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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 14, 2018 9:30am-10:01am BST

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of scotland through this afternoon. the front moves away 70s to its overnight and then pushes its way westwards later on, perhaps getting as far west as the eastern side of wales. behind the rain we will see clearer spells, tunbridge is getting closer to freezing across the grounds of scotland. that front is still with us until tomorrow morning, eventually moving east. more cloud and outbreaks of rain particularly through the morning. it should remain dry, spells of sunshine, temperatures tomorrow between 11 and 17 celsius. they could feel for many. this area of high pressure will be of england and wales on tuesday, notice these funds toppling in from the atlantic which will increase cloud, bring rain into northern ireland, northern and western scotland, perhaps the of england into the afternoon, maybe into north wales but the rain and mud is nowhere near what we've seen in the last 48 hours. apart from this, sunshine, temperatures reaching 1117 celsius, behind that found more than 12. the weekend
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looks quieter, driest in the south and east, not as warm, rain at times in the hello, this is bbc news with julian worricker. the headlines... the former brexit secretary david davis has called on cabinet ministers to "exert their collective authority" and rebel against theresa may's plans for leaving the eu. it comes ahead of a crucial summit with eu leaders in brussels on wednesday. the met office says storm callum is set to ease off today. the high winds and torrential rain have caused major disruption across parts of the uk and led to two deaths. britain and the us are considering boycotting a major international conference in saudi arabia, after the disappearance of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. mr khashoggi, a critic of the saudi government, vanished 12 days ago after visiting its consulate in istanbul. the nhs in england has said it will crack down on people who wrongly claim free prescriptions. a new digitised system will allow pharmacies to instantly check who is entitled to free medication.
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and princess eugenie and jack brooksbank have released the first official photographs from their wedding day, which took place on friday at windsor castle and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this mornings reviewers are henry mance and robert fox. before the paper, sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. good morning. wigan warriors have won the super league grand final for a fifth time. they beat warrington wolves 12—4. it was the perfect send—off for their head coach shaun wane. he is ending a 30 year association with the club to join the scottish rugby union. another dismal day for wolves though, who also lost the challenge cup final this year. adam wild was at old tarfford.
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this is rugby league's biggest moment. wigan warriors, grand final winners, and for some, the grandest final farewell. the journey to old trafford has taken a season to get here. a route both sets of fans know well. it's ourtime again! it's going to happen! but for wigan coach shaun wane, one with extra significance — his final match with his hometown club after 30 years. a fairy tale finish was all that was left. it was warrington, though, with the better start, asjosh charnley — once of wigan — slid in with the corner. but these sides were so evenly balanced, it wasn't long before the scores were even again too. but these sides are so evenly balanced, it wasn't long before the scores were even again too. when tom davies just managed to get his hand on this one, wigan had the lead before half—time. but that only ramped up tensions even higher. the break couldn't quite cool them down. but it took until the season's dying breath for wigan to win it. it came in the form of a warriors‘ roar. dom manfredi with the decisive score. heartbreak for the wolves of warrington. for this wigan side,
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the perfect end. and so, a grand finalfairytale finish for the wigan warriors as they say goodbye to some of their biggest names. they finish on the ultimate high — super league champions again. i'm just happy for all the staff that stuck with me, and showed me all the respect and worked hard. i'm happy that we got the victory and, you know, it's great for the club, for us to finish like this, and i think we've owed it to our fans, they've been great, the fans have turned up every week and i'm so happy to get the victory for them. i'm super proud of them. from where we started in november to where we finished, we made two grand finals in one season and came up a little bit short this but we have the backbone of a hard, resilient foot ball backbone of a hard, resilient football team now. it's going to
