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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 22, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... its's 95% done — theresa may's brexit message to the commons later — after a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. in brussels, brexiteerformer ministers met the eu chief negotiator michel barnier for talks — insisting they weren't there to undermine theresa may. the prime minister gets my full support. we are fully behind her. we have got article 50 past and now would we want to see is this end arrangements. saudi arabia's king and crown prince phone the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi — to send their condolences. calls to boycott ryanair — after staff refuse to move a passenger who hurled racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — katherine downes. hi, simon. lewis hamilton will have to wait until next weekend to try
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and win his fifth formula 1 world title but we will be hearing why some people think he might not be racing for much longer than that. talk to you later, kat. and nick miller has all the weather. but we really enforce no? we have had some late summer weather. a big change though with something much colder on the way this weekend. big coat weather is coming back to the uk. i have all the forecast for you. thank you very much, i think! also coming up — back as a double—act — after a short break meghan rejoins husband prince harry as they visit fraser island off the queensland coast. hello, everyone. this is afternoon
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live. i am simon mccoy. the prime minister will tell the commons later that a brexit deal with the eu is now 95% complete. but theresa may is facing growing angerfrom some of her own mps — some of whom have been condemned for using violent language against her — with one reportedly saying she should be "knifed in the front". downing street has said that "personal vitriol has no place in politics". our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. back to westminster for what's sure to be another turbulent week. the prime minister must report back on the state of the brexit talks to parliament, to her cabinet, and to her own mps. it was always going to be the case that these negotiations would run to the wire, it was always going to have been the case that there would be lively debates about what should or should not be agreed, and the reality is that the negotiations that matter in the coming weeks will be between the prime minister, dominic raab, the brexit secretary, european counterparts, as they work to try and find the best resolution for everyone involved. but the former brexit secretary is one of those with other ideas. senior ministers also have doubts about the prime minister's strategy.
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and these former cabinet members, now prominent brexiteer backbenchers, made their own trip to brussels this morning to tell the eu theresa may's proposals wouldn't work. we are presenting some ideas which we think are constructive, and we had a constructive discussion, and now we're going to go back and talk to the government about it, and this is all within the power of what the government says they want to achieve, which is, ultimately, to leave on the best terms and the best arrangements. over the weekend, there were further attacks on the prime minister from within her own party. the tone of the anonymous comments drawing criticism from colleagues. we should be making a stand about how we speak about women, or indeed any politicians. is it acceptable to use terms like "hot knives being plunged into them", "bring your own noose"? this is really violent, threatening language which is wholly unacceptable, and, you know, they should put their names to those quotes, i'm afraid. theresa may insists the divorce deal with brussels is nearly done
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and there's been good progress on how the future will look too. but she faces hostility from all corners in westminster, and this week, winning support for her approach and her leadership will be her biggest challenge. leila nathoo, bbc news. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, who's in central lobby for us. it is all very well to say something is 95% complete but if you look at twitter, a point has been made that ifa twitter, a point has been made that if a plane is 95% complete it still isn't going to fly. the point there isn't going to fly. the point there is that the sticking point is the same sticking point that has been for months and months and not much sign of how they are going to get through it. theresa may will come here not as several hours as it stands out because is lots of other brexit stuff beforehand but she will come here to feedback to mps what happens at that eu summit but nobody
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is really expecting her to say anything new because there doesn't seem to be anything new on the table for stock she will face a lot of questions though about the suggestion that transition period may go on even longer. there are many brexiteers on her own side that believe this is a delaying tactic and it is designed to keep the uk in this holding battle when nothing changes and it doesn't feel like we have left the eu at all. as i say, before theresa may arrives here there are two other brexit urgent questions. one is coming from... sorry, both are coming from the conservatives. he once asked the government about the cost of staying in the customs union and the cost of the withdrawal. that is notjust the cost of £39 billion that the uk is expected to say as part of those so—called divorce proceedings but it is how much it might cost us to stay in this kind of customs union if
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that were to carry on. following that were to carry on. following thatis that were to carry on. following that is dominic grieve on the other side of the argument on the tory benches, the arch former remainer who wants to know about these so—called meaningful vote. this follows a letter last week from the brexit secretary dominic raab talking about how it is all going to work. remember there is a huge row here about whether mps would really get any kind of realistic choice between a deal that theresa may maybe brings back air or the option of no deal at all. now, mps felt they had concessions meaning they could have a meaningful votes, what dominic grieve is concerned about is that actually it will turn out to be potentially meaningless. he wants to pin down the brexit secretary on all of this to find out exactly what mps will get to vote on if that's all comes back and crucially whether they can amend or change any motion that comes back to this house. they might want to amend it in order to
