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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 17, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: theresa may prepares to meet eu leaders, but there is little sign of a breakthrough on brexit. a warning that thousands of babies are growing up in toxic households, at risk of severe harm. and a hug for the royal couple, as harry and meghan continue to pull in the crowds in australia. pension pots worth £20 billion are sitting unclaimed after people lost track of them. i will be telling you how you can track yours down. no bale, but no problem for wales, as a brilliant free—kick from harry wilson helps them to beat ireland and go top of their nations league group. and more glorious autumn colours to parts of the uk, but a bit of rain to come in central and southern england. details on that and look forward to the weekend forecast coming up on breakfast.
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it is wednesday 17 october. our top story: theresa may will address european leaders at a summit in brussels this evening, with the brexit talks deadlocked. the two sides are struggling to agree over how to prevent the return of customs checks on the irish border. our political correspondent iain watson reports. the last time the prime minister met her fellow european leaders in salzburg in september, things didn't exactly go to plan. she was told the ideas for a new trading relationship after brexit wouldn't work, and the president of the european council posted this photograph on instagram suggesting the british government couldn't have its cake and eat it, or cherry—pick the best bits of the european single market. so perhaps it is not surprising that expectations of progress of this month's summit are low. this is what the eu council president, who will chair the discussion, said yesterday. if i fit beyond a source of hope
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for a deal, for now, if the goodwill and determination on both sides. however, for a breakthrough to take place, besides goodwill, we need new facts. before she even gets to brussels, theresa may will face further scrutiny from the opposition, and very likely from some in her own party, at pmqs. then she will face 27 european leaders before they go off and digestjust what she has told them over dinner. on the menu will be the so—called backstop, the tricky issue of how to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the irish republic in all circumstances after brexit. so what will be agreed in brussels today? probably very little. the idea of calling a special summit in november to sign off a deal now seems unlikely. if there is an agreement with the eu, it may not come until closer to christmas, just a few months away from when the uk leaves the european union. iain watson, bbc news, westminster.
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our europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. damian, this was once considered a crucial meeting in the brexit timetable, but now expectations are really low. louise, it was meant to be more than that, it was meant to be the meeting today when everything would have been essentially in place. perhaps a couple of little things to sort out just left over. instead, what we haveis just left over. instead, what we have is this situation where the talks have broken down. those talks are not happening any more, that happened at the weekend. mrs may will come here and, rather than be trying to seal the deal, she is going to have that opportunity this evening, late this afternoon here, to address the other 27 leaders, to try to convince them to see things her way. over that issue that ian was just telling you about, of the
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irish border, this plan of how to avoid customs checks, the return of the so—called hardboard. the difficulty that she has is that donald tusk is saying the eu wanted that progress, she didn't see that progress, but she did agree in december that the uk would sign up to something including backstop to ensure no border remains in ireland, and how to resolve that remains the conundrum at the heart of the negotiations. so what will then happened today is that the eu 27 leaders will sit and meet with their chief negotiator, michel barnier. they will decide whether they need a special summit in november. but everything is being pushed back, and that isn't good news for the negotiations at all. thousands of babies are growing up in toxic households, at risk of severe harm, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield is calling on the government to inject more cash into local authorities and social services to help prevent
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the abuse and neglect of young children. lauren moss reports. entirely dependent on adult care, babies are the most vulnerable in society. but there is a warning thousands are living in homes exposed to abuse or neglect. it is feared council services are creaking underfinancial feared council services are creaking under financial pressure, and will reach a tipping point if more funding isn't found, and fast. there isa funding isn't found, and fast. there is a risk that with decreasing budgets for local councils and most of the money now going on children with acute needs, when crisis happens, that the money that is left for early intervention at the earliest possible time to prevent problems isn't available. so my worry is that children aren't being offered the support they need, that families aren't being offered their help, and that literally we are having to cross our fingers that those children don't suffer severe
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harm. according to the report, more than 19,000 babies under the age of y&r in need, where they depend on support from social services. almost 16,000 of those are deemed to be at risk of severe harm, yet haven't been taken into care. more than 8000 are growing up in the middle of what is being called a toxic trio of drug 01’ is being called a toxic trio of drug or alcohol addiction, is being called a toxic trio of drug oralcoholaddiction, domestic violence, and severe mental ill health. later this month, the chancellor will deliver his autumn budget and set out what the government plans to spend its money on. the commissioner and local councils are calling for more cash for children's services. the government says it is investing £270 million in social care programmes, but there are fears the most vulnerable in society will continue to be the most at risk. president trump says accusations saudi arabia murdered a journalist represent another case of guilty until proven innocent. he added that he had spoken to the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman, and he had totally denied any knowledge of what had happened. turkey has claimed the journalist
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jamal khashoggi was murdered in the saudi consulate two weeks ago. us secretary of state mike pompeo revealed details of the meeting as he headed to ankara this morning for talks with the turkish president. i stressed the importance of them conducting a complete investigation... into the disappearance ofjamal khashoggi and they made a commitment, they said they would do that, they said it would be a thorough and complete and transparent investigation. we'll all see the results of that, they made a commitment that they would show the entire world the results of their investigation. they also indicated that they would get this done quickly. i don't know the precise timeline, but they indicated that they understood the importance of getting that done in a timely, rapid fashion, so they could begin to answer important questions. an international register of suspected sexual predators in the charity sector is to be set up by the british government. it follows a series of scandals
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earlier this year involving staff at oxfam and save the children. £2 million from the aid budget will be spent on the project. the announcement comes as a new report from the charity commission reveals that there is still systemic under—reporting of safeguarding problems. canada will today become the second nation in the world to legalise recreational cannabis. smokers will be able to purchase the drug from licenced producers, in a move that marks the end of 95 years of marajuana prohibition. canada has one of one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, particularly among young people. the average life expectancy in the uk is due to rise from just under 81 years to 83.3 by 2040. britons are expected to move up to 23rd place in the world table of longevity, according to new research. but we will be outranked by the super—healthy spanish, who are expected to overtake the japanese as the longest—lived, with an average of 85.7 years.
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iam not i am not sure i would have guessed that it would be the spanish who will soon be on top of the leaderboard. are surprisingly healthy lifestyle, it is all that churros and chocolate and all of that. churros, let's have some of that. the duke and duchess of sussex are continuing their tour of australia, today visiting new south wales, an area that has been badly affected by droughts. it is the first official overseas visit for the couple. our sydney correspondent hywel griffith is in dubbo, and the royal couple are currently experiencing some much—needed rain for the area. we saw a glorious day yesterday, but some much—needed rain where they are. absolutely, while the royal car bill summer rae couple are welcome, what has really made the town happy
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is the torrential rain —— royal couple. so the focus is on drought and community resilience, but inevitably the day started with a focus, once again, on the royal pregnancy. shortly after they arrived at the airport, harry and meghan were met some local school children, one of whom took his opportunity to give them some hands—on parenting experience. five—year—old luke got stuck in there, giving meghan a hard and tugging on harry's beard. i am not sure he could believe who he was meeting. they got to see that children do not always do what you would expect. they met flying doctors and moved on to a farm where they learned more about what these communities in new south wales have been going through for a month. the woodley family, sheep farmers, struggled to get their sheep to graze. many people doing it tough for the last couple of years. so they learned first—hand the experience of rural communities in australia, and afterwards prince harry spoke about that resilience
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and the need to ask for help. it has been a pretty full day albeit under some pretty stormy weather. we will be back later on for some more detail. lovely to see all of that. be back later on for some more detail. lovely to see all of thatlj detail. lovely to see all of that.|j think detail. lovely to see all of that.” think this should be the programme of the benefits of hugging. just to defuse the situation. let me know if you fancy one later on.” defuse the situation. let me know if you fancy one later on. i wouldn't like to apprise you or anything. do you remember we had a photo shoot, good morning, sally. we had a photo shoot on this programme about six month ago, and the camera guy came in and he said could you put your arms around each other? and we went we don't touch each other. in unison we don't touch each other. in unison we said we do not touch. in the nicest possible way. we do by mistake often. i wonder when —— if viewers can see, when our hands touch we go... it would be happier
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if we all held hands under the desk. what are you doing? sally, what is happening? lets all hold hands now. iam much happening? lets all hold hands now. i am much more relaxed about these things. be quiet now and get on with the sport! a good win for wales last night. there was a good win for wales last night as they beat ireland in the nations league. wales were without stars gareth bale and aaron ramsey in dublin, so 21—year—old harry wilson stepped up with this lovely free—kick to win it and send wales top of their group. things go from bad to worse for germany. they were beaten by france and could be relegated from their nations league group. they have lost six times this calendar year, the first time that has ever happened. jose mourinho has been charged by the football association for using abusive, insulting or improper language after manchester united's win over newcastle 11 days ago. he has until friday to respond. and more headaches for england head coach eddie jones ahead of the autumn internationals, chris robshaw the latest to join a long list of absentees, with a knee injury. jones names his squad tomorrow.
