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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 18, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2pm: extending the extension — there's anger among some conservative mps after the prime minister confirms that the uk's post—brexit transition period could be lengthened. a further idea that has emerged, and it is an idea at the moment, is to extend the emblem intention period for a matter of months, and it would only be for a matter of months, but the point is this is not expected to be used. the us asks turkey to produce a surveillance recording — said to showjournalist jamal khashoggi was murdered in the saudi consulate in istanbul. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten—year peak. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with chris mitchell the eight new faces in england was
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maghreb union squad for the autumn internationals but still there is no place for danny cipriani. thanks. and all the afternoon weather. yes, it is as pretty as a picture out there for many of us today and it is going to stay like that into the weekend. details coming up. thanks. also coming up — not quite dressed for the beach harry and meghan get a warm reception as they visit a coastline clean—up campaign in melbourne. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. theresa may is trying to defuse a row within the conservative party over the idea of extending the transition period after brexit,
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to ensure there is no hard border in northern ireland. the prime minister's critics say any extension beyond the end of 2020 could cost britain billions of pounds in extra contributions to the eu. mrs may has insisted the extension wouold only be a matter of months and that she does not expect to need to use the extra time because she still hopes a trade deal could be agreed before then. christian fraser is in brussels. hello. we are expecting an extra hour to hear from the hello. we are expecting an extra hour to hearfrom the eu leaders, what we call the wash up here in brussels where they come out and give us their thoughts on the events of the last 2a hours. and there will probably be some frustration from those leaders because by all accou nts those leaders because by all accounts they heard nothing new last night at the dinner, in fact we are told theresa may only used half of
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her allotted time that she was given before the dinner. the big news is this idea that passed the 18 months of the transition, which is already in the agreement, there is a plan to talk about an extra buffer zone, perhaps another year of transition, which hopefully, from theresa may's perspective, would push the prices point surrounding the backstop further away. it does not deal with theissue further away. it does not deal with the issue which is why there is a visible row breaking out within the conservative party. a cheery angela merkel. a chipper dutch prime minister. brexit talks may have stalled, but no signs yet of stress. translation: the reason, explained belgian charles michel, the ball is in the uk's court. theresa may now has an offer to consider, an extended transition — stretching the period after the uk quits the eu next year but effectively stays under its rules would mean extra time to sort out a trade deal,
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but would tie the uk to the eu for longer. the point is this is not expected to be used because we are working to ensure that we have that future relationship in place by the end of december 2020. i'm clear that it is possible to do that, and that's what we are working for. last night, the other leaders listen to mrs may appeal to their friendship to reach a deal, then headed off without her to relax over a beer in the centre of brussels. but the idea of binding the uk to the eu for longer has already stirred opposition from conservative mps, as in any transition the uk must follow eu rules but have no say in their making. the 21 month period when we are in the eu rulebook but not actually contributing to those rules is problematic, but it has been accepted by the house. but an extension is genuinely problematic. and of course, as you rightly pointed out, it doesn't solve the northern irish issue because i suspect any time limit
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on an extension would fall foul of the european union's view that they need a backstop. the most common phrase to me is "just get on with it", and if this means more prevarication, more delay, it opens up the horror of very large sums of money possibly being handed over as we get into the next european spending round, so it's pretty unattractive. but unattractive too for all sides are the other options, including a total impasse in the talks and a chaotic exit for the uk early next year. this new idea which eu leaders seem open to, to extend the transition period, make some sense to the negotiations because it will allow more time to sort out problems like the irish border. the difficulty is that for theresa may taking this back home and selling it politically may be a tough thing to do. we exactly know that theresa may is in a tricky situation because she has huge pressure in the uk and at westminster, we have a common interest to defend also, so we need to find the right
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balance but we can't allow cherry picking and destroy in fact the internal market and the rules. it is a question also the interest of our economy. so red lines on all sides. now the brexit negotiations enter their endgame and it is mrs may under most pressure, hemmed in both at brussels and at home, time ebbing away to strike a deal. in the first thing to say, as was expected, as because there was no progress last night concrete, the pencilled in date for november is 110w pencilled in date for november is now on ice because they don't think there has been enough progress to even merit a summit, so negotiations will carry on. we are still hearing broadly positive language from the eu side but time is ticking and we
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will here get some reaction to whether everything can be done in a limited time at second. before that, let's talk about the transition, because that is very much the news of the day. correspondent, chris morrice. explain why we need a transition and what it does. first, it is meant to be part of the withdrawal agreement, signed and ratified before brexit. so no withdrawal agreement, no transition. the idea, and it is at the moment suggested it would last 21 months after brexit, is to avoid a cliff edge, a sudden change, a sudden rupture in relations. 721 months until the end of 2020 basically everything would stay the same, the eat uk would be out of the eu but would still enjoy the benefits of being in a sigel market and customs union in terms of open borders, which businesses would appreciate. but of course it would also have the response abilities of membership which are things like payments into the budget, jurisdiction of the eu court and the free movement of people. now what
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has emerged over the last few days is the suggestion that martis 21 months but maybe that transition period could be extended, possibly forup toa period could be extended, possibly for up to a year. the feminist talks about a matter of months. why? it would give you more time to get the future relationship sorted. the prime minister said she doesn't think we need an extension, that you can sort out a future trade agreement by the end of 2020. i think a lot of other observers think thatis think a lot of other observers think that is very unlikely. even with this extended transition that may be difficult. we will talk to the singapore trade minister later. they are here to sign a trade deal with the eu, it has taken seven years to get that point. there is a big but about the transition, there is was about. in this case it is obviously about. in this case it is obviously a lot of people don't like the idea that if you extend it for a year for example that would be 33 months after the day of leaving the eu in which britain would have to follow
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all eu rules without having any say in making them. and that is something that will be very difficult for a lot of brexiteers to swallow. and the other thing is what this doesn't do, it still doesn't get rid of the need, necessarily, for this irish backstop, the guarantee about the hard border in ireland. itjust guarantee about the hard border in ireland. it just pushes guarantee about the hard border in ireland. itjust pushes it further away. if you think about it, the idea that you have a future trade relationship that can solve the irish border problem, to do that really you need to stay in the single market and the customs union. if you look anywhere else around the external borders of the eu, there are no completely open borders. if thatis are no completely open borders. if that is what you are asking for on the island of ireland, no one i know has yet come up with a way of doing that without staying in the single market. angela merkel made it very clear that she wants the best possible deal with britain but if
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you are a third country outside the single market you cannot have truly frictionless trade. so even if it is two years, three years, four years down the road, at some point you will have to cross the lexicon and thatis will have to cross the lexicon and that is how do you have regulatory checks, customs checks, without a border either in the irish sea between the north and south?m comes back to the choice has been less as the referendum, what do you prioritise? market access or sovereignty? in the globalised syste m sovereignty? in the globalised system that the eu has created it is difficult to have both an sense. chris morrice, thank you. let's ci’oss chris morrice, thank you. let's cross to our brussels bureau. let me put the timetable issue to you. november is off the table. let's say... it could be december or january, february. how long do you
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need to be able to ratify this deal? actually, i think december would be the last chance saloon as far as i see the timelines, because even at that stage it would be far late. it has to go through committee stage, it has to go through all of the political groups, it has to go to kerry. we have to give our consent of this, but it doesn't mean we will acce pt of this, but it doesn't mean we will accept a document and say ok, we will forensically instrumented to make sure it meets our view one brexit and the withdrawal agreement. i'm not so sure we can run into january, i don't think it is feasible. also from a uk perspective i would think the house of comments needs to scrutinise and vote. i'm hoping in one sense that november does come into play, that there will be sufficient progress in between 110w be sufficient progress in between now and the dates for the leaders to call the meeting. if that doesn't happen, possibly december. but i would like to be sitting down to my christmas dinner with no withdrawal agreement. 0r christmas dinner with no withdrawal agreement. or not having an exact
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idea of how we are going to be come march next year. that would make it all a little too anxious, i think, for all of us who have to look at this, look at its impact for our citizens, and make sure we're doing the right thing. so it is not an indefinite process here on the withdrawal agreement side, because article 50 requires that the uk leaves at the end of march but it needs a withdrawal agreement or it is no deal. none of us want contemplate that. i would say yesterday i got the impression from both sides of negotiators that there is such a strong willingness to reach a agreement despite the analysis you have put forward which i agree with, it is extremely difficult to find an outcome, but i didn't get any sense in which people we re didn't get any sense in which people were charging at each other, they we re were charging at each other, they were certainly going at least on the road in one direction. therefore i hope your scenario of letting this run for months does not become a reality because i don't think politically that is possible. no. the correspondence down here on the floor asking the question, why would
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the prime minister acquiesce to something like an extra year of transition that creates so many political problems for her back at home. one theory, not really a theory yet, because donald tusk has spelt out for us, they are running out of patience. michel barnier is running out of patience, and the only way to keep him onside is to put this extra year on the shelf. is that what you are hearing? not at all. i have no michel barnier a long time, he has endless patience. really, he doesn't even get frustrated, it is extraordinary how he has as one individual manage this process. i would he has as one individual manage this process. iwould not he has as one individual manage this process. i would not agree with what your analysis is in relation to impatience. people are a bit frustrated, and there are all sorts of desires to get this done, because remember today the leaders are discussing other issues which are very difficult as well. so it isn't just brexit causing a challenge to us, many issues like migration and security as well. when the lord
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created michel barnier they gave him ple nty of created michel barnier they gave him plenty of patience. i think he will do the job as he is doing it up to 110w. do the job as he is doing it up to now. but i don't think we should see this as a never—ending process, i don't think that is respectful of the uk or eu position. the reason i believe some extra time is being mooted is to say let's not tie ourselves to this time if we need extra time to get the result we are all striving for, then in the overall scheme of things and the decades ahead, if it takes an extra year that will be time well spent, andl year that will be time well spent, and i think that is how michel barnier is framing it. the prime ministerl barnier is framing it. the prime minister i think is open to it but of course she is going to get some reaction that she will have to analyse and deal with back in the uk which goes back to the internal negotiating at the uk level, whereas that the eu level there is no internal machinations about this, out internal machinations about this, our situation and position has been to live from day one. we are just hoping that the uk side it will equally clear. but you know the
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irish politics very well and you know that really without some movement on one side or the other this is insoluble. unless the dup accepts there will be some border checks in the irish sea, i don't see how you get around this problem without putting yourself in the single market and a customs union which would be an inferior position to the one that norway has. you wouldn't be able to do trade deals. i think wouldn't be able to do trade deals. ithinkl wouldn't be able to do trade deals. i think i look at this from a totally different angle, if i may. remember that the withdrawal agreement contains the irish protocol because everyone realised that if brexit was to happen in the severe way that some would like there would be this vision of a hard border on the island of ireland that fio border on the island of ireland that no one wants and the prime minister and the eu are at one on that. sol would turn it around and say that we know it is very difficult, the dup also don't want a border, they have
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concerns about a border in the irish sea and i have tried to say, and i hope they are listening, there is no desire for us to put borders anywhere, that is why europe exists. and frankly i think the analysis where you saved the stay in the customs union and single market disc problem is rated, we are trying when these associations in the future conclude is this insurance policy of the backstop which must be enough withdrawal agreement, the eu parliament has insisted on that as have the other situations, that it is not used. but you buy insurance so is not used. but you buy insurance so you is not used. but you buy insurance so you never is not used. but you buy insurance so you never have is not used. but you buy insurance so you never have to use it. and thatis so you never have to use it. and that is why i think there has been a misunderstanding. i think some people on the brexit side believe that this is is going to be used and used against certain groups, which is not the case. it is an insurance policy and it is built around 20 years of the good friday agreement, peace, stability, prosperity, close to where i represent and indeed were overrepresented where communities
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work and play together, do business together, and enjoy it as it is today. i spoke to a radio station in donegal, might constituency, and they are very —— concerned. i suppose it is trying to preserve that and also preserve if you like that and also preserve if you like that intangible factor of the goodwill created by the good friday agreement. there are many bitter nesters and sad stories and traumas there and you will never get away from them, but at least we have a platform and a vision for our relationships with the uk that is positive and life enhancing rather than the past that i remember growing up which was anything but. thank you very much. i do buy your point that this is an insurance policy that you hope you never have to use, but unless you want to go all the way to the single market, customs union solution, which may
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brexiteers don't want, then at some point down the land whether two, three orfour point down the land whether two, three or four years down the line you might have to face that option. it isa you might have to face that option. it is a very difficult problem theresa may, also for the eu leaders who want a solution. we will hear from them probably in the next hour. we will bring you all the reaction from the various leaders and also the european council donald pask. thank you. these are the latest headlines. the prime minister confirms that the uk's post—brexit transition period could be lengthened sparking anger among some conservative mps. the us asks turkey to produce a surveillance recording — said to show would shootjournalist jamal khashoggi was murdered in the saudi consulate in istanbul. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten year peak. england face south africa. the
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former pakistan cricket has admitted spot fixing. it comes after six yea rs of spot fixing. it comes after six years of denial. and luke shaw has signed a new five—year contract at manchester united. i'll be back with more of those stories in just a moment. the scottish government has confirmed a case of bse — more commonly known as mad cow's disease. restrictions on the movement of livestock have been put in place at the farm in aberdeenshire, while further investigations take place. officials said there was no risk to human health. to tell us more, here's our environment correspondent, claire marshall. what more do we know about this case in aberdeenshire? this is bad because bse is terrible for farmers. it attacks the brain and spinal—cord