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ta ke football team now. it's going to take it super effort to beat a quality team at wigan hour. they we re quality team at wigan hour. they were fantastic night, we will get back at work hard during next year and will come back bigger and better. —— and will come back bigger and better. — — they and will come back bigger and better. —— they were fantastic tonight. is freddie burns says he will bounce back after experiencing the ultimate low in his rugby union career. the full—back had two chances to win the match for bath in their champions cup 0pener against toulouse. trailing 22—20 in the final minutes, burns missed this penalty in front of the posts to give them the lead. he was then sure that he'd won it. he was over for a try, but as he started celebrating, the ball was poked out of his hand by maxime medard before he could ground it. burns was distraught and was substituted by his coach, who said he was a little bit "mentally shot". a disappointing start for most of the british teams in europe. four more get under way today. gloucester won't find it easy against french champions castres. cardiff travel to lyon with glasgow welcoming premiership winners saracens to scotstoun. newcastle's first european match
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at this level in 14 seasons is a tricky one away to toulon. england's charley hull has missed out on a second lpga tour title, slipping from the overnight lead to finish second in south korea. she made five birdies in herfinal round in incheon but undid that good work with four bogeys. she finshed second, three shots behind home winner in gee chun scotland expect hampden park to be half full tonight for their friendly with european champions portugal. they lost to israel in the nations league on thursday — their fifth loss in seven games under alex mcleish. captain andy robertson has gone on the offensive at some of the pundits who've been questioning them. for me, i think the criticism is a bit harsh but some people prefer
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when we do ban instead of when we do good. you really believe that? yes, especially something maybe sums pundits or whatever in fairness they have something to write about but that's theirjob, have something to write about but that's their job, that's have something to write about but that's theirjob, that's what they get paid for, we go out to go on the right lines and as soon as we don't do that, people have stuff to write about. we gave them an excuse to write about us negatively, and we need to take it on the change does its part —— take it on the chin because it's pa rt —— take it on the chin because it's part and parcel of football. it's their decision. england's netballers have lost their series against jamaica after losing in kingston overnight — the hotss are 2—up with one to play. the roses, who beat the sunshine girls on the way to winning the commonwealth games title earlier this year, trailed by four after the first quarter and could never claw themselves back into it. jamaica pulled away at the end for a 58—39 win. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, it's the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday
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morning paper review. with me are henry mance, political correspondent for the financial times, and robert fox, defence editor for the evening standard. good morning. lets take a look at the front pages. in today's front pages — unsurprisingly, the state of brexit negotiations features prominently. after getting hold of leaked emails, the observer says dup leader arlene foster is "ready" to trigger a no—deal brexit and now regards this as the "likeliest outcome" while the sunday times has a call from former brexit secretary david davis for the cabinet to rise up against theresa may's brexit plans unless she changes course. the sunday telegraph also leads on trouble for the prime minister as the paper reports 63 tory eurosceptics have issued a major new challenge to her authority. and the sunday express reports quotes from leading brexiteerjacob rees—mogg who urges
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the pm to stand up to eu "bullies". away from brexit —"plane mutiny keeps rapist in uk" — says the headline of the mail on sunday. the paper reports officials were forced to abandon the deportation of somalian yaqub ahmed. and finally, the sunday mirror leads with a warning from strictly come dancing's neiljones — the paper says the star told seann welsh to keep his hands off his wife katya jones, following the dancing pair's now infamous snog. so, lots about theresa may and brexit as well as some strictly. let's move onto brexit matters. what about the the sunday times lead on david davis? we are getting to crunch time, it may be a hectic week. this is about david davis, the former brexit secretary upping the empty thing he doesn't do it
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promised a's dealed bustles and he's calling for those still —— bustles deal. he's calling for the cabinet to come and pressure theresa may to even resign. what this piece doesn't tell us is whether those cabinet ministers are going tojump and whether those cabinet ministers are going to jump and whether there will bea going to jump and whether there will be a leadership challenge to theresa may. there's a good cartoon here of people on the brink. that is where we are. i did think it is clear who will say and go. and david davis don't know who's going to move? he knows everything, brexit bulldog.:. what is fascinating about many of the headlines, mostly about brexit, if they don't make the story underneath it. there may be a whiff of mutiny in the air but is is on the good ship lollipop not mutiny on the good ship lollipop not mutiny on the bounty. names are named but they