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was that ok? i have been annoying him the whole time. i am under attack here. a moment later, let's book it in. you can touch at 7:45 a.m.. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. ididn't mean i didn't mean it that way. what a lovely picture, matthew. good morning, amid weak and mood boost, and a cracking shot from east sussex. the autumn colours are in full bloom, and with blue skies overhead it looks stunning. there will be more of that to come over the next few days. the best of those clear skies are in the northern half of the country. scotland and northern ireland in particular, one
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or two showers pushing at the moment. a lot more cloud the england and wales, high cloud meaning a bit ofa and wales, high cloud meaning a bit of a hazy start to the day. particularly northern england through wales, but thicker cloud down across the south—west, through parts of the midlands, east anglia, bringing outbreaks of rain. that will edge its way further southwards and eastwards through the day. the odd heavy burst through south coast but most of it light and patchy, never quite reaching kent, sussex, parts of suffolk and norfolk until late in the day. rain and drizzle through parts of hampshire and dorset, brightening up the south—west england, sunshine through wales in the north midlands. scotla nd wales in the north midlands. scotland and northern ireland, a fine autumn date to come for you. a bit of a breeze blowing across the north of scotland but not quite as strong as it was yesterday. that trees remained in place, keeping temperatures up. an area of cloud and patchy rain and drizzle slipping close to the channel islands, south—east corner, keeping temperatures appear through the course of the night. for most of you
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it will be quite a chilly night. temperatures in rural parts, scotla nd temperatures in rural parts, scotland and northern ireland, very close to freezing as we start the morning. a crisp, autumnal start to tomorrow morning. blue skies overhead, early morning mist and fog patches clearing away. the remnants of this weather front will break up, sunny spells coming through. pleasa nt sunny spells coming through. pleasant enough where you have the sunshine, with light winds. a breeze in northern scotland, and shetland may catch the odd shower. in the friday, scotland and northern ireland with a cloudy day on the way. showers spreading from west to east through scotland, the odd one in northern ireland, largely dry. much of england and wales will be dry, mistand much of england and wales will be dry, mist and fog clearing, lots of sunshine around and clouding over to the north—west later. temperatures creeping upjust the north—west later. temperatures creeping up just a the north—west later. temperatures creeping upjust a little bit, not1 million miles from where we should be at this time of year. if you are thinking about the weekend, the driest and brightest of the weather this weekend will be further south. high pressure in charge in scotland,
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northern ireland and northern england, likely to see a weather front pushing through. a bit of rain at times but a lot of dry weather as well. for now, back to dan and louise. let's take a look at the front pages. the telegraph — the chancellor has warned the uk will have to pay the eu £36 billion even if it fails to agree a trade deal, according to the daily telegraph. the main image is the duchess of sussex on tour of australia, wearing a pair of diana's earrings. the image on the front of the times is uncovered artwork in pompeii which suggests that mount vesuvius erupted in october ad79 and not august as previously thought. (pres) the guardian has a story about an international passport —— the guardian has a story
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about an international passport scheme putting european security at risk. the image is of anna burns — the winner of this year's man booker prize. and the daily mirror leads with news of ant mcpartlin's divorce. and this is how australia's abc news website is reporting the royal tour. it says 5—year—old luke vincent stole the show today by stroking harry's beard, as the duke and duchesses' visit was marked by hugs and torrential rain. in dubbo. what have you got us? netflix results have come out overnight. there was some concern that maybe netflix had reached its peak. but according to the results la st peak. but according to the results last night. 7 million subscribers worldwide. they've now got 137
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million people worldwide who subscribe to netflix. that is a lot of money. how much they are spending in original content. they are very well. i wonder how much of that is the crowd. orange is the new black is one of the successful ones. that at least their ratings, however.m would be interesting to see. get on the case. i am talking about andy murray this morning. we know he has been struggling the last couple of years with injury. he is still recovering from surgery. he has recruited bill knolls, a world—renowned recruited bill knolls, a world— renowned expert, recruited bill knolls, a world—renowned expert, who is basically helped anyone, tiger
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woods, frank lampard and others, is basically within the whole time. trying to get him back to full fitness. he has got a real battle on his hands. the reason they think the city is may not have erupted in october rather than august, this is very old graffiti. this could do with the way they translated the latter. a misunderstanding with the roman calendar or perhaps just bad handwriting. there is a little bit of graffiti. they could not have ended the world than august. did you see this yesterday. pepper the robot? this is a robot. the robot was there because the robot was in the middle. mps asked the robot
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about the future of artificial intelligence. pepper the robot reassured them that humans would a lwa ys reassured them that humans would always be needed. if only for free hugs. i am glad. you are giving me a bad reputation. what it must be like for harry and meghan on tour, if somebody asks, you can't say no. back off! sorry, you go. argue sure? is yours funny? not massively. neither is mine. unionist, come on. this is the closest physical contact we will have. it is david moyes who
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isa we will have. it is david moyes who is a hugely experienced coach. talking about how the difficult times have made him a better coach and talk about what it takes to survive to survive a terrible speculation when thejob survive to survive a terrible speculation when the job is going wrong. how you had to be very thick—skinned. is he looking for a job? perhaps? this is insane, come and get me. i like people who talk ofa and get me. i like people who talk of a bit of honesty. he is brilliant. i wonder if manchester united fans think they got rid of him too soon. this is great. talking about learning from bad times. late fred, i've got this year. should we hold hands while we wait? i've missed more than 9000 shots in my
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career. this is michaeljordan who in multiple times, most valuable player, i've lost almost 300 games. 26 times are entrusted. i failed over and over again in my life and thatis over and over again in my life and that is why i succeed. that is the philosophy that gareth southgate has been taking. you can't be afraid to fail. keep them away from me. it's been a summer of delays and cancellations on the rail ...arewe are we not the right people? are you trying to scare us? we are talking about delays and cancellations on the rail network meaning it leads to immense passenger of frustration with staff becoming the victims of abuse or
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even assault. so to tackle the threat, virgin trains is equipping all frontline workers with body cameras in the hope it will help reduce the number of incidents. our transport correspondent tom burridge has more. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. they work on the frontline of our railway, checking tickets, and dealing with disruption. thank you. now a lot of staff on virgin trains will wear these cameras. it's because of incidents like this. a man confronts a conductor on a train from london to birmingham injune. this was filmed by another passenger. lewis knows what it's like to be assaulted while on the job. when a passenger missed his train, lewis told him he'd have to buy another ticket. then this happened. the sort of launched into
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the side of the gate and i ended up damaging my shoulder in the process of that. he sort of made a threat of me and told me he was going to kill me and told me he was going to kill me in the end. i was more speechless and shocked about what actually happened. new figures show a rise in physical assaults on staff. incidents are relatively rare but police believe body cams. angry passengers from turning violent. staff on trains are getting abused either verbally or physically every day and don't think that's acceptable. what affect the body cameras have? we have had a number of pilots and it has a massive impact in reducing violence against staff. the most recent one showed it halved the number of staff assaults. the video recorded by these cameras is being fed directly into a database which british transport police can access. the idea is it this —— if there is an incident, it can be reviewed quickly and action taken if can be reviewed quickly and action ta ken if necessary.
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can be reviewed quickly and action taken if necessary. passenger and on gas passions —— passengers suffered when timetables were botched a frontline staff suffered two. michelle heard the stories. she is pa rt michelle heard the stories. she is part of a network of chaplains who travel by train across the country to offer counselling to staff. travel by train across the country to offer counselling to staffm travel by train across the country to offer counselling to staff. if it happened in an office situation, it wouldn't be tolerated. people are doing theirjob every day and they are experiencing, on a day—to—day basis, humiliation, verbal abuse, and physical abuse, and some of it is horrendous. the cameras will only be switched on if someone bill is threatened. lewis admits sometimes recording might inflame the situation further but he says wearing his body cams will give them confidence and reduce the amount of abuse. i saw one of those a couple of days ago on the train. now i know
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what they were doing. i didn't know at the time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: how one town has turned its fortunes around thanks to a market hall, inspiring other places to do the same. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. passengers have been warned to expect major disruption this morning at one of london's busiest railway stations. all great western railway trains running between paddington and slough have been cancelled until at least midday after overhead electric cables were damaged at ealing last night. trains between paddington and heathrow airport are also not running. meanwhile there were also major delays for hundreds of commuters using victoria station on yesteeday evening after an electricity supply failure. the power problems had affected a large section of track between croydon and victoria. all lines are now open. well let's take a look at the rest of travel situation now.
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tfl rail is part suspended between paddingron and heathrow due to those overhead power lines. on the roads northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. traffic on the a13 is building westbound from dagenham into barking. paris could see 20,000 jobs from london move across the channel over the next few years as a direct result of brexit. that's according to the main lobby group for the financial district there. the estimate is based on the transfer of existing jobs from london and future roles which could be created in paris instead. recruiters accross the channel say they've already seen a ten—fold increase in the number of londoners applying forjobs in france. now that the british people have
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voted in favour of praxis and because of the consequences of the loss of the passport, paris is in a position to attract new international companies coming from london or everywhere in the world which want to develop new activities in europe. and we'll have a special report from paris at 6.30 this evening on how london an respond to the challenge from across the channel. a task force which was set up with the aim of cracking down on moped crime in the capital is now set to be extended across the country. there is a lot of cloud and that is gained to stay with us through the day with light rain and drizzle as well. this is a weakening cold front and it's bringing this patchy light rain and drizzle and it gets stuck towards the west and north of london. anywhere that could have a spot or two but sure more likely to catch that rain in that direction. elsewhere, predominantly dry but
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yes, it's going to feel rather damp with that cloud and temperatures reaching 17 celsius. overnight tonight, it starts off cloudy but that cloud may start to in and towards the end of the night we may get wanted to clear spells. minimum temperatures between nine and 12 celsius. that myst will clear through the morning. temperatures getting up to 15 celsius. settled weather for much of the week but misty and foggy mornings. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: the head judge of the wildlife photographer of the year competition tells us
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what makes this winning shot so special. the love story that started with a tattoo in a death camp. author heather morris tells the true tale of the couple who met in auschwitz and survived against all odds. # always look on the bright side of life... and he is the pessimist who wrote the ultimate anthem for optimists. eric idle talks to us about always looking on the bright side of life. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: theresa may will address european leaders at a summit in brussels this evening, with the brexit talks deadlocked. the two sides are struggling to agree over how to prevent the return of customs checks on the irish border, but both sides want to avoid that border becoming hard. the eu says it is up to the uk to bring new ideas to the table. our political correspondent
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alex forsyth is in westminster. alex, good morning to you. every day this week it has been crunched 24 hours for the prime minister and those trying to see if this could be the week where things get ironed out. as we carry on through the week, alex, it looks less likely.” think that is pretty accurate. i sometimes get a sense of deja vu when we talk about brexit vic as we bill it as a major turning point in the talks, the crunch meeting of eu leaders, and then things store and get stuck. that is what happened this time around. the issue as you mentioned is still how to avoid a ha rd mentioned is still how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland at all cost, no matter what. to put it frankly, the eu and the uk cannot agree on how to do that yet, so rather than theresa may heading off for brussels for what might have been a pretty triumphant meeting where they could have said we are
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pretty much there was a brexit deal, that doesn't look like it will happen. instead she will address eu leaders at a meeting tonight and they will all go off and have dinner together and she won't. while the eu have said what they want is new ideas from the prime minister, her intention might be to try and persuade them that she really has moved all she can. she is under a lot of pressure from mps in her own party and the democratic unionist party and the democratic unionist party of northern ireland as well not to shift any further when it comes to the issue of the irish border. that is why things have become so locked down. don't expect a big rake through but do expect some signals on whether we might get a deal down the line —— breakthrough. we are looking for signs that suggest how this might play out in the next few weeks and months. thank you for signposting those things for us. thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm and neglect because they are growing up in households that are labelled as toxic in a new report. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield,
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is calling on the government to inject more cash into local authorities and social services to help prevent the abuse of young children. there is a risk that, with decreasing budgets for local councils, and most of the money now going on children with acute needs, when crisis happens, that the money that's left for early intervention at the earliest possible time to prevent problems isn't available. president trump says accusations saudi arabia murdered the journalist jamal khashoggi represent another case of guilty until proven innocent. he added that he had spoken to the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman, and he had totally denied any knowledge of what had happened. turkey has claimed the journalist was murdered in the saudi consulate two weeks ago. i stressed the importance of them conducting a complete investigation into the disappearance ofjamal khashoggi, and they made a commitment, they said they would do that. they said it would be a thorough, complete
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and transparent investigation. we'll all see the results of that. they made a commitment that they would show the entire world the results of their investigation. they also indicated that they would get this done quickly. i don't know the precise timeline, but they indicated that they understood the importance of getting that done in a timely, rapid fashion, so that they could begin to answer important questions. an international register of suspected sexual predators in the charity sector is to be set up by the british government. it follows a series of scandals earlier this year involving staff at oxfam and save the children. £2 million from the aid budget will be spent on the project. the announcement comes as a new report from the charity commission reveals that there is still systemic under—reporting of safeguarding problems. canada will today become the second nation in the world to legalise recreational cannabis. smokers will be able to purchase the drug from licenced producers, in a move that marks the end of 95 years of marajuana prohibition. canada has one of one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, particularly among young people.
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the average life expectancy in the uk is due to rise from just under 81 years, to 83.3, by 2040. britons are expected to move up to 23rd place in the world table of longevity, according to new research. but we will be outranked by the super—healthy spanish, who are expected to overtake the japanese as the longest—lived, with an average of 85.7 years. the novelist anna burns has become the first northern irish author to win the man booker prize. she scooped the £50,000 prize for her novel milkman, the tale of young woman being sexually harassed by a powerful man during the troubles. the judges said it was incredibly original. it also makes her the first female winner since 2012, when hilary mantel took the award. over the years, we have brought you some spectacular advances in robot technology. but take a look at this.
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it is indeed a dancing robot dog, from the technology firm boston dynamic. # uptown funk. they are —— i think this is how the world ends. it certainly has the moves. some serious moonwalking at the end. so how long before we can expect it to be a strictly come dancing co ntesta nt ? robots on strictly, goodness me. it is quite scary. that was pretty impressive, that. and worrying for
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our future. you get really concerned. have you seen the one where they opened the door and someone comes and shuts the door? baht what was the robot called... pepper the robot said it was ok, humans will not be needed in the future. anyway, that particular robot says humans are still needed. for what, i don't know. to read the sport? definitely not to read the spot. but to play the sport. although have you seen drone racing? although have you seen drone racing? although i suppose you need a human to operate the drone. drones racing at night through an obstacle course. we still need footballers. do you know why we need them, because they make mistakes, as well. did the keeper make a mistake last night,
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perhaps? and it was a robotic freekick from mr wilson. let's start by having a look at a lovely free kick from wales's harry wilson. here it is, a great strike from just outside of the box. it gave wales a 1—0 win over the republic of ireland in the nations league in dublin last night, and leaves wales top of their group. but boss ryan giggs isn't getting ahead of himselfjust yet we set out in this nation ‘s lead to win the group and then see where it took us. so that is good, that we can do it with one game to go. and now the next thing is to look to win it. it won't be easy, and we've got denmark at home, but the city stadium will be bouncing, i guarantee that, and we are really looking forward to the challenge now. things go from bad to worse for germany, beaten 2—1 by france in paris, antoine griezmann with both goals for the world champions. germany are now on the brink of relegation from their group, and have lost six times in a calendar yearfor the very first time.