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of the cow, they appear mad, which is why it is called mad cow disease. so it is re—bad news if it spreads. but this is only one case. they are very sporadic, very rare in scotland, the last case was 2008 in the uk it was 2015. everyone i have spoken to, the government, the scottish government, several vets, they all say don't worry, you can go and buy beef tomorrow in the supermarket, it is fine. it is likely they can contain this just on one fine. they have spoken to the farmer and told him not to move animals, keep everything there and we will properly test this carcass, it was found in a cow that was already dead. essentially, don't panic. but it is interesting because it is rare. but there have been sporadic cases in recent years. this isa sporadic cases in recent years. this is a one—off but it is not unknown. no, and that is why they are taking it very seriously. there is a really
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comprehensive surveillance system where every cow that you might eat which goes into the food chain is now checked for this and several other things in the abattoir they go and get checked all over completely. that came into place after the 1980s and 90s when you may remember the horrific outbreak of bse when there we re horrific outbreak of bse when there were huge funeral pyres of cows, they'll had to be cold, there were millions of cows that had to be killed. that is because there was eventually a link established between variant cjd which attacks your brain and damages it so much that you die. they found this link and it completely changed what cows we re and it completely changed what cows were being fed, they were deviously being fed other bits of cows and sheep. now they are just fed plants and all sorts of checks are in place. so everyone i am speaking to says don't worry. so there is no
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immediate clue as to what caused this case. they are investigating? they are investigating. the brain of the cow will be sent away untested. the one that in particular i spoke to said they have no idea, it could, and this is real speculation, this is just and this is real speculation, this isjust one and this is real speculation, this is just one hypothesis, and this is real speculation, this isjust one hypothesis, it and this is real speculation, this is just one hypothesis, it might be from a bit of contaminated feed from abroad, but also no one else is saying that on the record. so they are going to send all this off, they have clamped down even more on the surveillance, they have upped the level of surveillance, so the message is at the moment if you are watching, don't worry, you can still go to the supermarket and buy beef. thank you. the trade secretary liam fox has pulled out of a major saudi arabian investment conference — it follows the suspected murder of thejournalist
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jamal khashoggi. earlier french and dutch finance ministers had said they would also boycott the event in riyadh. meanwhole, president trump has asked turkey for a copy of a recording — which is said to contain clear and disturbing evidence that mr khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul. the washington post has just published the journalist's last column before he went missing more than two weeks ago: in it he says arab governments are given free rein to silence the media. chris buckler reports from washington. no matter what the investigations and searches finally discover, there seems to be a growing acceptance that jamal khashoggi will not be found alive. inside the saudi consulate in istanbul, he disappeared, and the claims that he was interrogated, tortured and murdered here are becoming more and more difficult for saudi arabia to simply deny. as a turkish crime scene investigation team left the saudi consul‘s istanbul residents, the washington post published mr khashoggi's last column, an article which its editor said showed his passion forfreedom,
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a freedom they believe he gave his life for. in the opinion piece, mr khashoggi writes the jailing ofjournalists and attacks on the media in the arab world no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. he goes on to say that arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media as an increasing rate. the us secretary of state has now visited both ankara and riyadh, and offered reassurances to turkey's president erdogan that the truth would be uncovered. but president trump has done nothing to distance himself from saudi arabia, america's middle east ally. if you look at saudi arabia, they're an ally and they're a tremendous purchaser of not only military equipment, but other things. when i went there they committed to
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purchase $450 billion worth of things and $110 billion worth of military. those are the biggest orders in the history of this country. probably the history of the world. there is pressure for saudi arabia to give some kind of explanation for what happened afterjamal khashoggi was pictured entering its consulate. one of the saudi crown prince's own bodyguards is accused of being part ofa bodyguards is accused of being part of a hit squad that flew into istanbul. with claims that there is more evidence of a gruesome killing inside this consulate, the voices of international outrage are only likely to grow louder. our correspondent mark lowen is in istanbul. a lot of talk about these tapes, these audio and possibly video tapes of what happened inside the consulate. do they exist? that is
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the $64,000 question. the details have been leaked from them over the last week or so through the turkish programme and media. macabre details of how jamal khashoggi was dismembered, he is said to have heard screams from inside the consulate. there are reports that for example the torturer was told by the consul general, please don't do this inside the room, and then he barked back, if you want to stay alive when we get back to saudi arabia, shut up. we simply do not know whether all this is it an attempt by turkey to exert pressure over saudi arabia, to have leveraged over saudi arabia, to have leveraged over them and whether it is fictitious. or whether it does exist but the turks are not releasing it to other intelligence agencies and governments to show that it bugs its consulates. it is very murky indeed. but if they were to be released i think that would be the game changer because it would point to incriminating evidence both of mr khashoggi's killing but also who was
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behind it, and that would make attem pts behind it, and that would make atte m pts by behind it, and that would make attempts by donald trump to try to engineer a way out for the saudis, which it seems he is trying to do at the moment, increasingly difficult. thank you, mark. the number of murders in england and wales has risen to its highest figures from the office for national statistics , published this morning , show that the overall number of crimes recorded by police has gone up by 9%. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is with me to explain more. i think the concerning saying is this spike in serious violence which we have been seeing now are the past three orfour years. and we have been seeing now are the past three or four years. and what the figures show is that homicides for example which include murder, manslaughter and infanticide, are up to 719, the highest since 2008. would generally, violence is up 19%. that is the year to the end ofjune.
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we're also seeing a big increase in robbery, up 22%. again over the time period. and also this is probably driven more by reporting of offences, people more willing to come forward, increase in sexual offences, are priced 18%. this is driving increase for demand of police forces. some of the investigation is a very complex and time—consuming and all the time when they have seen the number of officers come down by 21,000 over the past eight years. which brings us on the past eight years. which brings us on to clear up rates. what is the latest on that? not good news. these are measured according to how many of all the offences recorded by police end with someone being taken to court and prosecuted, and the number has dipped below 9%, so the vast majority of crimes do not end
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up vast majority of crimes do not end up with the perpetrator being taken to court and prosecuted. under 9%, and that has fallen since the last quarter. quite a difference in scotland, for we have seen over the recent yea rs scotland, for we have seen over the recent years is general falls scotland, for we have seen over the recent years is generalfalls in crime at a time when officer numbers have risen. the number of offences has edged up over the past year or two. quite a difference between england and wales and scotland. thank you. ajury has been retracing the last footsteps of two schoolgirls who were found dead on the south downs, 32 years ago. russell bishop is on trial — for the second time — accused of the murders of nine—year—olds karen hadaway and nicola fellows. he denies the charges. helena lee reports. this is wild park, just behind us here. this is where the two girls, karen hadaway and nicola fellows, both nine years old, went missing on the 9th of october 1986.
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they had been out to play after school. they didn't return home that evening and it was the following day when their bodies were found, not far from here in the park in a den. now today, the jury has been brought here really, to get a sense of the geography and the area where the girls were found. they were brought here from the old bailey by coach. they have been accompanied by the judge, mrjustice sweeney and also the barristers, who are not wearing their traditional clothes today, instead wearing suits and ties. and they have been taken around those key locations. they've already seen this morning, the den, the area where the two girls were discovered on the 10th of october 32 years ago. they also walked past a memorial, a long—standing memorial to the girls, but they didn't stop at that location. the judge had told them yesterday they didn't need to, it wasn't part of their considerations and there was no disrespect.
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they have also had pointed out to them a fish and chip shop not too far away from here, where some witnesses saw the girls on the afternoon they went missing. russell bishop isn't here with the jury today, he decided not to come today. thejudge told thejury it was a sensible decision by him and they shouldn't hold it against him. we are going to get a look at the weather forecast. some lovely colours of autumn around. injapan in japan they injapan they have had a turbulent typhoon season. look at this! a lot of the trees are suffering. they think this is due to the volume of salt water they have seen from the
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typhoons which has stripped the trees, due to the saltwater. a lot of them are falling off. on top of that the trees actually tell... believes actually tell the trees to not go into blossom. because the leaves have been stripped from these trees, you can see some of the very famous cherry blossom is coming into bloom. after the typhoons they have seen some unseasonably high temperatures. mother nature is very fragile. we have spring in october and that is confusing. and i have had roses in my garden. so, there you go. across the uk almost as confusing in some respects. it is warm and we have not seen that much in the way of significant rain this week. look at the beautiful colours week. look at the beautiful colours we have at the moment. it is lovely out there. there is a bit of cloud around but mostly up into the far north and west. england and wales
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are enjoying some lovely sunshine for the end of the day. you can see from that beautiful photographs in suffolk. north and west the cloud big enough for a few isolated showers. 12 degrees here, 16 and 17 in the south and east. overnight tonight there is a weather front. the wins will start to strengthen with rain pushing in from the west. it will not last long in terms of the intense wet weather. 10 degrees with the cloud around, acting like a blanket. tomorrow we split the country into two. the rain in scotla nd country into two. the rain in scotland will not amount to much. as it bumps into the high it will wea ken it bumps into the high it will wea ke n off it bumps into the high it will weaken off considerably so there will be more cloud in scotland and northern ireland with sharawee outbreaks of rain drifting its way across the borders. —— showery outbreaks. 12 up to 17 the hive. a
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murky morning across england and wales with maybe some fog lifting to low cloud. it could be disappointing but fingers crossed some of us could see some dry and sunny weather on saturday. another front pushing see some dry and sunny weather on saturday. anotherfront pushing into the far north—west. temperatures here around 14 to 18 degrees. the weather front could push here around 14 to 18 degrees. the weatherfront could push its here around 14 to 18 degrees. the weather front could push its way further south and east for the second part of the weekend. we're not expecting heavy rain but there is potential for wetter and windier weather to push down across scotland, northern ireland and into northern england. on sunday a bit more cloud around but in central and southern parts you will see the best of the weather, the best of the warmth with temperatures expecting to peak into the high teens, above average for the time of year. enjoy. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines. the uk could stay tied to eu rules and laws until 2020, as the prime minister proposes an extension to the post—brexit transition period. but some backbenchers in her party have expressed anger at the proposal. new figures show the number of muders in england and wales at their highest level for ten years, whilst recordings of violent crime see a 29% rise. international development secretary liam fox is to pull out of an international investment conference in saudi arabia
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amid concerns over the disappearance of dissidentjournalist jamal khashoggi after he visited the saudi consulate in istanbul. shoppers tighten their belts. uk retail sales dropped 0.8% last month. it was driven by a 1.5% fall in spending on food. sport now on afternoon live with chris. he hasjoined me from the bbc‘s sports centre. eddiejones has named his england rugby squad for the autumn the news is there are a lot of new faces. it is important to understand what an important period this is for england rugby. we have the autumn internationals coming up next month against south africa, australia and new zealand with real big hitters
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andjapan. japan is new zealand with real big hitters and japan. japan is hosting the world cup next year for the and japan. japan is hosting the world cup next yearfor the england should be on an upward curve and eddiejones should be formulating plans for the world cup next year. so many players are injured and suspended he has had to name eight and capped players in the training squad and there is still no place for danny cipriani, which will surprise many out there. he was the premiership player of the month in september. lots of changes. here is patrick geary. a year from the world cup and eddie jones patrick geary. a year from the world cup and eddiejones has been solving a puzzle where the pieces keep disappearing. eight of his 26 winning grand slam team are not available. they used to say in the early 2003 had a string of injuries and people were saying the game is getting too tough and too physical. you go through these cycles and you have these runs. no one knows why it happens but it does. it will rectify
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itself. last night jones lost another one, this time through suspension. nagin used banned for punching and then tweeting about it. england do have more players to choose from than any other rugby nation but there is no place in the latest squad for danny cipriani. a controversial call on a controversial call on a controversial character. after a year of indifferent results, the focus is on the man making them. he has lost with england five of the last six internationals but this is a new season, they are building up for the world cup. he must find good replacements so excellent players will come in. it is a pressure on the players, the whole squad and eddie. jones and england would have been hoping this automotive raise the memories of spring. in six weeks they must face the all conquering
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all blacks. england keep having to replace the engine. if you want more information on that you can get the full list of players on the website. some sad news from the world of cricket. a former player admitting to spot fixing. this is the former pakistan spinner. he has admitted spot fixing. he was and is pakistan's is to successful spinner. he was a big name in international cricket. he has admitted this after denying it for six years. he was banned from playing in england and wales for life. he was found to have pressurised mervyn westfield into spot fixing in 2009. kaneria has
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apologised and said, he cannot live apologised and said, he cannot live a life with lies. pakistan are currently playing a test match against australia in abu dhabi. how about this were a bizarre run out?! he thinks the ball is going for four and why wouldn't you? but it stops just short and so do the batsmen. he has a chat in the middle of the strip and corrupt while he's chatting, he is run out. you do not see that every day. luke shaw has signed a five—year contract manchester united. a big turnaround for him. in the past he has been heavily criticised by his boss, jose mourinho, but he is back in the squad and has made ( his own. he is backin squad and has made ( his own. he is back in the england squad as well put his reward, a new contract, reported to be worth around £150,000
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a week. this bit of magic from wayne rooney. a brilliant free kick. look at that! like days of old. that was for dc united overnight. it is his tenth goal sincejoining for dc united overnight. it is his tenth goal since joining the major league soccer side in june. tenth goal since joining the major league soccer side injune. he is having a real impact. they were struggling at the wrong end of the table but they are now up to sixth place in the table. usain bolt has turned down a moved to the champions of malta. he was offered a deal but is currently on trial in australia at central coast mariners. bus far he has not been offered a professional contract and the season sta rts professional contract and the season starts on sunday. that is all the sport for now. i will be back later. the international development secretary penny mordaunt has been heckled at a conference about sex abuse in the aid sector. it follows a series of high—profile abuse scandals.
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one former aid worker — and whistleblower from save the children — confronted the cabinet minister on stage — alleging the government was trying to control women in the sector. naomi grimley reports. it was the scandal that shook the aid sector. this year we learned how some of oxfam's staff had severely compromised its dearly held values. they'd used young prostitutes in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake. the charity dismissed four members of staff and let three quietly resigned without properly flagging up what had happened. and sexual harassment... today at a special safeguarding summit, the government made it clear it wants to turn the page on the sex abuse scandals in the aid sector. let there be no doubt that that is what we are here to do. notjust tinker around the edges but to fundamentally rewrite the way this sector operates from root to branch.
