Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 14, 2018 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

10:30 pm
ofa of a boost. otherwise, 11-15 bit of a boost. otherwise, 11—15 sums it up. two weather fronts on the seen as we head into monday and tuesday. that first one responsible for the waiting on monday will bring cloud of relief for the midlands and eased on tuesday. some list and fog lifting. the next weather fronts bringing in this narrow band of rain and drizzle, not much on that, and either side of that, we should get some brighter skies and some sunshine, as well. damage isjust a bit higher across the midlands. —— temperatures. the next weatherfront focuses the showers into the north west of scotland and northern ireland. one or two coming into the western side of northern england, but still stuck with this area of loud, which might produce rain and drizzle across east anglia and south—east, but elsewhere, quieter and brighter. sunshine around, temperatures typically 13—i7dc. hello.
10:31 pm
this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment, first the headlines. a number of "unresolved issue" relating to northern ireland. following a crunch meeting between the brexit secretary and the eu chief negotiator a joint statement says the uk is still committed to making progress at the eu summit on wednesday. after the storm, the clean up — roads and railways continue to struggle following a battering from storm callum. trains in devon are disrupted along the coast after flood damage caused a 6ft hole to open up beneath the line. france, germany and the uk issue a joint statement demanding a "credible investigation" in to the disappearance of the journalist, jamal khashoggi, who vanished after visiting saudi arabia's consulate in turkey. in response the saudi's say they will retaliate against any sanctions imposed on them.
10:32 pm
angela merkel‘s regional allies in bavaria look to have experienced their worst election result since 1950. exit polls suggest the csu, mrs merkel‘s bavarian sister party, has lost its absolute majority. the greens and the far right alternative for deutschland made the biggest gains. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. can you have too many martins? i don't think you can, which is fortunate... with me are martin bentham, who's the home affairs editor at the london evening standard, he is in the bluejacket. and, in the purple coloured tie... martin lipton, who's chief sports reporter for the sun. many of tomorrow's front
10:33 pm
pages are already in. i'm the one in pink, by the way... the telegraph says there are growing fears the cabinet will reject the draft brexit deal. the same story is covered in the guardian, which says that the irish border issue could place the entire brexit deal at risk. david davis, the former brexit secretary, is warning of a leadership challenge if number io doesn't change tack on brexit, that's according to the i. half of the cabinet are apparently set to quit over brexit, in a fresh blow to theresa ma, so says the express. —— theresa may. the metro also reports on the brexit negotiations. but the paper also carries a picture of katie piper, who was voted off strictly come dancing, while seann and katya escaped the chop, despite their kissing controversy. the ft leads on brexit. but it also carries a picture of csu members in munich, as they learnt of their worst ever performance in nearly 70 years. and the daily mail says elderly
quote
10:34 pm
people could be prescribed dance lessons on the nhs, to help combat loneliness. so, a varied set of front pages, let's see what our reviewers make of it all. where are we going to start... brexit, the telegraph, theresa may puts brakes on customs union deal, refusing to sign of a brexit agreement because of this idea that the backstop is not palatable to the cabinet, that it will keep the whole of the uk temporarily, for an undefined, limited amount of time, in the customs union. to stop die—hard border. that is the problem, as you have mentioned, undefined period, the backstop was agreed before christmas, this idea that we would remain in a customs union. the problem, particularly on the side of the brexiteers, but other people as well, that we would remain indefinitely in this, it would drag on and on, that is what theresa may and dominic raab have gone out to say, we need something different, wheat and end point if we
10:35 pm
are going to have this transition. we don't want to be in a position where it just goes we don't want to be in a position where itjust goes on and on. a few members of the cabinet, a significant number, unhappy about the prospect, and what has happened today, dominic raab has gone out there to say, the deal you were putting forward, potentially going to be agreed in the middle of this week, is not acceptable in its current form, precisely because the backstop problem has not been overcome. we cannot move beyond the risk of this in definite existence for northern ireland in a customs union. you wonder why this did not function more prominently in the campaign running up to the referendum. that would be far too orpheus, for far too long this has beena orpheus, for far too long this has been a series of bizarre positioning statements by all and sundry, people seemingly going to be reversing position overnight when it does not suit them. this weekend we had the
10:36 pm
germans briefing that there was a deal nominee agreed by all sides, apparently, number ten to nine this was the place, dominic raab going out to seemingly agreed a deal, then he turned his back on it at the last minute because it is not acceptable. in the meantime, lots of aggravation behind—the—scenes. those people apparently drafting " brexit" negotiations are now calling for rebellion of the cabinet against the proposal he had at some point been involved in the negotiations of... it is chaotic. how do you satisfy all those different constituencies? pa rt all those different constituencies? part of the problem is that we have agreed to things in the negotiations on the basis, maybe naively, that we are going to get something back down the line, we agreed to the backstop, divorce bill, and so on. perhaps in the hope there would be some flexibility from the eu side, in