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say, "we will not agree to a semester is another referendum." for example. it turns out though if the government does make a change it will be effectively voting on any deal that theresa may brings back. so there will be a few rows in this place is afternoon before we even get to the point when the prime minister arrives and takes questions presumably for an hour. a bit of trouble over the use of language over the weekend. do we know who has said what has been quoted? no. that is because people speak to journalists anonymously. obviously, the journalists involved will know, some conservative mps think they know but generally, over the weekend when this happens, people like nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, saying that she doesn't agree with theresa may very much much talk but this kind of particularly violent language that is being used, the idea of twisting a knife into somebody, of
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assassination, the sense that she will come to a meeting on wednesday and told to bring her own noose, all of that, most people here think is com pletely of that, most people here think is completely inappropriate and just the bases the political argument. i think there will be some on the brexit side that feel it undermines their arguments and there is no need for it at all. what it could do is mean there is some sympathy towards theresa may and you can be pretty sure that whoever said it will not be saying it publicly in the chamber for everyone to see. vicki, we will talk to you later. thank you very much. let's get more from our brussels reporter adam fleming. let's talk about michel barnier. he has been meeting various british politicians. this morning he had a visit from owen paterson who used to be the environment secretary, from iain duncan smith used to be work and pensions secretary and former tory leader and from david trimble who used to be first minister of northern ireland, leader of the
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ulster unionist and is now a conservative peer, but they all have in common is they are leading proponents of brexit and they are also leading critics of theresa may's plan with the economic partnership between the uk and the eu in the future. remember, theresa may was this so—called chequers plan which would make a common rule book which would make a common rule book which could be updated byjoint agreement in the future. the three that were here today were here to see michel barnier say that will not work and it should just be a normal free trade agreement, the kind of which the eu has with other countries around the world. i imagine that michel barnier would have thought, "yes, i agree with you on that point." but the point is that the uk will not be able to get the frictionless trade and close trading arrangement they want if thatis trading arrangement they want if that is the view. they came out of a meeting with michel barnier playing very nicely, saying they weren't undermining the prime minister, they we re undermining the prime minister, they were critical of people who use that violent imagery you were just
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discussing but then they basically admitted that they had come here to say that the prime minister's be plan for the future wasn't going to work. this 9596 nearly done, is that a figure they agree with there? they do not agree with the precise number. the last time i heard michel barnier talk about this he said it was 80% or 85% done. there was a bizarre game of trading different numbers. it is especially bizarre if you think about the old at the age nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. so this is a measure of progress as opposed to a tangible thing. having said that, that figure and the things the prime minister quotes as attributing to that figure such as a deal for gibraltar, a quotes as attributing to that figure such as a dealfor gibraltar, a deal for the british military bases on the island of cyprus, those are things that officials here in brussels have been telling the member states are broadly done. so not the total agreement on the
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number butan not the total agreement on the number but an agreement on what has broadly been agreed. adam fleming who is 100% done now, thank you very much. and at 2:30pm, i'll be talking to john rentoul, chief political commentator with the independent and the mirror's political correspondent, nicola bartlett. we'll be looking ahead to theresa may's commons address later and the tone of the language used in brexit coverage in the papers over the last couple of days. you are watching afternoon live. saudi arabia says the king, and crown prince, have both offered their condolences to the son of jamal khashoggi, after their foreign minister admitted — following repeated denials — that the journalist was in fact murdered. western countries have increased their diplomatic pressure — germany, britain and france signing a joint letter demanding facts. chancellor angela merkel says her country will no longer export arms to riyadh. here's eliza philippidis. new footage showing hatice cengiz, seen on the left, spending the night waiting for her fiance, jamal khashoggi, to come out of the saudi consulate. he never did. these pictures have been released
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showing what was probably the very last moment they spent together. saudi arabia has been under diplomatic pressure to tell the truth about what happened in istanbul. now they say his murder was a huge and grave mistake. we are determined to uncover every stone, we are determined to find out all of the facts, and we are determined to punish those who are responsible for this murder. many governments are currently unconvinced by the saudis‘ explanations as to what happened. germany say they will not export arms to saudi arabia, while the current uncertainty over the fate of mr khashoggi persists. translation: there is an urgent need to clarify what happened. we are far from having this cleared up, and those responsible held to account. in a joint statement, the uk, france and germany have condemned the murder, saying... the turkish president has vowed