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amongst the announcements were a new project with interpol to let charities access criminal records more quickly, and support for a so—called passport for aid workers, meaning charities can voluntarily pool information about job applicants. that is an excellent time for me to intervene, secretary of state. but as the minister was in full flow, she was interrupted by a protester who had been an aid worker but had quit in anger. this is about giving truth to power and i don't feel i have seen anything from what you have been coming out with with your pre—cooked summit solutions to tackle that. 0k. thank you for saying that. some of the anger is because save the children are helping to deliver the reforms when they have had their own scandal of sexual harassment in head office. but the charity itself believes change is happening. it's not a silver bullet, other things need to happen alongside it,
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including organisations working together to share information inculding tough internal scrutiny, and actually ensuring that cultures inside organisations change to put survivors and communities first. if nothing else, this eventful summit shows that the aid sector is still contorted about the way it has been run in the past. let's ta ke let's take you back to brexit. jeremy corbyn has said dominic raab's letter about the ‘meaningful vote' is a "supreme piece of arrogance." the labour leader said there should be a "serious and proper debate" with the opportunity to amend what the government puts forward. the prime minister has got itself
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into this mess by failing to reach any meaningful agreements with the eu and she is going to bring something back to parliament. we will decide what to do when we hear what is she is bringing back to parliament. some might think it is best to you to give her that support in the natural interests. —— national interest. she needs to recognise that there are divisions in her party and she should be negotiating with the european union and recognise that the six tests we have put down our how we will vote in parliament. what is your response to the government today in effect offering a take it or leave it boat? they gave themselves powers in the withdrawal bill in the first place. the letter from withdrawal bill in the first place. the letterfrom dominic withdrawal bill in the first place. the letter from dominic raabe withdrawal bill in the first place. the letterfrom dominic raabe is withdrawal bill in the first place. the letter from dominic raabe is a supreme piece of arrogance. he writes to parliament rather than
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turning up and says you can only have one vote on what we have put forward. we are all elected parliamentarians were $650. we all have ideas and surely there should bea have ideas and surely there should be a serious and proper debate and a chance to amend what the government has put forward. if the government puts forward a vote and if you vote against that boat and it means a no deal, we do still back it and vote in effect for a no deal? if parliament rejects what the prime minister has brought back, it is incumbent on how to either leave or make way for a government that will negotiate seriously with the european union go back and negotiate something better with them. it seems to me she is trying to avoid parliamentary scrutiny on theirs. we respect the results of the referendum and we want to make sure there is a trading customs arrangements to protectjobs will
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stop —— to protectjobs. this is the scene live in brussels where the belgian prime minister is driving off. we are also expecting to year from the various leaders in the next hour or two macro, including the prime minister, theresa may. that is not theresa may but it is someone preparing the podium and the microphone for where she will be standing, possibly in the next few minutes, with her take on how the latest round of eu talks have been going. the latest development is britain could stay tied to eu rules and laws until 2020 with the prime minister proposing an extension to the post brexit transition period. that has angered quite a few tory backbenchers but we will bring you the latest from the prime minister and other eu leaders that we are expecting to speak to in
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the next few minutes. the duke and duchess of sussex have hit the beach during a visit to melbourne but there's been no time to relax. on the third day of their tour of australia they've been looking at efforts to keep the coastline litter—free. in front of thousands of well—wishers, prince harry also spoke of "fast fashion" and its environmental impact. our royal correspondentjonny dymond reports from melbourne. from australia's second city, a first—class welcome. they only came for a day. for many here, it would be a day to remember. for one young woman, it was all a bit too much. as for that royal no touching rule? forget about it, you could almost feel the love. outside the governor's residence,
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a scheme to get women into fitness. for meghan, a chance to try aussie rules football. for the women involved, the chance to meet their inspiration. she's definitely a role model, i feel like anybody who has a position of power and uses it for good is considered a role model. her work with women and even coming here and speaking to the people, local melburnians about getting active, shows she is interested and wants to help in anyway that she can. from the green grass to the golden sands. but this was a beach trip with a purpose. championing the clean—up campaign that battles the plastic and needles that sweep up on the coast. watching the couple's every move, more crowds. a beach clean—up may not seem like a very royal concern, but it is a concern for people who live in melbourne. and it's the way the couple have got
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involved in issues like this that has connected them with australians. ijust think harry is just lovely. harry in particular? yeah, harry in particular. i really think they have taken on board the people's princess, i am going to say concept, that diana was her signature really and it's coming down through harry and his new wife. it was a brief visit, but melbourne loved it and the couple showed that royalty and relevance can go hand—in—hand. jonny dymond, bbc news, melbourne. let's have a look at the headlines on afternoon live the prime minister confirms that the uk's post—brexit transition period could be lengthened sparking anger among some conservative mps. the us asks turkey to produce a surveillance recording — said to showjournalist jamal khashoggi was murdered
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in the saudi consulate in istanbul. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten—year peak. hindu hardliners in southern india, angry at a supreme court ruling allowing all women to visit a famous temple in the state of kerala, have clashed with police in a second day of violence. a female journalist from the new york times abandoned her attempt to reach the temple following threats and abuses. the hardliners also prevented women from reaching the hilltop site on wednesday. james clayton reports from kerala. well, this road is a lot quieter than it would be usually because protesters here have essentially tried to shut down this part of kerala. what they have basically said to some of the drivers is, if you bring journalists
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into the temple complex then we will attack those cars. a lot ofjournalists have tried to get in today and have failed. but we were there yesterday and we saw some of the violence meted out by some of the protesters, particular violence towards women. we saw buses being checked for women and when a woman was found in there, mobbed until the buses turned around. we saw one woman being physically attacked by protesters. essentially, what the protesters were saying, is they did not want women of menstruation age, between ten and 50, to enter that temple. what they believe is the supreme court ruling, which lifted that ban has replaced one form of discrimination with another, that of religious intolerance and that is why they are so angry. what sounds like a cat but looks like a bird? it's not the start to a bad joke, but a genuine description of a north american bird that has
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turned up in cornwall. the grey catbird has drawn thousands of keen birdwatchers to fields near lands end. it's only the second time it's been spotted in the uk. naomi dymond has been to take a look. binoculars and telescopes to hand. they came today to catch a glimpse of the catbird, a species native to north america. we have stepped away from the group because the name of the game is not only patience, but also silence. the twitchers are poised with their cameras and it really is a waiting game. what is it like when you are waiting and you actually spot it? it is not pleasurable, i have to say. there it goes. it's just gone past. it has flown right over our heads. that was timing. it is extremely stressful, i have to say. when you have over a 40—minute wait and then it pops up,
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it is like relief. their patience was eventually rewarded. it has been blown across by the winds we have had recently and the conditions have brought it across — it doesn't belong here, it is a rare bird. it is a migratory species in america and it mimics a catlike noise which is why it is called a catbird. we didn't get close enough to hear it, but you can hear it's called in this footage captured in florida. —— its call. many travelled hundreds of miles so and a lot depended on this little bird. i think it is about the longest i have had to wait for a bird without giving up. relief — we set out at 5am so it is a relief. going to drive back now. it's not known how long the bird will survive here but that's not stopping those keen to catch
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a glimpse while they can. naomi dymond, bbc news, cornwall. not sure it does sound like a cat really. it sounds more like a crow. now for the weather. take a look at this weather watch a picture from cumbria. a little more cloud around further north and west today. maybe a few isolated showers but mostly cloudy and increasingly breezy as well. temperatures will struggle just breezy as well. temperatures will strugglejust a breezy as well. temperatures will struggle just a little. breezy as well. temperatures will strugglejust a little. the best breezy as well. temperatures will struggle just a little. the best of the sunshine is further south, bitter fairweather cloud around and temperatures peaking in the east around 16. further north and west we are looking at around ten to 12 and the winds. to strengthen. there could be gusts in excess of 40 miles an hour. there will a weather front
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pushing in from the west. that will prevent temperatures from falling very far. we could see chilly air and lower temperatures across the north—east of england for a time posting tomorrow morning. generally speaking quite a quiet story but this time of year we will see all to machines with a bit of fog which may bea machines with a bit of fog which may be a problem as well. —— we will see autumn issues. not everywhere across scotla nd autumn issues. not everywhere across scotland will see some wet weather. a band of cloud through the borders and into northern ireland by the end of the day. to the south of that was still a reasonably pleasant affair. 17 degrees the hive. it could potentially be a foggy start to the weekend. —— the high. some areas may see fog lifting to low cloud but fingers crossed it eases and breaks up fingers crossed it eases and breaks up and we will see some sunshine.
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patchy rain in the far north west of scotland. sheltered areas in scotla nd scotland. sheltered areas in scotland could be pretty warm which will extend into the east as well. still above average for the time of year. the high pressure will hang on for the second part of the weekend in england and wales. that front. to make inroads. there will be rain into scotland which will move its way into the north—west of england and ireland. the best of the sunshine is likely to be further south with highs of 18 degrees that is how the weekend is looking. enjoy. we have been able to achieve agreement to a very large degree. we do not have a solution on all fronts. we still have to deal with the irish situation. still no satisfactory answer to this. it cannot be completely separated from the question of what our
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relationship will look like in the future. so, this was on the agenda from yesterday. i still think a lot was reviewed and analysed in a very constructive way. as participants to yesterday's dinner, all of us, all of the 27, said we wish to bring about a solution, one that clearly ex presses about a solution, one that clearly expresses the fact that britain is no longer a member of the european union but also expresses what we all wa nt union but also expresses what we all want politically speaking, namely that we establish a good relationship to britain for the future. i call this a squaring off the circle. as long as we do not have a satisfactory solution we cannot explain in a satisfactory way how this is to come about but where there is a will there is a way, that is usually the case. we agreed, once we had sufficient progress, we will meet again at any point in time that
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is convenient. but, right now that we cannot safely say when such a meeting can take place. today we had a council meeting in the format of 28 and dealt with questions related to cyber security, also against a background of what we might expect in the run—up to the european elections and the german parliament already gave a statement to this effect on migration. we discussed in the intensification of relations to the intensification of relations to the north african countries. we wa nted the north african countries. we wanted to take up the egyptian proposal and have a joint meeting in the spring of next year between the european union and the arab league. egypt will host this meeting. we looked at the different facets of the dublin reform, external dimension partnership with africa. all of this is of interest to all of
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us all of this is of interest to all of us and we are at all of this is of interest to all of us and we are at one all of this is of interest to all of us and we are at one in saying, as regards the position on the internal dimension, we as yet do not have a solution but we did not count on having a solution quite as yet. we then addressed our foreign relations, the situation in bosnia—herzegovina after the elections and other international issues... we also briefly touched on the meeting with the representatives today, 21 asian countries will be united around the table. that is two thirds of the world's population with two thirds of global trade and two thirds of gdp will unite around this table. that means the better we are connected with each other, connectivity after all looms large on the agenda, the better we will be able to shape the global economy and this also was important during the luncheon discussion, namely
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reforming the eu area. the decisions we took together with the french president, emmanuel macron. in a way this guided us in our discussions. the chairman of the eu group gave a briefing on the work of the ministers of finance. the outcome of the discussion was that we all are one in saying we are resolved to bring... just in the end of the summit talking. she has been about brexit, saying whether as well there is a way. and saying once there is sufficient progress they meet again, but she can't say when. let's listen ina but she can't say when. let's listen in a little bit more. if we look at the risks also as regards trade risks due to the tensions that are happening make it incumbent upon us
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to make progress on this banking union and also on the agenda was the eurozone budget, there are a number of countries saying this should be discussed as part of the discussions of the financial framework. should be looked at when we discuss the budget of the eu as a whole. i have adopted a positive stance on this, germany has adopted a positive stance, as regards the shaping of the banking union, i think it is important that we have at the same time backs up but that we also have resolutely towards risk reduction and broadening the scope of the stability mechanism in the sense of a debt sustainability and sound fiscal positions. i gladly informed you about the state of play. madame
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chancellor, yesterday won had a bit ofan chancellor, yesterday won had a bit of an impression as if you and the other heads of state were a little more optimistic as regards the prospects for an agreement as regards brexit. why is this so and on migration? what do you think about this solidarity however based on commitments that austria has proposed? well, yesterday i went away from the dinner table neither more pessimistic nor optimistic. we we re more pessimistic nor optimistic. we were absolutely aware of the fact that we would not have achieved a breakthrough as regards britain's leaving the union but we reaffirmed yet again that each and every one wa nts yet again that each and every one wants those issues to be dealt with and resolved. that enhances in a innocence of security. but we'll need to find an answer, and britain needs to find an answer. what about northern ireland and the irish republic? but if you don't have an
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agreement you don't have a satisfactory answer either. as to that situation. what happens to northern ireland and the republic of ireland. so we are all called upon to find a solution. on migration, i made on this, solidarity based on commitments, i think that sounds a little too easy to me. it sounds good when you hear it, but if each and everyone picks what everyone wa nts and everyone picks what everyone wants and you say let's give more money for africa, that doesn't solve the problem... we'll leave it there. angela merkel with her latest commentary on where we are with brexit, sounding vaguely positive and optimistic, saying where there is a will there is a way. but also saying there wasn't sufficient progress yet to decide to meet again. once there is progress
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they will meet again. let's go to christian fraser. she reiterated their that the november summit which is pencilled in for the 17th and 18th is a nice pending some movement in the next few weeks. will there be enough movement have the summit we do not know. let's talk to adam fleming. he has been watching since last night. she says she is neither positive nor pessimistic. she is where she was two days ago which is precisely the problem. also what is interesting talking to the officials working on brexit, i keep saying to them how you feel about this, will it bea them how you feel about this, will it be a disaster, you hope for? they don't think in those terms because a lot of them are technocrats working on bits of paper, and the deal is done when it is done. they do not see it in emotive terms, it is a series of problems to be solved, for example the idea is extended the transition is a way of solving the problem in a technical way not forcing theresa may to swallow
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something that is a disaster for her domestic two. and if you wanted evidence of that, they all went out for a beer after they listen to her! what about the timetable now? if we are now into december, we would look into the vice president of the european parliament, as he suggested she wanted something on the table before sitting down to christmas dinner. do they need something by the end of the year if all the parliaments, the eu parliament and the eu council will sign off?|j think it was clever of you to say the novembersummit think it was clever of you to say the november summit was nice, as in it is not cancelled butjust not definitively happening. they have still left the door open to there being a summit in november but it will be driven by the progress in the negotiations rather than by an artificial date —based timetable. could there be any other kind of timetable? but they wanted to be about the progress in negotiations that leads to a summit to seal the deal rather than being held hostage by having to make a certain amount
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of progress by a certain date. i think there are lots of people in this building on the eu side that would like the deal to be pretty much done by november, because here they too have been making the calculations about the british parliamentary calendar, about the numberof things, parliamentary calendar, about the number of things, the number of statutory days that need to be given over to ratifying international treaty, and they also say it has to be november, beginning of december at the latest, to get through the british parliament. that was news to me because up until yesterday i had only heard that sort of thing from the british side. now i am hearing it from europeans too. though there is an intriguing detail i heard from anotherjournalist, i is an intriguing detail i heard from another journalist, i haven't checkedit another journalist, i haven't checked it yet, but they were saying actually if they want to do that dealjust before the christmas holidays leaving a period of a potential crisis in britain of a couple of weeks or leave it till january so it can be raced to the commons? so it's a balancing act.