10:37 pm
finding a solution to things like the irish border, in which case... it is not really happened, and what remains is the problem is resolved. our concession is to agree this backstop our concession is to agree this ba cksto p we our concession is to agree this backstop we never wanted to have in the first place, as a realisable entity, it was a backstop never put into effect. now the risk has come, there has not been a solution, no move on it full of in respect of this, so it seems, despite talk about the great use of technology by michel barnier. here you have dominic raab, interesting in this story, talking about going out there and saying, also rejected the deal being rejected, first the withdrawal, then the new trade arrangements, in other words, and over the money, agree all the withdrawal elements and we still have not got a properly agreed framework for trade in the future, which from our point of view is
10:38 pm
absolutely critical. that is another area where we have paid into their timetable, trying to agree all those things first, and gone along with that, and yet from our point of view, the crucial thing we always wa nted view, the crucial thing we always wanted was to have a future arrangement for train trading arrangements in the future, there seems to be no greater charity wack clarity at all on how that will be done. all those things are quite interesting. final point, boris johnson, matters as they are... treating us with naked contempt, he says, a big article about this, interesting that he says, the eu is a chess player forking interesting that he says, the eu is a chess playerforking out king interesting that he says, the eu is a chess player forking out king and queen, offering a binary choice. does it play chess? you have to move the king, you lose the queen... who is the queen? you think he is
10:39 pm
thinking that? how naive, too trusting, can the british negotiators beat, when you think all throughout this, throughout michel barnier, 27 countries seem to have been pretty united on what they are prepared to tolerate and what they are not, whereas britain, has britain given too much away in the hope as martin says that they will get something back later? the problem is, i suspect, it depends upon who you are talking to from the british government what the british position was. you had the more soft brexiteers talking at one time, and harder brexiteers talking at others, 39 harder brexiteers talking at others, eg engaging in conversation with the eu, andl eg engaging in conversation with the eu, and i suspect we have never... i suspect people within brussels did not believe what we were saying. maybe we should have been stronger in the way we were saying it, unified message, because at the
10:40 pm
moment, they are being deliberately, it seems, intransigent, they do not wa nt it seems, intransigent, they do not want to give anything, and every time they voice a suggestion they might give a bit of leeway, the next thing is they say they did not mean it. that intensifies. or are they immensely consistent, you want to leave, on our terms, we don't have to give you anything. they have been consistent but that is not a helpful position, it is not up to them to be helpful, it is not interesting if you are helpful, it is not interesting if you a re interested helpful, it is not interesting if you are interested in a future friendship, not poisoning relations between this country and the european union for a long period. you need to be more constructive.“ and when the departure finally comes, on whatever terms, we are still as a nation a significant
10:41 pm
trading partner with the eu 27. it will be damaging to them to cause damage to us, it is reciprocal, there is a need for both sides to find a compromise. the longer it goes on, the harder it is for people to find a position that which they can agree on. at this point in the negotiations... it is bonkers. what she has said, we know this. the chequers plan, as she put it forward , chequers plan, as she put it forward, is a nonstarter, backstop, no end point, at risk of the irish backstop been brought into effect. that is a nonstarter in this country, too many people on both sides, notjust the brexiteers site,
10:42 pm
on the other side as well, previously remain voters, in the government, do not think that is viable. the more and more likely it looks like it will end up with no deal, the more stark are the warnings from the government of the consequences of warnings from the government of the consequences of a warnings from the government of the consequences of a no—deal brexit, the latest paper, end of last week. saying this is the worst thing that could happen, but on the other hand, and this does not make sense. the consequences of a no deal, set out in those... it works both ways. particularly when it comes to transporting crossing borders. it is so concerning, genuinely worrying, because six or 7% loss to gdp, inability to cross might get trained to go to the continent... that sort of produce. this is government
10:43 pm
briefing papers. just resorting to wto rules, they have said, in terms of trade, that does not necessarily keep the trains running. governed by international rules as well. you can discount some of the more extreme scenarios. a significant impact even in less extreme circumstances of no deal. that is clearly something they wa nt to deal. that is clearly something they want to avoid and we want to avoid but if we stumble into it... wanting to achieve some solution, the point about this is perhaps, the eu, going to your point earlier, perhaps thinking theresa may could bring in her cabinet colleagues. the force of
10:44 pm
