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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 19, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a storm brewing back home. theresa may faces a conservative backlash over plans to delay britain's eu breakaway. get a shift on. the government's told to speed up its ban on new petrol and diesel cars. we'll be live in sydney, where in the past hour prince harry has scaled the sydney harbour bridge to officially launch the invictus games. in sport, we hear from lewis hamilton, who's on the brink of a fifth world title. he could have it wrapped up in texas this weekend. a record number of bank branches closed this year, but with so many customers now online, does it really matter? i'll be hearing both sides of the debate. and there's been heartbreak and health scares, but after 60 years in showbiz tina turner tells us she's simply the best. how are you, tina?
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i'm happier than i've ever been in my life. i'm happier than i ever thought that life would become for me. good morning. let's see if the forecast will make you happy today, sunshine in england wales after a frosty and foggy start. a bit more cloud for scotland and northern ireland. details on that and you're full forecast coming up on brea kfast. full forecast coming up on breakfast. bash your full forecast. — your breakfast. bash your full forecast. —— yourfull breakfast. bash your full forecast. —— your full forecast. it's friday the 19th of october. our top story: theresa may is facing fury from conservative mps over her latest attempt to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. yesterday, the prime minister suggested she was looking at delaying the uk's departure from the eu beyond the end of 2020. but the idea has not gone down well among many members of her own party. we can speak now to our political correspondent, ben wright. ben, good morning. who would have thought it might be more comfortable for theresa may to still be in brussels than to be back home?
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yeah, ithink brussels than to be back home? yeah, i think that's absolutely spot on, charlie. she'll be in front of mps i'd imagine early next week when she makes a statement reporting back on the summit she's at in brussels, and it's not going to become double for her. this, of course, was meant to be the moment she and eu leaders would pretty much sign of the deal both sides are aiming for. that had certainly been the schedule, but in fa ct certainly been the schedule, but in fact it's been a flat summit in brussels, nothing has been finally agreed, there's been more fudge, more delay and the insurgency continues now five months from when the uk leaves the uk —— uncertainty. there's big issues to resolve, not least how to solve the conundrum around the irish border to find a way of ensuring there can be no hard border on the island of ireland after brexit. theresa may's idea is to kick this decision down the road, extend the transition period after the uk has left, but, as you said, that united all parts of her divided
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party in opposing the way she's going about it. brexiteers hate what she's up to, tories wanting to remain in the eu think it's the best, worst of all worlds. there's great pressure on her to change course but there's little time for her to so course but there's little time for herto so —— course but there's little time for her to so —— johnny parking mr mercer added that he is alone in the tory party at the moment. for the tory party at the moment. for the moment, thank you. prince harry has launched this year's invictus games for sick and injured service personnel in sydney, australia. he raised the event's flag on the city's harbour bridge after a barefoot stroll along bondi beach with his wife, the duchess of sussex. amazing pictures. this was about an hour ago. he climbed up the bridge alongside some of the people who will be competing in the games.
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unsurprisingly, his wife, the duchess of sussex, didn't climb the bridge as she's recently announced her pregnancy. sydney correspondent hywel griffith reports. barefoot on bondi, the day started with a relaxed feel... if that's possible with hundreds of people watching every step. the royals came to experience fluro friday, a way of supporting people tackling mental health problems by meeting up for a chat and a surf at the beach, as well as a group hug, of course. prince harry said something that really stuck out to me, if you're struggling, reaching out for help is not a weakness, it's a sign of strength so it's going to show people around the world that mental health does not discriminate. prince harry may be sixth in line to the throne, but in australia, he polls as the nation's favourite royal. while a clear majority of the people here want the country to be a republic, with every visit, the crowds have still turned out. the trip here to bondi was another example of the royal couple wanting
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to be seen to be approachable, hands—on, huggable even. in reality, every step of the tour is tightly choreographed and it happens under intense scrutiny. —— security. thousands of tourists climb sydney harbour bridge every month. for harry's ascent, things will be in lockdown as he and australia's prime minister aim to plant the invictus games like at the summit ahead of the opening ceremony tomorrow. hywel griffith, bbc news, sydney. we can talk live to hywel griffith now. keys at the bridge. —— he's at the bridge. prince harry was climbing it. you don't get a sense of how big it. you don't get a sense of how big it is, it's difficult to get perspective looking down the camera lens. absolutely, i climbed it myself a few years ago. we've got a wedding party coming through, carry on, you'll be on british television. pretty popular spot to watch the
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bridge, as you can see. he made it up bridge, as you can see. he made it up in ten or 15 minutes with scott morrison, the current australian prime minister. they change prime minister pretty often hear. i guess all the choreography, the planned events, this was the most symbolic one. the moment the invictus is really arrived in sydney. while all the attention‘s been on the pregnancy, and so much focus has been then, con them as a couple and the... the focus is on the invictus game, which dance tomorrow, the project prince harry has been working on to bring wounded soldiers to these kind of events. he will be relieved when the sport begins tomorrow night and for the next few days and maybe take attention away finally from the upcoming baby, as he described it earlier this week. lots of enjoyment yesterday, hywel, with them both on the beach and i understand they'll be back on the beach later today? yes, they were on
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bondi this morning, as you saw there, taking part in that session. mental health has been another one of those beams, prince harry spoke in dubbo and again today about the need to reach out for help —— themes. the need to confront fears and how mental health issues are indiscriminate really. no matter the walk of life you're in. we spoke to people on the beach and they felt genuinely they were listening and they cared. of course, it's another one of those choreographed moments and one of the causes they really wa nt and one of the causes they really want people to film and to seek right around the world, and there's been so much attention, that will actually breakthrough. thanks very much, hywel. hywel griffith there for us. us president donald trump says he believes the missing washington postjournalist, jamal khashoggi, is dead, and the consequences for saudi arabia could be severe if its involvement is confirmed. it comes more than two weeks after mr khashoggi was last seen entering the saudi consulate in istanbul, where turkish officials say he was murdered. police are searching forests and farmland nearby. we're waiting for some
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investigations, and waiting for the results. we'll have them very soon, andi results. we'll have them very soon, and i think we'll be making a statement, a very strong statement. but we're waiting for the results of about three different investigations. plans for a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars should brought forward by eight years as a way of getting more of us to go electric. that's the verdict of a group of mps who say that rather than coming into force in 2040, the ban should begin by 2032. business correspondent theo leggett has the details. 0ur city streets are heavily polluted and traffic takes much of the blame. the government says it wa nts to ba n the blame. the government says it wants to ban the sale of conventional diesel and petrol powered cars and vans by 2040, and to make sure that all new cars are effectively zero emission. the
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committee thinks that plan's too vague and doesn't go far enough. it wants the target brought forward by eight years, and to ensure the ban covers all but the cleanest hybrid cars as well. mps also think that charging network for electric vehicles is simply not fit for purpose, and they've condemned the government decision to reduce the grants available for buyers of electric cars. electric is the future, so the challenge is, how do we make electric possible? that means rolling out the charge points, which will encourage manufacturers to manufacture more cars if they know people are going to buy them because people no longer have our range anxiety. by bringing the ban on petrol and diesel forward would be farfrom on petrol and diesel forward would be far from easy —— but on petrol and diesel forward would be farfrom easy —— but bringing. sales of electric cars have been rising fast, but they still make up a tiny percentage of the market. plug—in hybrids, which abnormal engines but can run on electric power for short distances, also engines but can run on electric powerfor short distances, also have a very small share. with more than
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31 million cars on the road, phasing out petrol and diesel will certainly bea out petrol and diesel will certainly be a challenge. in fact, the society for motor manufacturers and traders says bringing the target forward by eight years would make it nigh on impossible to meet. the government hasn't responded to the criticisms directly, but a spokesman said it wa nted directly, but a spokesman said it wanted the uk to be the best place in the world to build and own an electric vehicle, and it outlined measures for a major improvement in charging infrastructure. theo leggett, bbc news. the father of a man who died after being assaulted at a block of flats in south london has said his son frequently confronted drug dealers on the estate. the 46—year—old victim, named locally as ian tomlin, was killed in battersea on wednesday afternoon. john donnison has more on this story. tell us more about the story. police we re tell us more about the story. police were brought to the block of flats in battersea after reports of a large bike in one of the communal areas. when they arrived, they found
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areas. when they arrived, they found a man badly injured and died at the scene after 45 minutes —— fight. they've not confirm his identity but he's been locally named as ian tomlin, 46 years old. he is thought to be the father of two and worked for the local council. his father, cecil tomlin, as you say, has been speaking to a lot of the papers this morning saying his son had confronted a group of drug dealers in front of his flat, and that was something he had done before several times in the past. police say all the suspects fled the scene by the time they arrived, and they're appealing for witnesses. john, for the moment, thank you. a reminder, we will be speaking about... the rise in violent crime with one of england's most senior police officers after 8am. the online retailer amazon has announced plans to create up to 1,000 newjobs across the uk. the us based firm said 600 of the positions will be highly—skilled roles in its software and cloud—computing business. the government welcomed the move
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as an enormous vote of confidence in the uk. broadcaster rachael bland's podcast, you, me and the big c, documenting her life with cancer, has been named best new radio show at the audio, radio and industry awards. the bbc radio 5live presenter, who has been praised for her inspirational honesty and courage, died last month at the age of 40, almost two years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. her husband, steve, accepted the award, saying it would have meant the world to her. a fitting tribute indeed. matt will have all the weather in about four minutes, but good morning, kat. good morning. we talk about social media a lot, how people handle it and what high profile people should be exposed to on social media, but this story your
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covering is really troubling. some sports people get more abuse than other sports people, and perhaps female footballers get quite a lot of abuse anyway because of the nature of the game and the fact they're trying to raise the profile of it. some people say there's no for women in football and it's an easy target, isn't it? but this is particularly vile and horrible abuse that's been levelled against england midfielder karen carney, who isjust playing for chelsea in her dayjob! she's had rape and death threats against her! it happens, everyone has their way of coping with abuse on social media, but it gets to the point where you have to ask what's being done to stop this happening? everyone can come out and say this is horrible but how do you stop it from happening? she was sent rape and death threats after chelsea's win over fiorentina in the women's champions league earlier this week. the fa says its appalled and dismayed and wants the police to do more to deal with this kind of abuse.