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there are also rumours that the fred yury recess would be cancelled. about the transition, i know you've been asking what it means, are we right it is optional so the uk could decide whether or not is taking up? what is bolted on in terms of finances? what we're actually talking about is a clause being written into the withdrawal agreement, to the treaty that deals with the divorce related issues, that would open up the prospect of the transition period, the implementation phase, being extended bya certain implementation phase, being extended by a certain period. so we're talking about creating a mechanism and writing that down in a form of text. the uk have said it isjust an idea that is floating around, they talk about it lasting four months rather than years, would there even bea rather than years, would there even be a time limit written into that extension clause? would itjust be about the mechanism? from eu officials i hear they would create a way fridge to be a joint decision, the uk would have a veto on whether
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it was extended by beyond the end of 2020 or not, presumably to guard against the allegation that the uk is being imprisoned in the period for longer than it once. so the discussion will be about the text going into the document, no not necessarily the end point. in terms of bolt on is, the transition period here is called the full monty minus, the uk is signed up to all eu policies but doesn't have a seat at the table. that is the minus for the full monty. if the transition is to be extended beyond jets ember 2020 it would be for the full monty unless the uk can convince the eu to negotiate the very nature of the transition period during the extension. and tickets for the full monty minus are quite expensive!” think you are getting at the financial contribution. part of it is that you pay financial contributions, billions of euros every year, as if you were a member. the deal is we signed up to pay
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those the 20192020 will stop if we are in the transition period beyond that we will have to make a financial contribution. a few months ago we found out uk officials had a seat on the working party negotiating the eu's multi—annual budget from 2020 onwards. how wise words they that they now have a seat at the table where that budget will be discussed? interesting. one final thought, someone said to me we are going round and round in circles and isaid, but going round and round in circles and i said, but aren't we now crystallising around the two options? if you are going to deal with the irish border problem we know you can either have canada plus plus plus or as nicky morgan said, there is a growing body of people in parliament to feel they want norway single market plus a customs union, and that is the only way to solve the insoluble problem of the irish border. that's interesting, because
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i have not discussed norway minus or canada plus plus or checkers or the common rule book the good at any point with anyone in the last 24, 48 hours. the focus here has not been on the big picture for the future relationship, it has been on what is the content of the northern ireland backstop in the withdrawal agreement, how does it then link to the future relationship document that will spell out the shape of the future relationship and how do you use those two bits to avoid or to make the northern ireland backstop less of a problem? so people are talking about that rather than the big an statement. they are talking about the short to medium term to make a withdrawal agreement possible in westminster. if it contains this clause, which it well, that says northern ireland could end up staying in the customs union.” northern ireland could end up staying in the customs union. i hate that didn't get too technical! this is the real point, we have the withdrawal agreement and their
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political declaration going hand—in—hand with it, and one of the debates going on is how much detail you put into that. angela merkel wa nts you put into that. angela merkel wants lots of detail so she can skip some certainty do business. you fa ncy some certainty do business. you fancy theresa may would likely to be vague as possible. but if it is vague as possible. but if it is vague as possible does it the remainders? thank you. the trade secretary liam fox has pulled out of a major saudi arabian investment conference — it follows the suspected murder of thejournalist jamal khashoggi. meanwhile, president trump has asked turkey for a copy of a recording — which is said to contain clear and disturbing evidence that mr khashoggi was killed inside the saudi consulate in istanbul. the washington post has published the journalist's last column before he went missing — in it he says arab governments are given free rein to silence the media. chris buckler reports from washington. no matter what the investigations and searches finally discover,
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there seems to be a growing acceptance that jamal khashoggi will not be found alive. inside the saudi consulate in istanbul, he disappeared, and the claims that he was interrogated, tortured and murdered here are becoming more and more difficult for saudi arabia to simply deny. as a turkish crime scene investigation team left the saudi consul‘s istanbul residents, the washington post published mr khashoggi's last column, an article which its editor said showed his passion forfreedom, a freedom they believe he gave his life for. in the opinion piece, mr khashoggi writes the jailing ofjournalists and attacks on the media in the arab world no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. he goes on to say that arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media as an increasing rate. the us secretary of state has now visited both ankara and riyadh,
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and offered reassurances to turkey's president erdogan that the truth would be uncovered. but president trump has done nothing to distance himself from saudi arabia, america's middle east ally. if you look at saudi arabia, they're an ally and they're a tremendous purchaser of not only military equipment, but other things. when i went there they committed to purchase $450 billion worth of things and $110 billion worth of military. those are the biggest orders in the history of this country. probably the history of the world. there is pressure for saudi arabia to give some kind of explanation for what happened afterjamal khashoggi was pictured entering its consulate. one of the saudi crown prince's own bodyguards is accused of being part of a hit squad that flew into istanbul. with claims that there is more evidence of a gruesome killing
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inside this consulate, the voices of international outrage are only likely to grow louder. some people have compared the alleged murder there in the saudi consulate in istanbul to the attempted murder in salisbury of yulia and sergei skripal, and we have been hearing from vladimir putin on this. he said russia does not have enough information about the accident disappearance of the saudi journalist in istanbul. he says it is a pity that jamal khashoggi has gone missing and that russia will wait for details. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister confirms that the uk's post—brexit transition period could be lengthened, sparking anger among some conservative mps.
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the us asks turkey to produce a surveillance recording — liam fox is pulling out of a conference in saudi arabia amid concerns about the disc appearance of the dissident journalist jamal khashoggi. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten—year peak. the scottish government has confirmed a case of bse — more commonly known as mad cow disease. restrictions on the movement of livestock have been put in place at the farm in aberdeenshire, while further investigations take place. officials said there was no risk to human health. our environment correspondent, claire marshall has been following the story — i spoke to her a little earlier. everyone i have spoken to, the government, the scottish government, several vets, they all say don't worry, you can go and buy your beef tomorrow in a supermarket, it is
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absolutely fine, it is likely they can contain this just on one form. they have spoken to the farmer, they said not to move any animals, keep everything there and we will properly test this carcass, cause it was found in a cow that had already died, so essentially, don't panic. but it is interesting because they are quite rare. but there have been sporadic cases in recent years. this isa sporadic cases in recent years. this is a one—off but it is not unknown. it is not unknown but this is why they're it seriously. there is a really comprehensive surveillance system. every cow that you might eat that goes into the food chain is now checked for this and several other things, in the abattoir they get checked all over completely. that came into place after the 19805 and 90s came into place after the 19805 and 905 when you may remember the horrific outbreak of bse when there we re horrific outbreak of bse when there were huge funeral parlour5 of cows, they all had to be killed and there we re they all had to be killed and there
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were millions of cows had to be killed. there was a link eventually established between bse and a link or variant established between bse and a link orvariant cjd, an established between bse and a link or variant cjd, an awful disease that damages your brain so much that you eventually die. they found this link, completely change what cows are being fed, they were being fed other bits of cows and other sheep, and that has now changed, cows are just fed plants and also subjects going into place so everyone i have speak the words spoken to says don't worry, they are looking at it. the number of murders in england and wales has risen to its highest level for ten years. figures from the office for national statistics, published this morning , show that the overall number of crimes recorded by police has gone up by nine per cent. earlier i spoke to our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, and asked him for more details. i think the concerning thing is this spike in serious violence which we
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have been seeing for the past three orfour have been seeing for the past three or four years. what the figures show is that homicides which include murder, manslaughter and infanticide are up to 719, the highest since 2008. generally violence is up 19%, thatis 2008. generally violence is up 19%, that is the year to the end ofjune. we're also seeing a big increase in robbery, up 22%, again over the time period. and also, probably driven by reporting of offences, people more willing to come forward, sexual offences up by 18%, again victims more willing to come forward, having confidence in the police. but what all this is doing is driving demand the police forces in england and wales. it is increasing the number of investigations they have to carry out. some of these investigations are very complex and time—consuming and all ata are very complex and time—consuming and all at a time when they have seen the number of scissors come down by 21,000 over the past eight yea rs. down by 21,000 over the past eight years. which brings us to clear up
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rates. what is the latest on that? not good news. these are measured according to how many of all the offences recorded by police end with someone being taken to court, with them being prosecuted. and the number has dipped below 9%. so the vast majority of crimes do not end up vast majority of crimes do not end up with the perpetrator being taken to court, prosecuted. under 9%, and that has fallen since the last quarter. quite a difference in scotland. over recent years we have seen a generalfall scotland. over recent years we have seen a general fall in crime at times when officer numbers have risen. the number of rest offences has edged up of the past year or two but quite a contrast between england and wales which has seen big reductions in staff numbers and scotla nd reductions in staff numbers and scotland where crime rates have been sta ble scotland where crime rates have been stable of falling and officer numbers have gone up. we'll go back to brussels and donald tusk and jean—claude juncker. we'll go back to brussels and donald
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tusk and jean-claude juncker. the european council this morning and the euro summit over lunch. now without further ado i invite donald tusk to take the floor. thank you. good afternoon. let me start with brexit. yesterday after listening to prime minister made's assessment of the state of the negotiations, the eu 27 confirmed that we want to continue the talks in a positive spirit. we have expressed a full trusted michel barnier and asked a negotiator to continue efforts to achieve agreement. i stand ready to convene a european council on brexit if and when the eu negotiator reports that decisive progress has been made. and we should be clear that for now is not enough progress has been made. there is a lot of
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speculation about the length of the transition period once the uk leaves the eu. let me say this, the issue of the length of the transition period was not discussed among the eu 27 leaders yesterday. but let me re call eu 27 leaders yesterday. but let me recall that in her speech in september 2017, mrs may proposed a transition period of around two years and we accepted this unanimously. therefore if the uk decided an extension of the transition period would be helpful to reach a deal, i am sure that the leaders would be ready to consider it positively. today we also discussed migration and reconfirmed our objection to stop the flow of illegal migration. we noted in particular the need to closely watch the situation in the western
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mediterranean and in this context to strengthen our cooperation with morocco is recommended by the prime minister there. following our discussion we also agreed conclusions on strengthening our internal security. let me mention one issue specifically, in light of the recent hostile cyber attack carried out against the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons, the european council calls for measures to combat illegal cyber activities. in this context, we asked ministers to work on a sanctions regime which will be specific to cyber attacks. such a resume should help to protect our citizens, companies and institutions from all kinds of cyber security threats. finally on today's euro
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summit, the aim was to assess the state of play of the emu reform and keep up the momentum for change. we agreed we need to accelerate the technical work, we want to get an agreement on the banking union and the efm in december. i hope our discussion today will inspire inspired a eurogroup to act more dynamically. thank you. thank you and now the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. bonjour. he speaks french we arejust
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we are just listening there to jean—claude juncker. for the moment we don't have translation on that. but we were hearing donald tusk, president of the european council, saying that the eu 27, the other 27 members of the eu, stand ready to convene a council if and when there is decisive progress. so far he said that sort of progress has not yet been made. but he was also then talking about the proposed extension of the transition period and saying eu leaders would he thought probably react to that positively. let's listen in to jean—claude juncker. translation: we have no negative prejudice against the italian budget, we will examine it with the same rigour and the same freedom as we used to examine others. but there
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are five or six situations where we have to do is ask the governments for additional information, but apparently i have read in the press this morning, or i heard, that the commission was about to reject the belgian budget. i said yesterday that the belgian budget was not a big problem, or even a small problem, or even a problem at all. but we did have some additional questions to ask them. so all of those who for some incomprehensible reason started looking very carefully at the belgian situation, could ijust say that don't get excited about things where there is no need to. secondly, we discussed
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the financial perspectives of 2127 andl the financial perspectives of 2127 and i was pleased to see that no prime minister or chancellor or dominant leader in europe said that we had to adopt the financial perspectives after the elections. i said as! perspectives after the elections. i said as i have done many occasions the fact that there are in european elections in may does not reflect a crisis situation in europe. it is absolutely normal to have elections in europe. and it is possible to ta ke in europe. and it is possible to take decisions right up until the la st take decisions right up until the last minute and i am counting on the colleagues in the european council to ensure that good budgetary decisions are taken before the european elections. i see, you are
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absolutely shocked by the fact that lam able absolutely shocked by the fact that i am able to speak briefly!” absolutely shocked by the fact that i am able to speak briefly! i open the floor questions. the lady in blue, please. thank you. you said that journalists get blue, please. thank you. you said thatjournalists get a blue, please. thank you. you said that journalists get a bit overexcited. .. nope. i that journalists get a bit overexcited... nope. i said ministers. journalists are never excited. they bring other people to be excited. ok. can you say whether. .. be excited. ok. can you say whether... is there a lack of urgency among the heads of government about deepening the economic monetary union? do you think that progress will only be made if we are faced with a crisis? do we have to wait for that to happen before it is completed? we
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haveis happen before it is completed? we have is commission presented 40 proposals regarding this and six or seven have been adopted so there is a lot of work to be done. and i hope that ministers will do so in the next coming months. there is no sense of urgency but it is urgent. yesterday, you said, speaking to some of my colleagues that you could not accept everything from italy otherwise other member states would be very angry at you. i wanted to know whether you found, in this summit with this kind of support that you should not be too indulgent with italy. i have to repeat we did
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not discuss in italian. it was not a meeting for doing so but i know from the past that the commission has always been accused for having been too generous when it came to italian budgets. i am too generous when it came to italian budgets. lam not too generous when it came to italian budgets. i am not saying we were generous but we have introduced in the implementation of the stability pact, some elements of flexibility. italy is the only country for having used all the flexibility instruments we have introduced since we started asa we have introduced since we started as a commissioner. i had some colleagues on the phone. they do not wa nt colleagues on the phone. they do not want us to act to flexibly, to add more flexibility is. that is not our intention. italy was able to spend over the last three years 30 billion euros more without a sanction being
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taken underthe empire, euros more without a sanction being taken under the empire, like the french are saying, the stability pact. so, we were very kind, gentle and positive when it came to italy because italy is italy. thank you. the next question for the lady in the second row. you were mentioning president task about the possibility of extending the transition period. could there be found the solution to the irish border issue? —— tusk. is that traction with having a temporary customs union for all of the united kingdom and, if yes, with
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that appear in the withdrawal agreement and would that supersede then the northern ireland specific backstop? sorry for the multilayers. for me, it is too complex. for me, it is too easy. no. this prolongation of the transition period probably will happen. that is a good idea. it is not the best idea the two of us have had but it is giving us some room to prepare the future relations in the best way possible. i am convinced that, under the leadership of donald, we will find a deal with britain for the my working establishment is not that we will have a no deal. that will be dangerous for britain and the european union and instead of describing the differences,
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divergences we have, we have to concentrate and focus on a large numberof concentrate and focus on a large number of agreements we have and we will have to look at the two was three missing elements with the disagreements. it will be done. -- two or three. can i have comment on whether the northern ireland specific backstop could be replaced with the idea of a uk wide customs union? madam, we are not in a negotiation room here. sorry, maybe it is too general but what i can say todayis it is too general but what i can say today is that we are in a much wetter mood now. what i feel today is we are closer to final solutions and the deal but it may be more
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emotional in person than the russian one. as you know, emotions matter in politics. thank you. two questions, ifi politics. thank you. two questions, if i may, one to each of you. for mr tusk, if indeed there is an extension of the transition, is it clear to you that britain would have to make additional payments to the eu budget and, forjean—claude juncker, us commons secretary ross surprised everyone yesterday by saying that president trump's patients is unlimited when it comes to trade talks with europe. and he was suggesting that europe is dragging its feet over the talks. when you left the white house meeting with mr trump injuly, did
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you feel at this stage, at this point now, we would be in serious negotiations and whose fault is it if the talks are moving slowly? as i mentioned in my introduction, the length of the transition period was not discussed among the 27 leaders yesterday and i do not want to be a pa rt of yesterday and i do not want to be a part of the speculations.” yesterday and i do not want to be a part of the speculations. i had a meeting with president trump by the end ofjuly and what we have agreed and the two of us have committed two will be done. we discussed africa this morning. that was an important element of our debates. i do not think we mentioned it. morocco. yes.