circumstance would require us to give ground, and what she is saying is, i'm not in a position to do that. even if she wants to bring significant numbers along that road. thank you very much. threat to quit before brexit, backbenchers, potential leadership challenge. really open. the night of the long knives, that is how harold macmillan got rid of half of his cabinet, this would be in the back. i don't believe any prime minister could survive if half her cabinet walked out, it is inconceivable, that unleashes the dogs of war. talk today about up to... 48 letters of i'io today about up to... 48 letters of no confidence already being in, nobody actually knows the right
10:45 pm
number but there is more claiming to have gone in. we have read this weekend that andrea leadsom and esther mcvey and penny mordaunt potentially ready to quit as soon as tuesday, dominic raab is another one, davis seems to be on manoeuvres, believing that he could be the one who takes over as the short—term leader, always wanted to be prime minister, perhaps boris johnson... what a mess. we have had threats for a long time, we have borisjohnson, david davis both leaving the cabinet, we have had to departures. talk about some of the people you just mentioned. hasn't happened. remains a live threat and something that if it did happen to the extent, if we get to a point where, deal, no deal, whateverthe format of what happens becomes more clear, if that is possible, that is
10:46 pm
when people get to the point where they have to take a decision and thatis they have to take a decision and that is where you could see some resignation. the scottish secretary, saying, if there is this separate arrangement for northern ireland, we cannot support it, we will have to quit, endangering the scottish bard in the union. seems to be a sale from also writes. —— assailed from all sides. you feel sympathetic to a net stand, but it is the job that she wanted. tough job. net stand, but it is the job that she wanted. toughjob. in net stand, but it is the job that she wanted. tough job. in a way, this story is a no story, so much happening, and yet nothing quite has happened, deal has not been agreed, we don't quite know where it is going to develop over the next day or two, so everything is sort of... everything is in this holding position, with great confusion swirling around underneath. a hard one for the papers to... hapless prime ministers tend to find theirs... gordon brown have the same situation, losing senior figures, deserting him, trying to find
10:47 pm
somebody ready to challenge, nobody did, they also loaded at the last minute. i suspect this time there will be one or twojumping above the parapet, saying, come on then, i fa ncy parapet, saying, come on then, i fancy some of this. the consequences are so fancy some of this. the consequences are so stark. defining moment for the country. lets stop with brexit... !... the country. lets stop with brexit. .. !... laughter. the country. lets stop with brexit... !... laughter. and move on to something quite different. strictly shame... have you been following this who hasn't been! the only story in the country this week. they survived the cut, despite controversy over their kiss last week. did not even get into the dance—off, they easily cleared the hurdle. this is what the shows are all about. all public city is good
10:48 pm
publicity. in the week, it all went off... rebecca humphries painted him as the worst lover in the history of love rats, very long whiskers and tail by the sound of things, and long hair, as well, as you can see from the photographs! but, clearly, no marked effect on his popularity amongst the watching millions. maybe we liked a bit of dodgy dealing. they survived. katie piper did not. kate silverton, she did, she kept going. well done kate. we understand she found herself a very difficult. teachers setting up affordable private schools. depends how wealthy
10:49 pm
you are, 30,000 a yearfor a sixth form plays, basically, the idea of doing this in london, to be honest, for a lot of people, it will be irrelevant. even if they wanted to do it, the basic argument they are putting forward, which i think is clearly true, is that some private schools at the top and have become ever more expensive, quoting figures here, admittedly for boarding places, 30 42,000 every year. some private schools have tremendous facilities, they have sports facilities, they have sports facilities, absolutely i watering the brilliant... great drama, all of thatis the brilliant... great drama, all of that is quite expensive as well as the it commitments, all types of businesses face them, the fees have
10:50 pm
been for quite some time well above the rate of inflation. making it more and more difficult for people the types of profession that would have sent their kids there before to afford it, they are saying, go back to having something that people who are teachers, lawyers, whatever, less wealthy lawyers. not find it cripplingly. .. if ifi if i were spending £13,000 a year on my child's education at sixth form... which i would not, i certainly would expect a real library rather than a virtual library rather than a virtual library which we are told they have at this school full of apparently thatis at this school full of apparently that is keeping down the cost. £30,000 is either a huge amount of money for people or only what some private schools already charge, there are some schools, not far from london, who charge around that sort of money. that is still beyond the reach... of course it is. spending
10:51 pm
£13,000 for one child... taxed income... that is at least £20,000, in that position. it is... it shows theissues in that position. it is... it shows the issues of education in the round, if even the moneyed classes cannot afford to pay, they feel they have to go down that path, maybe more money should be spent on state education. they believe they have to go down that path, maybe if there was better options that did not cost so was better options that did not cost so much... in london, plenty of good options for most people. this other story, a number of newspapers looking at this, also on the daily mail on the day when it could be talking about brexit and they have chosen not to, talking about this... cookery classes, a call from the