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the other sports headlines for you this morning: lewis hamilton could wrap up his fifth world championship title at this weekend's us grand prix, as he his eyes michael schumacher‘s record of seven. jo konta's ending the tennis season strongly. she's through to the semi—finals of the kremlin cup in moscow, just her second semi on tour this year. and ronnie 0'sullivan continues to do well at a venue he called a hellhole. he's through to the quarter—finals at the english open in crawley. perhaps he's getting used to the smell of urine, maybe it wasn't as bad as he made it out to be. smell of urine, maybe it wasn't as bad as he made it out to belj smell of urine, maybe it wasn't as bad as he made it out to be. i don't think it was! see you in a few minutes for the papers. it has been lovely in terms of weather, it was a glorious day yesterday. good morning, not bad at all. more sunshine to come but this time mainly across england and wales, a
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different story for scotland and northern ireland, but england and wales start where the coldest conditions, richmond and north yorkshire, lincoln and worcester, hovering just above freezing. a cold one for the morning commute, some fog across parts of eastern england, around lincolnshire and the east midlands in particular. it is not the same everywhere. scotland and northern ireland, not quite as chilly as it was last night, and into yesterday morning. into the cloud, showery outbreaks of rain straight in across scotland through the day. brightening in the west later. northern ireland fairly cloudy during the middle portion of the day, with the odd shower, and we will see that cloud extend into parts of northern england, threatening a showerfor parts of northern england, threatening a shower for the end of the afternoon. sunshine turning hazy for northern england and wales, but for northern england and wales, but for much of england and wales, a fine day. a fine end to the day in scotla nd fine day. a fine end to the day in scotland as well. temperatures not farfrom scotland as well. temperatures not far from where they should be for the time of year. that zone of cloud moves its way northwards once again and we start to see low cloud
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developed in the west, so eastern fog as well. not as chilly in western areas but in the east we could see temperatures drop down into lower single figures. as we go into lower single figures. as we go into saturday morning, it could be a little bit like this. temperatures start to rise and some dense fog patches around. in england and wales that fog could linger through the morning, not clearing until close to lunchtime. not a bad start elsewhere, morning cloud breaking up, some good sunny spells the southern and eastern areas. temperatures in aberdeenshire hitting 18, 18 to the south—east corner. northern ireland and western scotla nd corner. northern ireland and western scotland could see more in the way of cloud throughout the day and a few spots of rain and drizzle. most will be dry on saturday, but saturday night into sunday, this weather front brings more substantial rain across northern and western scotland and the north—west of northern ireland first thing. that will spread its way southwards and eastwards through the day, reaching light and patchy rain and drizzle into northern ireland and
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wales. scotland and northern ireland brightening up after that wet morning, further south you will stick with a fine conditions. early—morning mist and fog clears, sunny spells, and temperatures not doing too bad as we go into the weekend. 1a to 17 degrees. more details on all of that throughout the morning, and news of some very wet weather in spain as well. wet weather way? in spain. the rain in spain is falling quite a lot at the moment. as long as it is not falling here. let's take a look at today's papers. the times says theresa may's offer to extend the transition period after brexit has angered both remain and leave tory mps. the picture shows the duke and duchess of sussex at a beach in melbourne yesterday, as they continue their tour of australia. the mail leads with its own investigation into the financial link between mps and saudi arabia. the paper says the kingdom has spent money lavishing freebies on 38 mps
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over the last five years. the guardian reports eu leaders are preparing to back mrs may in building a "coalition of the reasonable" in parliament to avoid a no—deal brexit. it has also got a story about a fraud investigation into the plastic recycling industry. the daily mirror leads with news we have been running this morning — the murder of a council worker who was killed in south—west london after allegedly telling drug dealers to stop selling outside his flat. after 8:00am this morning, we will be discussing rising crime figures in england and wales, and we want to hear from you on this. we have seen the highest number of
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murders in the uk in a decade, and the number of crimes being solved is falling. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. let's have a look through some of the inside pages. there is a tech theme to a lot of the business pages. the big announcement from amazon yesterday that it will bring 1000 techjobs to amazon yesterday that it will bring 1000 tech jobs to the uk. they are keen to point out this is high skilled jobs, notjust processing in their warehouses. they are investing in three hubs across the country, in manchester, cambridge and edinburgh. in manchester they will hire around 600 new staff, working on software development, machine learning, and research and development, flying in
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the face of criticism that while amazon is a big tech giant it is not investing in highly skilled jobs. that is on the front of the business pages of the telegraph. facebook upping its war on fake news, it has hired 400 people in what they call their war room. you can see a sample of it, that is in california, to co nsta ntly of it, that is in california, to constantly monitor, they say, all online operations, especially given the number of elections taking place around the world. they will use that to combat fake news. an interesting story on the front of the ft. uber which we may know as a way of hiring a car or which we may know as a way of hiring a carortaxi, which we may know as a way of hiring a car or taxi, they will rollout out to other things, so if you are putting on an event and you need a waiter, you will be able to use the uber at to find temporary waiters or security guards, all those sorts of things. this is part of their plan to move the island transportation. it is going into thejob to move the island transportation. it is going into the job agency market. essentially, yes. so if you
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need temporary workers for four hours of an evening, you can use the app. the telegraph is launching its ma nifesto to app. the telegraph is launching its manifesto to save grassroots football, after khan pullout of the sale of wembley, and the fa said they would use that money to invest in grassroots football. so they have launched this manifesto to say where the money will come from, and they have some interesting figures. 2360 grassroots teams disbanded between 2012 and 2015. under 1000% rise in the cost of maintaining pictures. 0ver the cost of maintaining pictures. over 20 years, to hire a pitch. and tyson fury will face deontay wilder in the heavyweight ring in december. and he punched a burrito on
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television, and he had to apologise. also getting into a fight at nandos. it was a mascot, and he gets brought on and is told give him a bit of a punch, and he properly waxed this reason, and there were rumours the quy reason, and there were rumours the guy broke his jaw —— whacks. he knocked him across the studio. you did have to explain that, because i thought punched a burrito? they said you are going to have to dress up as a burrito, but there is a risk... can you imagine filling out your health and safety forms? any danger ofan health and safety forms? any danger of an accident? so i have a quiz. who would like to take part in the quiz? the set up for this is 0xford university have released some questions that they asked. getting into 0xford questions that they asked. getting into oxford and cambridge is notoriously difficult and when you go for the interviews, apparently, i haven't been there myself, you may
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be surprised to know, they ask you very awkward questions, not obvious questions, off the wall questions. they have released some of the questions they ask. who would like to be asked the question? so you would like to come to oxford university, would you? yes, please. i have a question for you. how can historians not find out about the past? how can historians not find out about past? that is the question, yes. by not examining the present. i think a lot of our history comes from our current socio political environment. am i in?|j can't argue the results right now. so shall give them a question? would you like to go to oxford university? —— ben. you like to go to oxford university? -- ben. not really. that is the wrong answer. what does a rock look
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like? there is no true form for a rock, it was a rock is an experiential way of looking at the world that gives us insight into... further, deeper insight into the way the world works. i am already thinking he will fail.|j the world works. i am already thinking he will fail. i got a place. you escape this one, for now. thank you. if you have been enjoying the latest series of autumnwatch, on bbc one, you will have seen images captured on cameras so sensitive that they can spot a mouse from a mile away. the technology was developed for military use, and until recently was top secret. 0ur science correspondent richard westcott has been to find out more. calais harbour, in france, shot on a
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camera that is 20 miles away, in dover. by powerful enough to crack open this rich source of food. and no one had ever seen this before. jaguar ‘s hunting sea turtles at night. they are images captured on a thermal camera that was top—secret until a few years ago, and it is made here in basildon. to give you an idea of just made here in basildon. to give you an idea ofjust how sensitive the camera is, you can pick out changes in temperature down to 0.001 degrees. so if i put my hands on my chest like this, i am eating my jumper, and hopefully when i take them away, you will see that. let me introduce paul. hello, paul. hello, richard. i know you are out there somewhere in the dark. we can even see a mouse mile away searching for food in a field. wow, you can see a mouse in a field? yes, you wouldn't be able to identify what mouse species it is, but you can definitely tell it as a mouse
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running around. lights. paul is a wildlife enthusiasts, and he was using the military camera to photograph 0wls at a local aerodrome when he got chatting to someone with connections at the bbc. he said some of the footage off to the natural history unit in bristol, and within 48 hours i had the producer on the phone, could he come down and see this kit, because it was so, so much ofa this kit, because it was so, so much of a leap forward, to the technology they were using, really. she is nervous, and this is why. the faint glow in the grass is our hidden baby. just a day or two old. the tea m baby. just a day or two old. the team spent a year adapting the system team spent a year adapting the syste m fro m team spent a year adapting the system from something that was hooked on the front of an raf helicopter to something that was portable and offer wildlife filmmakers. 0ne portable and offer wildlife filmmakers. one of the reasons this camera has been able to capture previously unseen animal behaviour is that it can see a very, very long way away. if you compare it to our
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normal tv camera, that brown water tower on the horizon is six miles away. here is the view on the thermal imaging came. 0r away. here is the view on the thermal imaging came. or how about these coffee roasting chimneys? look at the heat coming off. finally, we used to film a bbc reporter at a watering hole nearly a mile away. spot the heat from the coffee. just a few years ago, this camera was still a military secret. now it is transforming the way we see the natural world. amazing, isn't it? amazing what they can film. coming up on the programme this morning: a decade ago, christopher isaac stone co—founded a micro—blogging site. it was called twitter, and it did rather well. ben will be chatting to him in just over an hour. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. new figures show the number of women reporting sexual offences on london's transport network has increased. transport bosses say reported incidents have doubled since a campaign was launched three years ago encouraging victims to come forward. it is thought the #metoo campaign has also had an impact. it's got everyone talking about what's 0k and what's not ok, and what's 0k and what's not ok, and what is unacceptable behaviour. so there was an issue that lots of womenjust brushed off there was an issue that lots of women just brushed off this behaviour and thought it wasn't an issue. there was an issue that women sometimes internalised that and just didn't want to talk about it, didn't wa nt to didn't want to talk about it, didn't want to share it, because theyjust wa nted want to share it, because theyjust wanted to suppress it and get on with their lives. and there was a significant issue that women felt that the police wouldn't take them
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seriously. the east london radical preacher anjem choudary is expected to be released from prison today. choudary was jailed for 5.5 years for inviting support for the islamic state group. the bbc understands police have been preparing a list of up to 20 measures to control and monitor him on his release. the public are being reminded not to pick mushrooms and other wild produce from the royal parks. there has been a rise in foraging in the capital's most famous green spaces, despite it being banned in the royal parks. police issued 35 warnings last year. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning, but there are minor delays on tfl rail. 0n the roads, the usual build—up on the a102 pear island northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. lane two remains part closed in both directions a13 stanford—le—hope bypass due to central reservation repairs. in harringay, the traffic lights aren't working on a105 green lanes at the junction with west green road, by turnpike lane underground station.
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now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we have one or two mist and fog patches out there this morning, out towards the suburbs, the home counties, parts of surrey. gradually, though, it were left to a fine and dry day. now, if you do have the foggiest morning it will probably take until mid—morning for that he lift and disperse. but after that he lift and disperse. but after that it that he lift and disperse. but after thatitis that he lift and disperse. but after that it is blue sky and sunshine, a really pleasant day all in all. a gentle north—easterly breeze. temperatures on the cool site, around 16 celsius in central london. now, tonight is going to be very similarto now, tonight is going to be very similar to last night. clear skies and very light winds, the perfect recipe once more for some mist and fog. perhaps more widespread as we head into saturday morning. a chilly night as well, minimum temperatures around three or four celsius. so again, a murky start to saturday. it will take again until mid—morning for that to lift and disperse to a fine, dry afternoon, with some sunshine. high pressure of course in
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charge for the next few days, so fairly settled weather. just watch out for those misty and murky mornings. temperatures similar and turning a little cooler as we head into monday. the entries for the 2018 wildlife photographer of the year prize will go on display at the natural history museum later. they include the winning photo, taken by marsel van 0osten, of the endangered snub—nosed monkey in china's qinling mountains. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: flying the flag. we'll have the latest from australia as prince harry launches the invictus games in sydney. walking again after ten years in a wheelchair. the ms sufferer whose life has been turned around by a gruelling stem cell transplant. he'll bejoining us later.
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and she's come a long way from nutbush. after a turbulent 60—year career, tina turner tell us how, at the age of 78, she's happier than she's ever been. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: theresa may is facing protests from conservative mps over her latest attempt to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. yesterday, the prime minister suggested she was looking at delaying the uk's departure from the single market and customs union beyond the end of 2020 to ensure there is no hard border in northern ireland. but the idea has not gone down well among many members of her own party. us president donald trump says he believes the missing washington postjournalist, jamal khashoggi, is dead, and the consequences for saudi arabia could be severe if its involvement is confirmed. it comes more than two weeks after mr khashoggi was last seen entering the saudi consulate in istanbul, where turkish officials
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say he was murdered. police are searching forests and farmland nearby. we're waiting for some investigations, and waiting for the results. we'll have them very soon, and i think we'll be making a statement, a very strong statement. but we're waiting for the results of about three different investigations. healthcare professionals need to improve the way they talk to patients about death, according to a new report. nearly half of all lives end in hospitals, but the royal college of physicians says many health workers lack confidence when it comes to telling a patient of a terminal diagnosis. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. talking about death is never easy, but linda knows how important it can be for patients who are dying and their families. when her husband graham was seriously ill four years ago, linda found medical staff struggled with the conversation. they literally just said, "you've got weeks to live",
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and sadly, it was done in an environment that wasn't private, there, as i say, were five people around the bed, pagers were going off at the same time, it was very chaotic, and it left a real sort of feeling of guilt with me, because i felt that i should have done more, because that was a private moment and a really significant moment for him. nearly half of all deaths in england occur in hospitals. one in three adults admitted to hospital as an emergency is in the last year of their life, but only 4% of patients have talked about end of life care with a doctor. they're worried that as doctors, they'll be seen as a failure for saying we can't necessarily prolong your life, and they're worried about the reaction they'll get. the second is because we don't always have the confidence as doctors, or the training or the experience, to have those conversations sensitively. and the third thing is we don't do not have the time or the privacy
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or the right information, and we worry about rushed conversation done badly, so i think there are some practical considerations. the royal college says talking honestly about dying is an essential part of making sure there is compassionate care at the end of life. dominic hughes, bbc news. plans for a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars should brought forward by eight years as a way of getting more of us to go electric. that's the verdict of mps who say that rather than coming into force in 2040, the ban should begin by 2032. the business, energy and industrial strategy committee has described the government's plans as unambitious and vague. electric is the future, so the challenge is, how do we make electric possible? that means rolling out the charge points, which will encourage manufacturers to manufacture more cars if they know that people are going to buy them because people no longer have that range anxiety. blocks of flats which display residents' names on doors and doorbells are in breach of new eu data protection laws, according to an austrian court.
