conditions will improve today. chi chi izundu reports. wales haven't seen floodwater like this for decades. —— wales hasn't seen floodwater like this for decades. overnight, more rain, more flood defences breached. in carmarthenshire, police remain
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at the scene of a landslide. one man was killed here. officers are warning against all but essential travel. wales bore the brunt of storm callum. torrential rain and wind has flooded homes and left some without power. i've been here 26, 27 years. i was born here and i've never seen it this bad. it's quite bad. some of the smaller cars are trying to get through, and then, well, they're going through, but at the other end, they're just breaking down because the water's so deep on the road. ijust don't know how long it's going to take for it to all go down, so it'sjust waiting for everything to dry out, i guess, and see what happens from there. but i know a lot of people on the street haven't got insurance or anything, so i don't know what they're going to do what i'm going to do. the force of the storm has been felt across much of the uk. in brighton, a man died after being swept out to sea in the early hours of saturday morning. last night, train services on the west coast main line between preston and carlisle were stopped by a landslide. forecasters say the worst of the rain has now passed,
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but warnings of flooding look set to remain in place for much of the day. chi chi izundu, bbc news. hurricane—force winds have hit parts of portugal, bringing down trees and leaving more than 15,000 homes without power. people were urged not to go outdoors overnight as storm leslie swept towards the centre and north of the country. it's a rare example of an atlantic hurricane striking continental europe. winds of more than 100 miles per hour were recorded overnight. the health secretary is launching a crackdown on people in england who wrongly claim free prescriptions. the nhs will also target rogue pharmacists and dentists who defraud the health service. matt hancock says he'll halve prescription fraud, which is thought to cost the nhs more than 250 million pounds a year. but some pharmacists have criticised the government's approach, saying the measures could prevent patients from getting
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the medicines they need. theresa may could faces a rebellion in her own party and increased pressure from her dup allies over brexit as a key summit with eu leaders looms. former brexit secretary david davis said the prime minister's plan was "completely unacceptable" and urged cabinet ministers to "exert their collective authority." it comes ahead of a crucial meeting of eu leaders next week, which will determine whether a deal can be struck. britain and the united states are considering boycotting a major investment conference in saudi arabia later this month following the disappearance of the saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. it comes after president trump threatened to inflict "severe punishment" on saudi arabia amid claims by turkey that mr khashoggi was killed by saudi agents inside the country's consulate in istanbul. saudi arabia denies the allegations. princess eugenie and her new husband
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jack brooksbank have released a set of official photographs from their wedding day. one of the pictures shows eugenie in a silk evening gown by the american designer zac posen as she attended the evening reception. a group shot shows the bride and groom's families, with eugenie's mother, sarah, standing between the duke of edinburgh and her former husband, the duke of york. and a black—and—white shot shows the newlyweds sharing a kiss in the scottish state carriage, which took them back to windsor castle after the service. around three million people watched the wedding on friday. that is on pavey —— tv obviously, not in winds up. now let's catch up with the sport. what have you got us? rugby league, it was a grand old occasion. only four teams in the past 20 years have actually got their name on that famous trophy.
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warrington are not one of them. they also lost the challenge cup final this year as well. pretty grim morning for warrington fans. good morning. a great one for wigan. shaun wane, wigan warriors' head coach, says this was the perfect finish after 30 years at the club. he has had everyjob going there, he started off as a player. his final game in charge, before joining the scottish rugby union, saw them win their fifth grand final title after a tough 12—a victory over warrington wolves. adam wild was at old trafford. this is rugby league's biggest moment. wigan warriors grand final winners, and for some, the grandest final farewell. the journey to old trafford has been taking a season to get here. our time again! is going to happen. but for wigan coachjohn wayne, one with extra significance. his final match with his hometown
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clu b after his final match with his hometown club after 30 years. a fairytale finish a law that was left. it was warrington, though, with a better start as they had the corner. but these sites are so evenly balanced, it wasn't long before the scores we re it wasn't long before the scores were even. when tom davies just managed to get his hand on this one, we can have the lead before half—time. but that only ramped up tensions even higher. the break couldn't quite cool them down. but it took until the season's dying breath for wigan to win it. it came in the form of a warriors roar. they have a decisive score. heartbreak for the walls of warrington. for this wigan side, the perfect win. a grand finalfairytale this wigan side, the perfect win. a grand final fairytale finish or the wigan warriors have they say goodbye to some of their biggest names. they finished on the ultimate high. super league champions again.|j
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finished on the ultimate high. super league champions again. i am just happy for all the staff that are still with me, they worked hard. unhappy that we got the victory and great for the club rusted on it like this and they think we all did great, the fans are turning up every week in and so happy to get the for them. it's still the international football break. there were a couple of nations league matches yesterday. the republic of ireland, who are in wales's group, toughed out a goalless draw against denmark in dublin. the danes had the best of it, but the republic did manage to create some late chances, this one falling to fulham's cyrus christie — saved well by leicester's kasper schmeichel. it's ireland's first point in the nations league — they host the welsh on tuesday after losing to them a—1 in cardiff last month. germany's woes continue after their terrible world cup where they lost to the netherlands 3—0 in the nation's league. liverpool's virgil van dijk and georghino wijnaldum there were among the scorers.