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jose mourinho has been charged for using abusive, insulting or improper language after manchester united's win over newcastle. you might remember that it was a last—gasp win for united that probably saved mourinho's job. the fa used a lip—reader to confirm what he said to the cameras, and decided it was offensive. we have cut that bit out, for obvious reasons. he has got until friday to respond. it was in portuguese, so if anyone was watching at home and was easily offended... did we show it? no, we didn't. ican offended... did we show it? no, we didn't. i can tell you this, it wasn't just words, it was also didn't. i can tell you this, it wasn'tjust words, it was also the gesture. a blow for arsenal and scotland midfielder kim little, who will be out for at least ten weeks after breaking her leg. it happened in a heavy challenge during arsenal's 5—0 win over champions chelsea in the women's super league at the weekend.
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her england colleague lucy bronze offered her support, but says players are repeatedly let down by the standard of officiating. eddiejones has all kinds of problems as he prepares to select his england squad for the autumn internationals. chris robshaw is the latest to join a growing list of absentees with a knee injury. fellow forwards billy vunipola and joe launchbury are also injured, whilst nathan hughes is facing a suspension. england play south africa, new zealand, japan and australia in consecutive weekends at twickenham next month. england face sri lanka in the third one day international later this morning. england are one up in the series, with three to play. moeen ali came into the series in good form, having played a big part in england's test win over india this summer, and says he has got
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plenty more to offer. ifeel like i'm very comfortable with myself, comfortable in my game, the way i play. and you know whether you've done bad or you've done well, if you've made an impact and stuff. and they're the kind of things that, like i said, i've got the experience a bit more now, and ifeel like, being part of this group, that i feel like i'm coming into my peak. and the papers this morning still very excited about england's win over spain on monday night, and the fans are still a bit giddy too. a petition to have this image of harry maguire riding an inflatable unicorn put on the £50 note has attracted almost 15,000 signatures. what do you think is mac i think it works. his england team mate kyle walker says he'd like to be on the fiver.
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i think maguire has the better chance. those unicorns are just amazing. i don't think that is going to happen, do you? stranger things have happened. it looks quite good, though. some kind of novelty item. the duke and duchess of sussex have been continuing to delight crowds on the second day of the couple's first official overseas tour. they have been visiting areas in new south wales, meeting with the royal flying doctor service and farmers affected by drought. let's speak to our sydney correspondent hywel griffith, who is in dubbo, and there has been some much—needed rain, hywel? absolutely, dubbo has been through some of its driest months on record. but for the royal visit, nick kamen bucketloads. and as you might be able to see, when the royal couple came toa
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able to see, when the royal couple came to a big community picnic at victoria park in dubbo, people really braved it with their ponchos, under their umbrellas, everyone desperate for a site of the royal couple, who obliged by going beneath umbrellas to give a speech about community feeling, community resilience, and the need to accept help when it is on offer. earlier in the day harry and meghan went to visit one of the families affected, a sheep farming family who have had a sheep farming family who have had a very tough over the last two yea rs, a very tough over the last two years, not being able to feed or graze their sheep. they will have learned a lot about resilience today, while most of the crowd were very pleased to see the rainfall. and some lovely pictures of the children they have been meeting a longer journey. children they have been meeting a longerjourney. yes, absolutely. there is a big focus on parenting here, of course, given the news of the royal pregnancy. i was at the airport when the plane eventually landed, and the queue of children waited very patiently. right at the
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end, about number 30, was five—year—old luke. he watched all the other children have a handshake but that wasn't enough for him. he got very hands—on. he gave meghan a hug followed by a quick tug on harry's beard. so a little parenting experience for them, knowing that little children don't always do what you would expect. we are looking at those pictures now, and he obviously really loves harry. he is absolutely adorable. what is next on the tour for them? yes, so next stop tomorrow will be melbourne, where they get to experience its tram system, let me tell you. for tram buffs out there, it is the biggest tram system in the world, and i am sure you are one of those tram buffs, and they will be taking part in a beach clean, and it is fairto taking part in a beach clean, and it is fair to say there have been thousands waiting to meet them and get those all—importa nt thousands waiting to meet them and get those all—important selfies.” am sure you didn't imagine becoming
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the baby correspondent, but thank you very much indeed. and we have been hearing about some much—needed rain in dubbo. from new south wales to wales and the rest of us. good morning. not as much rain as we have had over there, i think we have had enough over the last few days. at celebrating some of the autumn colours, this was the scene in essex yesterday. the good news is there will be a little bit more in the way of sunshine to help bring out the best of those colours over the next few days. this area of cloud is not as threatening as it looks. a lot of it is high cloud. there is a thin zone of thicker cloud which extends from dorset in hampshire to the west of london and parts of east anglia. wrap the day, some patchy rain and drizzle. a few showers pushing on. most of the areas will be drier. into the
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south—east corner of the country, some sunshine. temperatures into the upper teens but that rain and drizzle coming on. the midlands, much of wales, lots of sunshine. into northern ireland in northern and western scotland, the breeze is still noticeable. it will be quite as strong as yesterday. tonight in the south—east, we still have a weather front, decaying the south—east, we still have a weatherfront, decaying as it the south—east, we still have a weather front, decaying as it sits there. it will stop temperatures from dropping away. further north. temperatures can be done close to freezing as we start tomorrow morning. an autumnal start to the day. more cloud across eastern
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counties in england. pleasant enough in most of you with light winds. a chilly night will follow. a lot more cloud, some showers pushing from west to east. maybe they will make it into the far north of england. even a touch warmer confederate thursday. you are starting to think of the weekend, high pressure. scotla nd of the weekend, high pressure. scotland and northern ireland, some dry weather. this weather front. showers are cool breeze. sunshine at times as well. certainly doing better than we have across the western mediterranean. and quite stormy weather. back to both. more than 1.5 million
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pension pots are sitting unclaimed after their owners changed jobs or moved house. steph's got more on this. yes, morning everyone. with the average person in the uk moving house eight times and working in 11 differentjobs it's no surprise that we lose track of those letters you get from your pension provider. new research published this morning by the association of british insurers has found there's £20 billion sitting in these accounts and the average pot is worth £13,000. i'm joined now by michelle cracknell from the pensions advisory service, an independent body that provides advice to the public on pensions. good advice to the public on pensions. morning to you. i bit good morning to you. it can sound a bit irresponsible to lose track of your pension but it's easily done. tells a bit about why. if you are
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working, an employer will put you into a pension scheme. or even know that the money is coming out of your bank account. the chances of losing your pension are quite high. there will think about sending their pension out. this is a problem that is growing because there is an automatic enrolment? yes, there are more peoplejoining pension schemes and its growing for that reason. the second reason is, so much as online today. you don't even have a piece of paper that nudges you to go and find out pensions from your past employment history. can you do about it? you should sit down a look at all the companies you have worked for and whether you have a pension scheme. now in the 80s, there are a lot of employments where you wouldn't have had a pension scheme but as soon as you get into the 90s and to thousands, the chances of you
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being a pension scheme, particularly if you are working for a large company, is really high. you should go back to that company and ask, give them your date of birth and your national insurance number, and when he worked in that company, you can find the pension. how easy is it to do that? some of them are big companies. i can't say it's easy but it's difficult to do. there is a government tracing service, a pension tracing service, and if you look at that, can type in the name of your employer and it will give you the name and address of the administrator will stop that is a really good place to start. we are a government public service. you can look on our website. we'll give you consider whether you have got a pension and you have, where you should go to try and trace it. as
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soon as you find that you have a pension pot, what happens. had you get the money? you may not be a law to get hold of the money immediately. the most important thing is to make sure you know their contact details immediately. you can keep telling them every time that you move. so when you do get to an age that you can start drawing pensions, in certain cases, if you've got lots of small parts, you may actually want to get some help to see whether it's worth consolidating those all into one pot which is obviously easier to keep track of. how common is this. his interview people with lots of money? will there be lots of our best lots of people out there who don't realise they have pension pots?m is estimated about two thirds of people have lost a pension. people
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changing jobs, likely to change jobs ina changing jobs, likely to change jobs in a working life. it's a common problem. the chances are, you might have more pension and you think you've got. we appreciate you coming you can use the government's pension tracing service to find out who runs your old scheme. we've put the link on the bbc breakfast twitter page. that is really quite extraordinary, that 70 people could be missing out. many of our towns have suffered because of weak sales on the high street, forcing businesses to shut their doors. today the british retail consortium will set out what it thinks could be done to give towns the boost they need. but there are some areas already bucking the trend. altrincham in south manchester has turned its high street around injust 5 years. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been finding out how. it's all reason really busy and
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vibrant. people feel happy coming here. ijust vibrant. people feel happy coming here. i just love vibrant. people feel happy coming here. ijust love the food, the variety and just enjoy being around the people here. it's always a great atmosphere. it is a reason to come into town, isn't it? definitely. it's a sunday afternoon and you can't move for people. this is ottringham market south of manchester. it was renovated and reopened five years ago. it's the right kind of fire, it fits in, it suits everyone, it's great, if you got kids, it's a great place to be. nickjohnson is the brains behind the market. it's a series of stalls and crucially hand—picked quality food and drink outlets. we are incredibly social animals and people are exchanging conversations with
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strangers but they are there with the full family. it puts a smile on people ‘s faces. you can tell this isa people ‘s faces. you can tell this is a happy place now, it's a happy town. which is a surprise because it used to be a ghost town. more than 30% of shops were shut a decade ago. nickjohnson now has plans to repeat the formula. half an hour down the road this is the picture drome in macclesfield, one of the first purpose—built cinemas in the country. macclesfield is my hometown, it's a fantastic town, and like most town centres, its suffering a little bit. carl massey, who has just sold the site to nick, has high hopes for the future of the town. i think will transform this end of town, it will put macclesfield on the map as a food destination. this is macclesfield
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high street. pressure from things like online shopping and business rates m ea ns like online shopping and business rates means shops are shocking. sue is it possible to replicate the success of altrincham ? is it possible to replicate the success of altrincham? when we forecast the death of the high street it's premature but with that there is real opportunity to reinvent, everything creatively about what we want our places to become. more than 30 local authorities have come here to study the model, getting people to come back into town by giving them an experience not available online. some of the answers might be out there. what if you could use that boost to your own town central high street? you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. how rail staff hope body cameras will help them tackle abusive behaviour from passengers time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. also, before that, coming up is eric
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idle. we speak to him. always look on the bright side of life. not in the middle of a really dark triathlon. there are dark moments there. when you have had your massive coffee at six o'clock in the morning, you are always on the bright side. kathleen always helps. —— kathleen. —— caffeine. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. passengers have been warned to expect major disruption this morning at one of london's busiest railway stations. all great western trains running between paddington and slough have been cancelled until at least midday. it's after overhead electric cables were damaged at ealing last night. meanwhile there were also major delays for commuters using victoria station yesterday evening after an electricity supply failure. the power problems had affected a large section of track between croydon and victoria. all lines are now open. well, let's take a look at the rest
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of travel situation now. tfl rail is part suspended between paddington and heathrow due to those overhead power lines. on the roads northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in other news paris could see 20,000 jobs from london move across the channel over the next few years — as a direct result of brexit. that's according to the main lobby group for the financial district there. the estimate is based on the transfer of existing jobs from london and future roles which could be created in paris instead. recruiters accross the channel say they've already seen a ten—fold
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increase in the number of londoners applying forjobs in france. now that the british people have voted in favour of the brexit and because of the consequence and the loss of the passport, paris is in a position to attract new implementations of international companies coming from london or coming from everywhere in the world which want to develop new activities in europe. and we'll have a special report from paris at 6.30 this evening on how london can respond to the challenge from across the channel. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a fairly mild start out there this morning but not an especially bright one. there is a lot of cloud and that cloud is going to to stay with us through the day with a lot of light rain and drizzle as well. this is a weakening cold front and it's bringing this patchy light rain and drizzle and it gets stuck towards the west and north of london.