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council workers in vienna are removing more than 200,000 door signs from municipal buildings to comply with the ruling of a local court, angering many residents. a spokesman for the eu commission said the new rules were not intended to cover door signs. time for the sport with kat. good morning. quite a troubling story this morning. but i'm not surprised, high profile people, male orfemale, being abused on social media. people get angry, you call them keyboard warriors, send stuff off, most big you can deal with, some of it takes it too farand deal with, some of it takes it too far and needs to be dealt with harshly. there's a general buzz of abuse of high profile people, particularly sports people, people watching and going that's rubbish, i could do better but then there comes
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a point where it becomes too much and everybody says this is unacceptable. phil neville, the england manager coming out to support karen carney, the subject of this particularly vile abuse to say something needs to be done. is too bad. rape and death threats are another level to just saying, why did you miss that goal? we're talking about the abuse that's directed at sportspeople on social this morning, specifically the england midfielder karen carney. she was sent rape and death threats after scoring the winner in chelsea's champions league win over fiorentina this week. the fa says it's appalled and dismayed and have urged the police to do more to deal with social media abuse. it's potentially a huge weekend for lewis hamilton. he could win his fifth formula one world tile at the us grand prix if everything goes his way in texas. if he does it, he'll sitjoint second in the all time list of winners with only the great michael schumacher ahead of him, but he's not taking anything for granted this weekend. none of us are saying how cool it
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would be if it happened this weekend, or the next. we're not focusing on ifs, we're focused on on making sure we deliver. there's still 100 points available, so you canjust still 100 points available, so you can just never be complacent in life, and in a championship as intense as this. we expect ferrari to punch back hard here this weekend, so we can't be relaxed in anyway, shape or form. johanna konta's finishing the tennis season strongly. she's really struggled forform this year, but is through to the semi—finals of the kremlin cup in moscow. it's just her second semi this year. i don't know if you saw the brilliant goalfrom i don't know if you saw the brilliant goal from wayne rooney, we showed you yesterday, it's all over social media, his new side, dc united in the american mls, he moved to the states injune, having quite an impact on and off the pitch and stuart pollard has been finding out how he's been getting on. a special goal from wayne rooney...
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wayne rooney! rooney! he has scored! after 15 years at the epicentre of english football playing in either liverpool or manchester, washington is now wayne's world. wayne rooney! i'm a big fan of rooney, my cat is named after him! i was not a big fan of him being signed up but he has turned my mind round. he is doing really good at dc united and i love him. i love him, i can't believe how great he's been. he was like, i can't believe we've got rooney and we came to the opening game and it was like... i was like, seriously! you complained about them signing this guy! he's amazing! they are amazed now butjust a few months ago the stands were full of sceptics. there have been some players over the years who have come over, star players, who have looked at this as maybe a bit
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of a vacation, a step down, they didn't have to work that hard. but wayne's been the opposite. and results have been much better. rooney's scored ten goals, dc united are unbeaten in ten games. it's been good. enjoyed it. enjoy playing here, enjoy playing the games. accepted the pressure of the games and enjoy being here with my family. so everything has gone to plan really. and you've obviously dispelled any sense that you were going to come here for a payday. i've never been a player who's going to play and just not care, i'm a player who cares and care about what i do. i'm a proud person, that's the way i grew up. that's me. i'm never going to take anything for granted, i'll come out working and give my best, and that's what i'm doing. and after taking dc united from bottom of the table into a play—off spot, the rooney revolution is in rude health. stuart pollitt, bbc news, washington. life looking pretty rosy for wayne rooney now he's moved to the states. that's good. people are happy for him. americans seem very happy for
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him, but they're often happy about all sorts, including their sport. there are very few more passionate fa ns there are very few more passionate fans than american sports fans. that isa fans than american sports fans. that is a brave thing to say on uk tv! 0bviously uk fans are passionate... don't put that one out there! don't write in! but americans take it to another level, they take everything to another level and their passion for sport. they loved hero worshipping, say wayne rooney is... another successful transatlantic transaction. -- so wayne rooney is. 11 grammy awards, millions of records over a 60 year career. tina turner, one of the original queens of rock and roll. her life story is one of real trauma and turbulence, as she reveals in her new autobiography. bbc arts editor will gompertz has been to meet her. tina turner, another autobiography.
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another. this one is the end of the second part. yeah! why, what did you wa nt to second part. yeah! why, what did you want to say? a lot has happened since the stage life, and my life changed. that's how the book starts, with this beautiful wedding, starts actually in this hotel and you go back to your house, lakes zurich, not far from here and then a series of revelations happen. you feel a bit weird on your wedding day, a bit tired and you were 73 at the time, and then you had a stroke? and then it was the stroke that came. the face became bigger, the handwriting, corrected all of that. with a bit of make—up as well. your spouse to say, tina, you look great. you do, tina, what can i tell you! —— supposed to say. you say in the book in 1968,
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you tried to take your own life. to write. at that time when i was trying to take —— trying to commit suicide, was really down. it was be ike and tina days. phil spectre, david bowie, mick jagger, ike and tina days. phil spectre, david bowie, mickjagger, of those creative relationships you enjoy that were successful, which was the most meaningful to you? that were successful, which was the most meaningful to you ?|j that were successful, which was the most meaningful to you? i think phil spectre. he wanted me to keep singing. i've thank in more of a gospel we. the melody of that song was... when i was a little girl. when i was a little girl, i had a rag doll. and the production of... real production of that song was what phil wanted. the room was full of
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all kinds of musicians, that wall of sound. the famous wall of sound. the famous wall of sound. how you get there is with an instrument here, another kind of instrument, four or five instruments. the room was full ofan five instruments. the room was full of an orchestra. and when that... i'd chill now. it was, it was another feeling to sing to that. your 79 next month, how are you, tina? i'm happier than i've ever beenin tina? i'm happier than i've ever been in my life. i'm happier than i ever thought life would become for me. idid fora i did for a couple of days ago and broke something, so i was in a wheelchair and on crutches. but now i'm going through my sick period, andi i'm going through my sick period, and i think it'll take me into the
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90s or whatever. i'll be around for a while! she's impressive, isn't she? absolutely. an extraordinary life, as full... she tells about her misery at times but this incredible music career as well. looking forward to seeing lots more of that interview as well. it is 6:45am. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: backlash over brexit. theresa may faces criticism of her plans as she tries to break the deadlock in the eu negotiations. reaching new heights down under. prince harry has scaled the sydney harbour bridge to launch the invictus games. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. you know, iwas you know, i was looking at those pictures in australia ahead of the
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invictus games, and looked at this picture and it looks as though it is not of the uk. i am sure you will tell me i am completely wrong. not of the uk. i am sure you will tell me i am completely wrongm not of the uk. i am sure you will tell me i am completely wrong. it is from the uk, just a hint of what to expect across england and wales. a sunny start with a few mist and fog patches here and there. england and wales this morning have a chilly as the conditions. scotland and northern ireland yesterday, but this morning temperatures close to freezing in northern england, down to —2 in parts of north yorkshire. a few fog patches in the east midlands, lincolnshire and towards the west midlands. you have been under clearer skies through the night. different stories in scotland and northern ireland compared with yesterday. cloud spreading its way in will leave some spells of hazy sunshine, especially across eastern areas. showers of outbreaks of rain in the north and west of scotland allege they way eastwards through the day. showers in northern ireland on an overall cloudy day but the morning will be cloudier than the afternoon. the cloud will break up
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in the sunshine will come through. hazy sunshine for northern and western wales but the cloud thickened up later. cumbria could see a few splashes of rain. a lovely day again. temperatures 13 through 16 degrees. into the night, the cloud doesn't get too far south before it moves its way northwards once again, with a strengthening breeze. that could bring a few splashes of drizzle in the western scotla nd splashes of drizzle in the western scotland by the end of the night. most will be dry, clearest conditions across eastern areas, where temperatures will drop the furthest. a touch of frost in some sheltered eastern parts to take as into saturday morning. that is not the only thing concerning us for saturday morning. fog could be as well, especially across parts of wales in the midlands. dense, widespread fog will struggle to shift, maybe clearing up by lunchtime full stops low cloud lingering, other than that lots of sunshine across england and wales. eastern scotland, hazy sunshine as well. 0verall, eastern scotland, hazy sunshine as well. overall, a milder day tomorrow. western scotland and northern ireland, always more cloud through saturday. a few sunny spells
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but a little bit of drizzle at times as well. into sunday, high pressure is still firmly with us across southern areas, keeping things dry, southern areas, keeping things dry, so fog could be another issue across the south, slowly shifting through the south, slowly shifting through the morning. scotland and northern ireland, much more breeze on sunday. a greater chance of some breeze as well. it won't be a washout of a day, some drier and brighter moments, a little bit of afternoon sunshine as cloud and patchy rain pushed into northern england and north wales. 0verall pushed into northern england and north wales. overall the weekend is not looking too bad. lots of dry weather, a big contrast with what is happening down in spain. if you are thinking of heading to spain, some torrid conditions at present. these are the scenes to the north of valencia during yesterday evening. widespread flooding, could see as much as 300 millimetres of rain over the next short period. and had rain falling quite heavily through the north at the moment. if you are heading off to the costa del sol, watch the chart as we go into saturday. some severe storms
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expected, but things will gradually improve as we go into sunday. that is how it is looking. you did promise those pictures, and an interesting pronunciation of valencia. the correct pronunciation, isn't it? i was impressed you did it with conviction and it came across really well. brilliant, thank you. he is so not happy. he is always happy. so let's say hola to ben. you will talk to us about bank branches. yes, we hear about bank branches closing all the time, but according to research for the bbc, the scale of the closures is pretty startling. the figures show that 6,000 local branches have shut since 2010. that is about a third of the network gone. these figures reflect similar ones
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collected by the consumer group which, which has been campaigning on this. why is this happening? the banks say that fewer people are using bank branches. branch visits have fallen by a quarter since 2012. more than two thirds of people now use the internet to access banking services. but many still rely on bank branches, especially in rural areas. small businesses have been missing out, they need to use cash. angela runs a cycle business in sowerby bridge, in west yorkshire. the last bank branch closed there injuly this year, and it is making it more difficult for her to get cash out.
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people do use the cards. we do have a card machine. not to be fair, the older generation don't want to use the cards. they want to use the cash. so if you don't have change in your deal it is a bit frustrating for the customer. you are there by yourself, trying to get change, the post office can't meet the demand, and you have to go into halifax to go and get your change. so that is the view from west yorkshire. the banks, for their part... uk finance, the body that represents banks, says there are now more places where you can bank than ever before. they say you can check your balance online, pay back a friend digitally, or speak to your bank for 24/7 advice. but they accept that technology is not for everyone, which is why they say all major banks offer day—to—day banking services through 11,500 post office branches. it is that sense of community, isn't it, that banks give. not saying that, when was the last time you went into a bank? i go into the bank
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quite a lot. i go into a branch quite a lot. i go into a branch quite a lot. i go into a branch quite a bit. so do i. i know people in my local branch. it is interesting, i did some filming recently for this programme, and we we re recently for this programme, and we were ina recently for this programme, and we were in a pub near sheffield, and in that pub they have put everything together, so they have a shop, a coffee shop, a pub and a post 0ffice. that means you can also go in and do your banking in there. they have said maybe the idea of stand—alone bank branches for each bank in the country, having a high street presence, is no longer viable, but maybe we end up with a scenario where we have one place thatis scenario where we have one place that is a storefront for a number of different banks, and that might be one way of solving that problem. when was the last time you went into a bank? a year, at least. it has been a busy week down under for the duke and duchess of sussex, from that pregnancy announcement on monday morning, getting drenched in the bush, countless selfies with children, and meeting surfers on bondi beach. and this morning, prince harry has launched the project which is perhaps closest
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to his heart, the fourth invictus games, for sick and injured service personnel. he did so by raising a flag on sydney harbour bridge. hywel griffith is there and we can speak to him now. you are right next to the bridge itself. it has been a busy day for them. yes, absolutely. it started morning sydney time, in bondi, not a bad place to be on a friday morning. the royal couple were barefoot, enjoying the sites, but also a reason. it was fluro friday, eve ryo ne cove red reason. it was fluro friday, everyone covered in fluorescent paintand everyone covered in fluorescent paint and clothing to raise awareness for mental health. it gave them a relaxed atmosphere to come and talk about mental health issues. we have seen lots of handshakes and hugs on this royal tour so far. today the first group hug, as harry
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and meghan, alongside some of the charity workers, the part in the big group hug at the end. 0ne charity workers, the part in the big group hug at the end. one of the representatives said harry spoke quite openly about enduring mental health problems and the need to ask for help, seeing that as a sign of strength rather than of weakness. so that was the first big engagement of the day, and yet again we saw hundreds of people line up in order to see them. yes, so actually seeing those, they are really charming pictures, as you say. a bit of a round of applause, are hard on the beach, and then it was up for a client to the bridge behind you. yes, the coathanger, as it is known locally, always has some flags on top, but today for the first time this flag on the left, the invictus flag was raised, so prince harry along with scott morrison, along with the current prime minister, they change them pretty often, ——
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scott morrison, the current prime minister, they change pretty often, to raise awareness that they are beginning tomorrow, with the opening ceremony, the games beginning properly on saturday. we are hearing so much about the impending parenthood, some of the charities that prince supports, but the invictus games is a big one, the opportunity for 500 competitors to compete on australian soil, coming together from 18 different countries. thank you very much for that wonderful, dramatic backdrop from australia. we will be talking to some of the individuals involved in invictus games a little bit later in the programme, as well. still to come on breakfast this morning: it has been a year marred tragedy for the 0vertones. six months after the death of singer timmy matley, they are back with a new album which they say is a celebration of their bandmate's life. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. new figures show the number of women reporting sexual offences on london's transport network has increased. transport bosses say reported incidents have doubled since a campaign was launched three years ago encouraging victims to come forward. it is thought the #metoo campaign has also had an impact. it's got everyone talking about what's 0k and what's not ok, and what's unacceptable behaviour. so there was an issue that lots of women just brushed off this behaviour and thought it wasn't an issue. there was an issue that women sometimes internalised that, and just didn't want to talk about it, didn't want to share it, because theyjust wanted to suppress it and get on with their lives. and there was a significant issue that women felt that the police wouldn't take them seriously. the east london radical preacher anjem choudary is expected to be released from prison today. choudary was jailed for 5.5 years for inviting support
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for the islamic state group. the bbc understands police have been preparing a list of up to 20 measures to control and monitor him. the public are being reminded not to pick mushrooms and other wild produce from the royal parks. there has been a rise in foraging in the capital's most famous green spaces, despite it being banned. police issued 35 warnings last year. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes. 0n the roads, the usual build—up on the a102 northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. lane two remains part closed in both directions near the a13 stanford—le—hope bypass due to central reservation repairs. willesden lane is closed in both directions between lydford road and deerhurst road due to a building fire. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we have one or two mist and fog patches out there this morning,
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out towards the suburbs, the home counties, parts of surrey. gradually, though, it will lift to a fine and dry day. now, if you do have the fog this morning, it will probably take until mid—morning for that he lift and disperse. but after that, it's blue sky and sunshine. a really pleasant day, all in all, a gentle north—easterly breeze. temperatures on the cool side, around 16 celsius in central london. now, tonight is going to be very similar to last night. clear skies and very light winds — the perfect recipe once more for some mist and fog, perhaps more widespread as we head into saturday morning. a chilly night, too — minimum temperatures around three or four celsius. so again, a murky start to saturday. it'll take, again, ‘til mid—morning for that to lift and disperse to a fine, dry afternoon, with some sunshine. high pressure, of course, in charge for the next few days, so fairly settled weather. just watch out for those misty and murky mornings. temperatures similar, then turning a little cooler as we head into monday. the entries for the
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wildlife photographer of the year prize will go on display at the natural history museum later. they include the winning photo of the endangered snub—nosed monkey. it was taken by marsel van 0osten in china. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it is back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: get a shift on. the government's told to speed up its ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars.