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it's their biggest win over the germans and their first in 16 years. hampden park is expected to be only half full for scotland's friendly with european champions portugal tonight. the scots lost away in israel last week in the nations league. it was their fifth loss in seven games since alex mcleish took over as manager. we are all striving to get a winning formula and get the players to a certain extent to enjoy what they are doing, and don't see it as a challenge, a hard challenge. it would be really exciting if they performed to the top level against portugal and got a good result. it stopped raining for long enough in sri lanka for england's cricketers to win their latest one—day match. the first match was a wash—out, but they're now one up in the 5—match series. captain eoin morgan top scored with 92 runs, joe root also made 71. chris woakes took three wickets to swing the match in england's favour before the heaven's opened
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once again, and they won the match on the duckworth lewis stern method. all very complicated. morgan was full of praise for woakes and new bowler olly stone. there in press, he has been doing it for quite sometime now, a lot of the time goals overlooked, and i thought he really did set the tone. he made quite a relaxing impression early on rusted come in and do what we do. ollie boldly that the lucky has been doing in the nets in the warmup game, which i think is a really good sign. he bowled with pace, he managed to get the ball moving and it is all that very calm head on his shoulders, which is a good sign. in rugby union, freddie burns had two chances to win the match for bath in their champions cup opener against toulouse. any friends and family might want to look away now. the papers have gone to town with this. tea rs of
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tears of a clown. that is a little bit harsh. burns distraught after howler costs bath victory. but you will see —— it is the opening round of matches of the european champions cup. freddie burns says this was the ultimate low, because this was the match to lose. they were leading to lose 22— ten. there earns in a kick to win it. but he missed that there is, going overfor a try he thought he had made to make amends. and he goes to touch down for the winning try and it gets nicked out his hands and he was absolutely distraught. he said it was the ultimate low. that is the ground underneath him. he is hoping it will swallow him up. that is substituted because his coach said he was mentally shocked. well,
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he posted this on social media last night. if they know anything about rugby union, they will rally around him and they will be firing in a game. —— firing and they will be firing in a game. -- firing in and they will be firing in a game. —— firing in the next game. elsewhere, exeter drew 10—10 with munster. they were leading until munster‘s cj stander scored in the second half at a windy sandy park. leicester were 3—0 up at half—time against ulster, but they lost 2a—10. jacob stockdale was among their try—scorers. elsewhere, edinburgh and scarlets both lost. there are four more champions cup matches today. british golfer charley hull is in with a chance of her second win on lpga tour — she's two off the lead at the latest event in south korea with six holes to play. she has just let things slip a bit. closer to home, england's eddie pepperell will take a 3—shot lead into the final day
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of the british masters. he's on 9—under par. this was an eagle on the 11th at walton heath. victory would see him break into the world's top 35. mick schumacher continues to follow in his father's footsteps — the 7—time formula 1 champion michael started out in formula 3, and mick hasjust won the championship in the junior racing series after the latest race at hockenheim. he's expected to make a step up again next season with many formula 1 teams believed to be keen to sign the 19—year—old. now, let's return to football — you should never leave before the final whistle, and you should also never be late, and this is a match between the irish premiership champions crusaders and glentoran. there was a goal after just 10 seconds. just four touches between kick—off and the ball hitting the back of the net. the crusaders' matthew
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snoddy the scorer. they won 3—0. just quickly to tell you as well. england's netballers have lost their series with jamaica with one game to play. jonathan rea won in the world superbikes in argentina too. he was already champion. that is your sport. thank you very much. you might remember a few weeks ago, we told you about researchers at the royal horticultural society who had discovered something in their archives that they needed help with. they were trying to track down the family of a woman who won a gardening scholarship in 1898, but who had never been allowed to claim her prize, because she was a woman. after a bit of detective work, her relatives were finally tracked down. helen briggs went to meet them. tended garden in the yorkshire dales that belongs to the granddaughter of
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a certain miss harrison, and she has fond memories of the women, whose passion rick —— whose passion for pla nts passion rick —— whose passion for plants was legendary in the family. my plants was legendary in the family. my strongest memory as an 8— 90 role, being taken for walks in the country and being told the names of every flower. we never missed a flower possible. now we know her name. olive mary edmondson may harass and, the missing details of her life, herfamily ‘s harass and, the missing details of her life, her family '5 always harass and, the missing details of her life, herfamily '5 always knew about her success in the exams, having kept lettered —— letters. they are being shared with the rhs, who denied her the scholarship. we knew she had the middle. that is about all we knew. nothing about the scholarship? nothing about the scholarship, no. photos show a lid