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anywhere could have a spot or two but you are more likely to catch that rain in that direction. elsewhere, predominantly dry but yes, it's going to feel rather damp with all that cloud and temperatures reaching 17 celsius. overnight tonight, it starts off cloudy but that cloud may start to thin and towards the end of the night, we'll get one or two clearer spells. minimum temperatures between 9 and 12 celsius. that mist will clear through the morning. mid—morning onwards, sun arriving. temperatures getting up to 15 celsius. settled weather for much of the week but misty and foggy mornings. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: theresa may prepares to meet eu leaders, but there is little sign of a breakthrough on brexit. a warning that thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm because they are growing up in households blighted
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by drink and drugs. a hug for the royal couple, as harry and meghan continue to pull in the crowds in australia. an advert for cosmetic surgery shown during itv‘s hit show love island has been banned. more on thatjust before 8:00am. no bale, but no problem for wales, as a brilliant free—kick from harry wilson helps them to beat ireland and go top of their nations league group. and some sunshine to show—off the autumn colours. patchy rain in southern england, i have details on that and a look at the weekend forecast coming up here on brea kfast. it is wednesday 17 october. our top story: theresa may will address european leaders at a summit in brussels this evening, with the brexit talks deadlocked. the two sides are struggling to agree over how to prevent the return of customs checks on the irish border. our political correspondent iain watson reports. the last time the prime minister
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met her fellow european leaders, in salzburg in september, things didn't exactly go to plan. she was told her ideas for a new trading relationship after brexit wouldn't work, and the president of the european council posted this photograph on instagram, suggesting the british government couldn't have its cake and eat it, or cherry—pick the best bits of the european single market. so perhaps it is not surprising that expectations of progress at this month's summit are low. this is what the eu council president, who will chair the discussion, said yesterday. as i see it, the only source of hope for a deal, for now, is the goodwill and determination on both sides. however, for a breakthrough to take place, besides goodwill, we need new facts. before she even gets to brussels, theresa may will face further scrutiny from the opposition, and very likely from some in her own party, at pmqs.
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then she will face 27 european leaders before they go off and digestjust what she has told them over dinner. on the menu will be the so—called backstop — the tricky issue of how to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the irish republic in all circumstances after brexit. so what will be agreed in brussels today? probably very little. the idea of calling a special summit in november to sign off a deal now seems unlikely. if there is an agreement with the eu, it may not come until closer to christmas, just a few months away from when the uk leaves the european union. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. and we will be speaking to an irish mep to get her thoughts on today's summit in around ten minutes' time. thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm and neglect because they are growing up in households that are labelled as toxic in a new report. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, is calling on the government to inject more cash into local
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authorities and social services to help prevent the abuse of young children. there is a risk that, with decreasing budgets for local councils, and most of the money now going on children with acute needs, when crisis happens, that the money that's left for early intervention at the earliest possible time to prevent problems isn't available. president trump says accusations saudi arabia murdered the journalist jamal khashoggi represent another case of guilty until proven innocent. he added that he had spoken to the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman, and he had totally denied any knowledge of what had happened. turkey has claimed the journalist was murdered in the saudi consulate two weeks ago. i stressed the importance of them conducting a complete investigation into the disappearance ofjamal khashoggi, and they made a commitment, they said they would do that. they said it would be
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a thorough, complete and transparent investigation. we'll all see the results of that. they made a commitment that they would show the entire world the results of their investigation. they also indicated that they would get this done quickly. i don't know the precise timeline, but they indicated that they understood the importance of getting that done in a timely, rapid fashion, so that they could begin to answer important questions. canada will today become the second nation in the world to legalise recreational cannabis. smokers will be able to purchase the drug from licenced producers, in a move that marks the end of 95 years of marijuana prohibition. canada has one of one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, particularly among young people. the average life expectancy in the uk is due to rise from just under 81 years to 83.3 by 2040. britons are expected to move up to 23rd place in the world table of longevity, according to new research. but we will be outranked by the super—healthy spanish, who are expected to overtake the japanese as the longest—lived, with an average of 85.7 years. no commuter services will operate
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from paddington station to heathrow airport until later today, because of wires damaged at ealing on tuesday night. passengers are being told to find alternative routes. the duke and duchess of sussex are continuing their tour of australia, today visiting new south wales, an area that has been badly affected by droughts. it is the first official overseas visit for the couple. our sydney correspondent hywel griffith has been following their royal trip. day two of the royal tour and another chance to fine tune does parenting skills as dubbo school children lined up for photos and hugs, five—year—old luke tugged on heartstrings and harry's beard. it is only a flying visit but coming to
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regional australia is seen as significant as many people here can feel forgotten, especially during months of drought. 90% of new south wales remains desperately short of rain. crop farmers haven't been able to sow seeds, and the woodlea farmers have struggled to find ways to let their sheep graze. they told the royal couple about their experience. a royal visit doesn't guarantee rain, but dubbo skies did open as the duke and duchess arrived for a picnic, where the message was about being willing to ask for help. you are all in this together, and if i may speak personally, we are all in this together. because asking for help was one of the best decisions that i ever made. you will be continually amazed how life changes for the better. they may have got soaked, but for the crowds here, the rain really is welcome. they will hope it stays long after their
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visitors have gone. we will be going to australia a little bit later for the latest on that. the novelist anna burns has become the first northern irish author to win the man booker prize. she scooped the £50,000 prize for her novel milkman, the tale of young woman being sexually harassed by a powerful man during the troubles. the judges said it was incredibly original. it also makes her the first female winner since 2012, when hilary mantel took the award. iam i am looking at some comments from the chairman of the panel, who said it was enormously rewarding if you persist with it. he suggested some might prefer to listen to it, because it is challenging, but he says the view is terrific when you get to the top. lounging leopards, suburban bears and a bed of seals —
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all entries for this year's wildlife photographer of the year competition. in the end, it was this photograph of two snub—nosed monkeys which clinched the top prize out of more than 45,000 entries. the picture was taken by dutch photographer marsel van oosten and titled the golden couple. for me it is the colours of that which arejust for me it is the colours of that which are just absolutely incredible, as well. and you were talking about the judges' comments, they were saying it is a portrait and normally they don't really give the prize out to a portrait, but because it is so rare and such an impressive shot, as well, they have gone for that as their wildlife photographs of the year. we are talking about it later, aren't we? shall we have a quick look at the front pages? the times leads on
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britain spearheading a list of sexual predators within the charity sector, part of what they call a concerted global effort to clean up the charity world, after the times exposed sexual misconduct by oxfam workers in haiti. and long—lost graffiti in pompeii has helped to put the record straight about exactly when one of the world's most devastating natural disasters happened. historians have claimed it was 24 august, but this graffiti proved it happened in october. it was painted on a wall in october, ad 79. philip hammond warning of a £36
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billion no deal bill, and meghan markle on the front page of the daily telegraph. she is wondering the memory of diana by wearing the same butterflied hearings. the daily mailare same butterflied hearings. the daily mail are talking about the drug gangs using so—called county lines, information about that coming out yesterday. back to our top story, and later today theresa may will head to brussels to address eu leaders, as she attempts to keep hopes of a brexit deal alive. after 18 months of negotiations, this week's summit had been pencilled in as crucial for reaching agreement on a brexit deal. but differences over the irish border remain, with the european council president, donald tusk, saying there is little optimism they can be resolved. with little chance of an agreement this week, another summit might now take place in november or december. but the most important date is of course 29 march 2019.
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that is when brexit is due to happen. we are joined now by mairead mcguinness, irish mep and vice president of the european parliament, who is in brussels. thank you forjoining us. first up, what is the mood music? is there likely to be any movement towards a deal this week? good likely to be any movement towards a dealthis week? good morning, and it isa dealthis week? good morning, and it is a good morning, the weather is nice, so that is good news. as to whether there will be a deal? no, i don't think so but they will hopefully be progress. the sides are engaged in intense discussions and there is an unresolved issue around there is an unresolved issue around the island of ireland question. this commitment to no hard border on the island of ireland, and as you know i represent a constituency close to the border with northern ireland, so this is quite an important issue for the people i represent, and indeed for everybody, not just the people i represent, and indeed for everybody, notjust in ireland but across the european union, who
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understand the sensibilities. and british prime minister is committed to no hard border. so i hope that over dinner at some point we will see working towards a compromise, if thatis see working towards a compromise, if that is what we call it, but progress, towards allowing the uk to have an orderly exit at the end of march. i think that is what we all are working towards and hoping for, but also addressing this issue which remains on the table and has been for many, many months. and the reason why it is on the table and has taken so long is because there is no easy answer to this. one hopes that against the background of an ever tightening deadline, both sides wa nt to ever tightening deadline, both sides want to see a solution. you say that both sides will have to give ground, and how can they do that?” both sides will have to give ground, and how can they do that? i think there have been some developments last evening and overnight about possibly extending the transition period. i haven't got specific details on that. that is one of the
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suggestions. you see, the difficulty is, let's come back to base here. the commitment of all parties that there will be no hard border on the island of ireland. and when you try and square that with the red lines that are on the table from the uk's side, of leaving the customs union and single market, i think that has a lwa ys and single market, i think that has always been a conundrum, if you like, the impossible ask. and yet politically we have two answer that question, because we owe it to generations to come not to allow any backward movements in relation to developments in northern ireland. we have a peace process of 20 years, and all of us are working hard to make sure that communities strengthen and build rather than, if you like, being in any way distracted by what is happening here. so when i say that both sides have got to find a solution, and maybe the word is compromise, it is that we don't concede on our core commitments, and find a way to answering the irish question, as all
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parties want to, and also understanding that the uk prime minister has issues which she says she cannot move forward on. but look, i think if you come here and meet with leaders from across the european union, and we all want to do the best of our citizens, our way has to be found. and i think if we don't find it, i think the citizens of the united kingdom and of europe will wonder why, and how we failed. you mentioned this possible one—year extension. so you have heard that as well. how helpful, in your view, would that be, or is it notjust delaying the inevitable? well, i think it is not, because the inevitable, if i call it that, is that the united kingdom does leave the european union at the end of march. that is clear that something dramatic happens. so that is what will happen regardless of a deal or not a deal, the idea which has been floated of extending the transition,
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asi floated of extending the transition, as i read it, and this will evolve during the day, is to provide a time to find those solutions which have eluded the parties until now, because they are not easily found. i am not so sure how people will react to that, it was as you know there are very entrenched positions on both sides of this argument. but on the other hand, if it allows time and freedom for people to think and come up with very important solutions to this problem, then what isa solutions to this problem, then what is a year? a year as a short period of time if it brings us a good result. the prime minister will make her pitch, make a speech and in the 27 other leaders chat among themselves and negotiate towards whatever it is about what she says. when they gather together, they are all
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politicians. they have to answer to that government, the parliament. the atmosphere, and i believe it will be positive, there is a genuine desire. i expect the prime minister to state her case. the others will have to think through what she said. i think there are low expectations of a significant breakthrough. but there will be a step change perhaps in both the mood and indeed the possible progress on this difficult issue. even everyday get some white smoke this evening, there is tomorrow and there is n. i'm afraid that people having their breakfast may well have delivered this story. it is ongoing. we all wish the dramatic developments. sometimes they come in very small pieces but when you put them together, we will find that solution which has evaded
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us find that solution which has evaded us until now. thank you very much. i did mention yesterday, but if you really wa nt did mention yesterday, but if you really want to mourn the intricacies of all of this. europe editor as well is as well. and adam fleming in brussels. they are all there are now very good. step, you mentioned netflix earlier. they added stacks of streamers. they had a good set of results which are just come out of the quarter. they've added 7 million subscribers, which takes them to 137 million subscribers across the world. this is the world's largest online streaming service. if you think about how much money they've spent in attracting them, that's why there's been a bit of doubt about
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whether netflix can do well. or whether netflix can do well. or whether it had reached its peak. they are spending something like £8 billion a year on the content. that is what is attracting the new subscribers. there is a lot of content subscribers. there is a lot of co nte nt you subscribers. there is a lot of content you can't get on any other platform. the huge successes, the likes of the crown, it's all made a big difference to them. some people we re big difference to them. some people were worried they may have spent too much money and they weren't going to get enough subscribers but they had done it and the share price has gone up done it and the share price has gone up 14% overnight which is really good news for netflix. on the flipside that, we've had results just out from flybuy, and they have put out a profit warning saying actually, times are pretty tough and the moments that downgraded what they think they are going to achieve in terms of their finances for the
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year are now saying that is because of wea k year are now saying that is because of weak consumer demand. not enough of weak consumer demand. not enough of us flying with them. also the value of the pound being low and the higherfuel costs as value of the pound being low and the higher fuel costs as well. although there chief executive has said, they think barrow will to cut down costs and improve things but it is still tough going for flybe. how many subscribers for netflix? 137 million. it starts at £5 in the uk. -- £6. matt million. it starts at £5 in the uk. —— £6. matt has some lovely pictures for us. yes, try to give you a bit ofa for us. yes, try to give you a bit of a midweek mood boost. still brightening up. we've seen some monthly sunshine over the last few days. there is a bit more of that to come over the next few days. the northern half of the country, you can see the satellite imagery, skies pushing in. the odd heavy one
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pushing in. the odd heavy one pushing through northern ireland in south—west scotland. this area of cloud, while fairly threatening, is only a narrow band of bigger crowd. hazy sunshine to the north and west. from dorset, hampshire, through to the north and west of london, some cloud and occasional rain and drizzle. it's not moving a great deal. staying dry all day long. still a few heavy bursts of rain from the south coast. temperatures 17, 18 degrees. northern england. 10-14 17, 18 degrees. northern england. 10— 14 degrees here. nowhere near as strong as it has been. tonight, the breezy will keep temperatures up. the weather front will fizzle a bit more. just keeping the temperatures
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up more. just keeping the temperatures up here in double figures for the vast majority. adding further north, a chilly night. crisp, fresh, autumnal start. temperatures in rural parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland, close to freezing. a beautiful autumn day. light winds. you will feel the benefits. a bit more clout in southern counties of england. even that will fade. 12— 15 degrees. a corner will follow. friday, the best of the weather. early—morning mist and fog has cleared. cloud, occasional raid, spreading its way eastwards. it will cloud over into the afternoon. temperatures to the south of the weather front, up a little bit on tomorrow. up to around 17 degrees. as to the weekend, we saw torrential rain. the best of the
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driest weather. rain across scotland and northern ireland. dan and louise come back to you. i know are now arriving in china to sneeze. it was nice to keep it a relatively quiet. it's been a summer of delays and cancellations on the rail network, leading to immense passenger frustration, which has at times boiled over, leading to staff becoming the victims of abuse or even assault (pres) so to tackle the threat, —— so to tackle the threat, virgin trains is equipping all frontline workers with body cameras in the hope it will help reduce the number of incidents. our transport correspondent tom burridge has more. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. they work on the frontline of our railway, checking tickets, and dealing with disruption. thank you. now a lot of staff on virgin trains will wear these cameras.