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a storm brewing back home. theresa may faces a conservative backlash over plans to delay britain's eu breakaway. get a shift on. the government's told to speed up its ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars. we'll be live in sydney, where, in the past few hours, prince harry has scaled the sydney harbour bridge to officially launch the invictus games. good morning. in sport, we hear from lewis hamilton, who's on the brink of a fifth world title. he could have it wrapped up in texas this weekend. good morning. does twitter change the way we see the world? top tweeters might include presidents and popstars, but is itjust hot air? or can it really help spark debate over the world's biggest issues? i'll speak to one of twitter‘s founders. and there's been heartbreak and health scares, but after 60 years in showbiz, tina turner tells us she's simply the best. how are you, tina? i'm happier than i've ever been in my life. i'm happier than i ever thought that life would become for me. will your weekend forecast be simply
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the best? details on that and news ofa the best? details on that and news of a chilly but bright day ahead for england and wales. cloudier with a a few showers for scotland and northern ireland. details of that and yourfull northern ireland. details of that and your full forecast on bbc brea kfast. and your full forecast on bbc breakfast. —— with a few showers. it's friday the 19th of october. our top story: theresa may is facing fury from conservative mps over her latest attempt to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. yesterday, the prime minister suggested she was looking at delaying the uk's departure from the eu beyond the end of 2020. the idea has not gone down well among many members of her own party. we can speak now to our political correspondent, ben wright. good morning to you, ben. so the prime minister regains in brussels this morning, but the focus very on those voices within her own party at westminster? —— remains. those voices within her own party at westminster? -- remains. that's right, and she knows there's a big political rumpus brewing here for
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her return next week when she will have to make a statement in the commons and explain why this summit failed to produce the breakthrough in the brexit talks that both sides had hoped forfor in the brexit talks that both sides had hoped for for many months. this was meant to be the moment a deal was meant to be the moment a deal was pretty much agreed, that hasn't happened and it looks like this could be now shunted to the end of the year, maybe december, before we get a deal, if there is one to be signed. delay and uncertainty continues, and there's real unhappiness within her own tory ra nks unhappiness within her own tory ranks about this idea of extending this transition period after britain has left the u. so we remain tied to all the eu rules and regulations but we don't have a vote —— the eu. brexiteers hate this because they see it as a way of delaying brexit further. people on the remain side of the tory party say this proves how daft brexit is, and they say this shows there should be another referendum because this isn't what people voted for. the arguments are acute and angry, the mood is
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fractious. 0ne tory mp, johnny mercer, has given an interview saying in very colourful language that the government is doing a pretty bad job of this, questioning whether it shared mac his own values any more. the tory party is not a happy place and theresa may will have a bruising time when she comes back to westminster next week —— whether it shared his values. ben, thank you. plans for a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars should brought forward by eight years as a way of getting more of us to go electric, that's the verdict of mps who say that rather than coming into force in 2040, the ban should begin by 2032. the business, energy and industrial strategy committee has described the government's plans as unambitious and vague. in a few minutes, we'll be talking to the chair of that committee, rachel reeve mp. us president donald trump says he believes the missing washington postjournalist, jamal khashoggi, is dead, and the consequences for saudi arabia could be severe if its involvement is confirmed. it comes more than two weeks after mr khashoggi was last seen entering the saudi consulate in istanbul, where turkish officials say he was murdered.
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police are searching forests and farmland nearby. we're waiting for some investigations, and waiting for the results. we'll have them very soon, and i think we'll be making a statement, a very strong statement. but we're waiting for the results of about three different investigations. the father of a man who died after being assaulted at a block of flats in south london, has said his son frequently confronted drug dealers on the estate. the 46—year—old victim, named locally as ian tomlin, was killed in battersea on wednesday afternoon. reporterjohn donnison has more on this story. john, take us through the stories. police say they were called to this block of flats in battersea around 5:30pm on wednesday after reports of a brawl, a large fight. when they got there, they found a 46—year—old
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man who was seriously injured, and he died about 45 minutes later. now, they've not identified this man yet but as you say, he's been named locally as ian tomlinson and viewers might have seen in the papers this morning, his father, cecil, has been speaking to reporters —— tomlin. he said his son confronted a group of people selling drugs outside his flat and that's how the fight started. he said his son, ian, had done this several times in the past. police are saying when they got there, all the suspects had fled. they are, of course, appealing for anyone with information to come forward. all this comes in a week when home office figures say the homicide rate is at its highest point in more than ten years. john, thank you very much for that. and we will be speaking about the rise in violent crime with one of england's most senior police officers after 8am. these are real things, maybe you've got thoughts on the crime figures, how you been affected and how the police have responded. 0ne
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one of them is involved in those statistics. that's just after 8am. healthcare professionals need to improve the way they talk about death according to a new report. nearly half of all lives end in hospitals, but the royal college of physicians says many health workers lack confidence when it comes to telling a patient of a terminal diagnosis. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. talking about death is never easy, but linda knows how important it can be for patients who are dying and their families. when her husband graham was seriously ill four years ago, linda found medical staff struggled with the conversation. they literally just said, "you've got weeks to live", and sadly, it was done in an environment that wasn't private, there, as i say, were five people around the bed, pagers were going off at the same time, it was very chaotic, and it left a real sort of feeling of guilt with me, because i felt that i should have done more, because that was a private moment
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and a really significant moment for him. nearly half of all deaths in england occur in hospitals. one in three adults admitted to hospital as an emergency is in the last year of their life, but only 4% of patients have talked about end—of—life care with a doctor. they're worried that as doctors, they'll be seen as a failure for saying we can't necessarily prolong your life, and they're worried about the reaction they'll get. the second is because we don't always have the confidence as doctors, or the training or the experience, to have those conversations sensitively. and the third thing is we don't do not have the time or the privacy or the right information, and we worry about rushed conversation done badly, so i think there are some practical considerations. the royal college says talking honestly about dying is an essential part of making sure there is compassionate care at the end of life. dominic hughes, bbc news. blocks of flats which display residents' names on doors and doorbells are in breach of new eu data protection laws, according to an austrian court. it's taken action!
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council workers in vienna are removing more than 200,000 door signs from municipal buildings to comply with the ruling of a local court, angering many residents. a spokesman for the eu commission said the new rules were not intended to cover door signs. can you imagine that, removing those little pieces of paper with everybody‘s name. little pieces of paper with everybody's name. a fiddly job. what's even more annoying, if you're in one of those flats, it makes it so much easier, how many times you have to go, no, two buttons up, two buttons down, not me! all the sport and weather coming up for you shortly. they are cost—efficient, safer for the environment and often described as the cars of the future. but despite their benefits, electric cars still make up a tiny percentage of the market., and phasing out petrol and diesel remains a big challenge. i ——, and phasing out petrol and
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diesel remains a big challenge. the government plans to ban new petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040, but mps have criticised those proposals, describing them as unambitious and vague. labour mp rachel reeves, chair of business, energy and industrial strategy committee, joins us from leeds. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. i must say, it feels as... in my business journalism years i've been talking about electric cars for more than a decade and expecting them on the roads, and it feels a bit sluggish, not the cars but the fact we don't see as many of them on the road. what needs to be done? well, we now in the top ten countries in the world for electric vehicle sales and 496 world for electric vehicle sales and 4% of new car sales are electric, so we're getting there but what we're saying to the government is we need to go further and faster and they need to do some things do encouraged the take—up of electric vehicles. what we heard as a committee is people's number one concern is whether they would be able to rapidly and reliably charge an
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electric vehicle, so we're urging the government to do more to ensure that infrastructure is available, particularly on our major roads, on our motorways and a roads. and also to reverse the perverse decision made last week to cut the support given to people buying new electric vehicles. that grant has been reduced, which makes electric vehicles more expensive, and that is going in the wrong direction. what was the reasoning used being given for that grant being withdrawn? well, the government didn't give a reason, they put it out late at night and hoped nobody would notice. but you noticed, what did you say? well, what we say is the government should reverse that. it's already more expensive to buy an electric vehicle because it is new technology. the cost will come down and is going to come down, but at the moment we think it is right to have incentives to get people to shift to electric vehicles because
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we need to improve our air quality and reduce our carbon emissions, and that grant was one of the things that grant was one of the things that was encouraging the take—up of electric vehicles, and the worry now is we could go into reverse, in the wrong direction, and we need to be boosting electric vehicle sales, not killing this nascent industry. boosting electric vehicle sales, not killing this nascent industrylj should killing this nascent industry.” should ask, because you're the chair of this committee, do you drive an electric vehicle? no, but i've test driven a couple and i'm keen to do that. the challenge for me and the challenge for a lot of people is i often drive long distances. i work in london but i'm a member of parliament for leeds, make that journey by car quite regularly. i have my summer holidays in the uk, soi have my summer holidays in the uk, so i need to be able to travel long distances and be able to rapidly charge my car, especially with two young children who don't want to be sitting around for hours. that investment in infrastructure is extremely important to encourage more people to make that shift and no with an electric vehicle, you'll
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be able to charge rapidly wherever you are in the uk. it almost goes against your argument, when we were talking about the ban on sales of new diesel and petrol cars, you yourself, you're the chair of the committee, designed to encourage as to be more green and to go electric so to speak, the infrastructure isn't in place. the society of motor manufacturers and traders say it would be nigh on impossible to bring forward the target for bringing that ban forward the target for bringing that ba n foreword forward the target for bringing that ban foreword by eight years, so you surely understand if the infrastructure isn't in place there's no point in having this nominal date when won't work. the money isn't there, we always argue on this programme with politicians about no money for the nhs, let alone for this infrastructure.” understand that totally, that's why we need the infrastructure and the government should cancel the decision to reverse the support for people buying electric vehicles. what you see in other countries, like norway, where the target is 2025, seven years earlier than what
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my committee recommending, if you bring forward the target, that investment in infrastructure happens. we didn't have to give incentives for people to build petrol stations, people built petrol stations because they knew the demand was there to charge their cars... to put petrol and diesel into their cars. so if the government brings forward the target, it encourages investment because investors know the demand is there so that's important to kickstart investment in the infrastructure to make it work. in many ways we agree with the society of motor manufacturers and traders, with the rac, to make sure this target works, this ambitious target my committee is setting out today, we do need that infrastructure in place and government can play a role in doing that by bringing forward the target to encourage that investment, make sure it's available in rural areas as well as cities, to encourage that take—up. it will be good for the abhorrent, good for our
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air quality and good for carbon emissions. -- for the environment. wa nt to ta ke emissions. -- for the environment. want to take advantage of having an mp on the programme today, brexit and the transition period —— i want to. we're getting him is the eu is ready to extend the proposal length of the so—called transition period if the uk needs that. do you think that's a good idea, do you support that's a good idea, do you support that idea? i'm not sure extending the transition period is going to find a solution to the problem in ireland. of the prime minister thinks she needs more time, and has some solutions on the table... but some solutions on the table... but so far, nothing the prime minister and the government has put forward convinces me that they have a solution to insure you can have that frictionless and free trade between ireland and the republic of ireland... northern ireland and the republic of ireland if we leave the customs union and the single market. if it came down to backing that extension or no deal, which would you back? what i would like to have