10:52 pm
postman to stop loneliness, they reckon to be 200,000 older people, who... i'm not that old! looking at me...| who... i'm not that old! looking at me... i know that i am past it but i am not that old! very touchy! laughter i wasn't implying that. you are welcome here any time. referring to you because no good me saying martin... 200,000 older people have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in a month. this is sad, a pilot scheme announced by theresa may, she can drag her old self away from brexit negotiations, this will be in liverpool, in new maldon, south—west london, and whitby. introduced more widely after that. encouraged to prescribe group activities such as cookery and dancing classes for people who are lonely. this feeling... makes you
10:53 pm
think about, you know... nobody loves me, i feel pretty lonely. serious issue here. when people are particularly, if they are widowed, for whatever reason, divorced, particularly, if they are widowed, forwhatever reason, divorced, on theirown, forwhatever reason, divorced, on their own, you do get a sense of insecurity and, as you get to a certain age, what do i do, where is my companion? your friends may have died off, move away. you need some degree of social... to keep your mind active. actually, this is not a bad idea at all, anything that looks after the mental health of people, is beneficial. this idea that postman and women will look out for signs of loneliness, it adds to the idea that bus drivers are supposed to look to see if people are struggling, signs of dementia. you
10:54 pm
wonder how realistic that is.|j struggling, signs of dementia. you wonder how realistic that is. i was tempted, flippa ntly, wonder how realistic that is. i was tempted, flippantly, to say that the post will get even late in the day if they are stopping to have conversations... but, serious note, you cannot expect necessarily a post woman to stop and have a conversation. they might notice something and also, i know you don't... normally putting the letter through the letterbox, not engaging with the person behind the door but if they happen to see somebody, just to say hello, have a view second word with them, can be a nice thing for somebody. having a report. we have neighbourhood watch ideas... maybe they are about stopping crime, looking after this environment in local areas but actually, this is what the neighbourhood watch should be about, making sure people are ok.
10:55 pm
that is it, but martins will be back with us at 11:30pm for another look at the newspapers. coming up next, the weather forecast. of the storm callum and a temperature of 26 degrees, the next few days will be quieter, everything coming in from the atlantic, very slowly. —— after storm callum. that cloud will die down towards iberia, where we are feeling most of the cloud at the moment, which brings outbreaks of rain. much drier across wales, even sunshine earlier in the day and as a result, number of flood warnings have been dropping and we will see levels dropping as well. the rain is much further east, here in
10:56 pm
lincolnshire, struggling to make double—figure temperatures. the rain has eased off for a while but will pack up again and could return and push west, towards the west country, even as we go to south—east wales. cloud for england and wales, clearer skies further north, temperatures in eastern scotland will not be far from freezing. scotland, northern ireland seeing more sunshine developing. england and wales, away from the far north and the far west, a lot of cloud, further outbreaks of rain which could be heavy at times, mainly in the midlands, and in the south—east, although we could get late sunshine giving the temperature isa late sunshine giving the temperature is a bit ofa late sunshine giving the temperature is a bit of a boost otherwise, 11 to 15 sums it up. two weather fronts on the scene, both slowing down and both weakening as well, the first one responsible for the rain on monday, bringing an area of cloud. mist and fog slowly lifting. the next weather front will bring in a narrow band of rain and drizzle, not
10:57 pm
much on that, either side, brighter skies and some sunshine as well. temperature is a little higher, across the midlands, into eastern england once the sunshine comes out. weather front coming in from the atlantic, going east, not much on that, next weather front in focus is the showers to the north west of scotla nd the showers to the north west of scotland and northern ireland, one or two coming in. scotland and northern ireland, one ortwo coming in. tending scotland and northern ireland, one or two coming in. tending to fade away late in the day. still stuck with this area of cloud, rain and drizzle across east anglia and the south will stop quite a day, brighter day, a bit more sunshine around, temperatures 14 to 17 celsius. —— rain and drizzle across east anglia and the south this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 11 — a number of unresolved issues relating to northern ireland. following a crunch meeting between the brexit secretary and the eu chief negotiator a joint statement says the uk is still committed to making progress at the eu summit on wednesday.
10:58 pm
i think there is a lot of realism that the issues are difficult and challenging but people want to end up challenging but people want to end up with a relationship where britain and europe are friends. france, germany and the uk issue a joint statement demanding a credible investigation in to the disappearance of the journalist, jamal khashoggi who vanished after visiting saudi arabia's consulate in turkey. also this evening — the desperate plight of civilians in yemen — on the brink of the worst famine for 100 years. nowhere
10:59 pm
11:00 pm

54 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on