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to reveal within days the naked truth over the death of the washington postjournalist. translation: we are seeking justice, and this incident will be entirely revealed — entirely. why did 15 people come to istanbul? why were 18 people arrested? this must be revealed in detail. questions are being raised as to whether the west will really punish the saudis. they possess around 18% of the world's oil reserves, and earnings from military contracts are huge. eliza philippidis, bbc news. our correspondent sebastian usher is in the saudi capital riyadh, where the stage is set for a major international investment summit, even though some high profile names have pulled out. one thing is the sure this
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conference, davos in the desert as it is dubbed will go ahead despite all of the people who have pulled out, the keynote speakers, the government ministers, the top ceos. it is in place, it will start tomorrow as it was supposed to add the ritz, this extraordinary grandiose hotel where it will take place. all the preparations are being done, the main venue where it is happening is beautifully lit and ready am about who is going to be speaking? that is a big question. there is no sign from the organisers of who those people are going to be who will replace the big hitters such as christine lagarde of the imf for example who was going to be one of the opening speakers at the first meeting. they say that will be updated and refreshed during the day but we're counting down the hours to
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when it opens. it is not a very good sign. organisers have said it is a great challenge to turn things around. the key for the saudis was this must go ahead and for many of the business people, it is very important as well. it may not be the top names who are there but other delegations certainly are. they believe the investment that saudi needsis believe the investment that saudi needs is a business that is notjust lucrative but in some cases is something that will do good for the region that saudi arabia, according to the vision 2030, this grandiose ambitions projects of crown prince mohammed bin salman can transform saudi arabia and they can have a pa rt saudi arabia and they can have a part in it. a man i was talking to who was an environmentalist was hoping that there would still be real talk about what is necessary to do to protect the environment here, to meet the challenges that the world is facing, notjust saudi
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arabia, and that what saudi arabia has talked about doing can still go ahead. but day by day that confidence is beginning to fade and this will be a test over three days. you may not notice it here but internationally as the voices and as action taken more seriously against saudi arabia, they will no doubt have a impact and it may be the difference between the conference really m ea ns difference between the conference really means anything whether they arejust really means anything whether they are just words that will fade and have very little future meaning. i very much depends of course on the man at the centre himself, crown prince mohammed bin salman, can he weather the storm? that was sebastian usher. in the last few minutes, donald
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trump has been tweeting about the ca rava n trump has been tweeting about the caravan of people who are moving towards the us border. our system is not working at the moment but what he has been saying is that he will ta ke he has been saying is that he will take action against what all, honduras and el salvador. he says they will now be cutting off or substantially reducing the mass of foreign aid routinely given to them. that is a tweet from donald trump in the last half hour is that pressure continues to mount over that arrival which does now seem to be imminent of those who seek refugee status, as they call themselves, towards the border with the united states. we will bring you more on that as it develops. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines its‘s 95% done — theresa may's brexit message to the commons later — after a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. saudi arabia's king and crown prince phone the son of murdered journalist journalist jamal khashoggi —
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to send their condolences calls to boycott ryanair — after staff refuse to move a passenger who hurled racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. and in sports, lewis hamilton will burn out before reaching michael schumacher‘s record of seven championships in formula 1. that is according to... west ham winger could be out for months after tearing his achilles tendon. and england and great britain hockey captain will miss next month's champions trophy, she has concussion after hitting her head on holiday. i will be back with all of the stories just before 3:30pm. see you then. the transport secretary chris grayling has called for police action to be taken after an elderly black woman was racially abused by a white man on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted. the incident was recorded by a fellow passenger and shared on social media. ryanair says it has reported what happened to the police
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but the airline is facing criticism after allowing the man to stay in his seat while the woman was moved. chichi izundu reports. i will tell you this, if you don't go to another seat, i will push you to another seat. this video has now been viewed more than 11.5 million times on facebook and more than 3 million on twitter. it shows an argument between two passengers on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted last friday. stop. there's no need for that at all. just stop. this man then becomes racially abusive to 77—year—old mrs gale, who sat next to him. david lawrence filmed it on his phone. i was expecting to see the cavalry turn up, the police, for them to escort him off the flight, for him to be arrested, charged, locked up, everything, like i often see happen to other passengers who do this. none of that was done.
