Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 15, 2018 10:45pm-11:00pm BST

10:45 pm
on the same level as racist and religious offences, under a review of the law. that's in the telegraph. so, a varied set of front pages — let's see what our reviewers make of it all. we had the statement from the prime minister this afternoon, backstop over back stock is how the metro puts it. she is saying that under no circumstances will there be a customs border in the irish sea, no way they will split northern ireland from great britain. she is also claiming that somehow the eu is coming round to her idea of how backstop, which is actually that the whole of the united kingdom stays in the customs union for a period of time until things are sorted. the eu may be coming round to that point of view, but i doubt that many of her mps are coming round to it, because i thought that was dead. this customs union issue has been weaponised by the eu, in these
10:46 pm
talks. i do feel that this trouble should be solved by technical issues. actually, the chief executive of eight mrc said he couldn't envisage having infrastructure at the border, whatever the circumstances. —— hmrc. so why this is the all—consuming passion, i am amused by it. it has worked well for the eu. clearly there is huge amount of concern over this issue. the prime minister had a tough ride today. concern over this issue. the prime minister had a tough ride todayli was in the press gallery watching it andl was in the press gallery watching it and i counted one mp standing up and giving support to theresa may's plan. borisjohnson giving support to theresa may's plan. boris johnson will stand giving support to theresa may's plan. borisjohnson will stand up and criticise it, but there are other people, like justin greening —— just the net greening, criticising the proposal, saying it
10:47 pm
is appalling. there was a lack of support for theresa may and her plan, notjust support for theresa may and her plan, not just on support for theresa may and her plan, notjust on the backstop, but oi'i plan, notjust on the backstop, but on the chequers deal in general. the key thing with the backstop is that theresa may says she expects this backstop to be ended by the end of 2021. she won't put the actual date m, 2021. she won't put the actual date in, she says it is not hard and fast. they need to find a form of words so that if the eu say, move away from the table and stop the trade deals, at the backstop itself can be taken out and the uk can move away from it. until she gets that, without a date, a lot of tories want back. a lot of her mps would agree with that. britain does need to export more, and there were lines made about the fact that trade deals
10:48 pm
need to be struck. that is the key point, the eu are saying that you have to have a form of customs union eitherfor northern have to have a form of customs union either for northern ireland have to have a form of customs union eitherfor northern ireland or the rest of the uk as well, if you want to avoid the border. rest of the uk as well, if you want to avoid the borderlj rest of the uk as well, if you want to avoid the border. i think this is absurd. it has been blown out of proportion. the border can be dealt with using current technology, there is no doubt about that. there is a border already, because we have different vat rates and hmrc does some spot checks. not necessarily at the border, but it is there already. it has just been weaponised and the negotiators have gone along with it. they agreed to this in back in december. the guardian picks up on the same story, saying may lobbies eu leaders to rescue brexit deal. she is travelling to brussels on wednesday and it is difficult to see where the breakthrough will come from. she will stand up on
10:49 pm
wednesday, saying the same song she sang in salzburg. she was on the phone to a manual macron tonight. she also spoke to angela merkel over the weekend, because she is trying to get support. she doesn't want another human lesion like stuttgart. there is still... donald tusk said at the invite to the summit and he said there was a risk of no deal like never before. he was time to raise the stakes. the eu doesn't wa nt raise the stakes. the eu doesn't want to make it look like it is easy for britain to get a trade deal, because they want to stop the brexit contagious spreading across other countries like italy. i did believe it would. italy is backing off, because some of the parties in the coalition... they will back off. do you think they will back off? he hasn't backed off on anything else so hasn't backed off on anything else so far. £10! £10 or 10 euros?! let's
10:50 pm
have a look at a different story. the financial times talk about the institution for fiscal studies. if philip hammond wants to balance the books by the middle of the 2020s, he will have to cut spending will increase taxes. the second thing is that this whole posterity thing, this is the labour party's agenda. this is what worried me about to reason mac's speech. if you look at the public spending figures, we are spending 800 billion per year, it is 38.5% of
10:51 pm
gdp. surely, this is an posterity. i prefer gdp. surely, this is an posterity. i p refer to gdp. surely, this is an posterity. i prefer to see it that this is normalising public expenditure after the slower edge —— the splurge in the slower edge —— the splurge in the 2000s. politicians don't think the 2000s. politicians don't think the way i think and i am alone in this. this has to be paid by taxation or something along those lines. the tax to gdp ratio is projected to be the highest since 1969 this year. come on! £800 billion is a lot of money. the ifs, highly respected, says that philip hammond will have to find 19 billion if the government will stick to that page. philip hammond must put his head in his hands every time theresa may makes a speech, because we have this 384 million, then we have the end of posterity at the tory conference. he is the guy that has to go to the spreadsheet and with
10:52 pm
the figures around. the ifs are saying one way they can do this, to get the 19 billion. that only reaches the current spending commitments, then there is the future coming up. if he wants to meet this kind of threshold, there isa meet this kind of threshold, there is a lot of money to find. moving on to labour's territorial, by saying that level and austerity, but not saying how what aspect of austerity they will end. and they go to borrow billions upon billions to find info structure programmes? they are concealing their narrative. this is normalisation. spending is still rising, but it is rising less quickly than it did in the 2000s. there are some tories that say there hasn't been austerity. i've met them! who either?! -- who either a?!