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it's because of incidents like this. a man confronts a conductor on a train from london to birmingham injune. this was filmed by another passenger. lewis knows what it's like to be assaulted while on the job. when a passenger missed his train, lewis told him he'd have to buy another ticket. then this happened. they sort of launched into the side of the gate and i ended up damaging my shoulder in the process of that. he sort of made a threat to me and told me he was going to kill me in the end. i was more speechless and shocked about what actually happened. new figures show a rise in physical assaults on staff.
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incidents are relatively rare, but police believe body cams will prevent angry passengers from turning violent. staff on trains are getting abused either verbally or physically every day and i just don't think that's acceptable. what affect do the body cams have then? we have had a number of pilots and it has a massive impact in reducing violence against staff. the most recent one showed it actually halved the number of staff assaults. the video recorded by these cameras is beamed directly into a database which british transport police can access. the idea is that if there is an incident, it can be reviewed quickly and action ta ken if necessary. passengers on northern and govia thameslink suffered in may when new timetables were botched, but frontline staff suffered too. michelle heard the stories. she is part of a network of chaplains who travel by train across the country to offer counselling to staff. if it happened in an office situation, it wouldn't be tolerated. people are doing theirjob
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every day and they are experiencing, on a day—to—day basis, humiliation, verbal abuse, and physical abuse, and some of it is horrendous. the cameras will only be switched on if someone feels threatened. lewis admits sometimes recording might inflame a situation further but he says wearing his body cams will give him confidence and reduce the amount of abuse. tom burridge, bbc news. i saw one the other day on the train i was wondering what it was about. i was a though. later, eric idle will be here. ambulance stars, a husband and wife, will be here. and heather morris, who's written a book called in the book is called the tattooist of auschwitz. he found a man who was fluent in five languages, who was in auschwitz, and because they knew sir mick —— and because he knew so many managers, they persuaded him to tattooed number on every single person coming to auschwitz. and the horrific thing is it would speed up the line of people. in that line one
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day, he met this woman called gita, they fell in love and they survived their time they fell in love and they survived theirtime in they fell in love and they survived their time in auschwitz, they survived and had a family and this lady, heather morris, met up with this man and he told her his amazing story, every single word of it is true and she's written a book about it. it is incredible. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. passengers have been warned to expect major disruption this morning at one of london's busiest railway stations. all great western trains running between paddington and slough have been cancelled until at least midday. it's after overhead electric cables were damaged at ealing last night. they told me there is an alternative
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to go from waterloo to redding and parkway which is going to take another hour and ten minutes on top of our journey. another hour and ten minutes on top of ourjourney. we have clients work today in bristol piper two days and we have hotels booked. meanwhile there were also major delays for commuters using victoria station yesterday evening after an electricity supply failure. the power problems had affected a large section of track between croydon and victoria. all lines are now open. well let's take a look at the rest of travel situation now. tfl rail is part suspended between paddington and heathrow due to those overhead power lines. onto the roads and there are anticlockwise delays on the m25 heading towards junction 19 at watford, following a 2 vehicle collision, with tailbacks to the m1 atjunction 21. and in brentwood the a1023 remains closed betweenjunction 28 at the m25 and brook street following a serious accident. in other news,
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paris could see 20 thousand jobs from london move across the channel over the next few years — as a direct result of brexit. that's according to the main lobby group for the financial district there. the estimate is based on the transfer of existing jobs from london and future roles which could be created in paris instead. recruiters accross the channel say they've already seen a ten—fold increase in the number of londoners applying forjobs in france. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a fairly mild start out there this morning but not an especially bright one. there is a lot of cloud and that cloud is going to to stay with us for much of the day with a little light rain and drizzle as well. now, this is a weakening cold front and that's bringing this patchy light rain, the drizzle and it gets stuck towards the west and north of london. anywhere could have a spot or two but you're more likely to catch that rain in that direction. elsewhere, predominantly dry but yes, it is going to feel rather damp with all that cloud and temperatures reaching 17
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celsius. overnight tonight, it starts off cloudy but that cloud may start to thin and towards the end of the night, we'll get one or two clearer spells. we could get a little bit of mist by dawn tomorrow morning. minimum temperatures between 9 and 12 celsius. that mist will clear through the morning. mid—morning onwards, we could see some sunny spells arriving. temperatures getting up to around 15 celsius. quite a pleasant afternoon. fairly ettled weather for much of the week but some misty and foggy mornings. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. more on our website at the usual address. now back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: theresa may will address european leaders at a summit in brussels this evening, with the brexit talks deadlocked.
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the two sides are struggling to agree over how to prevent the return of customs checks on the irish border, but both sides want to avoid that border becoming hard. the eu says it is up to the uk to bring new ideas to the table. i think there are low expectations of a significant breakthrough. but i hope there will be a step change, perhaps, in both the mood and indeed the possible progress on this difficult issue. but you know, even if we don't get some white smoke this evening, there is tomorrow and there is tomorrow. thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm and neglect because they are growing up in households that are labelled as toxic in a new report.
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the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, is calling on the government to inject more cash into local authorities and social services to help prevent the abuse of young children. president trump says accusations saudi arabia murdered the journalist jamal khashoggi represent another case of guilty until proven innocent. he added that he had spoken to the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman, and he had totally denied any knowledge of what had happened. turkey has claimed the journalist was murdered in the saudi consulate two weeks ago. canada will today become the second nation in the world to legalise recreational cannabis. smokers will be able to purchase the drug from licenced producers, in a move that marks the end of 95 years of marijuana prohibition. canada has one of one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, particularly among young people. commuters face major disruption at paddington station in london today. no services will operate between paddington station and heathrow airport until at least midday because overhead electric wires were severely damaged at ealing on tuesday night. passengers are being told to find alternative routes. the duke and duchess of sussex have spent a second day touring australia
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on their first official royal visit. they arrived in new south wales, but had the show stolen from them by a young boy who took rather a shine to prince harry. the couple then visited a farm that has been badly affected by droughts. melbourne is the next stop on their tour tomorrow. over the years, we have brought you some spectacular advances in robot technology. but take a look at this. # uptown funk. it is indeed a dancing robot dog, from the technology firm boston dynamic. it certainly has the moves.
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do you think it is as disobedient as my do you think it is as disobedient as 7 do you think it is as disobedient as my dog? are you having difficulties with your dog? it is getting better, but thanks for giving everyone an update. coming up, matt will have the weather. sally is here with news... you were telling us yesterday about an england win. yes. and today another freekick from harry wilson. which i think it's fantastic. you are saying
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the goalie should have got a hand to it. let's start by having a look at a lovely free kick from wales's harry wilson. here it is, a great strike from just outside of the box. it gave wales a 1—0 win over the republic of ireland in the nations league in dublin last night, and leaves wales top of their group. but boss ryan giggs isn't getting ahead of himselfjust yet. we set out in this nations league to win the group and then see where it took us. so that's good, that we can do it with one game to go, and now the next thing is to look to win it. it won't be easy, and we've got denmark at home. but the cardiff city stadium will be bouncing, i guarantee that, and we're really looking forward to the challenge now. things go from bad to worse for germany, beaten 2—1 by france in paris, antoine griezmann with both goals for the world champions. germany are now on the brink of relegation from their group, and have lost six times in a calendar yearfor the very first time. jose mourinho has been
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charged for using abusive, insulting or improper language after manchester united's win over newcastle. you might remember that it was a last—gasp win for united that probably saved mourinho's job. the fa used a lip—reader to confirm what he said to the cameras, and decided it was offensive. we have cut that bit out, for obvious reasons. he has got until friday to respond. a blow for arsenal and scotland midfielder kim little, who will be out for at least ten weeks after breaking her leg. it happened in a heavy challenge during arsenal's 5—0 win over champions chelsea in the women's super league at the weekend. her england colleague lucy bronze offered her support, but says players are repeatedly let down by the standard of officiating. eddiejones has all kinds of problems as he prepares to select his england squad for the autumn internationals. chris robshaw is the latest to join a growing list of absentees, with a knee injury. fellow forwards billy vunipola
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and joe launchbury are also injured, whilst nathan hughes is facing a suspension. england play south africa, new zealand, japan and australia in consecutive weekends at twickenham next month. england face sri lanka in the third one day international later this morning. england are one up in the series, with three to play. moeen ali came into the series in good form, having played a big part in england's test win over india this summer, and says he has got plenty more to offer. ifeel like i'm very comfortable with myself, comfortable in my game, the way i play. and you know whether you've done bad or you've done well, if you've made an impact and stuff. and they're the kind of things that, like i said, i've got the experience a bit more now, and ifeel like, being part of this group, that i feel like i'm coming into my peak. and the papers this morning still very excited about england's win over spain on monday night, and the fans are still a bit giddy, too. a petition to have this image of harry maguire riding an inflatable unicorn put on the £50 note has attracted almost 15,000 signatures. his england team mate kyle walker says he would like to be on the fiver.