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he was allowed to travel to his destination. rya nair's chief executive, michael o'leary, has been doing interviews this morning on the company's falling profits but the company has refused to comment further on friday's incident because they've handled the matter over to essex police. transport secretary chris grayling said authorities should be involved. what we saw was totally u na cce pta ble. the fact is, abuse, racist abuse of that kind is a crime. if a crime is committed, it should be dealt with appropriately and therefore i would hope, notwithstanding what took place on that day, that the police would want to take action in such an extraordinarily unacceptable case. the shadow transport minister, karl turner, says police may not have the power to act. the uk law only applies if the aircraft is travelling to a uk destination. it needs to be in flight, the definition of in—flight is that the aircraft engines are on and the plane is moving. it was stood on tarmac in barcelona.
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surprised, disgusted and hurt. that's how the family of mrs gale have described the incident to the huffington post and say they still haven't heard anything from rya nair. chichi izundu, bbc news. ministers have been told that cutting the use of antibiotics — and developing new drugs to replace them — should be in the government's top five priorities. mps on the health and social care committee have called for more research to help tackle the resistance of infections to drugs. in the meantime, they say gps should be more sparing in prescribing anti—biotics. the government has said it is investing record amounts in developing new drugs. the group representing hospitals, ambulance services and other nhs trusts in england is predicting that the strain on health services this winter will be worse than last year. nhs providers says the provision of cancer care and routine operations is already under severe pressure — that's before hospitals respond to the seasonal demand for emergency care. on top of that — they say work force shortages are intensifying problems.
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the deputy ceo of nhs providers — saffron cordery spoke this morning to the bbc radio 4 today programme — and told them why they are predicting such a tough winterfor the nhs. we know the warning signs are out there. a&e performance has dropped. we've got to demand going up across all services. that includes routine operations and cancer care as well as emergency services. and, as you heard, the rising workforce shortages. so, yes, we think it's going to be a challenging winter ahead. and yet the nhs in england say," well, look, hold on, there is extra money going into a&e and extra money going into social care short—term and there is better national level winter planning." that is true. all that has happened and that is immensely welcome but would you have got to look at is a number of factors. you have to be clear about the scale of the challenge we are facing and also, when money goes into the system very late it is actually very difficult to deploy it effectively.