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haven't said they will do it. the the sunday times is something they do feghouli which is basing a lead story on —— they do frequently which is basing a lead story on a common piece by david davis. his piece is very weak. why? because he says they should have negotiated properly, the usual thing. backstop, should have negotiated properly, the usualthing. backstop, customs union, northern ireland, and beta relations with the european union. mr davies, what were you doing there? for two years? mr davies, what were you doing there? fortwo years? —— mr davies, what were you doing there? for two years? —— future relations. it's riddled with inaccuracies because the eu say dilemma marshmallows and need to use this german cars, but the bit most worrying, it's not poisonous, it's just a neutral comment, he said in i'io
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just a neutral comment, he said in no danger, even if we quarrel, of having a general election. i think thatis having a general election. i think that is a bit of complacency too far. henry, what is your take was not a german newspaper is reporting saying a deal is almost done with robert downing street see this as a eu tactic 2% of the deal is almost done. -- to pretend the deal is almost done. it increases the pressure on theresa may, holding the pen in brussels saying all you need to do is sign and it will all be sorted. 0f to do is sign and it will all be sorted. of course, what downing street says is we need to square off oui’ street says is we need to square off our own cabinet, get tory mps behind and the dup have been very hard line. let's talk about the dup with reference to the front of the 0bserver. they are reporting these lea ked 0bserver. they are reporting these leaked e—mails with particular reference to a meeting between arlene foster and michel barnier this week. with a direct quote. it said it had been very difficult indeed and arlene foster came out fighting. she does seem to be
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prepared to pull the plug. she has got, according to this report, support from very interesting people like ruth davidson in scotland saying she is worried about the integrity of the uk, which it would be in view of what nicola sturgeon has been saying this week. this is quite a substantial story. but it is not clear actually how they are going to negotiate these things, this is what is so striking. the comment is week by the professionals, tim shipman who is really the man with the inside track of the the sunday times. he is much more like henry, saying time will tell, we have got a crucial week and we don't really know. we don't know what is going to happen. but what is absolutely clear is how badly this has all been done with mrs may
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saying we are going to trigger article 50 but we don't quite know what kind of road map we will work to. this is why it is coming home to roost, we are talking mostly about tory newspapers and i see this as symptoms of that high—performance jet aircraft breaking up in midair. they are far too much quarrelling with each other. what of this dup story? i think it's interesting. one thing downing st will not like is arlene foster saying she's ready for no deal, for downing street now deal isa no deal, for downing street now deal is a terrible scenario for the economy, they loss of faith in the government. it would have an impact for northern ireland which has the only land border with the rest of the eu. it's whether this is bravado and this is a last—ditch effort to convince theresa may to try and get a date for a cut—off in the brexit agreement. and the parliamentary mathematics make the position of the
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dup absolutely crucial. if they don't have the dup onside the many many more labour mps onside, to offset the dup. there is an analysis in the papers suggesting they'd have not identified yet those numbers of labour mps who would be prepared to vote with the government. they might downgrade the budget? that's where i think the david davis things goes wrong. you can say it is a confidence motion but it is as near as dammit but i don't think they minority government can keep limping oi'i minority government can keep limping on losing vote after vote. taking up something henry were saying about a i'io something henry were saying about a no deal crash, it's interesting in the story we talked about with the sunday telegraph that michael gove is quoted as saying that the
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economic impact of a no—deal brexit in the next 13 years will be small. the chairman and chief executive of next warned of a superstition and relu cta nce next warned of a superstition and reluctance in government he earnestly prepare for such a situation. in the telegraph, brexiteers are said to be raising the stakes. indeed, it says 63 mps have criticised the government's brexit forecast. as robert picks up, brexiteers have always wanted the government has prepared for no deal but it's too late. if we are going to leave in march, there is going to bea to leave in march, there is going to be a lot of disruption if there is no transitional deal in place. i think again, there are a lot of quotes in here which leave room for komru miah. what they are asking for isa komru miah. what they are asking for is a cut—off date —— for compromise.