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it kind of almost works. i think just the unicorn is great. i don't think that works. have you tried it, daniel walker? think that works. have you tried it, danielwalker? a think that works. have you tried it, daniel walker? a bigger amount needs a bigger ahead, he daniel walker? a bigger amount needs a biggerahead, he says. daniel walker? a bigger amount needs a bigger ahead, he says. very good. lounging leopards, suburban bears and a bed of seals — all entries for this year's wildlife photographer of the year competition. in the end, it was this photograph of two snub—nosed monkeys which clinched the top prize. but, with over 45,000 entries, how was it whittled down to a single photograph? to find out, we arejoined now by chair of the judging panel, roz kidman cox. good morning to you. we will have
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another look at that winning picture. talk us through why this one was select did as the winner.m did takea one was select did as the winner.m did take a long time, but there was one picture which stayed with us all the way through judging. it really stood out and every time we came back to it we all thought it was something very special. but yes, it was chosen from all the winners of all the 16 categories. if you stare at it now, it looks almost like it has been painted. well, we called it the golden couple, in the light is pa rt the golden couple, in the light is part of what makes it so special. also there is something fascinating about those two monkeys, golden snub—nosed monkeys, they are only from china and probably no more than 3500 of them left in one mountainous region. and they are looking to one
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side, they are not looking at the photographer, and it was an extraordinary picture to actually ta ke to extraordinary picture to actually take to be there at that moment when they had come down from the trees and they were just sitting and looking at a fight going on in the valley. that one was taken by dutch photographer marsel van oosten, and do we have the young winner? tell us about it, and hopefully it will pop up about it, and hopefully it will pop up in about it, and hopefully it will pop upina about it, and hopefully it will pop up in a moment. well, here's a young south african photographer who was 15 when took it. he had to compete with other photographers who got through to the finals, but again, this one has got very special light. it isa this one has got very special light. it is a beautiful portrait, worthy ofa it is a beautiful portrait, worthy of a professional, so it is extraordinary to think of his age. 0f extraordinary to think of his age. of course, he lives in africa. he got very familiar with this leopard, which was an interesting beast
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because it had a limp and it couldn't actually climb up trees easily with its prey thomas owen had to eat its prey on the ground. but here it is asleep on a tree, and it has just woken up, just opened its eyes. you have beenjudging this competition for quite a few years. how has the style of the entries changed? well, i would say the most important thing is a photographer's i. important thing is a photographer's i, but of course digital photography has revolutionised photography for those who shoot wildlife, because it enables those who shoot wildlife, because it e na bles low those who shoot wildlife, because it enables low light photography, and in fact enables low light photography, and infact our enables low light photography, and in fact our overall winner, probably you wouldn't have got that luminous light in those conditions in the forest quite so easily ten years ago, say. it has revolutionised underwater photography dramatically. we are seeing some other entries now, iam not we are seeing some other entries now, i am not sure if you can see
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this, this is a couple of towels, some fantastic photographs. he was only nine years old —— a couple of owls. we are moving on to a bare, we are wrapping through these. for those who might be watching —— bear. some other wonderful pictures coming in here, what would be your top tips for those thinking i would love to get into this or i would love to get my photographs up to this standard? well, i don't think it isjust my photographs up to this standard? well, i don't think it is just about cameras. it is about knowing your subject and actually thinking about your picture and what you are trying to achieve. some of the best pictures are from people who really get to know their subjects. it could be your doorstep wildlife. urban foxesis be your doorstep wildlife. urban foxes is a classic and they come back repeatedly in the competition. but something intimate where you get to know your animals so well that
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you can tell what it is going to do, and you can think through your picture. thank you so much for coming on this morning and talking to us about that. a worthy winner, it has gone down very well with our brea kfast it has gone down very well with our breakfast audience this morning as well. i know it has changed quite a bit over the years, because it used to be wildlife magazine, and it has been taken over by the natural history museum. will you be involved for many years? i am chairing the judging panel next year, but of course, the national history museum was a partner with bbc wildlife going back many years, from 1984, and the big exhibition opens this weekend. a very worthwhile is seen. and you can see those photographs by p°ppin9 and you can see those photographs by popping down there. thank you for coming in and talking about some of those winning pictures. we have
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lovely pictures, often, with the weather as well. it is a golf course. i thought that would perk you up. i think some of our weather watchers could indeed enter the competition. we see some stunning images of autumn, trying to give you a midweek mood boost with those beautiful autumn colours on show. sunny skies in suffolk, yesterday the best of the sunshine. scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england with lots of sunshine coming through. we have a zone of cloud with a few showers set to push through, but only for a small portion of the day. a lot more cloud for england and wales, the sunshine very hazy across much of england and wales and the thickest of that cloud is in the zone from hampshire, suffolk through towards north norfolk, where we will see some rain at times and a few showers are pushing across scotland and northern ireland. at into the afternoon, that weather front doesn't move a great deal. it means to the south and east of london we will stay dry. some sunshine, 18 the height at parts of
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hampshire, dorset, berkshire and the home counties will continue to see some rain. a bit grey and gloomy. the rest of england and wales, sunny spells, isolated showers, maybe the odd shower this afternoon in northern ireland and scotland. they are few in number, most will stay dry. wind is lighter than yesterday, a breeze blowing in the finals will continue tonight, keeping temperatures up here. at the same time, weather fronts in temperatures up here. at the same time, weatherfronts in the temperatures up here. at the same time, weather fronts in the south. the temperatures falling too much. some rain and drizzle on it, not a huge amount but lingering across southern counties into the morning. keeping temperatures up in london at about 12 degrees. in the parts of northern england, scotland and northern ireland, and autumn chill. temperatures in the countryside down towards freezing. a cool start to your thursday morning away from the south, where we will start with a bit of cloud. that will break up allowing some sunshine through, but for most, morning mist and fog clearing, light winds and feeling very pleasant outback. a bit of warmth to be had in that mid—october sunshine. more cloud to finish the day in parts of scotland and
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northern ireland. that will proceed what will be a cloudy day over all as we go into friday. some outbreaks of rain pushing west to east across scotla nd of rain pushing west to east across scotland during the morning. the middle part of the day for northern ireland, sunshine will follow in its wake. it means england and wales after the morning mist and fog, lots of sunshine on to the clouds over in the north midlands and north wales later. at a degree for saturday, at 217 or 18 later. at a degree for saturday, at 217 or18 in later. at a degree for saturday, at 217 or 18 in the south—east corner. if you are thinking about the weekend, well, it looks like certainly compared with last weekend a much better one for england and wales. high—pressure close by, most of the time dry, maybe a few showers to end the day in the north of england and north wales because our weather front will push through scotla nd weather front will push through scotland and northern ireland, bringing some rain here. a lot of the time it will be dry throughout this weekend. certainly this weekend, the uk looking much better for those across the west. anyone heading to the mediterranean, it looks like parts of spain could see some pretty nasty storms, hate to be
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the bearer of bad news. parkway sorry, i didn't realise i could give you my sneezes. this is a win for health campaigners. a win for health campaigners. a cosmetic surgery advert that was shown during breaks in the reality show love island has been banned for being irresponsible and harmful. steph's got more on this. this is... this is an issue we talked about at the time, there were some concerns that the adverts around the show were exploiting insecurites around body image. well this morning the advertising standards authority has agreed. the advertising standards authority didn't blame itv for airing the advert, but said the company behind it "implied that the women were only able to enjoy the aspirational lifestyle shown, and to be happy with their bodies, because they had undergone that surgery."
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it has decided to ban this advert for breast enlargement surgery. now the nhs and others were critical of adverts like this over the summer. love island was a hit for its maker itv, which makes its money by selling advertising. i asked itv‘s boss carolyn mccall about all this back injuly. my myjudgement, and my judgement, and my judgement myjudgement, and myjudgement is the juxtaposition of a tiny fraction, a tiny fraction of what we did, and that was on hub only, and that was not the broadcast channel, the juxtaposition of the advertising, and we are looking at that and we will take our own action. we are highly regulated and we haven't actually done anything wrong as far as that is concerned. we ta ke wrong as far as that is concerned. we take our duty of care to the co ntesta nts we take our duty of care to the contestants extremely seriously. what makes no more diet pills or breast enlargement ads? you must be an avid viewer. you are watching the hub and all the time. i'm not disputing the fact that you have these ads. i'vejust
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disputing the fact that you have these ads. i've just said what i just said, which is that we are highly regulated and we are compliant and we are looking at monitoring that. a punchy interview there with myself and the boss of itv. it important to point out that the advertising standards authority doesn't blame itv for airing the advert but says the company behind it says the women were only able to enjoy the aspirational lifestyle store shown on to be happy with our bodies because they have undergone this surgery. that is the implication from this advert. word is that leaving is now? i'm joined now by claire murdoch mental health director at nhs england. she's in our london newsroom. you are quite vocal at the time. we felt quite strongly that young people, a growing body of evidence that tells us that young people are experiencing greater and greater
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pressures around body images, idealised body images. images of an idealised body images. images of an idealised lifestyle. and that we we re idealised lifestyle. and that we were calling on the advertising standards authority to act in the case of this particular advert. but to also send a warning shot to others that are making adverts like this. young people themselves are telling us that they are suffering asa telling us that they are suffering as a result of bombardment and manipulative adverts, social media campaigns, encouraging them to be discontented with the bodies. and what this does, it can really drive anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, self harm, and other mental health problems which can become really problematic. while the nhs of course is looking at increasing the range of services that we are offering to young people and indeed we got a
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massive expansion in train now including around eating disorders, the nhs alone cannot pick up the pieces of irresponsible and harmful behaviours. so what difference do you think the banning of this advert will make? it went out during the time that love island was on. do you think this will send a warning to other companies now?” think this will send a warning to other companies now? i really hope that it does send a warning to other companies. it was obvious to myself and simon stephens, when this advert was aired in that context it was aired. it wasjust was aired in that context it was aired. it was just wrong and that it was irresponsible and harmful. i think other advertisers, companies, the industry, and social media, need to ta ke the industry, and social media, need to take a long, hard, look now, not only in light of this ruling, which we really welcome, but also in light
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of what people are saying, whether its experts from across the field where there is this growing body of evidence or young people themselves. last year, the youth parliament that sits held to help select committee and1 sits held to help select committee and 1 million young people voted for the issue. it is obvious to young people themselves. more regulation is not needed, it takes on that responsibility to the mental health and well—being and resilience of our young people. many of our towns have suffered
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because of weak sales on the high street, forcing businesses to shut their doors. today the british retail consortium will set out what it thinks could be done to give towns the boost they need. but there are some areas already bucking the trend. altrincham in greater manchester has turned its high street around injust 5 years. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been finding out how. it's always really busy and vibrant. it makes me feel happy coming here. ijust love the food, the variety and ijust enjoy being around the people here. it is a reason to come into town, isn't it? it is, definitely. it's a sunday afternoon and you can't move for people. this is altrincham market south of manchester. it was renovated and reopened five years ago. it's just the right kind of vibe, it fits in, it suits everyone, it's great, if you got kids, or it's just a great place to be.
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nickjohnson is the brains behind the market. it's a series of stalls and crucially hand—picked good quality food and drink outlets. we are incredibly social animals and people are sitting down at share tables, they‘ re exchanging conversations with strangers but they are there with the full family. it puts a smile on people's faces. you can tell that actually, this is a happy place now, it's a happy town now. which is a surprise because altrincham used to be a ghost town. a decade ago, more than 30% of shops were shut. footfalls are up and vacancies are at record low levels. nickjohnson now has plans to repeat the formula. half an hour down the road this is the picturedrome in macclesfield, one of the first purpose—built cinemas in the country. the plan, to create another market. macclesfield is my hometown, it's a fantastic town. like most town centres, it's suffering a little bit.