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attended the horticultural college, where she was on a those women of her time to be trained and one of the first women to enter the gardening profession. she was a gardener all her life, which is really lovely to know, and you know that she actually garden professionally. despite not getting the scholarship, she returned back to swanley and then went to work for the cadbury family as a gardener until she got married in 190a and she had a family life. it is clear olive's green fingers pass down the generations. she spent her life looking after family and plants and this is the last garden she tended. is also where her family come to remember her. —— it is. olive had four children and eventually moved to settle. even in herfinal years, she was helping in the garden of this church. this is the memorial and you can see that she is the second person down. and she died
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after a about four years. she was 92. could life well lived. —— good. she can now take place in gardening history alongside other female pioneers. how lovely. well done, olive. belatedly. how nice that all the bits of the jigsaw could he put together. —— could be. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. is equating down a little bit as people wake up? —— is it claiming. —— whitening. —— quietening. the warnings have expired but the brain is moving eastward. and improving picture, dry and bright kind that rain, parts of eastern england likely to hang on. very
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different from yesterday where we had 26 celsius across parts of lincolnshire, compared to just eight in scotland is. really was a day of contrast and that rain, as you can see, a very slow—moving front. this cloud towards portugal was hurricane leslie, very strong wind to portugal and yesterday evening. yet today we have this front still going nowhere fast. it is developing a wave on it. although it will clear away later, it will push back overnight. this is the latest rainfall radar, the last 12 hours and is a outbreaks of rain across the north of scotland and further rain pushing up from france across southern and central part of england into wales. heavy rain for ata time england into wales. heavy rain for at a time across south wales but notice how that slides its way north and eastwards to the days. is likely to linger across eastern counties of england. further west, eventually to linger across eastern counties of england. furtherwest, eventually we will see sales of sunshine coming in topic that is the temperature, 13 or 14 topic that is the temperature, 13 or 1a celsius compared to the early 205
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from yesterday. a wet afternoon across central and eastern parts of england, further west, sunshine for northern ireland arriving into north—west england and western scotland. it making a huge —— kicked a few showers going through scotland. overnight, the rain moves away and that is how it pushes its weight back westwards. further rain overnight, further north and west, mainly dry, chalice for the northern isles and chile across glens of scotland, getting to around freezing. into monday morning, for many, mainly dry and that rain is lingering across central and in eastern parts of england, slowly starting to pull away and in the sunshine to purchase up to 16 or 17 celsius 11 called scotland and northern ireland. into tuesday, we see this area of high pressure developing, but france to the north and west will introduce more cloud, showery eight outbreaks of rain and that will become persistent two—day across northern ireland, northern and western scotland and into parts
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of north—west england, maybe the far north—west of wales but nowhere near the rainfall levels seen in recent days. ahead of this, some sunshine, temperatures at 16 or 17 celsius. story to take ways that over the coming days things turn much quieter. it would not be as warm as has been recently, the driest weather will be in the south and east but always some rain at times in the north and west. back to you. it looks like autumn has finally made its way in. certainly in my garden, i rate a few leaves and you would never know. —— raked. we are back with the headlines at seven o'clock. time for the travel show now, and ade adepitan has been to the egyptian capital, cairo. this week, we're in cairo, as egypt's capital prepares to open the doors to the biggest archaeological museum in the world. it's fit for a king. you have lentils, you have chickpeas and you have these fried onions.
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we sample some of the city's culinary delights. all in this one dish? and we go behind the scenes as scientists attempt a delicate operation to restore a priceless discovery back to its former glory. this is one of the oldest structures of wooden ship in the world. we start this week in egypt's capital, cairo, a huge sprawling city and home to more than 20 million people. but the traffic here in cairo is just another level. cars everywhere, and the sounds from the horns beeping, it's just nuts. as we reach giza on the outskirts of the city, we get a glimpse of the archaeological wonders that have fascinated visitors for centuries. wow! oh, man, is that them? i've only ever seen them on tv. the ancient egyptians built these pyramids as elaborate tombs for their rulers, or pharaohs, some a,500 years ago. they've become the calling card of egypt's tourism. and the oldest, the great pyramid of khufu, stands at nearly 150 metres, and is the largest stone monument anywhere on earth. wow, that is awesome.