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it's perfectly possible or imaginable that brussels finds a way of finding some kind of language that suggest britain has the right to pull out at some date and will these people back down at that point? i think it's perfectly possible. it is hard to predict. in terms of who blinks first, as far as the sunday express front page is concerned, it is up to the eu to blink because they quote jacob rhys—mogg. blink because they quote jacob rhys-mogg. so jacob rhys-mogg has urged the banister, with whom he has an interesting relationship, the obvious way at eton of how to deal with bullies is stand up to them —— urged the prime minister. we have to stand up to the bullet, come on, jacob, we have heard this for far too long. there's a lot of public support? —— stand up to the bullies. that's the level of debate. the
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element on both sides in the referendum campaign, we are not going to rerun that one. but it is there. one thing is that is worrying about the uk coverage of this, certain papers accepted, is how good the coverage of europe is. and actually what goes on with the way michel barnier was set up as a pantomime villain, he may be an unpleasant man or an extraordinarily pleasant dinner companion in private life but the fact it was all he that was doing this, it took double task to come out and say no, look, he works to our brief. and all that and i'm absolutely with hep me again on this because from what i discern in the eu, there is a tremendous will for a workaround because they have other huge problem —— i'm with henry. they have the looming or now
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actual debt crisis in italy for example, which is colossally problematic. they just can't example, which is colossally problematic. theyjust can't be doing brexit, brexit, brexit allthe time. at some point in this process, if one side, according to jacob rhys—mogg, the uk side, continues to stand up, eventually the other side has to shift? there is an element of that brinkmanship. they want to reach a deal in northern ireland this week either is already a final deal on the divorced and is not come until november. the eu can you extend and extend, go to midnight talks, but it won't come out with the sort of concrete hardline blistering failure of negotiation, there will be eight, mice and a big decision for brexiteers. —— compromise. if you stand up to bullies, they often give you a bloody nose. so i think the idea it will be a pain free, to take concrete hardline stance, though not
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be quite true. i think we'll be talking about this in my bath chair! let's go to other stories. the front of the sunday telegraph, tight security cost taxpayers £2 million. andjim security cost taxpayers £2 million. and jim chaudhry who has security cost taxpayers £2 million. andjim chaudhry who has been on prison in a terror offence but 5.5 yea rs prison in a terror offence but 5.5 years injail —— the bill around awem years injail —— the bill around anjem chaudhry is millions. he was sworn in to isis supposedly and those who committed the terror attacks on london bridge and killed lee rigby followed him. someone who seems dangerous but might be targeted by right wing extremist or make more terror attacks, it an eye
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watering bill. what are your thoughts? the agony of civil society, you have to do it. the terrible bill really is something which we are beginning to learn with isis returnees, of which there have beena isis returnees, of which there have been a trickle, but the isis detainees, about 7—800, now being held in northern syria particularly by the kurds. they say they cannot hold onto them but the return rate active violence, income on pilots you would call terrorism, is very high indeed. common parlance. apart from this, the intelligence services are warning that stretched. —— that they are very stretched. now let's talk about the jamaaljamaal
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khashoggi story, using it there should have been greater prominence thanit should have been greater prominence than it has been? perhaps i am too taken than it has been? perhaps i am too ta ken out by than it has been? perhaps i am too taken out by it because i was in istanbul when all this was happening. what i was at the co nfe re nce happening. what i was at the conference for media people, and it was referred to and they are taking it much more seriously. notjust turkey, the arab and islamic world. there is a role of donald trump which is extremely interesting of this in this. the papers get it wrong that he will stick with saudi arabia come what may. trump, uncharacteristically, was self—deprecating and said he is speaking up but i am serious about this. what is going on is a powerful undercurrent because jamal khashoggi has political form, he has very