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we have had some really welcome capital funding, around £140 million, to make some changes in a&e departments but that came in september and has today used in september and has ——to be used by december so there are a number of issues about timing of funding. it is very welcome. after a short rest from royal duties, the duchess of sussex has rejoined her husband for a walkabout on fraser island off the coast of queensland. the couple, who are expecting their first child in the spring, are on a 16 day tour taking in australia, new zealand, fiji and tonga. our royal correspondentjonny dymond is travelling with them. chanting. on the edge of eastern australia, a traditional welcome for harry. this is fraser island, also known as paradise. take a photo! the duke came to declare the rainforest here part of the queen's commonwealth canopy — a conservation project stretching
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across dozens of countries. put simply, without trees and forests, we don't survive. it is a symbiotic relationship and one that so many people still fail to realise. and then some handshakes and some royal playing around. he played alone, meghan taking some time out. but harry was more than enough excitement for some. when he shook my hand, he asked our names and i, like, forgot my name for three seconds and then i was like, oh, destiny. "my name is destiny!" he seems like a nice fellow, down to earth. another location, another welcome. and more playing around from harry. there's no stopping him, but still, no meghan. if you want an idea as to why meghan
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is not taking part in this section of the tour, then check out the roads on fraser island. they are winding, they are bumpy and some would say they are no place for a pregnant woman. but at the end of the day, strolling on firmer ground, there she was, one hand pressed against her tummy. and they both made time to talk to those who had stood and waited in the sun. hi, guys! there is nothing like a double act — and this one has drawn the crowds across australia. one of life's little triumphs for a lover of royalty. jonny dymond, bbc news, fraser island. lovely there and it has been lovely
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here but is that about to change. nick miller is herewith the forecast. a big nod from me. when was the last time you wore gloves, not including gardening? probably around march. so it is going to get colder? yes, big change on the way. cast your mind back to last weekend, that was yesterday! it really seems like a long time ago. 20 degrees was a top temperature in southern england, also in aberdeenshire as well at the weekend. but as i transform the picture into what we are expecting this weekend, a big change. let's just say single figure temperatures, many of us around 8 degrees. there isa many of us around 8 degrees. there is a wind chill as well so it will feel colder. that is a bit of snow, yes. many of us will see some sunshine, catcher passing shower but
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it will feel very different this weekend. so what is going on? is this a jet stream issue? i mean, it's the end of october. it's not unusual to have an early cold blast at the end of october but because of what we have had it will feel very different. you are right, thejet strea m different. you are right, thejet stream is something to do with it. let's look all the way across to north america, very undulating jet strea m north america, very undulating jet stream so on the peaks you have warm airand on the stream so on the peaks you have warm air and on the troughs you have cold air. another area of building warmth just to the east of north america into the atlantic. it is underneath this little peak in the jet stream there is an area of high pressure developing and we are on the other side of that. so o'clock from —— a clockwise flow of air, we are very much in the blue, a strong wind as well and wind chill is an issue and
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there will be some snow showers as well. to summarise what we are expecting, a cold snap on the way, strong northerly winds, snow on northern hills but not that unusual. it is only monday. that is the weekend. what about in between? there was a little bit of weather in between. high pressure in control at the moment keeping many of us fine but a very different story in the northern isles this afternoon where we have heavy rain, strong winds up to 70 miles an hour but it will be turning breezy across the uk as we go through the rest of the day, tonight and tomorrow. these are this afternoon's temperatures, they have come down a bit since the weekend but it is not unpleasant in the sunshine. that's take a look at things through tonight. it turns breezy through northern parts of the uk. some cloud filtering in, more in northern scotland, but all of that serves to kick temperatures up, to
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rogers will be highest overnight across northern scotland, into double figures. they will be lowest in southern england. now, tomorrow we will keep pulses of rain moving into northern scotland, gusts of around 50 mph, high grounds around scotla nd around 50 mph, high grounds around scotland and northern england. southern and eastern parts of the uk are seeing the best of the sunshine, temperatures up a little bit and thatis temperatures up a little bit and that is around 18 degrees in aberdeenshire. wednesday is a quieter day. we're losing that range from north—west scotland where it is turning later and the wind is easing. damages in the mid teens. the first signs of this weather change coming in on thursday. you will notice this area of blue here which is rain coming into northern scotla nd which is rain coming into northern scotland and this time the rain will move southwards, thursday nights, through northern ireland and then eventually into england and wales into friday. if you still have some sunshine and warmth on thursday that is just about the end of it because after that the weather front moves