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isa you back? what i would like to have is a people's vote on the final deal, because all the promises made by the leave campaigners during the referendum, we've now found out, aren't true, whether additional money for the nhs, securing that free border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, and staying in the... having the benefits of a single market and customs union. we now know those things are not possible, so i believe the people should have a say on the final deal and we should have a people's vote on it. rachel reeves, chair of the business, energy and industrial strategy committee, mp, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. thank you. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. some mist and fog around for some of you this weekend. england and wales this morning waking up to some of the coldest conditions across the country. temperatures in rural areas
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close to freezing. down below in parts of north—east england, 0xfordshire and into parts of north yorkshire as well. to go with that, isaid we yorkshire as well. to go with that, i said we will have some mist and fog as well. not as cold in scotland and northern ireland, because we have had cloud pushing in through the night. under the clear skies is where we have seen the fog. if we split the country into two, england and wales, eastern wales, the west midlands, fog clearing, the same across the east midlands and lincolnshire. a dry day with lots of sunshine, a bit more cloud to northern and western areas later, maybe the odd shower in cumbria but most will be dry. scotland and northern ireland, some brighter weather in the south—east, but we will start to see some cloud and
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rain spread its way eastwards. not much rain in eastern scotland, only one or two isolated showers in scotland, and the cloud breaking up into the afternoon with some sunshine at times. a bit wheezy in the north, 12 or 13 degrees, but 16 or 17 the further south we are. into the night, the cloud which is across some central parts to begin with works its way northwards once again. a lot more cloud across the west in areas, especially western scotland and northern ireland, and some rain across the hebrides. some lengthy clear skies in eastern scotland down across eastern and southern england. temperatures close to freezing tomorrow morning, and as the air gets more humid, fog could be an issue for some. england and wales the main fog risk tomorrow, especially the west midlands into wales, and it will take all morning that to. elsewhere, england and wales a fine day on saturday. dry with good spells of sunshine. some cloud and western scotland and northern ireland, is threatening some rain and drizzle. down towards the south—east of england because he temperatures peak about 18 celsius. asa temperatures peak about 18 celsius. as a saturday night in the sunday, high—pressure holes on for england and wales, so fog could be another issue in sunday morning. the breeze picks up, another weather front into scotla nd picks up, another weather front into scotland and northern ireland, and more rain on sunday. especially
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north—western parts of scotland. a few showers for northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland, and later in the day northern england and north wales. scotland and ireland will brighten up through sunday afternoon and southern parts of the country, after that morning fog, there will be some sunshine to ta ke fog, there will be some sunshine to take you through the second half of the day. all in all, not a bad weekend that all. temperatures a little bit above where they should be, at 14 to 17 degrees. that is how it is looking. i will hand you back. not looking bad at all. ben is looking at how many bank branches have closed this year, and the rest of the day's business news. when was the last time you went to a branch? i go quite regularly, but i know that is not necessarily... the number of people going has been falling quite sharply, and big firms have been wondering whether they can close branches more easily. new research by the bbc suggests 6,000 bank branches have closed across the country since 2010. that is a third of the entire bank branch network. it is because two thirds of us are now using the internet
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and smartphones to do our banking, and visits to branches are down more than 25% in the last five years. a lot of you getting in touch with us this morning about that. we will talk about that after eight a. m.. china, the world's second—largest economy, hasjust reported its slowest quarterly growth rate in nearly ten years. the official growth figure for the three months to september was 6.5%, down on the year before. and amazon has revealed plans to create more than 1,000 jobs in the uk, in manchester, edinburgh and cambridge. it has opening 600 highly skilled roles working on artificial intelligence and software development in manchester, as well as nearly 450 jobs at its development centres in edinburgh and cambridge. and in the next half—hour, i'll speak to biz stone, one of twitter‘s founders. the social network launched in 2006. in just 12 years, has more than 300
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million users around the world. but does it help debate and discussion, or help the spread of fake news and hateful messages? i will speak to mr stone in about half an hour here on breakfast. very timely, with what we were talking about this morning. many people dedicate a huge amount of time and money to their beloved football club, spending hours travelling to games, reading transfer rumours, and talking tactics. but do the football clubs return the devotion? jayne mccubbin in enfield, in north london, to find out how one club is giving the love back to the community and changing lives. and i tell you what, they are very active for this time in the morning, aren't they? how is it going? aren't they? they have woken me up. good
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morning. talking about feeling the love for your team. they are feeling it for hendon this morning. a big game tomorrow. who is going to win? hendon. 0f game tomorrow. who is going to win? hendon. of course they are going to win. this isjohn's birthday dance. going get warmed up, it is looking freezing. we are talking about the power of the big game to change people's lives. to really make a positive impact. there is a big game tomorrow, hendon is that in the league at the moment and they are saying to anybody, if you have mental health problems, you can call up mental health problems, you can call up and get free tickets, notjust for this game tomorrow, but for any game this season, which is remarkable. that is just a tiny bit of the things they are doing to support their community here, and there is a very serious story behind that. we will hear more about it in a minute. first of all let's whiz away from hendon, up north to everton fc, to hear about the
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incredible thing is some clubs have been doing to give back. does anyone mind if our manager, marco silva, wins this game? because seriously, no manager of everton has won anything the 23 years. this get get—together is that everton's £800,000 lube base. they hold weekly nostalgia sessions for people with dementia here, like lob. this is the man who discovered the young wayne rooney. it was good times. and the? yes. this club sits in the middle of one of the poorest communities, not just in liverpool, but in europe. the blue base isjust one part of the work they do to tackle social issues here. all come flooding back? definitely, yes. everton set up its preschool to give kids who have fallen out of education, like zac, a second chance. the stuff he has achieved has been amazing. well done
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you. with the fringe... before the free school you had been excluded from three different schools. there was no hope, even in myself, because things were so bad. but here you are, you are a mentor now, amazing. yes. do you liverpool. this badge doesn't discriminate. we are chatting in the club's latest venture. home is where the hart is was set up to extend the support everton already gives the kids in care. just as zach was when he first came into contact with the club. we needed this extra support, so that young people —— somewhere young people can come to when they are struggling. literally a roof over their head. families is one of our values as a club. and pitch side i met mattie. he was supported by the clu b met mattie. he was supported by the club as a youngster in care, but still ended up in prison. there was no sense of, you have let us down, you have had your chance and that is
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it? no, they were fully supportive throughout. they kept in regular contact, lots of visits, lots of letters, the worker was always someone there to support me. in fa ct, someone there to support me. in fact, everton's offenders scheme has a non— reoffending rate of 79%, compared that to the national average of 38%. today, mattie is in average of 38%. today, mattie is in a stablejob average of 38%. today, mattie is in a stable job and average of 38%. today, mattie is in a stablejob and a average of 38%. today, mattie is in a stable job and a stable relationship. just had a little boy, six months old. it is all good? can you imagine going back to how you we re you imagine going back to how you were before? itjust wouldn't happen. just brilliant stories. and listen, we all know, don't we, that there is a tremendous amount of money in professional football. you think of the big game, the big money, the big signings. maybe a game that has got too big for its boots, and has strayed away from the grassroots. at some clubs really are doing remarkable things, taking over work thatis remarkable things, taking over work that is normally done by the probation service, the education
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service. and if there are people out there thinking this is just about pr, consider this conversation we had with a chap from the fa, who said there are far easier ways to get a good headline and to work with some of the most troubled kids in the community, people who have just come out of prison. anyway, hendon is less wealthy than everton in the premier league, but i want to hear now about the story behind the free tickets. now it is just a small part of what you do, but what is the story behind it? yes, the chairman, simon lawrence, decided after the sad and untimely death of dermot drummond. a hand in legend. he was also at the chelsea academy, a very well—known figure in football. a very bubbly character, people didn't know he suffered from depression and u nfortu nately know he suffered from depression and unfortunately he had an untimely death. because of that we now give out free tickets to anybody suffering from loneliness and depression. we welcome anybody to come in and share this lovely... and you do much more than that. give us the shopping list of what you do in
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the shopping list of what you do in the community. we work with the early years the community. we work with the early yea rs intervention the community. we work with the early years intervention service in brent, and we have a wonderful programme that goes on, working with young people, and we are seeing some great results from that. we are part of the dementia action alliance, we wa nt to of the dementia action alliance, we want to be dementia friendly by 2020, in line with the london borough, being dementia friendly for the london borough culture. we have also got... so many initiatives going. there are too many, too many to talk about! we will come back to talk to you later. thank you for your time this morning. we will also hit from some people in the community who are supported by this scheme, and of course, or of them. it is like herding cats, isn't it? see you later. lovely cats, nevertheless, they? and very quick as well. # what's love got to do with it?
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she has come a long way from nutbush. after a turbulent 60—year career, tina turner tell us how, at the age of 78, she is happier than she has ever been. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. new figures show the number of women reporting sexual offences on london's transport network has increased. transport bosses say reported incidents have doubled since a campaign was launched three years ago encouraging victims to come forward. it is thought the #metoo campaign has also had an impact. it's got everyone talking about what's 0k and what's not ok, and what's unacceptable behaviour. so there was an issue that lots of women just brushed off this behaviour and thought it wasn't an issue. there was an issue that women sometimes internalised that, and just didn't want to talk about it, didn't want to share it, because theyjust wanted to suppress it and get on with their lives.
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and there was a significant issue that women felt that the police wouldn't take them seriously. the east london radical preacher anjem choudary is expected to be released from prison today. choudary was jailed for 5.5 years for inviting support for the islamic state group. the bbc understands police have been preparing a list of up to 20 measures to control and monitor him. the public are being reminded not to pick mushrooms and other wild produce from the royal parks. there has been a rise in foraging in the capital's most famous green spaces, despite it being banned. police issued 35 warnings last year, compared to just five in 2016. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes. very slow on the m25 clockwise from junction 28. there have been two collisions close to each other along that stretch. lane two remains part closed in both directions near the a13 sta nford—le—hope
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bypass, due to central reservation repairs. willesden lane is closed in both directions between lydford road and deerhurst road due to a building fire. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we have one or two mist and fog patches out there this morning, out towards the suburbs, the home counties, parts of surrey. gradually, though, it will lift to a fine and dry day. now, if you do have the fog this morning, it'll probably take until mid—morning for that to lift and disperse. but after that, it's blue sky and sunshine. a really pleasant day, all in all, a gentle north—easterly breeze. temperatures on the cool side, around 16 celsius in central london. now, tonight is going to be very similar to last night. clear skies and very light winds — the perfect recipe once more for some mist and fog, perhaps more widespread as we head into saturday morning. a chilly night, too — minimum temperature around three or four celsius. so again, a murky start to saturday. it'll take, again, ‘til mid—morning for that to lift and disperse to a fine, dry afternoon, with some sunshine.