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morocco is africa, yeah? north africa. it was not only about morocco. i wanted to say, as i did chewing the speech on the state of the union it is not about migration. we wa nt the union it is not about migration. we want a fair, equal partnership with the african continent because we think this will be one of the main problems we have to share together with the africans. i will visit tunisia later this month and i am intending to visit morocco in january, february. so, we are very close to the concerns of the africans but i wanted to say, don't make the mistake to think this is only about migration. we have an internal investment programme. we
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have to build a stronger economic relation with our african friends. it is not only about migration. one la st it is not only about migration. one last question. you said there might be an agreement by the end of the year on the european stability mechanism and the banking union. you did not all about the eurozone budget. is that premature? translation: know, last year, i suggested that in the framework of the general eu budget, we should dedicate some lines to the eurozone budget, whether you call it a eurozone budget or dedicated eurozone budget or dedicated eurozone budget or dedicated eurozone budget lines. but when no, the idea has not gone away. this concludes the press conference.
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interesting noises about the state of negotiations. jean—claude juncker saying the idea of an extension to be transition period is a good idea, he said, to give us some more room. he was convinced there would be a deal on brexit. no deal, said jean—claude juncker, would be dangerous. it will be done. sounding very convinced there will be a deal and that a no deal will be dangerous. also significantly from donald tusk, president of the european council, saying that the mood at this summit was much better than in salzburg, which remembering did in some acrimony and we are much closer to a deal. both of them sounding pretty upbeat and pretty positive about the prospects of a deal and warning again of the dangers of no deal.
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that is the latest from brussels. more from my colleague at the top of the hour. the international development secretary penny mordaunt has been heckled at a conference about sex abuse in the aid sector. it follows a series of high—profile abuse scandals. one former aid worker — and whistleblower from save the children — confronted the cabinet minister on stage — alleging the government was trying to control women in the sector. naomi grimley reports. it was the scandal that shook the aid sector. this year we learned how some of oxfam's staff had severely compromised its dearly held values. they'd used young prostitutes in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake. the charity dismissed four members of staff and let three quietly resign without properly flagging up what had happened. and sexual harassment... today at a special safeguarding summit, the government made it clear it wants to turn the page on the sex abuse scandals in the aid sector. let there be no doubt that that is what we are here to do. notjust tinker around the edges
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but to fundamentally rewrite the way this sector operates from root to branch. amongst the announcements were a new project with interpol to let charities access criminal records more quickly, and support for a so—called passport for aid workers, meaning charities can voluntarily pool information about job applicants. that is an excellent time for me to intervene, secretary of state. but as the minister was in full flow, she was interrupted by a protester who had been an aid worker but had quit in anger. this is about giving truth to power and i don't feel i have seen anything from what you have been coming out with with your pre—cooked summit solutions to tackle that. 0k. thank you for saying that. some of the anger is because save the children are helping to deliver the reforms when they have had their own scandal of sexual harassment in head office.
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but the charity itself believes change is happening. it's not a silver bullet, other things need to happen alongside it, including organisations working together to share information including tough internal scrutiny, and actually ensuring that cultures inside organisations change to put survivors and communities first. if nothing else, this eventful summit shows that the aid sector is still contorted about the way it has been run in the past. let's get the latest from brussels and brexit. we werejust ringing let's get the latest from brussels and brexit. we were just ringing you whatjean—claude juncker and donald tusk was saying, that no deal would be dangerous and that it will be done. let's get thoughts from christian fraser. both of them
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sounding pretty upbeat.” christian fraser. both of them sounding pretty upbeat. i think there has been an acknowledgement beside that the fallout from the salzburg summit was not really helpful in the process committee was not helpful for theresa may and caused all sorts of political difficulties back home. there has been a more determined effort on the pa rt been a more determined effort on the part of big european leaders and jean—claude juncker and donald tusk about what is down on paper. a large pa rt about what is down on paper. a large part of the withdrawal agreement, the divorced paper, is signed off. 90% of it is in green. it is really this indissoluble issue of the border, the northern ireland border, which gets in the way. they think they can move towards something out they can move towards something out the big positive. they don't have very much time to do it, i might add because we have heard from the vice president to the european parliament that she wants something on the table by december said that the european parliament can ratify it and they told us in the press
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conference we have just heard that the november summit is on ice. the one that is down for the 17th and 18th of next month. they are very few opportunities to get something across the line. does the transition issues of anything for theresa may? iam issues of anything for theresa may? i am doubtful because it pushes the backstop further and further away, it does not solve the issue of what to do with a non—frictionless border. is there something in the pipeline they are discussing? i don't know. we will find out in the next few weeks. on the idea of extending the transition period which the british government has come up with, donald tusk and jean—claude juncker sounded pretty positive but that is not really her problem. her problem is selling it to her own backbenchers at westminster. precisely, yes. people here in the room think it is more realistic to talk about her three—year transition to get the final trading agreements, the final
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relationship, because two years is particularly ambitious when you talk all the european parliament is needing to ratify and all the work that needs to be done. there is an enormous amount of work still to be done on that. i suppose, they think it might create some wiggle room for theresa may but we have heard from the brexiteers today the sort of problems it creates, we are tied to the european union or another year without a say on the rules, we are paying in billions for the pleasure of that and there are other costs of belongings to things like erasmus and the nuclear pacts we have with europe which has to come with it. you are not forced ultimately to get past the problem that is preventing the trade agreement. i do not think it will satisfy the brexiteers alive think it will certainly not satisfy
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the democratic unionist party. —— andi the democratic unionist party. —— and i think. donald tusk is saying we are in a much better mood than after salzburg and, what i feel todayis after salzburg and, what i feel today is that we are closer to final solutions and the deal. he said, maybe that is a more emotional impression than a rational one but emotions matter in politics and they do. yes, they do. in some respects, there is a greater understanding perhaps this side about the difficulties that theresa may has with the northern ireland backstop in the political problems it causes for her, in particular the sovereignty issues it causes when you factor in the democratic unionist party. one solution the other side of the withdrawal agreement might be to open up the rest of the united kingdom to a customs union and katya adler, our european editor, did put that to them. that sounds technical but what they are saying is rather than
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cleave of northern ireland and that remaining solely in the customs union, could we not extend that to the rest of the united kingdom to get around the problem? that sounds like you are having your cake and eating it but the other problem is the uk is throwing that into the mix with just three months of the negotiation left foot if we decide something has to be done by december. michel barnier has said there is not enough time to do it now. maybe the extra year or the months the other side of the transition, does that create a space to be able to come up with a solution like that and does that entire package solve the concerns of the dup? we will see. it will certainly be discussed in the days ahead. i will not bet on it. thank you very much indeed. in the meantime we are going to go to some pictures of the room where theresa may is going to be speaking with her view on what has been going on in brussels in the last 24 hours or so.
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the cameramen, including the bbc‘s own cameraman, waiting for the prime minister to speak. we will bring you that as soon as she comes into the room and addresses the press after those comments which, as we were discussing with christian from donald tusk and jean—claude juncker, slightly more upbeat than after salzburg. jean—claude juncker saying that a no deal would be dangerous and a deal will be done. look other news now. the duke and duchess of sussex have hit the beach during a visit to melbourne — but there's been no time to relax. on the third day of their tour of australia they've been looking at efforts to keep the coastline litter—free. in front of thousands of well—wishers prince harry also spoke of "fast fashion" and its environmental impact. our royal correspondentjonny dymond reports from melbourne. from australia's second city, a first—class welcome. they only came for a day. for many here, it would be a day to remember.
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for one young woman, it was all a bit too much. as for that royal no touching rule? forget about it, you could almost feel the love. outside the governor's residence, a scheme to get women into fitness. for meghan, a chance to try aussie rules football. for the women involved, the chance to meet their inspiration. she's definitely a role model, i feel like anybody who has a position of power and uses it for good is considered a role model. her work with women and even coming here and speaking to the people, local melburnians about getting active, shows she is interested and wants to help in anyway that she can. from the green grass
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to the golden sands. but this was a beach trip with a purpose. championing the clean—up campaign that battles the plastic and needles that sweep up on the coast. watching the couple's every move, more crowds. a beach clean—up may not seem like a very royal concern, but it is a concern for people who live in melbourne. and it's the way the couple have got involved in issues like this that has connected them with australians. ijust think harry is just lovely. harry in particular? yeah, harry in particular. i really think they have taken on board the people's princess, i am going to say concept, that diana was her signature really and it's coming down through harry and his new wife. it was a brief visit, but melbourne loved it and the couple showed that royalty and relevance can go hand—in—hand.