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south to go back into the blue again. the wind flow switching round to the arctic and there will be sunshine and showers. but there will be some snow into the showers as well. 8 degrees or so for the temperatures, feeling cold in the wind was all of that to look forward to, maybe not the correct phrase but nothing unusual about having that first burst of winter coming in late autumn but then again it is just not what we are used to. a big weather change on the way. more details as ever online. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: theresa may will try to rally her party behind her brexit negoitations this afternoon, as she tells mps that her deal with the eu is 95% finished. meanwhile, brexiteers and former cabinet ministers iain duncan smith and owen paterson deny undermining the prime minister after meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. the king and crown prince of saudia arabia phone the son of murdered journalist
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jamal khashoggi to offer their condolences. authorities say he was killed by "rogue operators". budget airline ryanair comes under fire for failing to eject a passenger who was filmed hurling racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. moscow warns that the world will be a more dangerous place if the united states pulls out of a key cold war nuclear missile treaty. the kremlin said russia would be forced to take measures to "restore the balance of nuclear power" if washington withdrew. lewis hamilton, it is a question of when not if he gets his nextjumping ship title but there have been some interesting things said. i'm not sure you have put any thought into what he will do after
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broadcasting, maybe a fashion line, a second career? gardening, i think. everyone has to have a plan and lewis hamilton has launched his own fashion line this year. the fans are justin bieber, will smith, they are wearing his clothes and he has been recording music as well. apparently he has recorded an album. the buzz is he is beginning to think about life away from formula 1 and sir jackie stewart saying it is inevitable, five world titles in ten yea rs, inevitable, five world titles in ten years, michael schumacher holds the record for seven, and jackie stewart saying there is no way he will be racing long enough to reach that record. he will burn out. as the success brings, you then... he's going into clothing for example and things. he loves music, for example. sooner or later, you get tired of it. i got tired of it at a very young age. 3a
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yea rs of tired of it at a very young age. 3a years of age i retired. and i went on to other things. inmost sports, you burn out. he will choose to retire. you want i can get burnt out very fast but we do not have the choice to retire. it would be nice to just think, i will live my dream and become a fashion designer and pop/ —— pop star. the england and wales cricket board has dismissed allegations that a small group of england players were involved in spot fixing in seven matches. the claims were made in an updated documentary made by the qatari based broadcaster aljazeera. the ecb said: the documentary has also been dismissed by fast bowler mark wood
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who is with the england squad in sri lanka. it just does not itjust does not really bother me, to be honest. i mean, we get sort of corruption, anti—corruption training. i have a guy called peter o'shea who i trust a lot. he is on the end of the phone if i need him. all of this stuff has no sort of hit or anything like that to it. it is nothing new to me. if they came up with concrete evidence or a name and they could prove something, then i would be a little bit more worried. but at the minute, it does not bother me because they keep making accusations and there is nothing behind it. west ham winger andriy yarmolenko could be out for up to six months after tearing his achilles tendon during saturday's defeat to tottenham. the ukrainianjoined the hammers from borussia dortmund during the summer and has scored twice this season. there's one match in the premier league this evening.
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arsenal take on leicester at the emirates. since losing their first two games of the season arsenal have won nine in a row in all competitions, but head coach unai emery doesn't think another victory‘s guaranteed tonight. leicester is a very good team. and they are playing, i think, with one identity very clear. they are very competitive. they have very good players. and we need every single players. and we need every single player and also our mentality together to be more strong than the last matches. i think they have good confidence in their play. perhaps they play with more direct play, and clinical play with clinical players
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like lacazette, for example. they have confidence for the future. there's been some bad news for england's hockey team with the news that captain alex danson will miss the champions trophy in china in november. she suffered a concussion after hitting her head on holiday, the 33—year—old has been a mainstay of both the england and great britain team for the past decade. that's all the sport for now. jose mourinho has said he wants to stay at old trafford until the end of his contract and beyond. i will have more for you later. let's get more on top story: the prime minister will tell the commons later that a brexit deal with the eu is now 95 per cent complete. but theresa may is facing growing angerfrom some of her own mps — some of whom have been condemned for using violent language against her — with one reportedly saying she should be ‘knifed in the front‘.