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high pressure, of course, in charge for the next few days, so fairly settled weather. just watch out for those misty and murky mornings. temperatures similar, then turning a little cooler as we head into monday. the entries for the wildlife photographer of the year prize will go on display at the natural history museum later. they include the winning photo of the endangered snub—nosed monkey. it was taken by marsel van 0osten in china. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it is back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time is 7:30am. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may is facing anger from conservative mps over her latest attempt to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. yesterday, the prime minister suggested she was looking at delaying the uk's departure from the eu beyond the end of 2020 to ensure there is no hard border in northern ireland. us president donald trump says
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he believes the missing washington postjournalist, jamal khashogee, is dead, and the consequences for saudi arabia could be severe if its involvement is confirmed. it comes more than two weeks after mr khashogee was last seen entering the saudi consulate in istanbul, where turkish officials say he was murdered. police are searching forests and farmland nearby. plans for a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars should brought forward by eight years as a way of getting more of us to go electric. that's the verdict of mps who say that rather than coming into force in 2040, the ban should begin by 2032. the business, energy and industrial strategy committee has described the government's plans as unambitious and vague. electric is the future, so the challenge is, how do we make electric possible? that means rolling out the charge points, which will encourage manufacturers to manufacture more cars if they know that people are going to buy them because people no longer have that range anxiety. prince harry has launched this year's invictus games for sick
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and injured service personnel in sydney, australia. he climbed the city's harbour bridge, to reveal the games' flag after a barefoot stroll along bondi beach with his wife, the duchess of sussex. sydney correspondent hywel griffith can tell us more. this is an issue, isn't it, hywel, that's very close, the games very close to prince harry's heart, but it seems the couple are winning the hearts of the people of the there? absolutely. the invictus games reason they are here. —— over there? this will be the biggest for some —— so far. 500 competitors. the raising of the flag and the ascent of the bridge behind me with the australian prime minister was part of the choreography, the big moment, the big reveal they hope the world will
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see, that flag will keep flying high for the course of the games. we will speak to you later on. hywel, thank you very much. broadcaster rachael bland's podcast, you, me and the big c, documenting her life with cancer, has been named best new radio show at the audio, radio and industry awards. the bbc radio 5live presenter, who has been praised for her inspirational honesty and courage, died last month at the age of 40, almost two years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. her husband steve accepted the award, saying it would have meant the world to her. iimagine it i imagine it wouldn't. —— i imagine it wouldn't. —— would have. kat, lots going on, and we should be clear, it isn't acceptable to abuse anyone. certainly not for a sports person to face rape and death threats related
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to her performance. that's what happened to karen carney, playing for chelsea mid week in the champions league, somebody said she should have scored a goal earlier in the match and it escalated from there to rape and death threats. phil neville, the england manager, has said it's completely disgraceful. her club chelsea have said it's totally unacceptable. interestingly, matt king, a snooker player playing in the english 0pen in crawley, he had death threats on facebook yesterday. karen carney has gone on instagram —— karen carney‘s came on instagram and matt king's on facebook so it highlights how awful people can be on social media and how terrible it is. she was sent rape and death threats after scoring the winner in chelsea's champions league win over fiorentina this week. the fa says it's appalled and dismayed and have urged the police to do more to deal with social media abuse. it's potentially a huge weekend for lewis hamilton. he could win his fifth formula one world title at the us
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grand prix if everything goes his way in texas. if he does it, he'll sitjoint second in the all time list of winners with only the great michael schumacher ahead of him, but he's not taking anything for granted this weekend. none of us are saying how cool it would be if it happened this weekend, or the next. we're not focusing on ifs, we're focused on on making sure we deliver. there's still 100 points available, so you can just never be complacent in life, and in a championship as intense as this. we expect ferrari to punch back hard here this weekend, so we can't be relaxed in anyway, shape orform. johanna konta's finishing the tennis season strongly. she's really struggled forform this year, but is through to the semi—finals of the kremlin cup in moscow. it's just her second semi this year. we are used to seeing brilliant goals from the career of wayne rooney in the premier league here,
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but how about the one yesterday for his new side, dc united, in the mls? it was his tenth goal since moving to the states injune, and he's having quite an impact both on and off the pitch, as stuart pollitt‘s been finding out. commentator: a special, special goal from wayne rooney... wayne rooney! 0h, rooney! england have scored! it's wayne rooney! after 15 years at the epicentre of english football, playing in either liverpool or manchester, washington is now wayne's world. i'm a big fan of rooney, i have a cat named rooney actually, after him! i wasn't a big fan of him being signed up here at all. turned my mind around. he was, like, i can't believe they got rooney, and then we came to the opening game here and he was, like, iwas, like, seriously? you complained about them signing this guy, he's, like, amazing. they're amazed now, butjust a few months ago, the stands were full of sceptics. there have been some players over the years who have come over, star players, who have looked at this as maybe a bit
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of a vacation, a step down, they didn't have to work that hard. but wayne's been the opposite. and results have been much better. rooney's scored ten goals, dc united are unbeaten in ten games. it's been good. enjoyed it. enjoy playing here, enjoy playing the games. accepted the pressure of the games and enjoy being here with my family. so everything has gone to plan really. and you've obviously dispelled any sense that you were going to come here for a payday. i've never been a player who's going to play and just not care, i'm a player who cares and care about what i do. i'm a proud person, that's the way i grew up. that's me. i'm never going to take anything for granted, i'll come out working and give my best, and that's what i'm doing. and after taking dc united from bottom of the table into a play—off spot, the rooney revolution is in rude health. stuart pollitt, bbc news, washington.
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he did some interviews in the press a few days ago and he said when he was living in manchester, he only went to the trafford centre once in five years. he would have been mobbed. looks like life might be changing for wayne rooney given what he's doing on the pitch. that woman loved it, he's amazing! brilliant. are you looking forward to the invictus games wears yellow i am, i am,| invictus games wears yellow i am, i am, ilove invictus games wears yellow i am, i am, i love the invictus games. -- are you looking forward to the invictus games were zero and from sydney, it will be amazing, —— are you looking forward to the invictus games as we've been hearing, the invictus games get underway in sydney, australia tonight, with more than 500 sick and injured service personnel from 18 countries taking part. it's an event with an ancient name. invictus is latin for undefeated, but a relatively short history of just four years. let's have a look back at some
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of the highlights during that time. i thought it had been going for longer than that. it feels very established. it shows what prince harry has done for the brand. you have done it. this is the moment, right here, right now. the uk team are doing brilliantly today. yeah! calm down, calm down. you are invictus. you are all winners. cheering now, alex james and cseh charmers are at the olympic park in sydney, and they've been getting ready to tell us all about the games —— cseh
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charmers. what a great time to be there. good morning. —— alexjones. good morning, how ru? very well. tell us what you're preparing for with games? we're on the other side of the world, so —— how are you? should you take this? you go. we are preparing first and foremost to get our emotions in check. having been here for a few days and seeing the competitors arrive, the atmosphere is really starting to build here. the weather is pretty lovely right now, but it's been pretty testy over the last couple of days and there's been lots of rain, but that's going to drift away and the magic is going to drift away and the magic is going to begin. i can feel it all coming together. absolutely, i didn't know what to expect. jj has done this before, completed in 2014, got a medal, doesn't like to mention it! it's been fantastic to meet the competitors, it's been a realfamily
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feel. 200 supporters from the uk have flown to sydney to support, and it's a magical feeling. have flown to sydney to support, and it's a magicalfeeling. the atmosphere's electric. i tell you what, the fact harry and meghan are here, people are assessed! who's not assessed with meghan, let's face it! honestly, everywhere you go, there is excitement... the city is buzzing, isn't it? blue up here at the olympic park and the competitors are staying in hotels very near to where we are and where we're going to broadcast, fantastic, we will have them in studio each night. 500 competitors' lives are going to change. we could see that montage there, i still get the tingles on there, i still get the tingles on the back of my neck, it will transform the lives of the class of 2018, as it did my life. we have the launch show tonight at 7:30pm and we're on every day until next saturday. 0pening ceremony tomorrow,
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we saw them rehearsing, by the opera house. the sun was out, beautiful, like being on holiday! we're not envious at all, don't worry, guys, i'm sure you're going to have a terrible time and work really, really ha rd! alex terrible time and work really, really hard! alex and jj, thanks very much! we've got jo hursey. you competed twice, first in 2013 and 2014. we get a sense talking to them of the atmosphere. what did it mean for you and what's your history, how did you compete?” mean for you and what's your history, how did you compete? i got involved in the invictus games it first started, was injured in 2008 andi first started, was injured in 2008 and i saw prince harry advertising it on television masoe i applied through help for heroes and got involved in that way. —— on television, so i applied through help for heroes and got involved in
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that way. i didn't know what it would be like. it was surreal, very exciting. there's a real buzz about it. you don't understand how many people really care about you. so many people pay to go out and see you and people were paying for tickets to watch you do a bit of sport. it is weird, it is a weird feeling but a nice feeling. when you say that you heard prince harry on tv talking about the invictus games did you think this is a natural path for you, or was it difficult for you to make that switch into competing in that arena? i've always been really sporty. even when i was a child, was really sporty and when i joined the army, was involved in all kinds of games. i wanted to do every sport. football... you name it, i think i did it. when that was taken away from me, it was almost like an identity being taken away from you. that's quite hard to deal with. i
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think i wanted to get my own identity back. and in order to do that, i had to accept i had an injury. it's the whole acceptance of having an injury, or having a mental illness, or whatever it is you've got, and having that process and dealing with that process is quite a ha rd process to dealing with that process is quite a hard process to go through. dealing with that process is quite a hard process to go throughm dealing with that process is quite a hard process to go through. it is true, isn't it, the challenges some people overcome in order to compete in these games are extraordinary. the emotions, jj was referring to it a moment ago, there is a lot of emotion because of the challenges people have faced. there will be a buzz... i'm envious of them being out there, there will be a buzz about the whole thing, but when you're involved with. .. about the whole thing, but when you're involved with... i suppose with your colleagues, your fellow ex— soldiers or fellow soldiers, or whatever service you're from, there isa whatever service you're from, there is a buzz and there's an emotional attachment to it because you have... i don't know, you've achieved something and you're representing your country. and there will be
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people who beam through the darkest of times. huge... and there are some people who haven't gone out of their house. a friend out there at the moment hasn't got out of her house for a couple of years and now she's ina plane for a couple of years and now she's in a plane and going to the other side of the world to compete and represent her country. amazing feeling. there will be lots of tea rs. feeling. there will be lots of tears. i was in tears at the first games and in toronto. an amazing feeling and quite rightly so. we should be proud of them, as they are proud of us and i was proud of myself as well. we look forward to it. the plea to see you this morning. as alex said, the coverage sta rts morning. as alex said, the coverage starts tomorrow on the bbc —— lovely to see you. the opening ceremony will take place on breakfast tomorrow so we will visit that and ta ke tomorrow so we will visit that and take a look in. thanks for coming in. you have a little bit of competition, because we saw those lovely scenes in australia, lovely sunshine, glorious. did you bring
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it? it may be sunny in sydney at the moment, but i hate to say it won't be this weekend. sunday and monday looking quite stormy. what a start in norfolk, this weather watcher shot from walking tractor. it certainly is this morning if you are about to head out this morning. temperatures close to if not below freezing across parts of 0xfordshire and in the northumberland. and as the picture behind him that, there isa the picture behind him that, there is a mist and fog around as well. england and wales, first of all. dense fog patches in the west midlands and eastern wales, and lincolnshire and the east midlands, clearing by mid to late morning. and then not a bad day at all. sunshine a little bit hazy on the north and west, and cloud thickening up across lancashire and cumbria later on to produce the odd shower. scotland and northern ireland bright to start with, especially some eastern areas. 0utbreaks with, especially some eastern areas. outbreaks of rain in the highlands
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and islands will spread its way eastwards, britney a few showers the southern scotland and northern ireland, and the car breaks up in its wake. we will see the sunshine coming out this afternoon. a breeze limiting temperature to ten to 13 degrees —— cloud breaks up. 16 or 17 hi this afternoon. into the night, we will have that zone of thick cloud for northern ireland and northern england, edging its way back northwards. with the wind coming in from the south—west will start to see things turn a little bit cloudier across western areas into the first part of saturday. even a little splash of rain and drizzle across the hebrides. eastern parts of england and to the south, temperatures at their lowest in the saturday morning. some of you across england and wales will have some dense fog to deal with as we start the weekend. it will be wales and the weekend. it will be wales and the midlands most prone. lasting through much of the morning before gradually clearing. a bit more cloud across england and wales compared with today. a bit more sunshine across eastern scotland. that could lift temperatures up to 18. 18 in the south—east corner as well. right
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and sunny spells possible but the odd shower will come and go, especially in the highlands. it is here we will see some wetter weather push into saturday night into sunday. this weather front here. high—pressure holding on the england and wales. this tenfold in southern areas, where winds are lightest, slowly shifting, and then another fine day. rain around for scotland and northern ireland on sunday. not and northern ireland on sunday. not a washout of the day by any means. some dry and bright moments, especially through the afternoon, with some sunshine. and northern england and north wales may see some rain as well. in the south it stays dry, temperatures still faring well for the time of year. 14— 17 degrees. lots of dry weather in the uk this weekend. end of half term for some, the start for others. if you are thinking of heading off to spain later today or tomorrow, i just have to show you this footage. it has not been great the last few days. this was just north of valencia during yesterday evening, torrents of rain pushing down the street, almost like a river. thunderstorms overhead. 300