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jonny dymond, bbc news, melbourne. we are going to have that business news in a moment that first the latest on the news about jamaal khashoggi, the saudi journalist it is alleged has been brutally murdered inside the saudi consulate in istanbul. we are hearing that the american secretary of state is going to be making a statement about that, the disappearance of mr khashoggi, at the white house in the next few minutes. we will be bringing that to you. here is right now. in riyadh, with the king, the crown prince got all of the united states cou nterpa rts
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all of the united states counterparts were there. we made it clear that we take this matter with respect of mr khashoggi very seriously thought that they made it clear to me they'd understand the serious nature of the disappearance of mr khashoggi. they also assured me they will conduct a complete and thorough investigation of all of the fa cts thorough investigation of all of the facts surrounding mr khashoggi and they will do so in a timely fashion. this report will be transparent for eve ryo ne this report will be transparent for everyone to see and ask questions about and to acquire with the respect of fairness. we ought to give them a few more days to com plete give them a few more days to complete that so that we have a com plete complete that so that we have a complete understanding of the facts surrounding that. we can then make a statement about how we should respond to the incident surrounding mr khashoggi. it is important to remember we have a long strategic relationship with the kingdom of saudi arabia. they are an important counterterrorism partner and they
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have custody of the two holy sites. they are an important strategic alliance of the united states and we need to be mindful of that as well. and i travelled and met with president erdogan, he talked to me about the incident. he told me they we re about the incident. he told me they were conducting their own investigation. we had a chance to meet with some of the team involved. he assured me they would share their results with the saudis as well. we do believe that, between these two efforts, a complete picture will emerge from actually transpired here and we're working towards fact, we looking forward to back wrapping up quickly and we expect it to be done in that way. why should saudi arabia be trusted to conduct a fair and impartial investigation? we're all going to get to see the work and the response that the kingdom of siberia de takes. when we see that all of us will get a chance to take a
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determination. —— the kingdom of saudi arabia takes. good afternoon. at this council on our shared determination to eliminate people trafficking, i reiterated the uk's min now and in the future to tackling migration problems at screen “— tackling migration problems at screen “ upstream. tackling migration problems at screen —— upstream. there is increasingly global, complex and sophisticated threats we must tackle together. we must take further restrictive measures to deter cyber attacks. last night i updated my fellow leaders on the good progress that has been made in the brexit negotiations since salzburg on the withdrawal agreement and on the future framework, thanks to the efforts of both negotiating teams. on the withdrawal agreement there are a few but considerable outstanding issues in relation to
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the northern irish backstop. i am committed to working with the commission and eu leaders to resolve these as quickly as possible. there isa these as quickly as possible. there is a lot of hard work ahead now will be more difficult moments as we enter the final stages of the talks. i'm convinced we will secure a good deal in the interests of the uk and the european union. i will take a few questions. thank you. you have been straining in the last couple of yea rs been straining in the last couple of years to keep all the promises you have made 30 brexiteers, two former remainer is, to northern ireland and business. ultimately you will have to disappoint someone. who is it going to be? what we have done is the government has put forward a set of proposals delivering on the vote of proposals delivering on the vote of the british people, that within sure we would end free movement and enter the jurisdiction of the court
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of human justice and enter the jurisdiction of the court of humanjustice and sending vast amounts of money to the european union every year, come out of the common agricultural policy and out of the common fisheries policy and protectjobs and of the common fisheries policy and protect jobs and livelihoods and the integrity of the union of the united kingdom. that is a proposal i believe is good for the uk but also would be good for the european union. tom... in the last 24 hours orso, if union. tom... in the last 24 hours or so, if you do not mind me being a little blunt about this...” or so, if you do not mind me being a little blunt about this... i have never known you be blunt before. you have angered brexiteers, you have angered remainers, you appear to have disappointed eu leaders by not bringing in any fresh and concrete proposals to the table and even went for a beer without you last night. what in your view is going wrong? these are always going to be tough
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negotiations and they were going to get tougher as we got to the closing stages of the gauche durations. yes, there are some difficult issues we are working through. —— of the negotiations. crucial is the issue of the northern irish backstop and we need to provide for a solution which is not the solution produced by the european commission initially which would have carved northern ireland away from the rest of the united kingdom. that is unacceptable to the uk government and to any uk government. on that issue, further solutions have been put forward. what we want to do is to work to get through that so we can actually get to the deal that i believe will be good for the british people. that is what we are working through these tough negotiations for, delivering on the boat of the british people are doing in a way to protectjobs and the e as well. —— delivering on
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the vote. with every compromise you make it these talks, the transition extension being the latest example, doesn't become less and less likely that your party will ever be able to get behind this deal? first of all let the address this issue you have raised about the potential extension to the transitional or implementation period. this idea has been around before. i have been asked about the ten shall for an extension in the house of commons previously. i have always been clear we negotiated an implementation period with the eu and that period would end at the end of december 2020. what has now emerged is the idea that an option to extend the limitation period could be a further solution to this issue of the backstop in northern ireland. what we are not doing, we are not standing here proposing an extension to the limitation period. what we
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are doing is working to ensure we have a solution to the backstop issue in northern ireland which enables us... which is currently a blockage to completing the deal, that enables us to get on with completing a deal delivering on the vote of the british people that is good for the future of the uk. heather, i think it is heather... yes, sorry. hello. eu leaders now do not have a meeting in the diary for november, the european councilfor november. the next one scheduled as december. if that turns out to the —— to bea december. if that turns out to the —— to be a meeting at which a deal is signed is there still time to get it ratified in parliament? if there is not a dealer that point is time to get whitehall ready for a no in march? we are intensifying the work.
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we are very clear. from what i have heard from leaders around the table over the last hours since i arrived here in brussels yesterday is a very real sense that people want that deal to be done. if you look at some other comments that have been made. chancellor merkel said where there isa chancellor merkel said where there is a will there is normally a way. jean—claude juncker said let's focus on the large areas of agreement and it will be done. there is a real sense that what we are doing is working to ensure that can do this deal within that reasonable timetable. i deal within that reasonable timetable. lam deal within that reasonable timetable. i am very aware of the legislative requirements we have in the house of commons and the period of time that will take. jason... the irish europe minister has said you know except, you have said you accept that the final backstop cannot be time limited. is that right? closer to home,
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cannot be time limited. is that right? closerto home, mr chowdhury will be released imminently and security services say he is still a threat to the public, you happy to see him on the streets again? on the first point, if i take a step back and explain what the backstop is. what it is intended to be there for? if there is a gap between the end of the fermentation period which has said has been set at 2020 and the introduction of the future relationship. if there is a period of months and i think we would only be talking about a matter of months when there is that gap, it is ensuring there is no return to a ha rd ensuring there is no return to a hard border between northern ireland and ireland during that time. because we believe the future relationship will resolve the issue of the border between northern ireland and ireland and it is that future relationship we want to see in place. and nobody wants the backstop in place. and nobody wants the ba cksto p to in place. and nobody wants the backstop to have to be used. we want to ensure that the future relationship, dealing with the issue
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of northern ireland, comes into place at the end of the implementation period which i have said we negotiated that period through to the end of december 2020. on the question of anjem choudary, obviously, he is an extremist preacher, he pledged his allegiance to daesh. if and when any terrorist event that is released, well rehearsed plans put in place to keep the public safe and the police, the prison and probation service and other agencies have powers available. they'll so have significant experience in dealing with such offenders. this includes the setting of strict licence conditions such as restrictions on movement and internet access, stringent curfews movement and internet access, stringent cu rfews and movement and internet access, stringent curfews and the breach of which could result in immediate recall to prison. now, can i ask if there is somebody here from —— bugle? —— der spiegel.
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there is somebody here from —— bugle? -- der spiegel. that does not seem to be a majority in the house of commons for a conceivable deal so what do you tell uk partners to take away their fear of the deal been rejected in parliament? looking back at the negotiations so far, would you say you have underestimated the eu's unity and if yes, how will you change your approach in the final stage of the talks? first, i think this will be the last question, but first of all, in relation to the unity of the 27, right at the very beginning of this process, i said we wa nt beginning of this process, i said we want the eu to remain strong. it is in the interests of the uk as the near neighbours of the 27 remaining states of the european union for the european union to remain strong. you asked about the question of the deal and is taking that back to
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parliament, i am confident we can achieve that good deal. and that when i take that steel back to parliament, at the members of parliament, at the members of parliament, i will be asking members of parliament to recall we are delivering on a vote of the british people. we gave the british people that choice, they voted to leave the eu and we will be delivering on that vote. and think about the importance of protecting jobs and livelihoods in the uk, protecting our security and the uk, protecting the union of the united kingdom. i think those will be issues that members of parliament will want to consider when looking at the deal. i believe a good dealfor the uk will be one that does deliver on the vote of the british people and is all those things, protects jobs, british people and is all those things, protectsjobs, security and the union of the united kingdom. thank you. theresa may, the british prime
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minister, departing the podium after speaking to members of the british and european press at the end of the european summit in brussels which has been going on since yesterday evening. a different summit from the one we expected when it comes to the negotiations over the uk's exit from the eu cash from the eu. the plan was the negotiations would make enough progress that the 27 leaders of the remaining countries could give a thumbs up to the football street he and get their heads down to spend the next month working on another document to spell out the future relationship with the eu so it could be signed off at another summit in mid—november, before the deal went to the british parliament to be approved by members of parliament. instead, the eu has judged that has not been decisive progress in the talks they expected. they are not planning for an extra summit in november. we don't have an outline of the shape of the future relationship. and all we have learned is both sides are now
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considering the concept, the idea at this stage of asking for an extension of the post—brexit transition or implementation phase which will last from brexit day next year on till the end of december 2020. proving quite controversial in the united kingdom today. what theresa may has also got is a lot of warm words from the other side. there was a summit a few weeks ago in the austrian city of salzburg which ended in acrimony. not this time. so listen to donald tusk, the president of the european council, who chairs the summit. the issue of the length of the transition period was not discussed among the eu 27 leaders yesterday. but let me recall that in her florence speech in september 2017, prime minister may proposed a transition period of around two
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yea rs transition period of around two years and the eu accepted this proposal unanimously. so if the uk decided an extension of the transition period would be helpful to reach a deal, i am sure the leaders would be ready to consider it positively. what is traditional at the end of these summit is loads of the other leaders to press conferences so let's hear from the german chancellor angela merkel. time is of the essence. but still, we do not have a solution on all fronts. for example, we still have to deal with the irish situation, there is still no satisfactory answer to this, this cannot be completely separated from the question of what our relationship is going to look like in the future. so this loomed large in the agenda of yesterday's talks. but i still think a lot was reviewed, analysed in a very constructive way. german chancellor angela merkel. to
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help us understand some of the technicalities, i am joined help us understand some of the technicalities, iam joined by help us understand some of the technicalities, i am joined by the bbc‘s reality check correspondent chris norris. tell us about this transition and fermentation phase. the transition as part of the withdrawal agreement which has to be signed and ratified before brexit. it prevents a sudden change in the relationship between the uk and the rest of the european union. so is mr departure. for 21 months after brexit, it would be good for businesses, many businesses say that would be good, we would stay in the single market and the customs union and continue to enjoy the benefits of that. but rules would stay the same as well, which would mean the eu, the uk rather continuing to abide by the rules of the european court ofjustice, paying large budget payments into the eu budget and continuing to allow free movement of people. what we have heard at the summit and the days leading up to it, there could be an extension perhaps of up to a year.
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theresa may talks about a matter of months. the thing about an extension, it is a possibility. but what, how long would that go on for? it feels like it should be for not all that long, but where would it go once you have got to the other side the transition? but there is always a but! there is always a but and it is this, i suppose. if you had a transition lasting for nearly three yea rs, transition lasting for nearly three years, that is nearly three years of the uk having to abide by all eu rules without having any say in making them. you can argue, yes, it gives you more time to reach that future relationship that theresa may say she wants or solve the irish border question. a lot of people say thatis border question. a lot of people say that is not really the case because evenif that is not really the case because even if you have a longer transition, that does not remove the need to have this irish backstop, the guarantee that and are also
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insta nces, the guarantee that and are also instances, there would be something that would keep the irish border open. and that is the problem. you can extend the transition and have mechanisms and review clauses, but the rest of the eu still insists to the rest of the eu still insists to the uk that that backstop has to be in the document. let's bring in sarah collins, sitting in the waiting room. she has not got a microphone! i will talk to you while sarah gets ready. what you are saying is that in the brexit treaty, which has to be finished in a couple of weeks and voted on in a couple of months' time in the british parliament, there will probably have to bea parliament, there will probably have to be a clause that says ultimately may be potentially in the last resort northern ireland stays in the eu's customs union. yes, last resort, but yes. it is very clear the rest of the eu says you have to keep that option open. interesting quote in the press conference yesterday from leo varadkar, this is not a yesterday from leo varadkar, this is nota minor yesterday from leo varadkar, this is not a minor squall, this is like climate change, this will change the
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relationship forever between the uk and ireland and the uk and the eu. they want a cast—iron guarantee that that potential backstop will be there. everyone says we do not want to ever be used, doesn't matter, still has to be that legally enforcea ble still has to be that legally enforceable language. the word i heard last night was, flood, you can do lots of things to camouflage it and put options roundabout and use linguistic treaty drafting trips to minimise its effect, but it still fundamentally has to be there. and as an equal problem, a bigger problem, theresa may says she is convinced the irish border problem can be resolved in the terms of the future relationship. well, if you are future relationship. well, if you a re really future relationship. well, if you are really going to keep the border as open as it is now, the only way you can really do that unless somebody comes up with a cunning plan no one has invented is to stay in the single market and the customs union. it is back to where we started. the united kingdom has to make a big choice between market
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access and sovereignty, and that basic dilemma is not really changed since the referendum to leave the european union more than two years ago. thank you very much. checking our reality. the other technicality about the transition period is we are talking about an extra clause in the brexit treaty that means the transition period could be extended at some point in the future so that is the short—term issue. talking to eu sources here, they say the uk would have a veto on whether the transition period or implementation phase was extended or not. that is to guard against this allegation that somehow the uk would be held prisoner in a transition period against its will which is the allegation you have heard from tory backbenchers and in the uk from brexiteers. we can now bring in sarah collins, she has a microphone on, that is the best news i have had all day! you report for the evening standard and other irish newspapers which gives you a perspective on the backstop, what have we learned about
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what is going on with avoiding the ha rd what is going on with avoiding the hard border in ireland? we have learned the same thing is still going on now that was going on last march and that was going on even before brexit that in order to avoid ha rd before brexit that in order to avoid hard border, you need to have a good enough to rate deal in place with minimal checks so you don't need to have any infrastructure at the border. the problem is that a trade deal will not be in place in time and the irish prime minister leo varadkar says he and the irish prime minister leo va radkar says he needs and the irish prime minister leo varadkar says he needs that assurance there will be something to fill the gap between brexit today and when that trade deal comes into place. that is notjust rhetoric from the irish government, they really, really mean it. they really mean it. one of the things that leo varadkar said on his way into the summit yesterday, he had a copy of an irish newspaper and his arm with an irish newspaper and his arm with a story on the front page of a killing in ireland on the border in the 19705 where there were border posts. it is a reread this role beer irish people have that any infrastructure could be targeted and
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used by power most trees as a target and create new smuggling routes. it isa and create new smuggling routes. it is a primalfear. but and create new smuggling routes. it is a primal fear. but there and create new smuggling routes. it is a primalfear. but there is and create new smuggling routes. it is a primal fear. but there is also the question for the irish of having a good trade links with the uk and good trade links with the eu fired the uk which they use as what is called a land bridge. they talk about east—west trade as well. thank you very much, sorry we did not have longer, that is what happens when you don't have a microphone on new! thanks very much, see you later. that is the end of the summit in brussels except it is not really because now 56 asian prime ministers have turned up for a meeting with their eu counterparts to discuss global issues. back to you. adam fleming, reporting live from brussels. look at the day's other news. the trade secretary liam fox has pulled out of a major saudi arabian investment conference, following the suspected murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi
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in the saudi consulate in turkey. the washington post has published his last column before he went missing — in it, he says arab governments are given free rein to silence the media. in the last hour, us secretary of state mike pompeo, who has just returned from a visit to saudi arabi and turkey, told reporters that saudi arabia will be given a few more days to investigate before there is any us response mr khashoggi's disappearance. i had ihada i had a chance to brief the president when i travelled to riyadh and ankara and i had a chance to talk with the king and the crown prince in riyadh, all the united states counterparts. we made clear to them we take this matter with respect to jamal khashoggi very seriously. they made clear they to understand the serious nature of the disappearance of mr khashoggi. they also assured me they will conduct a com plete also assured me they will conduct a complete and for investigation of all of the facts surrounding mr
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khashoggi and they will do so in a timely fashion. and that this report itself will be transparent for eve ryo ne itself will be transparent for everyone to see and ask questions about and to acquire its thoroughness. i told about and to acquire its thoroughness. itold president about and to acquire its thoroughness. i told president trump we are to give them a few more days to co m plete we are to give them a few more days to complete that so that we can also have a complete understanding of the fa cts have a complete understanding of the facts surrounding that at which point, we can make decisions about if the united states should respond to the incident surrounding mr khashoggi. i think it is important to remember that we have a long and since 1932, a long strategic relationship with the kingdom of saudi arabia and it continues to be at important cans terrorism partner, they have custody of the two holy sites and they are an important strategic alliance of the united states and we need to be mindful of that. when i travelled and met with president erdogan, he talk to me about the incident. he told me they we re about the incident. he told me they were conducting their own investigation. we had a chance to
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meet with some of the team involved with that. he assured me they would share their results with the saudis as well. so we do believe that between these two efforts, a com plete between these two efforts, a complete picture will emerge for what actually transpired here. and we're working towards that, we look forward to that wrapping up quickly and we expect it will be done in that way. that is the us secretary of mike pompeo. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: theresa may says there are still considerable unresolved issues with the eu relating to a backstop irish border arrangement, but that the uk had made a new proposal on the subject. us secretary of state mike pompeo says saudi arabia will be given a few more days to investigate the disappearance of the journalist, jamal khashoggi. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten—year peak.