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let's discuss all these with our political correspondent of the mirror nicola bartlett, and john rentoul, chief political commentator at the independent. 95%, what do we make of that, first of all, the fact she is going to say this in the commons later? last week we had michel barnier saying it is 90%, so she had to go one better and say in the last week we have had so much progress, 95%. the key thing obviously is that 5% contains the thorniest issue of them all, which is this backstop to avoid a hardboard. it might not sound like very much but it is the trickiest bit and the one that has held up the process for all these months. she has put this out there is other people feel there is progress being made. in the commons, the reaction may be slightly different. the problem is her own side don't like the direction of progress. she is progressing towards a deal that they really don't like very much. i think
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it is fairenough really don't like very much. i think it is fair enough for her to say 95% because i think she is very close to a deal. i think the fact that at official level they thought they had a deal the other day. you can have a bridge that is 95% complete but you are not going to cross it! but if the engineers tell you they have figured out how to do it, but you say, we are not quite sure about doing it that way, it does suggest they are very close to a deal and i think that is a good sign. from the point of view who want a deal. so we are point of view who want a deal. so we a re close point of view who want a deal. so we are close to resolving the irish border issue? i think so. are close to resolving the irish border issue? ithink so. both are close to resolving the irish border issue? i think so. both sides will have to comp demise in the end and these things always go to the la st and these things always go to the last minute. her problem is her side is not going to like the compromises she is going to make. you are being very diplomatic! the bridge analogy
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is very good. the problem is she is ina is very good. the problem is she is in a total bind, as you suggest, domestically, and if she is close to this deal, which her own side don't want, then what is the outcome at that point? she was talking about extending the transition period and that politically is so difficult for her to do. there is this discussion on, do we keep a backstop, we reject a backstop, so... but the point is, how many times have we sat here saying, how much longer can she survive? that question will be asked again this afternoon. that is the point, simon. there are people on her side will really object to what she is trying to do but they are a minority in her party. they are very loud and vocal and foul—mouthed, using the language you are just quoted, i think they should be left out of politics. are
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these names going to appear in the papers tomorrow? the suggestion is they are known in westminster but whether or not they kind of come out or not is kind of another question. that is one of the points behind using that kind of language is there isa using that kind of language is there is a frustration obviously inserting quarters and because there is a lack of action and probably, i think, her demise has been prematurely called again, that is their way of sort of getting it off their chest, as it were, albeit in a very nasty and quite sort of troubling way. how does this play with the public, do you think? this westminster bubble where everyone seems to be at each other‘s throats, the public look at this and say, can't someone just make this happen? they don't like it but the other interesting thing about it is that i detect a certain amount of sympathy for the prime minister and a feeling
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among the general public that although they don't rate her very much, they don't think she's a brilliant prime minister, they do think she is sincere, honest and hard—working and she is trying to get the best deal for the country and these attacks from the hard brexiteers in her own party, you know, actually strengthen her position in a funny sort of way because people feel she is being u nfa i rly because people feel she is being unfairly treated. do you think she will face a photo no confidence at some point in the next couple of weeks? i think she has had so many of these cliff edge moments, i mean, the point i think probably is when she comes back with a deal, and if that deal is unacceptable, and the arithmetic doesn't work in parliamentary terms, then i would have thought that would be the most likely case but she has this amazing capacity to sort of bring it back from the brink that every time. what is that down to? i think in a way, she has been in this tricky position
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almost from the start becoming prime minister, a position where she did not campaign for brexit, she said she would take it on. i think the weird situation she was faced with and her sort of i suppose just doggedness to keep saying, i am going to keep doing this, as she wrote in the sun newspaper today, it is not about me, it is about the deal. and i think people are warming to her and deal. and i think people are warming to herandi deal. and i think people are warming to her and i suppose she wears her sense of public duty quite heavily, asa sense of public duty quite heavily, as a person. i think in a way, that kind of cuts through it. the other side is, who is going to replace her? that is the great strength in her? that is the great strength in her position. the problem with the tory party rules as it is a vote of no—confidence in the leader, without specifying who you want to replace the leader with. which is a bit of an insensitive i—macro incentive for them to gang up against her. but i think they will hold back because