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millimetres of rain with further flash flooding possible, and into tomorrow, as the weekend begins, if it is costa del sol you are heading to, this is where the worst of the storms will be. but the good news is that will gradually clear through the rest of the coming week. on the dry as well. some breaking news for you this morning. the radical preacher andrem choudary has been released from prison after serving half of this five—year sentence. prison after serving half of this five-year sentence. he was jailed in 2016, this release now is believed to be subject to strict conditions, including a ban on leaving london, using the internet without permission, and he will be spending the next number of months living in a probation hostel. his assets have been frozen. we are always interested in talking to big business leaders, especially when their bosses —— they are bosses
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of social media enterprises, and we are talking about twitter. is it isita is it a force for good, or we have seen some examples where it can be a bit sinister. i will speak to one of the cofounders of twitter this morning. yes, whether you use it or not, social media has changed the way we see the world. we can read and share news faster than ever, and discuss all sorts of issues online. twitter is one of the biggest. it was founded back in 2006 by friends who wanted to find an easy way to stay in touch. but since then, it has grown to more than 300 million users around the world, including everyone from katy perry, with the current record of 108 million followers, to kim kardashian, with 59 million, and of course donald trump, with 55 million. one of its founders is biz stone, with 2.8 million followers. he is in the hague at an event
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called 0ne young world, talking to a group of young people about using social media to discuss some of the world's biggest issues. very good morning to you, biz. welcome to bbc breakfast. i wonder if you could take us back to 2006, first of all, where this all began. 2006, 12 years later, you have more than 300 million users on the service. did you ever imagine it would turn into such a giant? know, when we had 5000 people on the service, i thought we were successful. and then 300 million users later, we are now talking about president is using it, world leaders using it. did you ever imagine that world leaders would use it to announce government policy to all of us? absolutely not. it made sense when leaders started to join that they would want to talk to their delegates, but at the beginning, absolutely not. in fact,
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i thought celebrities would never use it, because the whole point of celebrity is you have limited access to them. so i was wrong about that as well. they would say it gives them a direct line, it allows them to cut out some of the third—party scrutiny of the media, and that is probably one of the reasons it has been successful, isn't it? they can speak directly to the people they wa nt to speak directly to the people they want to speak to. exactly, i think thatis want to speak to. exactly, i think that is the main point, that you get this great equaliser in social media, in that everyone can have their voice be heard. let's talk about the event you are doing today. it is called 0ne young world, and it is sort of a young person's davos. you have been talking to them about using social media for change. is it really about change? does it help discussion was that doesn't help debate? absolutely. as i said before, the purpose of twitter is to
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serve the public conversation. and this is something that... you know, it can't really be uninvented, we haveit it can't really be uninvented, we have it now, and it has woven its way into almost every way we do work and into democracy itself. a lot of these young people are the future leaders, and they... they are professionals at this. they enter the world's conversation, they argue, productively, ideally. and then they figure out how to collaborate. and that is building a future. clearly a force for good in terms of encouraging debate, encouraging analysis of what is happening in the world. we can get news more quickly than ever before. but those young people you are talking too must also be concerned about the dark side of all of that, about the dark side of all of that, about the dark side of all of that, about the hate speech, about the fa ke about the hate speech, about the fake news. how would you tackle all of that, in what are they telling you about how they want you to
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tackle all of that? well, the main thing is, ithink, tackle all of that? well, the main thing is, i think, first of all, to recognise that it is a different time now than when we first invented twitter. and it is time now to take responsibility for the content that is on the platform, and as i said, our purpose is to serve the public conversation. and if we are in service of that public conversation, thenit service of that public conversation, then it is our responsibility for then it is our responsibility for the health of the public conversation. there is a lot we are doing around that, a lot of work we are doing around what are the key indicators for the health of the public conversation, and then what tools can rebuild the increase that health? and this is something that is one of our lowest singular objectives, and this is also something that the young people care deeply about. they want to have the dialogue with the world that is constructive, that is meaningful, that moves humanity forward. and we can't have that if we have people
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interrupting that good dialogue with toxic hate speech and things like this. so we are making progress. we have been... i won't get into the details, but we have been making a lot of progress with machine learning, and specifically with identifying behaviour over looking at content. and that has been a signalfor us. at content. and that has been a signal for us. and many will appreciate the scale of the challenge. looking at the headlines this week, 10 million tweets found to be from iran and russian backed state accounts were removed. you are clearly doing some work there, but people will be shocked at the scale of that. 10 million tweets that were backed by a government to spread fa ke backed by a government to spread fake news. that is the real worry, isn't it, that it is very difficult to clamp down on this stuff? yes, and one of the reasons we did that, and one of the reasons we did that, and we released these numbers openly, is so that others can benefit from seeing this, and they can look at their platforms and make
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comparisons. you know, we're all in this together, and so that is one of the things that we need to recognise, and that is one of the reasons why we have shared as much information as we possibly can. quick word, biz, as well. donald trump said he wouldn't be president if it wasn't for twitter. what do you make of that? i don't make anything of it. that tells us all we need to know. biz, it is good to talk to you. thank you very much. that look says all you need to know. more from me after eight a.m.. one of the best answers we have had in response to a question on brexit in the long —— breakfast in a long time. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the radical east london preacher anjem choudary has been
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released from belmarsh prison this morning. choudary was jailed for 5.5 years for inviting support for the islamic state group, and served two years. the bbc understands police have been preparing a list of up to 20 measures to control and monitor him. new figures show the number of women reporting sexual offences on london's transport network has increased. transport bosses say reported incidents have doubled since a campaign was launched three years ago encouraging victims to come forward. it is thought the #metoo campaign has also had an impact. but it's got everyone talking about what's 0k and what's not ok, and what's unacceptable behaviour. so there was an issue that lots of women just brushed off this behaviour and thought it wasn't an issue. there was an issue that women sometimes internalised that, and just didn't want to talk about it, didn't want to share it, because theyjust wanted to suppress it and get on with their lives. and there was a significant issue that women felt that the police wouldn't take them seriously. the public are being reminded not to pick mushrooms and other wild
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produce from the royal parks. there has been a rise in foraging in the capital's most famous green spaces, despite it being banned. police issued 35 warnings last year, compared to just five in 2016. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes. turning to the raods. very slow on the m25 clockwise from junction 28 at the brook street roundabout. there have been two collisions close to each other along that stretch. willesden lane is part closed in both directions due to a building fire. finally, streatham high road is partially blocked by a burst water main at the junction with sta nthorpe road. so expect delays there. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we have one or two mist and fog patches out there this morning, out towards the suburbs, the home counties, parts of surrey. gradually, though, it will lift to a fine and dry day. now, if you do have the fog this morning, it'll probably take until mid—morning for that
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to lift and disperse. but after that, it's blue sky and sunshine. a really pleasant day, all in all, a gentle north—easterly breeze. temperatures on the cool side, around 16 celsius in central london. now, tonight is going to be very similar to last night. clear skies and very light winds — the perfect recipe once more for some mist and fog, perhaps more widespread as we head into saturday morning. a chilly night, too — minimum temperature around three or four celsius. so again, a murky start to saturday. it'll take, again, ‘til mid—morning for that to lift and disperse to a fine, dry afternoon, with some sunshine. high pressure, of course, in charge for the next few days, so fairly settled weather. just watch out for those misty and murky mornings. temperatures similar, then turning a little cooler as we head into monday. the entries for the wildlife photographer of the year prize will go on display at the natural history museum later. they include the winning photo of the endangered snub—nosed monkey. it was taken by marsel van 0osten in china. i'm back with the latest from bbc
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london in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... in the past few moments it's been confirmed the radical preacher anjem choudary has been released from prison after serving half of his five and a half—year sentence. theresa may faces a conservative backlash over plans to delay britain's eu breakaway. we will be live in australia. prince harry has scaled the sydney harbour bridge to officially launch the invictus games. a record number of bank branches closed this year — but with so many customers now online, does it really matter? in sport we hear from lewis hamilton,
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who's on the brink of a fifth world title — he could have it wrapped up in texas this weekend. there's been heartbreak and health scares but after 60 years in showbiz tina turner tells us she's simply the best. how are you? happier than i have ever been in my life. happier than i have ever thought that life would become for me. and your weekend forecast, and details of a rather chilly but frosty start across parts of england and wales, but more cloud for scotland and northern ireland with a few showers. it's friday the 19th of october. our top story is some breaking news this morning. the radical preacher anjem choudary has been released from prison after serving half of his five and a half year sentence. he was jailed for drumming up support for the terrorist group, islamic state. joining us now from our london
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newsroom is jon donnison. jon, what more do we know? people will be hearing he was jailed for five and a half years and he has been released early. this is a name, somebody who has been described as one of the most threatening people when it comes to radical islam, radicalisation? a man who police have described as a hardened, dangerous terrorist, released after just over two years in belmarsh prison. we think he leftjail at about 4am this morning, in a black rouble carrier with tinted windows, followed by a number of other people. —— black people carrier. we understand he will be taken to a probation hospitalfor understand he will be taken to a probation hospital for the first six months. there are strict conditions on his release. the bbc understands there are no less than 35 conditions, not being allowed to preach or attend certain mosques, he will not be able to use the internet without supervision, he will be
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allowed one phone, that is not allowed one phone, that is not allowed to have access to the internet. he will not be allowed to leave the country. we also understand that the un has put him ona understand that the un has put him on a list of global terrorists, meaning that his assets have been seized. if he breaches any of these conditions, he could, of course, be recalled to prison. jon, thanks for bringing us up to date. we will keep covering the summer programme and the news channel today. us president donald trump says he believes the missing washington postjournalist, jamal khashoggi, is dead — and the consequences for saudi arabia could be severe if its involvement is confirmed. it comes more than two weeks after mr khashogee was last seen. he was entering the saudi consulate in istanbul, where turkish officials say he was murdered. police are searching forests and farmland nearby. plans for a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars should brought forward by 8 years as a way of getting more of us to go electric. that's the verdict of mps
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who say that rather than coming into force in 2040, the ban should begin by 2032. 0ur city streets are heavily polluted and traffic takes much of the blame. the government says it wants to ban the sale of conventional diesel and petrol powered cars and vans by 2040, and to make sure that all new cars are effectively zero—emission. the committee thinks that plan's too vague and doesn't go far enough. it wants the target brought forward by eight years, and to ensure the ban covers all but the cleanest hybrid cars as well. mps also think the charging network for electric vehicles is simply not fit for purpose, and they've condemned the government decision to reduce the grants available for buyers of electric cars. electric is the future, so the challenge is, how do we make electric possible? that means rolling out the charge points, which will encourage manufacturers to manufacture more
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cars if they know that people are going to buy them because people no longer have that range anxiety. but bringing the band forward would be farfrom but bringing the band forward would be far from easy. sales of electric cars have been rising fast, but they still make up a tiny percentage of the market. plug—in hybrids, which have normal engines but can run on electric power for short distances, also have a very small share. with more than 31 million cars on the road, phasing out petrol and diesel will certainly be a challenge. in fact, the society of motor manufacturers and traders says bringing the target forward by eight years would make it nigh on impossible to meet. the government hasn't responded to the criticisms directly, but a spokesman said it wanted the uk to be the best place in the world to build and own an electric vehicle, and it outlined measures for a major improvement in charging infrastructure. theo leggett, bbc news. prince harry has launched this year's invictus games for sick
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and injured service personnel in sydney, australia. he climbed the city's harbour bridge, to reveal the games' flag, after a barefoot stroll along bondi beach with his wife, the duchess of sussex. 0ur sydney correspondent hywel griffith reports. barefoot on bondi, the day started with a relaxed feel... if that's possible with hundreds of people watching every step. the royals came to experience fluro friday, a way of supporting people tackling mental health problems by meeting up for a chat and a surf at the beach — as well as a group hug, of course. prince harry said something that really stuck out to me, if you're struggling, reaching out for help is not a weakness, it's a sign of strength so it's going to show people around the world that mental health does not discriminate. prince harry may be sixth in line to the throne, but in australia, he polls as the nation's favourite royal. while a clear majority of the people here want the country to be a republic,
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with every visit, the crowds have still turned out. the trip here to bondi was another example of the royal couple wanting to be seen to be approachable, hands—on, huggable even. in reality, every step of the tour is tightly choreographed and it happens under intense security. the helicopters circled as he ascended sydney harbour bridge to raise the flag. the games are the real reason for this visit. tomorrow's opening ceremony may, for a little while at least, move attention away from his pending parenthood. we can talk live to hywel griffith now. still so much to focus on today? tomorrow night, australian time, at
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least, i think people are focusing on the fact that the invictus games are happening and it is notjust about a royal visit. it will be shown on australian television. the australian government is behind it. australian government is behind it. australia will have a very strong team, as they always do in these events. people generally have enjoyed having the royalty. they have seen them out and about, trying be very hands—on, as we saw in those pictures at bondi. it doesn't in any way suggest that people here would wa nt way suggest that people here would want the monarchy to remain raiding over them, —— reigning want the monarchy to remain raiding overthem, —— reigning overthem, but he is seen as somebody who likes to have a bit of a joke and somebody who does not take himself as seriously as some of the other royals. i know we will get much more from you through the day. the opening ceremony is tomorrow night, australian time, and hopefully we will be covering out on breakfast.