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seeing them in real life is so cool. tourism is one of egypt's biggest moneymakers, and in 2010, it reached an all—time high, with more than 1a million coming here on holiday. but the following year, everything changed. change, change, change! anti—government demonstrations in cairo's tahrir square kicked off a wave of protests across the country. standing on the corner of the square is egypt's national museum. built in 1902, it houses perhaps the world's greatest collection of ancient artefacts, including the magnificent treasures of the boy king tutankhamen. during the turmoil, looters and vandals took advantage of the chaos and broke in. suddenly, thousands of years of the country's history were at risk. thieves damaged the building
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and stole more than 50 priceless artefacts. following the looting, a number of stolen antiquities ended up for sale online or at auction. the egyptian authorities managed to track them down, and now most of the stolen treasures, like this limestone statue, have been recovered. cramped, dusty and overflowing, the museum holds a special place in the nation's heart. but the break—in exposed its outdated and weak security, and highlighted what was already known — the need to better safeguard the nation's unique treasures. here in the shadow of the pyramids, a new ambitious project is entering the final stages of construction. due to open in 2020, the grand egyptian museum will be equipped to take the country's historic artefacts way
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into the future. when it's finished, it will be the biggest archaeological museum in the world. this place is absolutely enormous. the footprint is 500,000 square metres. there are over 3,000 labourers working here 2a/7, and it cost over us$1 billion to construct. now, this is the main atrium, it's the entrance, and when you arrive, you'll be greeted by this imposing statue of ramses ii, one of the greatest egyptian pharaohs. i think even he would have been impressed by the scale of this place. it's fit for a king. now, this state—of—the—art monument will be the new home for tutankhamen's treasures. and for the first time, over 5,000 objects discovered in the boy king's tomb will be on display to the public. but now, they'll be better
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protected by modern security, shedding new light on the lives of the ancient egyptians. so, tell me about this piece here. this is one of my favourite pieces. it's one of the chariots of king tutankhamen. so, we are pretty much looking at a 3,500—year—old artefact, but in perfect condition, intact, as it was? if we consider the 3,500 years, it's in a perfect condition. restorers in these specially built labs are using the most advanced technology in the world to prepare the artefacts for display. it is very convenient now that we can use modern x—ray, we can determine the composition of the materials that were used, the original colours,
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the nature of the gilding, all of these new, valuable information is being disclosed to us in a non—destructive way. more than two—thirds of the objects from tutankhamen's tomb have been hidden away in boxes since their discovery by howard carter almost 100 years ago. they're unrestored and have never been seen by the public. tourism here has really suffered over recent years. not just because of political unrest, but also through acts of terrorism. with assurances of increased security, it's hoped that this new centre dedicated to egypt's unique history will finally help encourage tourists to come back. most people come on holiday to egypt
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for the ancient history. the last time i came, it was for the beautiful beaches and the lovely weather. you wouldn't normally put food at the top of your list of reasons to be here, but there's a new group of people who are working really hard to make us all fall in love with egyptian cuisine. in cairo, street food is visible everywhere you turn. typical local cuisine is dominated by beans, grains and lots of rich flavours. up until recently, it hasn't received as much international recognition as other middle eastern styles. and we were, like, ok, we're going to do a food blog... but local entrepreneur mia nezar is hoping to change that. she and her foodie friend
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laila hassaballa founded what they claim to be the first tour of its kind in the capital. there are no food tour companies here in egypt, but its popular in other parts of the world. and egyptian cuisine is so underrated. it's always overshadowed by the monuments and historical tours, which is the reason a lot of people come here. but no—one really comes here for the food. first up on my tour is a family owned business which specialises in the country's most ubiquitous dish. this is koshary. you can get this from very cheap all the way to a gourmet deconstructed koshary dish. you have lentils, chickpeas, you have these fried onions, and you also have rice, you have macaroni.
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all in this one dish? yes. ok, i'm going give it a go. it's very rich. the onion flavour‘s coming out. i can get the kick as well from the spice, the peppers, and the garlic, as well. i like a lot. how are you doing? good to see you. this unassuming eatery specialises in a local favourite called hawawshy. can you tell me what these guys are doing now? hawawshy is a bit like an egyptian version of a hamburger. but here it has been upgraded. i love this.
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so gooey that i have to put on some gloves to eat it. as we say in the uk, the proof is in the pudding. that is good. don't give away too many secrets otherwise people will steal the recipe! that's it from us for now. these buildings are open their doors to the public. the view is incredible. they are family —— famous landmarks you can see from here. go to scotland where some
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options are leaving some with a bitter aftertaste. isn't this sacrilege? you can
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