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and — not quite dressed for the beach — harry and meghan get a warm reception, as they visit a coastline clean—up campaign in melbourne. there is no place for danny cipriani the —— danny cipriani in england's squad. they face matches against champions new zealand and australia. much maligned by his boss last season, jose mourinho, luke shaw has signed a new contract which will keep him at manchester united until june 2023, with an option to extend it for a further year. and the former pakistan cricket here has admitted spot fixing after six years of denial. i will be back with more on those stories shortly. the aftermath of that summit in brussels, we have heard from french president emmanuel macron, who says it is now up to the british prime minister theresa may to come up with
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new exit solutions. he said that brexit is now a british political issue and a political issue in britain, and no longer a technical one. so that the latest from president macron, and the various leaders have been talking, as you will have heard. we heard from angela merkel who said, while there is well, there is a way. we heard from jean—claude juncker as well, saying that no deal would be dangerous. he thought that a deal be done. and president macron of france saying that the brexit issue is now a british political issue and no longer a technical one. and we were hearing from all correspondence in brussels that so much of the brexit agreement has been agreed, something like 95%, but still keep issues to do with the northern ireland backstop in particular. —— key issues. the scottish government has
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confirmed a case of bse — more commonly known as mad cow's disease. restrictions on the movement of livestock have been put in place at the farm in aberdeenshire, while further investigations take place. officials said there was no risk to human health. our environment correspondent, claire marshall, has been following the story. everyone i have spoken to say the government, the scottish government, several facts, they say, government, the scottish government, severalfacts, they say, don't worry, you can buy your beef tomorrow in the supermarket and it is fine. it is likely they can contain is on one farm. they have spoken to the farmer and said, don't leave animals around, keep everything there and we will test this carcass which was found in a cow that have died already. so don't panic essentially. but it is interesting because they are quite rare. there have been sporadic cases in recent years. this is a one—off, but not unknown. it is not unknown, no. that is why they are taking it seriously. there is a really
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comprehensive surveillance system. every cow that you might eat that goes into the food chain is now checked for this and several other things, in the abattoir, they get checks all over completely. that came into place after the 19805 and the 19905, when you may remember the horrific outbreak of bse when there we re horrific outbreak of bse when there were huge piles of cows that had to be culled, millions had to be killed, because a link was established with the disease that occurs in humans called variant cjd and that is an awful disease that attacks your brain and damages your brain so much that you eventually die. they found this link and com pletely die. they found this link and completely changed what cows were fed, so they were being fed other bits of cows and other sheep and that has changed. they are just fed cows and checks go into place so eve ryo ne cows and checks go into place so everyone i have spoken to say is,
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don't worry, they are looking at it. claire marshall, our environment correspondent. the duke and duchess of sussex have hit the beach during a visit to melbourne — but there's been no time to relax. on the third day of their tour of australia, they've been looking at efforts to keep the coastline litter—free. in front of thousands of well—wishers, prince harry also spoke of "fast fashion" and its environmental impact. our royal correspondent, jonny dymond, reports from melbourne. from australia's second city, a first—class welcome. they only came for a day. for many here, it would be a day to remember. for one young woman, it was all a bit too much. as for that royal no touching rule? forget about it, you could almost feel the love. outside the governor's residence,
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a scheme to get women into fitness. for meghan, a chance to try aussie rules football. for the women involved, a chance to meet their inspiration. she's definitely a role model. i feel like anybody who has a position of power and uses it for good is considered a role model. her work with women and even coming here and speaking to the people, local melburnians about getting active, shows she is interested and wants to help in any way that she can. from the green grass to the golden sands. but this was a beach trip with a purpose. championing the clean—up campaign that battles the plastic and needles that sweep up on the coast. watching the couple's every move, more crowds. a beach clean—up may not seem
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like a very royal concern, but it is a concern for people who live in melbourne. and it's the way that the couple have got involved like this that has connected them with australians. ijust think harry is just lovely. harry in particular? yeah, harry in particular. i really think they have taken on board the people's princess, i'm going to say concept, that diana, was her signature really and it's coming down through harry and his new wife. it was a brief visit, but melbourne loved it and the couple showed that royalty and relevance can go hand—in—hand. jonny diamond, bbc news, melbourne. what sounds like a cat, but looks like a bird? it's not the start to a bad joke, but a genuine description of a north american bird that has turned up in cornwall. the grey catbird has drawn thousands of keen birdwatchers to fields near lands end.
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it's only the second time it's been spotted in the uk. naomi dymond has been to take a look... they came today to catch a glimpse of the bird, a species native to north america. we have stepped away from the group because the name of the game is not only patience, but also silence. the twitchers are poised with their cameras and it really is a waiting game. what's it like when you are waiting and you actually spot it? it's not pleasurable, i have to say. ooh, there it goes. it's just gone past. oh, it has flown right over our heads. that was timing! it's extremely stressful, i have to say. when you have over a 40—minute wait and then it pops up, it is light relief.
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their patience was eventually rewarded. it's been blown across by the winds we've had recently and the conditions abroad, it doesn't belong here, it is a rare bird. it is a migratory species in america and it mimics a catlike noise, which is why it is called a catbird. we didn't get close enough to hear it, but you can hear its call in this footage captured in florida. many travelled hundreds of miles today, so a lot depended on this little bird. i think it is about the longest i have had to wait for a bird without giving up. relief. i set out at 5am, so it is a relief. going to drive back now. it's not known how long the bird will survive here, but that's not stopping those keen to catch a glimpse while they can. naomi dimond, bbc news, cornwall.
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time for a look at the weather. here's x. for bird—watchers and everybody else. and news of the tree of the year competition which has been partly anticipated! who is the winner? you strike me as a romantic, are you? of course. this is a lovely story. this has been voted tree of the year. it was grafted, this beach tree, into the shape of n because the man pointed it to propose to his then girlfriend nelly. this is near leeds. it is over 100 years old and a p pa re ntly leeds. it is over 100 years old and apparently is now a place where lots of young people go to propose to their loved ones and was nominated by their grandson chris and it is the winner. is that not a lovely story? it is, so it is sort of man—made. yes, man—made, it got lots of votes and is now the new tree of the year.
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i will let you into a secret, i was climbing a tree when my husband proposed and a piece of the bark is in the hallway of my house. beautiful afternoon in yorkshire, lots of sunshine around and another glorious day. is that going to last? yes, it will last until the weekend so not much weather to talk about because most of the afternoon, i am talking breeze. but lovely story and lovely day in yorkshire and also many of us today. this autumn sunshine still continuing. lots of lovely colour. but there is a weak weather front into the north west. it is going to bring a little cloud through the evening. and then the winds will strengthen and we will see rain arriving eventually. it will take time. winds of 40, 45 mouse per hour unexposed west coates. temperatures in double figures. two, three degrees and a clear skies sir richard leese start in north west england. through the
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day, we have high pressure which brings beautiful autumn weather. the weather front toppling across the high so it continues to bring shower —— showery outbreaks of rain. it wea ke ns —— showery outbreaks of rain. it weakens as it pushes south and east through scotland. by the afternoon, showers as it moves through the borders into the north of england and parts of northern ireland. to the south of that, it is dry and settled and sunny, temperatures above the average, highs of 17 degrees, 63 fahrenheit. but it could lead to a quiet and still autumn night so we could see dense fog lingering first thing on saturday morning. it may lift to low cloud so you could be disappointed on saturday, but mostly, england and wales will be dry and sunny. further north and west, showery rain, but east of scotland is still quite warm, 17 degrees, 17 or 18 across the country which is still above the
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average for the time of year. into sunday, only subtle changes. the height is getting squeezed and this weather front is trying to push on which means the second half of the weekend will see more rain. but not much significant rain. perhaps pushing into north west england as north wales by the end of the afternoon and maybe more cloud around than we have seen of late. but mostly a quiet weekend and a good deal of dry autumn weather. good afternoon. you're watching bbc news. time for all the latest sport with chris. eight new players — no danny cipriani. eddiejones, the england rugby union coach, has picked his squad for the autumn internationals next month. lots of changes. here's our sports reporter, patrick gearey. a year from the world cup, eddie jones has been solving the puzzle for the pieces keep disappearing. eight of his 2016 grand slam winning team aren't available for the autumn internationals — the curious case of the vanishing englishman. the vanishing englishmen.
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people used to say that in the early 20005 when we had a string of injuries, people would say, "the game's getting too tough, it's getting too physical." we go through these cycles and you have runs, for some reason — no one knows why it happens, science can't explain it — and it just happens, and it will rectify itself. just last night, jones lost another one. this time, through suspension. nathan hughes, the powerhouse number eight, banned for punching and then tweeting about it. he was supposed to take billy vunipola's place in the side. once a key player forjones, he broke his arm — 12 weeks out. england do have more players to choose from than any other rugby nation, and yet there's no place in the latest squad squad for danny cipriani, september's premiership player of the month. a controversial call on a controversial character. and after a year of indifferent results, the focus is on the man making them. he's lost, with england, five of the last six internationals. but this is a new season, they're building up for the world cup, and what he has to do is find good replacements — excellent players will come in. but it's a pressure on the players — the whole squad, and eddie.
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jones and england will have been hoping this autumn would erase the memories of spring — when they came fifth in the six nations — but in three weeks they must face the all—conquering all blacks. just when they wanted to be fine—tuning for the world cup, england keep having to replace the engine. patrick gearey, bbc news. he was much maligned last season, but luke shaw has signed a new five—year contract at manchester united. it's a big turn around for the 23—year—old who was heavily criticised by boss jose mourinho last season. but he's made the left back role his own this term, is back in the england squad, and has been rewarded with a new contract worth around £150,000 a week. shaw says, "i am very proud to sign my new contract and continue my stay at this great club... "i'm still very young" —
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he's 23 — "with a lot more to learn and i can't wait to continue my progress under jose mourinho." meanwhile the united manager had this to say: "luke fully deserves this contract. "he understood his development process, he has worked really hard at every level and he always believes in himself which is a great attribute to have." roma fan filippo lombardi has been found not guilty of inflicting grievous bodily harm on a liverpool fan. sean cox was hit outside anfield ahead of the champions league semifinal in april. lombardi was cleared by a jury at preston crown court of the assault. but the italian was jailed for three years on a separate charge of violent disorder, which he admitted. the former pakistan cricketer danish kaneria has admitted spot—fixing, after six years of denial. the leg—spinner was banned from playing in england and wales for life after he was found to have pressured former essex team—mate mervyn westfield into spot—fixing during a game against durham in 2009. westfield was also banned and jailed for four months.
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kaneria has apologised to westfield, and says he "cannot live a life with lies". lutalo muhammad — the olympic taekwondo silver medallist — says the sport is in urgent need of reform. lutalo muhammad — the olympic taekwondo he says the sport should have more olympic weight divisions to stop athletes risking serious health problems. muhammad, who won silver for great britain in rio, says he has suffered "serious sickness" when attempting to reach the olympic weight category during his career. there are four categories per gender at an olympics, compared to a combined total of 16 at a world championships. the sport needs reform. we need change, we need more weight divisions. because the only reason i and other athletes put themselves in
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those positions where they can run into problems is because we don't have enough weight divisions. i mean, thejump have enough weight divisions. i mean, the jump from welterweight heavyweight is as crazy as it sounds. can you imagine amir khan, if he didn't make it, having to fight anthonyjoshua? if he didn't make it, having to fight anthony joshua ? that if he didn't make it, having to fight anthonyjoshua? that is literally the difference, and we need to change that. tony bellew — the british cruiserweight — says doping tests are having an impact on his current training camp. bellew — who fights in november — has been an outspoken critic of drug cheats and he's called for tougher sanctions on them. but he says he's had to provide five samples in seven weeks. "i'm all for a clean sport," he says, "but they're messing up my sleep patterns every week." usain bolt has turned down a move to the champions of malta. valletta fc had offered him a two—year deal. the eight—time olympic champion is currently on trial at australia's central coast mariners. he scored two goals in a recent pre—season friendly but — so far — hasn't been offered a contract.