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let's ta ke let's take you to brussels. theresa may is facing fury from conservative mps over her latest attempt to break the deadlock in the brexit negotiations. yesterday the prime minister suggested she was looking at delaying the uk's departure from the eu beyond the end of 2020. who is in brussels. good morning, we have been seeing angela merkel behind you. i know we are expecting theresa may. tell us what it is like? interesting, she is not expected to talk to us this morning. she's gone through a difficult few days and she has a new conundrum over brexit, there is the possibility of an extended transition period if they can get a divorce deal. that potentially means theresa may talking about an extra few months. it is a possibility. that is because they say, look, we will give you a plan to solve the riddle of northern ireland, avoiding
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the border between the north and the republic, so they can go for a temporary agreement where britain collects tariffs on a or that eu, but it will need more time and that is why that has to be an extension, possibly. theresa may thinks it can be done in that time. potentially it will cost money and it would still have the backstop, so if everything goes wrong, northern ireland will still be in a customs union on its own. iam still be in a customs union on its own. i am talking fairly quietly, every now and again you will have a world leader popping up. it is the biggest gathering of world leaders this year, the asian and eu summit. 52 countries involved. two interesting points, theresa may in a room with dmitry medvedev on the russian prime minister, following the skripal poisoning case. also, theresa may will be able to talk to the koreans, the australians, the japanese, the sense of the global british trading plan. there might be more from theresa may if she decides to talk to us later this morning. we
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have eyes on the red carpet. give us a sense of how it might feel for her being there. i wonder if it helps that she is physically out of the uk right now. you will be very aware, as we are, speaking to political correspondents, that the voices within her own party are getting more and more furious. and there is no other way of describing it. so the language now being used is off the language now being used is off the scale? yes, i will replace rubbish with another word that i could not use at this time of the morning, johnny mercer's comments as an mp. we have also had other european leaders come i spoke to the french president yesterday, emmanuel macron, who said the chances on the other side of that, she has to square it with her party, but he says the chances of no—deal are higher than ever before. every day that passes, he says it is statistically clear that the no—deal possibility is there. he is also not
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ruling out that british tourists, expats, workers, if they want to go to france in the event of a no—deal, they could face a visa. he said they would be blocked a man who wanted to keep smooth running, but it's another consideration on a reciprocal basis. the french and others are watching what the british would do in the event of a no—deal. no sign of theresa may yet. jacqui berry much. if she speaks, we will go back to you. —— thank you very much. the father of a man who died after being assaulted at a block of flats in south london, has said his son often confronted drug dealers on the estate. a murder investigation was launched after the 46—year—old, named locally as ian tomlin, was killed in battersea on wednesday afternoon. police were called to reports of a fight, and mr tomlin's father claimed that his frequent pleas with dealers to move away from his home may have caused the argument. a record number of bank branches closed this year. that's according to bbc analysis of official stats out this morning. 6000 local branches
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have shut since 2010 — that's about a third of the network gone. branch visits have fallen by a quarter since 2012. the banks say that fewer people are using bank branches. the research also found more than two thirds of people now use the internet to access banking services. mass will have the weather in about five or six minutes. —— matt. when roy palmer developed multiple sclerosis, he lost the use of his legs and had to use a wheelchair for more than a decade. now he's back on his feet thanks to an experimental treatment which uses intense chemotherapy to wipe out and re—grow the immune system. let's take a look at roy's story. every time i looked at my feet i would get a fizzing sensation down my legs. and, gradually, it got worse. i went to get out of bed and my legs would not hold me. there was a programme on panorama,
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a treatment called hsct. and two people on that programme went into sheffield hospital in wheelchairs and they both came out walking. i said, if they can have that done, on a trial, why can't i have it done? i basically went to my own gp and he put me forward. finally, at last, having hsct. let's hope it works. the support from the nurses there is absolutely fantastic. you keep pinching yourself now. it's like a miracle. i've been given a second chance in life. certainly an inspiring story. and roy's just walked into the studio. good morning to you all. the first
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question has to be, how are you? absolutely fantastic! this treatment has changed my life. from being in a wheelchair for ten years, being able to walk, going on holiday this year. i walked on the beach, swam in the sea. absolutely fantastic. it is an extraordinary story. can you take us back? we got a sense of it from the film a moment ago. at the darkest of times, when you first got diagnosed, what the situation was? it was a difficult situation. rory woke up one morning, pins and needles in his feet. we didn't know what was going on. eventually went into hospital, and was paralysed. it took about a week, with mri, lumbar puncture, to be diagnosed with ms. we were just
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off shock, total shock. what was the prognosis? what were they saying would be the situation looking forward ? would be the situation looking forward? wheelchair. what were you told about possible treatment? anything, that point? not really, no. for the first two years i was basically relapsing eight times in one year. i would get back on my feet, go a couple of weeks, and i would have another relapse. that went on. i went on all the top drugs, but every drug i was on didn't work for me. your body would get used to it, so he would relapse. and then you would end up being paralysed again. he used to lose his legs. fast forward through this story. you heard about hsct. you
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make the decision, which is presumably quite a brave decision, to think you will try this. how quickly do you know something is changing? basically, when i have the treatment, two days after having my stem cells put back into my body, i had cramp in my left calf. and i could never feel that. i had cramp in my left calf. and i could neverfeel that. i haven't felt there for ten years. that was it. as soon as i felt that, i said, get me up. rubbing his legs. literally saw the programme on panorama three years ago. two people went into a hospital in wheelchairs, and they walked out of the hospital. this is a good time to bring in susan. he was saying when the stem cells went in, can you explain what the treatment is? it wasn't easy for you to get this treatment, he had to push quite hard. tell us what is happening with this treatment? push quite hard. tell us what is happening with this treatment7m
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the 100,000 people that are living with ms in the uk, it will have a treatment on a very small number. so, it is a really, really effective treatment for a small number of people who fit a very strict criteria. what people go through is that they have stem cells taken out of their body. then they go through a really high dose of chemotherapy, really intensive process, a really tough process to go through. and then the stem cells are injected back into the body. and what happens is, for the people who it works for, the ms attacks that people frequently get seem to stop, they seem to get a little bit better. we don't know what happened in the long term. but we are very hopeful that the treatment will be effective. how long ago did you get up? since christmas i've been walking. i have
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the transplants. it was a year ago now. that is when he was in hammersmith hospital. watching you, watching that, the emotions are still very raw. weekly pinching ourselves. it's like it only happened yesterday from you. you have two children, presumably they have two children, presumably they have also been through an extraordinary roller—coaster of emotions? we all have. my wife has been brilliant, stood by me all the way. on the hospital, i must say... hammersmith, they are second to none. when i wasn't around to be with him, living so far away, they ke pt with him, living so far away, they kept his spirits up. i can't thank them enough for that, really. it's been lovely to see you both here today. fantastic. great to see you walking into the studio, not even tripping up like most people do when they walk in here. and it has been really great having you on, susan,
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highlighting what can be done. never give up, keep looking into the research as well. can i do say, since i've been back on my feet, i've started volunteering now, at gloucestershire. read, as a police cadet leader, which i really enjoy. a remarkable story. and you can find out more information on stem cell treatment on bbc breakfast‘s twitter page. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. thank you, very good morning. it might bea thank you, very good morning. it might be a bit cloudy across scotla nd might be a bit cloudy across scotland and northern ireland. and look at this in norfolk. this is from one of the weather watchers in the past hour. it's going to be a cracking day for much of england and wales. misty, if you fog patches around. quitea wales. misty, if you fog patches around. quite a chilly start across england especially. temperatures in the past hour have been close to, if not below freezing in part of
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0xfordshire and northumberland especially. as i said, there is some fog. let's split the country into two. england and wales, first of all. areas of fog across the west midlands and wales. notice that it appears during the middle part of the morning. a day of well broken cloud. a bit hazy to the north and west. it all links into what is happening in scotland and northern ireland. sunny spells in southern and eastern areas. hazy sunshine. there could cloud for a time with showers spreading southwards and eastwards. very few during the afternoon. the cloud breaks return, sunshine comes out. a fine end to the day. 1013 degrees in the breeze, 17 or 18 across some parts of southern england. into tonight, most will start dry, most of you will stay dry. as south—westerly wind sta rts stay dry. as south—westerly wind starts to kick in it. to turn cloudy across western coasts, especially west of scotland and northern
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ireland. can't rule out light rain and drizzle. clear skies to the east of scotland, eastern and southern england. we will see temperatures dropping low enough for a touch of frost to take us into the weekend. for some, it will begin like this, a bit foggy. some of it could be quite dense and places, particularly the midlands and across wales. the default patch elsewhere. lots of sunshine around, turning hazy at times in the west. scotland and northern ireland, particularly the west of scotland, some rain and drizzle. we could seek highs of around 18 degrees, 64 fahrenheit. for southern areas, the fine weather continuing into the weekend. high—pressure, light wind. the chance of some fog returning. to the north, another weather front returning. in scotland and northern ireland, some rain returning. mainly the morning and afternoon. afternoon showers in northern ireland and north wales, much of england and wales, once the fog has cleared, another fine autumn day.
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temperatures are still in the mid—to—high teams. we've been hearing this morning about ian tomlin. he was 46 years old, and a father of two in south london on wednesday night. his death was a stark reminder of the individual stories behind the crime statistics which yesterday revealed the number of murders in england and wales has risen to its highest level for a decade. that have been stories that he was attempting to take on drug dealers that worth operating near where he lived. —— that were operating. in the space of a year 719 people were killed — either by murder or manslaughter. that's a rise of 14%. and there's been a sharp increase in violent crimes — they're up by almost 20%. in total, police recorded 5.6 million offences betweenjune 2017 and 2018 — that's a rise of almost 10 % on the year before. bill skelly is the national police chiefs' council lead on crime recording and police
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statistics. hejoins us now from lincoln. we talk about statistics, these are real people and real crimes, people affected by this. talk to us about the figure. 0n the face of it, it is very alarming? it is. there are a couple of things going on. we have to look not just couple of things going on. we have to look notjust at couple of things going on. we have to look not just at the couple of things going on. we have to look notjust at the police recorded statistics, but also at the information coming from the crime survey of england and wales, which helped tell us about the experience of people in england and wales of crime. the crime recorded statistics have been improving over the last few years, in terms of how compliant they are with the rules. it has meant that some of the rise is that we have seen as a result of an improvement in compliance. there is no denying that what we are seeing are some genuine rises in violence and genuine rises in other categories such as robbery. just to be clear, there are two things going on. one is that the recording of
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crime is better. but underlying this, there are more crimes being committed and these are the crimes that effect before most common things like violent crime, burglaries and robberies? that is correct. what do you make of that? it isa correct. what do you make of that? it is a worrying situation. my collea g u es it is a worrying situation. my colleagues across the country have been working very hard with partner agencies to see what we can do to work with communities to reduce the amount of violence in our society. that is an ongoing issue for everyone. to cope? i think we have seen a number of pieces of state m e nts seen a number of pieces of statements that say we are being stretched incredibly. the reduction of resources over several years has meant that it is becoming incredibly difficult to meet the demands that we are seeing coming from members of the public. this is interesting phraseology, one we have heard many times before, viewers will have heard police officers saying those very things, we are being stretched. anecdotally, a lot of people say
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they report a crime and nothing happens. the police openly say they will not be investigating. that troubles a lot of people. our more crimes not being investigated by the police? i think that is the stark reality. when we have to make choices on vulnerability, harm and threat, we will look for the most vulnerable and give resources to those people accordingly. which does mean that there are people reporting crimes, who are less vulnerable, who do not receive the service they used to. i'm afraid that is the stark reality of the resources we have. to. i'm afraid that is the stark reality of the resources we havem is hard not to politicise this. you we re is hard not to politicise this. you were talking about stark realities. is this a very clear need for more money for policing? i absolutely accept it is very difficult for the government to make choices about where public money goes. everybody is aware of the pressures on the national health service, in social care, and other areas of public service. from a professional point
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of view, as a police officer, we have seen cuts over many years that have seen cuts over many years that have put us at a point where we definitely feel we should get more money into the system. how that happens, i'm afraid, is a far more difficult question. chief constable, one question i would like to ask you this morning, you may be familiar with a story that has broken this morning, anjem choudary has been released from prison. jailed in 2016 after being convicted of inviting support for islamic state. there will be great concerns about his release. i know that police, in conjunction with m15, were involved in the various conditions around his release. he is not allowed to preach, no internet allowed without supervision. could you just possibly talk to us a little bit about what reassu ra nces talk to us a little bit about what reassurances you can give people, you're talking about crime, but preventing crime, about his release and what conditions there might be a roundabout? i can't comment on any specific case, but in general i can
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reassure people. the police service will look at threat risk and harm and put resources into those that are most vulnerable. when it comes to serious cases we will be working with not just to serious cases we will be working with notjust the security to serious cases we will be working with not just the security service but also local authority and other bodies to ensure there is a level of protection to the public from those who seek to cause them harm. so, any individual case, we will work very closely with others to make sure that we protect as best as possible. i understand you can't talk about specifics, when you talk about access to the internet, for example, it isa access to the internet, for example, it is a very new challenge for police and security services in stopping people in these circumstances from getting that kind of a ccess ? circumstances from getting that kind of access? it is a challenge, there are far more devices that give people access to the internet. it is how we now live our lives. but physical checks take place. anyone with an order against them to access the internet, and we are very used to that with our management of registered six —— sex offenders.
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thank you for your time. talking to us specifically about those rises in crime recording, the 20% rise in violent crime, the latest figures. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. this is business live from bbc news, with maryam moshiri and victoria fritz. growth in china slows to the lowest pace since the financial crisis a decade ago, as it battles a trade war with america. live from london, that's our top story on friday 19th october. it's notjust slowing growth — china also faces rising economic challenges, including sky—high debt levels. also in the programme, goldman sachs joins us treasury secretary steve mnuchin in pulling out of saudi's so—called davos in the desert after the disappearance
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of journalist jamal khashoggi.

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