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carl massey, who's just sold the site to nick, has high hopes for the future of the town. i think will transform this end of town. i think it'll put macclesfield on the map as a food destination. this is macclesfield high street. pressure from things like online shopping and business rates means shops are shutting. so is it possible to replicate the success of altrincham? when we forecast the decline of the high street, it's premature. it's at a low ebb right now but there is real opportunity to reinvent, if we think creatively about what we want our places to become. more than 30 local authorities have come here to study the model, getting people to come back into town by giving them an experience not available online. graham satchell, bbc news, altrincham. launch doing lots of different
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things including letting the dog is at the table. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning — the husband and wife paramedic team dealing with the pressures of the job together in the new series of ambulance. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. passengers have been warned to expect major disruption this morning at one of london's busiest railway stations. all great western trains running between paddington and slough and services to heathrow have been cancelled until at least midday. it's after overhead electric cables were damaged at ealing last night. it's affecting people travelling as far afield as bristol. they told me that there is an alternative where you have to go from here to waterloo, from waterloo to reading and from reading, then to parkway which is going to take us take us about another hour and 30 minutes
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on top of ourjourney, which was about two hours before, right? we have clients work today in bristol parkway for two days and yeah, we're having hotels booked. meanwhile there were also major delays for commuters using victoria station yesterday evening after an electricity supply failure. the power problems had affected a large section of track between croydon and victoria. all lines are now open. well let's take a look at the rest of travel situation now. tfl rail is part suspended between paddington and heathrow due to those overhead power lines and there are minor delays on the district line between edgeware road and wimbledon due to a signal failure. onto the roads and southbound traffic on the m1 is building into the north circular at staples corner. and in brentwood the a1023 remains closed betweenjunction 28 at the m25 and brook street following a serious accident. in other news,
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paris could see 20,000 jobs from london move across the channel over the next few years — as a direct result of brexit. that's according to the main lobby group for the financial district there. the estimate is based on the transfer of existing jobs from london and future roles — which could be created in paris instead. recruiters accross the channel say they've already seen a ten—fold increase in the number of londoners applying forjobs in france. good morning. it's a fairly mild start out there this morning but not an especially bright one. there is a lot of cloud and that cloud is going to to stay with us for much of the day with a little light rain and drizzle as well. now, this is a weakening cold front and that's bringing this patchy light rain, the drizzle and it gets stuck towards the west and north of london. anywhere could have a spot or two but you're more likely to catch that rain in that direction.
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elsewhere, predominantly dry but yes, it is going to feel rather damp with all that cloud, and temperatures reaching 17 celsius. overnight tonight, it starts off cloudy but that cloud may start to thin and towards the end of the night, we'll get one or two clearer spells. we could get a little bit of mist by dawn tomorrow morning. minimum temperatures between 9 and 12 celsius. that mist will clear through the morning. mid—morning onwards, should see some sunny spells arriving. temperatures up to around 15 celsius. a pleasant afternoon. fairly settled weather for much of the week but some misty and foggy mornings. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: theresa may prepares to meet eu leaders, but there's little sign of a breakthrough on brexit. a warning that thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm because they are growing up
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in households blighted by drink and drugs. a hug for the royal couple as harry and meghan continue to pull in the crowds in australia. netflix beats expectations — the online streaming service added nearly seven million new customers in the three months to september. i'll be looking at why. no bale — but no problem for wales, as a brilliant free—kick from harry wilson helps them to beat ireland and go top of their nations league group. # always look on the bright side of life...# and he's the pessimist who wrote the ultimate anthem for optimists. eric idle talks to us about always looking on the bright side of life. is not a huge amount of pessimism in
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the forecast today, lots of sunshine over the next few days to see the best of the autumn colours, but, ok, some rain across central and southern england, details on that and a look at the weekend forecast coming up here on breakfast. it's wednesday the 17th of october, our top story: theresa may will address european leaders at a summit in brussels this evening with the brexit talks deadlocked. the two sides are struggling to agree over how to prevent the return of customs checks on the irish border, but both sides want to avoid that border becoming hard. the eu says it's up to the uk to bring new ideas to the table. we have correspondents in brussels and in westminster this morning. first to brussels, and our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. damian, this was once considered a crucial meeting in the brexit timetable, but now expectations are really low? louise, we know that there is no
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progress. this was notjust a crunch summit, this was meant to be the summit, this was meant to be the summit at which everything would essentially be wrapped up, that is what we were all led to believe, thatis what we were all led to believe, that is what the leaders had said backin that is what the leaders had said back in that salzburg summit, which was a bit of a disaster, all ending in acrimony, that this would be the moment when they sorted out the differences. it hasn't happened, we know the talks collapsed at the weekend over that issue of the irish backstop. it is a guarantee, not something that will happen to northern ireland, just the way that the sites could try to guarantee that whatever happened in future, there would be no return of border controls and ireland. donald tusk, who is chairing the meeting, has said there is no grounds for optimism, as he sees it, and he will be asking theresa may, he said, for new ideas to try to unblock the process. now, she has a one—on—one meeting with him this afternoon here, and he of course will then be
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chairing the session of eu leaders later. she will also get a chance to talk to the eu leaders, to explain the uk problems with the backstop proposal. the difficulty is that the eu insists on it, not only that, but she has agreed to a backstop, essentially agreed to basically what the eu is proposing, as long ago as last december, that was in the agreement in december that pushed all these talks forward, kept things rolling, but now theresa may has problems, particularly over the fact that it should have a time limit, and that is now where this is really stuck, the issue of customs check and time limits, and the eu looking to hope for a solution. damian grammaticas in brussels, thank you. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. listening to that, alex, yesterday we had the prime minister was asking her cabinet to stick together, does she have to come back from brussels with something? she doesn't have very much right now, to be perfectly
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honest because as damien was saying, theissue honest because as damien was saying, the issue of the irish border is still a real problem, and theresa may is under a lot of political pressure here, because there are people in her own party warning her that if she gives any more ground to the eu on this, there will be domestic political trouble for her. as you say, she met her cabinet yesterday, they came out pretty united, saying they are standing by the prime minister, that they think if they stand firm, there is a way through this, but plenty in the conservative party and the democratic unionist party who have put down some very phone lines about how far she can move. so i don't think that theresa may will go with a whole new plan to unveil, rather i think she will try to focus on the progress that has been made so far, the areas of agreement, and try to somehow show the eu that she has moved as far as she can, and she is hoping now that perhaps there could be something back from them. the whole point of this summit now is not for some major breakthrough, but for some optimism, for things to end ona for some optimism, for things to end on a positive note, instead of
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badly, as in the past, the whole hope being there can still be a deal in the weeks and months to come. alex forsyth, damian grammaticas, thank you very much. thousands of babies are at risk of severe harm and neglect because they are growing up in households that are labelled as toxic in a new report. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, is calling on the government to inject more cash into local authorities and social services to help prevent the abuse of young children. there is a risk that with decreasing budgets for local councils, and most of the money now going on children with acute needs, when crisis happens, that the money that is left for early intervention at the earliest possible time to prevent problems is not available. president trump says accusations saudi arabia murdered the journalist jamal khashoggi represent another case of "guilty until proven innocent". he added that he'd spoken to the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman, and he had totally denied any
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knowledge of what had happened. turkey has claimed the journalist was murdered in the saudi consulate two weeks ago. canada will today become the second nation in the world to legalise recreational cannabis. smokers will be able to purchase the drug from licensed producers in a move that marks the end of 95 years of marijuana prohibition. canada has one of one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, particularly among young people. commuters face major disruption at paddington station in london today. no services will operate between paddington station and heathrow airport until at least midday because overhead electric wires were "severely" damaged at ealing on tuesday night. passengers are being told to find alternative routes. netflix added nearly seven million new customers in the three months to september. steph's here with more. just staggering numbers of people they have subscribed. yes, 137
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million customers, so subscribers who are paying this monthly fee to them, so worth a lot of money for them, so worth a lot of money for them, and it is a key time for them at the moment, because there had been some scepticism about whether they could actually carry on growing as fast as they had been. oh, i think you have got a message, it will be a netflix subscriber, pointing out what is coming up! it is one which people were worried about, because they thought it was not going to carry on getting as many customers as they had done, so they have beaten expectations. there was some concern about the debt which they have taken on in order to provide all this original content that has attracted customers, they are expected to spend £8 billion on new co nte nt are expected to spend £8 billion on new content this year, original content, so things like the crown and house of cards, all of those things, and that is what investors we re things, and that is what investors were worried about, whether they could carry on growing and be able to pay for all of this content. dan
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mentioned that we don't know about viewing figures. no, they don't release ratings on how many people watch individual shows, which is interesting, yeah, they keep it secret. lots of shows, like ours, will tell the world how many people are watching, but they don't, for commercial reasons, because then we could work out which are the most successful for them, maybe they don't want to give it away. but it is interesting that started as a dvd rental service and now is literally the world's largest online streaming service. a significant player. the duke and duchess of sussex have spent a second day touring australia on their first official royal visit. they arrived in new south wales, but had the show stolen from them by a young boy who took rather a shine to prince harry. the couple then visited a farm that has been badly affected by droughts. melbourne is the next stop on their tour tomorrow. we will have more details on that
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tomorrow, doubtless. bullying and harassment has been "tolerated and covered up" for years at westminster, according to a damning report from dame laura cox. the findings caused huge fallout in the house of commons yesterday, with several mps putting pressure on the speaker, john bercow, to resign. mr bercow is expected to stand down next summer, and the bbc understands he has told friends he will stay in post until then. let's have a look what was said in the commons debate. over the last year, we have all been shocked and appalled at the reports of bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment in westminster. fish rots from the head, and the leadership failings that have been highlighted in this report are extremely worrying. the report is clear, that there needs to be a complete change in leadership, at the most senior level, including you, mr speaker. how can those deemed to be the problem themselves ever possibly be part of the solution? nothing fills the victims with more dread than when
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people play with their feelings, so don't do it. some very emotive language in the house of commons yesterday. let's speak now to the labour mp chris bryant, who was in the house of commons during that debate. thank you very much for coming on this morning to talk about this, i mean, you heard the level of detail people went into yesterday, some accusations as well, some comments about the future of mr bercow, which we will come onto, but to talk about the level of bullying and harassment in parliament, how shocked you buy these findings? well, i am shocked but not surprised, if that makes any kind of sense. that was something another mp said yesterday. i have worked for bullies in my time, two bullies in different careers, different parts of my career, as it were, and the miserable thing is that they never think they are a bully, because one moment they are praising you to high heaven, the next moment getting you down to
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size, shouting at you, cutting your feet off, and at the end of the week they think i was nice on monday evening, iam they think i was nice on monday evening, i am a nice person. this is the problem — i mean, i have heard... when the problem — i mean, i have heard... when! the problem — i mean, i have heard... when i was early as an mp, the next—door neighbour to me, he used to ball out his staff every single day of the week, and you would see them crying, crying. and sometimes, of course, within a small office of five or six people, you might end up with three or four people taking the side of, you know, the person in charge, the most senior person in the office, and one other person being horribly isolated, and i tell you, what it feels like when you go home is you just can't bear the idea of going into work the next day, because you just think the cycle will go on and on and on. so this is a very scathing report, we have to take it far more seriously, incidentally, it condemns the whole leadership of parliament, it is not about one person, this report, the whole leadership in parliament, and we
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have to take it seriously, otherwise junior staff will go, why on earth would i want to work in the building? it is not a place which is safe. we have a bit crackle on your microphone, but we will continue, we wa nt to microphone, but we will continue, we want to speak you about this important subject. can i ask you, you talk about your own experiences, do people challenge that behaviour? have you challenged that behaviour before? and if it is challenged, what is the response?” before? and if it is challenged, what is the response? i have it. it is really difficult in parliament, for all sorts of complicated reasons —we for all sorts of complicated reasons — we have a system of patronage, hierarchy, notjust within the political parties, but also, you know, within the house structure, and we have to look at whether we can change that. but what is the big message that will come across it parliament does nothing now? it is going to be that we don't really ca re going to be that we don't really care about this. and when i get pa rents care about this. and when i get parents coming to me about bullying ina parents coming to me about bullying in a schooled in the rhondda, i want to be able to stand tall and say,