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their season starts on sunday. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. chris, thank you. we will see you a little later on. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, has been heckled at a conference about sex abuse in the aid sector. it follows a series of high—profile abuse scandals. one former aid worker — and whistleblower from save the children — confronted the cabinet minister on stage, alleging the government was trying to control women in the sector. naomi grimley reports. it was the scandal that shook the aid sector. this year we learned how some of oxfam's staff had severely compromised its dearly—held values. they'd used young prostitutes in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake. the charity dismissed four members of staff and let three quietly resign without properly flagging up what had happened. and sexual harassment...
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today at a special safeguarding summit, the government made it clear it wants to turn the page on the sex abuse scandals in the aid sector. let there be no doubt that that is what we are here to do. notjust tinker around the edges, but to fundamentally rewrite the way this sector operates from root to branch. amongst penny morduant‘s announcements were a new project with interpol to let charities access criminal records more quickly, and support for a so—called passport for aid workers, meaning charities can voluntarily pool information about job applicants. that is an excellent time for me to intervene, secretary of state. but as the minister was in full flow, she was interrupted by a protester who'd been an aid worker but had quit in anger. this is about giving truth to power, and i don't feel i have seen anything from what you have been coming out with with your pre—cooked summit solutions to tackle that.
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0k. well, thank you for saying that... some of the anger is because save the children are helping to deliver the reforms, when they have had their own scandal of sexual harassment in head office. but the charity itself believes change is happening. it's not a silver bullet — other things need to happen alongside it, including organisations working together to share information inculding tough internal scrutiny, and actually ensuring that cultures inside organisations change to put survivors and communities first. if nothing else, today's eventful summit shows that the aid sector is still contorted about the way it has been run in the past. the number of murders in england and wales has risen to its highest level for ten years. figures from the office for national statistics — published this morning — show that the overall number of crimes recorded by police has gone up by 9%.
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earlier, i spoke to our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, and asked him for more details. i think the concerning thing is this spike in serious violence, which we've been seeing now for the past three orfour years, we've been seeing now for the past three or four years, and we've been seeing now for the past three orfour years, and it shows homicides for example, including cases of murder, infanticide, up to the highest since 2008. more generally violence is up 19%. that is the year until the end ofjune. we're also seeing big increase in robbery, up 22%, again over the same time period. and also, and this is probably driven more by reporting of offences, people moral willing to come forward, sexual offences up 18% —— people more willing to come forward. again, victims more willing to come forward, more confidence in the police, but what all this is doing is driving demand for police forces in england and wales, increasing the number of
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investigations they have to carry out. some of these investigations are very complex and time—consuming, and all ata are very complex and time—consuming, and all at a time when they have seen the number of officers come down by 21,000 over the past eight yea rs. down by 21,000 over the past eight years. which brings us on to clear up years. which brings us on to clear up rates. what is the latest? not good news on clear up rates. these are measured according to how many of all the offences recorded by police end with someone being taken to court, whether they are prosecuted, and the number has dipped below 9%, so the vast majority of crimes do not end up with the perpetrator taken to court and prosecuted. under 9%, that has fallen since the last quarter. one word — quite a difference in scotland. what we've seen in recent yea rs scotland. what we've seen in recent years is generalfalls in crime at scotland. what we've seen in recent years is general falls in crime at a time when officer numbers have risen. the of offences edging up over the past year or two, but quite a contrast between england and wales with big reductions in officer numbers, and in scotland where crime
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rates have been stable or falling and offers a rates have gone up. that was danny shaw, our home affairs correspondent, talking to me affairs correspondent, talking to me a little earlier. let's return to brexit now and the summit in brussels. in the past hour the prime minister said in brussels she was convinced the uk could secure a good deal, when she updated the media on the state of the negotiations. by by the way she was also asked about a possible extension on the transition period, and the fact that that has angered some of her own conservative mps. this is an idea that has been around before and i was asked about the potential for an extension in the house of commons previously. i have always been very clear we negotiated and implement fermentation period with the eu, and we negotiated that that implementation period would end at the end of december 2020. what has now emerged is the idea that an option to extend the implementation period could be a further solution
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to this issue of the backstop in northern ireland. what we are not doing, we are not standing here and proposing an extension to the implantation period. what we are doing working to ensure we have a solution to the backstop issue in northern ireland that enables us, which is currently a blockage to completing the deal, that enables us to get on with completing the deal that delivers on the vote of the british people and is good for the future of the uk. that was theresa may in the last hour or so. earlier, the european council president, donald tusk, said eu leaders would be willing to consider lengthening the transition period as part of the brexit negotiations. yesterday, after listening to prime ministers may's assessment of the state of the negotiations, the eu 27 confirmed we want to continue the talks in their positive spirit. we expressed a full trust in michel
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barnier and asked our negotiator to continue efforts to achieve an agreement. i stand continue efforts to achieve an agreement. istand ready continue efforts to achieve an agreement. i stand ready to convene agreement. i stand ready to convene a european council on brexit, if and when the eu negotiator reports that decisive progress has been made. and we should be clear that for now not enough progress has been made. as there is a lot of speculation about there is a lot of speculation about the length of the transition period once the uk leaves the eu, let me say this. the issue of the length of the transition period was not discussed among the eu 27 leaders yesterday, but let me recall that in her florence speech in september 2017 prime minister may proposed period of around two years and that you accepted this proposal unanimously, therefore if the uk decided an extension of the transition period would be helpful to reach a deal i
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am sure the leaders would be ready to consider this positively. donald tusk there, president of the european council, speaking a little earlier this afternoon. we'll have the latest business news for you injust the moment but we'll have the latest business news for you in just the moment but first a look at the headlines... the prime minister says she's convinced the uk could secure a good deal with the eu. she also said the post—brexit transition period could be extended, as an option. the international trade secretary, liam fox, is pulling out of an investment conference in saudi arabia — amid concerns over the disappearance of the journalist jamal khashoggi. the number of murders in england and wales reaches a ten—year peak. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: a warm summer boosts sales of food and ice cream at unilever, but the company remains tightlipped
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about the decision not to move its headquarters away from the uk. a bolt from the blue. the cypriot airline cobalt air has cancelled all its flights and indefinitely suspended operations, advising customers not to go to the airport. cobalt flew to 23 destinations and operated flights to and from heathrow, stansted, gatwick and manchester. gatwick airport is proposing to start regularly using its emergency runway from the mid—20205. it wants to add new flights to overcome a summer capacity crunch, despite local opposition over safety, noise and environmental concerns. it operates at full capacity in the warmer months. looking at the top market stories now. asos, the online fashion retailer doing well today? yes, that is because of animal
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print, doing well today. in any high street store today it will hit you, like a bolt out of the blue.” street store today it will hit you, like a bolt out of the blue. i knew that. yes, you're not sporting any? but i knew it was trendy. well that has helped asos, boosted their sales by about £500 million, adding 1.3% to its share price today, so it has done very well. lots of other retailers are hoping it will go that way for them as well, it will help their sales. we can find out about asos their sales. we can find out about a505 and other market stories today. laura foll, fund manager for global equity income at janus henderson investors, is here. see my guess, especially considering they are a large retailer in the uk, market cap bigger than marks & spencer '5 —— market cap bigger than marks & spencer 's -- yes, especially considering. really quite impressive. they have a decent chunk of that online clothing market as
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well now? exactly. the uk has been one of the fastest growing online markets, really well developed in terms of online sales in the uk and asos has been one of the key beneficiaries. moving on to not such a great business story in terms of success , a great business story in terms of success, cobalt. announcing at wednesday midnight it was cancelling flights. they haven't done so well in terms of being able to raise finance for its business, and that is why we have seen that announcement today. yeah, really difficult time for the airline sector in general. we saw disappointing result earlier this week from, ryanair profits warning as well. really a result of rising fuel prices and the capacity of that on long and short haul, putting pressure on pricing, really tough environment in which to be an airline operator. how are we seeing other airline stocks comparison? they are generally doing very
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poorly. the parent company has had poorly. the parent company has had poor performance because people are concerned about fuel prices, brexit, capacity, quite a lot of questions over the airline sector at the moment. finally, unilever, interestingly has been in the headlines over its headquarters and choice of location, but it has done quite well, pretty good trading update, but less than it expected in terms of consensus, so we saw the share price dropped today?” terms of consensus, so we saw the share price dropped today? i would say it was moderately good, so volumes slightly disappointing. the consumer staples for this type of company... and when we see moderately it is all fairly small margins, volume is up 2% rather than 396, margins, volume is up 2% rather than 3%, enough to disappoint people. i would say generally unexciting results, not particularly disappointing but not great. what has caused that? unilever makes the likes of marmite, products with pretty high demand. why has that not been so exciting? you think people would be quite happy to spend that
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money on consumer goods, fixtures of the kitchen and everyday life. mixture of things. rightly weakness in emerging markets. argentina has had well— publicised problems in emerging markets. argentina has had well—publicised problems and volumes were down double—digit there are, for example. so there's been a mixture of weakness in emerging markets and really quite dull and moderate growth in the likes of europe and the usa. ok, we will be watching unilever closely i am sure. thanks forjoining us. time for a look at the markets... all down? gloomy red picture. edging lower after what is going on in europe and brussels, negotiations regarding brexit, so we are seeing the market edge slightly down. not having an emergency summit to be able to sort out a deal, that is headed downwards in terms of across—the—board the ftse 100, the in terms of across—the—board the ftse100, the dax and cac, so in terms of across—the—board the ftse 100, the dax and cac, so it'll be interesting to hear reaction from
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businesses tomorrow. ok, michelle, thank you. multinational food giant del monte is locked in a land battle in kenya over the renewal of its lease for a giant 20,000 acre pineapple farm north of nairobi. the fruit ends up in tin cans and juice cartons around the world. their 99—year lease is due to expire next year but some local people want del monte to give up at least a quarter of the land, which they say was grabbed from the country under colonial rule. ferdinand omondi reports. at the age of 85, this woman should be enjoying her sunset years in her rural home. but she spends her days in this poor district of the town, built on land which does not belong to her, expecting to be evicted any day. she says it is a familiar story which started many years ago when, as a little girl, she watched colonial settlers drive her family off their property. translation: when the white man came they drove away the locals
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with their livestock. since then we have moved from place to place. all i want is a place to stay and a place i can bequeath to my children. even if it's a space where they can only lay their heads. just across from this land are vast areas of private farmland on which they do not dare trespass. this fence here represents the big divide that is the land question in kenya today. on my left are hundreds of people crammed into small spaces on land which they do not even own. on my right, hundreds upon hundreds of acres owned by a few individuals with the right to this property. it's a thorny issue and a big contrast that has remained largely difficult to solve in kenya today. many landless people who live here say this vast plantation was their ancestral land. it currently belongs to a multinational company which processes tinned fruit, del monte. del monte acquired the land
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from the british colonial administration in the 19205 on a 99—year lease. that lease is up for renewal next year but much of the local community does not want it renewed. how much land is del monte talking about? at a public hearing in this town they listen to public submissions. the majority of the locals want del monte to give back some land for housing as part of any renewal deal. they claim the company has about 5,000 acres of land it has never used. most of the leaders also backed a conditional renewal. yes, you can renew it, the land that you are occupying and utilising which is productive. that can be renewed by del monte. but when you have huge amounts of land that remains idle —
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that doesn't make sense for the company to continue holding onto those lands. we reached out to del monte, who declined to comment. this farm employs around 8,000 workers on its plantation. it is a major taxpayer for the kenyan economy. how the government will solve this stalemate will set a marker for future land cases between the people and multinationals which have invested in the country. good afternoon. look at this weather watcher picture from cumbria. i have to say there is a little more cloud around further north and west. maybe around further north and west. maybe a few isolated showers but it is mostly cloudy and increasingly breezy as well. temperatures will struggle a little. the best of the sunshine looks likely to be further south, a little fear whether cloud around but temperatures should peak in the south—east around 16 degrees.
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further north, 10—12, and the winds will start to strengthened. we could see them costing in excess of this weather front pushing and from the west eventually. that will prevent temperatures from falling very far —— we could see them gusting. we did see more chilly air and temperatures across the north—west of england for across the north—west of england for a time first thing tomorrow. generally speaking, quite a quiet story, but at this time of year we start to see those often issues with a little fog as a problem as well. but that weather front will bring some rain, some heavy for a time and windy, but as it bumps into the high pressure it weakens off substantially so not everywhere across scotland will see wet weather. a band of cloud through the borders and into northern ireland by the end of the day. to the south, still reasonably pleasant fear, 17 overall high and dry story. it could potentially be quite a foggy start —— quite reasonably pleasant affair.
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we could see some fog. some of those areas might see the fog lifting to low cloud but fingers crossed it eases and breaks up and we see some sunshine. patchy rain into the far north—west of scotland, sheltered eastern areas could be pretty warm, and that warmth will extend down into the south—east as well. 17 or 18, still above the average for this time of year. high pressurejust hanging on for the second part of the weekend for england and wales but at the same time that front will start to make inroads so perhaps a different story for the second part of the weekend. rain into scotland which will move its way into the north—west of england and northern ireland. not too much in the way of substantial rain. the best of the sunshine looks likely to be further south, highs of 18 degrees. that is how the weekend is looking. enjoy. today at 5: the eu says it's ready to extend the transition period post—brexit if that's what the uk wants. the prime minister says she is convinced the uk will secure a good deal and an extension is just an option. we are not standing here proposing
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an extension to the implementation period. we are working to ensure we have a resolution to the backstop issue in the northern ireland that enables us... which is currently a blockage to completing the deal. the president of the european council says the idea was not discussed at today's summit with eu leaders, but they would be open to the idea. if the uk decided that an extension of the transition period would be helpful to reach a deal, i am sure that the leaders would be ready to consider this positively.
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