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close links to turkey, a very powerful figure, an ambassador here in the united states and obviously clashed with the crown prince. what people are saying to me is it has shown an unacceptable dark side to the crown prince. it is not only this, it is the crudeness with which he has handled the stand—off with qatar and the he has handled the stand—off with qatarand the yamin he has handled the stand—off with qatar and the yamin war which is so bad. but jamal khashoggi got under his skin because he said your economic plans do not add up at all. the subtext is that he says now, not abandoning saudi arabia but we are 110w abandoning saudi arabia but we are now abandoning him. i think that is really important for the succession which comes up soon. the consequences of this internationally are potentially huge? the and us are usually tempered and measured but alreadyjeremy hunt has warned of
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serious consequences, the us says it will punish saudi arabia say in a region where the west is struggling for friends region where the west is struggling forfriends and region where the west is struggling for friends and influence what this could be a real chef. we have wondered. —— a real shift. we will discuss the royal wedding in the daily mail. there was a slightly miserable time to be covered which is princess eugenie spent too much, partied too much but there was a tequila party until 5:30am. they cost millions of pounds, the food of £100 a head, the marquee was 100 pounds a head. it looks like a great party, they may have been it over the top. a brief observation. mealy—mouthed. the clunker the top. a brief observation. mealy— mouthed. the clunker sentence is it will not —— not a dent in the royal finances. enough wedding.
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thank to both of you, that is the paper. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website at bbc dot co uk forward slash papers. and if you miss the programme you can watch it later on bbc iplayer thank you to my guests robert fox and henry mance. goodbye from us all. hello. we have seen torrential rain in the last 48 hours and while the rain warnings may subside, we still have a number of flood warnings in place. the heaviest threat of rain is moving away eastwards across wales and north—west england, seems to be drier arriving from the west all of this rain is courtesy of the strip of cloud of this slow—moving front. whilst at the moment it is moving away eastwards, it eventually returns westwards later today.
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this the setup through daylight hours on sunday. it is a very slow—moving front continuing to keep further outbreaks of rain across england and wales and trying to slide its way north and east. there's going to be some brighter skies developing across wales in south—west england. a fine day for northern ireland, spells of sunshine and extending across maps of scotland although we could catch a few showers still across northern and western ireland. so four o'clock in the afternoon, still further outbreaks of rain, central and eastern england, it's going to attempt to clear but the winds and brighter, temperatures are lower than yesterday. some spells of sunshine that move was aiming for northern ireland running up into much mayjust find a little bit of cloud and rain in the far east of scotland through this afternoon. that front moves away south and eastwards overnight, and then it starts to push its way back in westwards later on, perhaps getting as far west as the eastern side of wales. behind the rain, we see some clearer spells, temperatures getting close to freezing across
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the glens of scotland, that front is still with us tomorrow morning. eventually, it starts to move eastward but we still find more cloud outbreaks of rain for a time particularly through the morning. further north—west, it should be mainly dry, some spells of sunshine, temperatures tomorrow between 11—17dc so a cooler feel for many. this area of high pressure across much of england and wales as we go into tuesday but notice these fronts starting to topple in from the atlantic. that will increase the cloud hopping outbreaks of rain into northern ireland, northern and western scotland, perhaps the far north of england through the afternoon, mainly into north wales but rain amounts nowhere near what we have seen in the last 48 hours. ahead of this, still some spells of sunshine, spells of sunshine, temperatures up to 16—17dc, behind that more like 11 or 12. so for the week ahead, things are generally looking quieter. this is bbc news, i'm julian worricker. the headlines at ten o'clock. the former brexit secretary david davis calls for a cabinet rebellion — as theresa may faces growing
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pressure from ministers over her brexit plans. ido i do say to anyone in cabinets who has concerns about this, you have to make them very clear to the prime minister. storm callum is set to ease off today — high winds and torrential rain have caused major disruption and two deaths. britain and the us consider boycotting a major investment conference in saudi arabia — after the disappearance of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. the nhs in england says it will crack down on people who wrongly claim free prescriptions — which costs the health an estimated £256 million a year. princess eugenie and jack brooksbank release the first official
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