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yes, i have tried to deal with it in my own workplace, i will make sure it is tackled in the rhondda as well. there have been accusations of bullying against speakerjohn bercow, which he categorically denies, but we had mps lining up yesterday to stay he should stand down. where do you stand on that one? i am not here to defend or attackjohn bercow, i do not think you should use the victims of bullying and sexual harassment in parliament as a means of getting rid ofa parliament as a means of getting rid of a speaker that you do not like, and it is not a good look for parliament if the governing party tries to remove the speaker, because at any one time they can always do that. i understand what you're saying, but talking about constituency members who might be the subject of bullying — what message does it give if they see the shadow foreign secretary, emily thornberry, saying this is not the time to be changing speaker, when their accusations against that speaker? i don't agree with that line of direction, if the house
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needs to change speaker, then it should, but the bigger point, which i made yesterday, is that the report criticises the whole of the commission, the body which runs the house of commons, and that is where we should be taking the next step out of the hands of the commission, collecting backbench members who don't have to think to their party political stripes before they make a decision on what should happen next, and we should make sure that there is action on the three key proposals that the report makes by christmas. i don't think you need to change any individual personnel to do that, but you need to take this out of the hands of the commission and give it to some backbenchers, rather than the people appointed by the party political leaders. i know you said you weren't surprised by some of the details in this report, but many of our viewers will be rightly appalled that this is going on in the corridors of power at westminster. are you convinced, and can you say this to our viewers this morning,
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that there is an ability to change that there is an ability to change that culture? and can it be different yea rs that culture? and can it be different years from now? yes, of course it can be. one of the things thatis course it can be. one of the things that is absolutely preposterous about parliament is that there is no training when you arrive as a new mp, even though you may never have employed somebody in your life, there is no training for you to be a good employer. now, ithink there is no training for you to be a good employer. now, i think that should be... saying that it will be mandatory from the next general election, that might be in 2022, why don't we set it up this christmas? why don't we have proper training for every single mp on how to be a good employer, how to spot bullying in the workplace? lots of other major employers do that. the bbc, in the past, has had a big problem with bullying, the foreign office, where i was bullying, the foreign office, where iwasa bullying, the foreign office, where i was a minister, had a problem with bullying, and organisations have lots of experience of how to tackle the culture, but if we wait until 2022, it is a nonsense. let's get things done now. chris bryant, we appreciate your time this morning,
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thank you for talking about that report, which is highlighted bullying and harassment in the houses of parliament. do get in touch if you want to talk about that or anything else we are discussing the programme, and you can also now watch the programme on iplayer if you miss anything. if you're popping out and thinking i would love to watch eric idle, for example, you can take your little device with you, or catch up later. right now, we are catching up with matt and the morning's weather, lovely shot! this was the scene yesterday at sheffield park in east sussex, the gorgeous changing colours on show there, blue skies overhead, and we will all enjoy a little bit more of that over the coming days. the best of the autumn sunshine will be the northern half of the country, some clear skies pushing in through the night, a zone of cloud is producing a few showers in northern ireland and western scotland. the bulk of
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the cloud is across england and wales, most of it is high cloud, so hazy sunshine through much of england and wales, but an area from dorset, hampshire, the home counties towards cambridge and norfolk where we have got a weak weather front, some patchy rain and drizzle, heavier burst here and there, and it does not move a great deal through the day either. to the south and east of it, south and east of london some hazy sunshine at times, 18 is the eye. to the north and west of that weather front, hazy sunshine in wales and the north midlands, but more ina wales and the north midlands, but more in a way of blue skies and isolated showers for northern england, northern ireland and across scotland, showers very few in number, lovely day for many. the winds, well, still a noticeable breeze, but not as strong as yesterday. it will keep going overnight in the likes of shetland, orkney, the northern highlands, temperatures falling, but still a weather front which, through the night, snakes through southern counties of england and fades away, but stopping the temperatures from dropping too much, 12 in london, but
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for northern england, scotland, northern ireland, and extra snuggle factor tonight, temperatures close to freezing as we start tomorrow morning, a chilly commute, orde mist orfog had. still cloud across southern counties of england, but brightening up, clouding over a cross the western isles and the hebrides. temperatures around about where they should be for the time of year, 12—15d. scotland and northern ireland, more cloud into friday, showers pushing from west to east during the day, the middle part of the day for northern ireland, both should brighten later, northern england, north wales turning cloudy with isolated showers late on friday. further south it stays dry, sunny, 17—18d. if you are already thinking of the weekend, big improvements compared with last weekend, high pressure close by, most weekend, high pressure close by, m ost pla ces
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weekend, high pressure close by, most places will be dry, scotland and northern ireland into saturday night will see outbreaks of rain tied in with this weather front, pushing in later, the exact timing is uncertain, but splashes of running here and there, sunshine either side of it, turning colder across the north through the weekend, but all in all not a bad weekend, but all in all not a bad weekend, a big improvement compared to the last one. that is how it is looking, back to damp and louise. the duke and duchess of sussex have been continuing to delight crowds on the second day of the couple's first official overseas tour. it feels like day three, but i might be wrong! they've been visiting areas in new south wales, meeting with the royal flying doctor service and farmers affected by drought. let's speak to our sydney correspondent hywel griffith, who's in dubbo, and there's been some much needed rain, hywel? absolutely, the royal couple were welcomed, the rain really was welcomed, the rain really was welcomed, people with huge smiles on their faces as they got absolutely
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drenched. there was a community picnic planned, no—one expected the rain, because they had been through some of the driest months on record here in dubbo, one of the part of new south wales that has been enjoyed for months and years, but the thousands of people cheered the royal couple when they came, and they had also been to meet some of those drought affected farmers, a family of sheep farmers not far from dubbo who told them how things had become very tough financially, and of course not just become very tough financially, and of course notjust the become very tough financially, and of course not just the farmers, become very tough financially, and of course notjust the farmers, the money that flows through the community depends on crop growing, cattle being sold, and that has all been on hold for a very long time. there has been some hugging as well, hasn't there? yeah, i know you like to see a few happy hugs on the programme, let's see five—year—old luke in action, who was part of the welcoming party at dubbo airport, he waited very patiently at the end of the line, but when the opportunity came, he grabbed it with both hands, two arms, he went in for a full hug
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with meghan, but he wanted to give them some hands—on parenting experience, so he grabbed harry's beard as well, just to check may be that he was really meeting them. they seemed to take it in good grace, good experience for them, what they will start to experience next year. we are playing those pictures now, adorable, you can clearly see that he loves harry particularly. what has been the reaction to the visit over there?” think australia has embraced, quite literally in that case, the young royals, of course they are happy about their news, the pending parenthood. that does not necessarily mean that there is huge support for the future monarchy, polls suggest that australiawants to become a republic, but the celebrity appeal, the fact that they come to regional australia, notjust sticking to the cities, and harry has been a regular visitor, he spent some time here an army training and
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working on a cattle ranch. they are familiar with them, that makes him personally popular, as well as meghan of course, and unused that the baby is on the way has given everyone, i guess, a little bit more to talk about. australia in general very happy to welcome the couple, plenty more opportunities tomorrow, they are heading off to melbourne. 0k, they are heading off to melbourne. ok, our new baby correspondent, thank you very much indeed! i am not sure you imagine that as a job description! he looked very unimpressed with that! steph and sally are here to have a little look at the papers this morning, plenty going on. where are we going to start? we're going to go old school! goodness me, here we go, the daily mail is talking about so—called cou nty mail is talking about so—called county lines, what that is doing to the drug gangs, how they are being used, and the mirror, talking about ant mcpartlin's divorce yesterday, i think it took 30 seconds before the court. have you got the giggles?
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the reason why i wanted the graphics is because i have been drawing on this one! you will be sent to the tower for that! it is because we were talking about harry's beard! hammond warns of £36 billion no—deal bill, and the picture is of the duchess of sussex, let's circle the earrings! the same earrings that princess diana walk. i have not been doodling, but there isa i have not been doodling, but there is a story in the papers about graffiti, maybe it is appropriate! yes, that is what i was doing! this is in the times, a global list of charity sex predators, and the reason we are talking about graffiti, dan, you are looking serious now, there is new information which has come out about pompeii, basically a builder, they thought that it had happened in august that this dubious exploded,
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but actually they found a date, somebody writing a bit of graffiti, and it dates to october, so they're thinking that maybe there was a mistranslation in a letter that was written, or they didn't understand a roman character, but it happened in october, according to this graffiti. where is the graffiti? they are doing lots and lots of different excavations at the moment, they have found lots of information, it was inside a house that was being built at the time. oh, i see. still 79 a day. i was thinking, who would write the date of vesuvius going off...? he might have written it the day before! steph, what have you got?l lot in the papers about aldi and lidl, taking even more share from the big supermarkets, the discount supermarkets continuing to pull away from tesco and sainsbury's,
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sainsbury's with their latest figures. and a picture of one of the netflix shows, all to do with their results overnight, that is richard matt on and dustin hoffman, part of one of their new blockbusters. they are saying that they have had their shares soaring because they have subscribed another 7 million viewers, customers around the world. i remember it when it was dvds. you used to send off for them in the post, 2007 it's turns to online. one other thing, you can pay £10,000, should anyone have that money, to have john lewis to yourself. yeah, so have john lewis to yourself. yeah, so customers have john lewis to yourself. yeah, so customers can have john lewis to yourself. yeah, so customers can pay £10,000, and you get the whole store to sell. but you get the whole store to sell. but you don't get free products. only at night or something? between six and eight, but there we are. why would...? why would you want to have it to yourself? i like bumping into people in the shop, having a little chat. do you?! unless you could do
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the supermarket sweep thing... where you run around looking for bananas? that is me! i don't have time. i know we are nearly out of time, but i want to show you this, the men's and women's rugby sevens training centre in teddington, they train together, the facility is completely shared, but they train in different ways, because the women use music to motivate them. they have had a tough old time, the women's sevens team, but guess what the song is, you are going to love this! the greatest showman, this is me! added that theme tune, what keeps them going. early on we were talking about hugging, and you were saying because harry and meghan were hugging, they we re harry and meghan were hugging, they were being hoped, and you were saying that we don't do it enough.” was saying that none of us do it enough. i feel bad about invading personal space. we put this on social media earlier, this is what happens when we go to news, travel
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and weather wherever you are! happens when we go to news, travel and weather wherever you are !l happens when we go to news, travel and weather wherever you are! , an! come on, everybody, get in! don't get too close! i have to put the arms out now! big happy family! good morning. for many it is going to bea good morning. for many it is going to be a brighter day. more sunshine round for and it should be drier for most of us as well. but we have this area of cloud which is stretching, the thick health service cloud from parts of lincolnshire down to the south—west, further north, some clear spell, sunshine, already in scotla nd clear spell, sunshine, already in scotland and northern ireland, some showers moving in here, turning brighter across much of northern england, wales and the north and west midlands but it is this zone up
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to the wash, that will stay cloudy, rain at times and the far south—east of england, again it should be mostly dry with sunshine, temperatures down by a degree or so compared to yesterday, so feeling a bit chillier, but there is more sunshine to compensate. overnight tonight we have this zone of cloudier weather across eastern and south—east areas of england but clearer skies elsewhere. and that is is really because we have this big area of high pressure which is becoming quite well developed. we lose that weather front down to the south—east, but with this area of high pressure, with the clear skies it will turn chilly, into thursday morning, temperatures across northern areas getting down into fairly low single figure, a touch of frost, still down to the south—east, just with a bit of legacy of cloud, temperatures staying a bit higher. burr during thursday, that cloud will gradually clear away, some patchy mist and fog in northern ireland, and through the south of
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scotland, otherwise, though, a dry day and a bright day, lots of sunshine expected on thursday, with maximum temperatures getting up to 13-15 maximum temperatures getting up to 13—15 celsius. now friday and into the weekend, higher pressure, still firmly in charge for many. that keeps things mostly settled but there are weather fronts brushing the far north—west as we go through friday and into the weekend. for most of us the quiet weather continues throughout the weekend. —— bye. this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and sally bundock. putting on a show of its own. netflix signs up seven million new subcribers proving its billion—dollar bet on original
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content is paying off. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 17th of october. shares in netflix soar in after—hours trading, as it spends record sums on original content — so how are its rivals fighting back? also in the programme. canada's cannabis countdown ends — marajuana is now legal and growers are looking to get high on the potential profits. and as brexit talks rumble on — another crucial week
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