10:53 pm
the electorate might have something to do with this... or maybe tory voters. far be it for me to suggest. is it the thing about squeezing the pips until they scream?|j is it the thing about squeezing the pips until they scream? i remember it well. it could be that when it comes to next spring and we hit the brexit date, that actually, maybe no one will notice it because... there could be a royal baby. big news on the front of many papers, oh, baby, and the glow that harry and meghan are starting a new royal family. before i saw them today, i thought they would all be about brexit full stop quite a lot of them armed, they are on stop quite a lot of them armed, they are on meghan and other things. they know we will quite brexit heavy in the next few weeks. wouldn't it be great if the day we leave the
10:54 pm
european union is the day the royal baby comes out. this is theresa may's cunning plan! the metro says that royal baby is due at the same time as brexit... mexit. that only ta kes two time as brexit... mexit. that only takes two months, regularly go stations takes a much longer than that! -- stations takes a much longer than that! —— brexit negotiations. stations takes a much longer than that! -- brexit negotiations. we should talk about some more serious stories, that camp is open to saudi denials as accusation grows over jamal khashoggi. trump is a man who shies away from international conflicts. with the north koreans,
10:55 pm
sometimes he is quite big, but then he rises back. i think he doesn't wa nt he rises back. i think he doesn't want to have a row with the saudis. it has been reported that he has talked to the saudi king, he has been on the phone to him and he has denied having anything to do with it. trump has said it was rogue killers. he is satisfied because there will be an investigation into there will be an investigation into the killing of jamal there will be an investigation into the killing ofjamal khashoggi and i think he wants to back off. he doesn't want to get involved in all of this. that is my speculation. but there is growing pressure on the saudis and there is an investigation under way involving the turkish authorities. there is a lot of concern that if that does expose the fa ct concern that if that does expose the fact that the saudi government at some level was involved, that is potentially very serious. the saudis, the regime has always kept itself very much within its own state. we haven't seen them acting
10:56 pm
much... obviously, there are different things... but you wouldn't say that with the russian history, carrying out the poisonings of the skripals. .. carrying out the poisonings of the skripals... but this seems to be a slight change in their tactics. maybe they are feeling more bold, because america is pulling back from its role in the world. we don't know what happened, but we will find out. i think what happened, but we will find out. ithink mrtrump what happened, but we will find out. i think mr trump isjust what happened, but we will find out. i think mr trump is just doing that... for now, thank you very much indeed. that's it for the papers this hour. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you owen and ruth. you'll both be back at 11.30. it looks like we are getting a break
10:57 pm
from the storm this week, but it has been a different story elsewhere across europe. a hurricane responsible for the rain in france is this area of trout. behind that, there's a low pressure has a bit of x hurricane michael in it. there is another area of low pressure coming across the atlantic coming our way. that is just a regular area of low pressure. that has been weakening and the rain has petered out over the last few hours. just some drizzle from that low cloud moving northwards towards scotland. some mist and fog in the south—east of lingen. it would be as cold as last night and further south, the temperatures may be in double figures. it. a bit dull and misty on tuesday, it will slowly brighten up
10:58 pm
through the day as the breeze picks up through the day as the breeze picks upa through the day as the breeze picks up a little. some sunshine for the south—east in particular. we have someone south—east in particular. we have someone the weather in the north west of scotland, some rain but it would amount to much. a warmer day for england and wales on dues there, the temperatures could be up to 23 degrees. a few weather front nec on, this is the main one that we need to focus on —— if you weather fronts on the scene. this may well come to rest through the midlands and towards the south—west will stop some rain and drizzle, some early mist and fog in the south—east of england. spell is up towards scotla nd england. spell is up towards scotland and northern ireland. temperatures up to 13—18 degrees. that band of cloud on that weather front should move away for most areas. it will linger overnight for southern part of lingen, but
10:59 pm
high—pressure behind that will bring some cooler error. this be the cold est some cooler error. this be the coldest night of the next few. wednesday night into those in women, northern areas of the uk could see temperatures close to freezing in the countryside. some cloud across the countryside. some cloud across the south of england could spoil thursday, but they should be lots of sunshine for the most part. temperature is not quite so high, but if you have the sunshine, it should be quite nice. this is bbc news. i'm carol walker. the headlines at 11pm: theresa may has told mps she believes a deal with the eu is achievable despite differences over how to handle the irish border. we cannot let this disagreement derail the prospects of a good deal, and leave us with the no deal outcome that no—one wants. following the disappearance of a saudi journalist in turkey, the diplomatic pressure increases on the saudi leaders to explain what's happened to him. meghan and harry will become
11:00 pm
parents in the spring. the royal couple announce they're expecting their first child. you can see live pictures of the happy couple in sydney being welcomed by the governor and dignitaries.

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on