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most of them, i suspect, do not want to see borisjohnson or most of them, i suspect, do not want to see boris johnson or david most of them, i suspect, do not want to see borisjohnson or david davis as prime minister to complete the negotiations and even if they do get the 48 names to trigger that, she would win. within the commons generally, how was it helped when you see iain duncan smith, lord trimble, owen paterson coming out having had chats with michel barnier, saying they disagree with their prime minister? it is extraordinary. you have this queue of people going to visit michel barnier, paying homage at the court of michel barnier. we have had jeremy corbyn going on there, tony blair, nick clegg, and now the hard brexiteers want a bit of reaction as well. it is almost as if the 27 countries are negotiating with 27 varieties of british political positioning. and trying to get an agreement between those two sides is
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very difficult. a lot of talk about the impact of the march on saturday. 700,000 people on the streets of london. does that make a difference? i think it does in the sense that it shows the strength of feeling and it does so in quite a visual way. those are substantial numbers and it was effective to see that. whether we doubted there was that strength of feeling there already, it has kind of already been factored in. if you look at recent british political history, the numbers that marched against the iraq war, it does not a lwa ys against the iraq war, it does not always have an impact on political decisions. it does let people know what a certain section of the public is thinking. and it also makes the people marching feel—good, which is not to dismiss it, but it does make you feel like you are doing
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something but it is not necessarily tra nsfer something but it is not necessarily transfer into a reaction from the prime minister. it sets the context for the next stage. i have to say this because the independent obviously supports a second referendum on the march, but we are coming up to the point of decision on brexit and to have a second referendum as one of the options on the table, it is onlyjust on the table because the labour party... what i don't understand and maybe i am missing something, but if there was a second referendum on the public said we don't accept that deal, what then? that is the crucial question, what would be on the ballot paper? but that is why it is only an option at this stage. it is a backstop! we don't know what is going to be agreed or not agreed in brussels to have that as an option is very important, certainly for a large numberof mps is very important, certainly for a large number of mps in the house of
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commons. i must let you get back on your bike and head back to westminster. thank you both very much. three police officers have been found guilty of gross misconduct over the way they dealt with the aftermath of a fight outside a bedford nightclub five years ago, which left a man paralysed. a fourth officer was found guilty of misconduct. lauren moss reports. julian cole was a keen athlete, now he is paralysed and brain—damaged after a scuffle which led to his arrest outside a nightclub in bedford in 2013. four officers who we re bedford in 2013. four officers who were there on the night were accused of misconduct. julian broke his neck and suffered a severe spinal injury following an argument with bouncers and police after he had been asked to leave the club. ramblers was not called until he was at the police station. his family arrived at court today, hoping for answers. my hope
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isi today, hoping for answers. my hope is i need justice, no matter what ever they did for him, they won't bring him back but the only thing i need is justice. bring him back but the only thing i need isjustice. the officers were not accused of inflating the injuries but breaching standards of duty and not carrying out welfare checks. pcs hannah ross have been found guilty of misconduct and breaching standards. ps andrew with lee was found guilty of misconduct and breaching standards and responsibilities. today's results may offer some comfort forjulian ‘s mother but she still has an answer questions about how he became injured in the first place. julian cole will need 24—hour bedside care for the rest of his life. i've really missed him, but i'm delighted to say ben bland is here,
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with the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. it's 95% done — theresa may's brexit message to the commons later — after a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. saudi arabia ‘s king and crown prince phone the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi to send their condolences. calls to boycott ryanair — after staff refuse to move a passenger who hurled racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. morrisons has lost its challenge against a high court ruling that it is liable for a data breach that saw thousands of its employees' details posted online. the court of appeal upheld the original decision against the supermarket, issued in december 2017. more on this in a moment. the pound has slipped amid renewed talks of a challenge to the prime minister over her handling of brexit. theresa may is due to update parliament later
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strong sales in europe and the middle east have boosted profits at uk footwear firm dr martens. earnings grew 33% to £50m in the year to march, with sales up 20% to £348.6m. the northamptonshire—based company, most famous for its distinctive boots, said it had seen double—digit growth in revenues and profits in all regions. morrisons has lost its challenge to a high court ruling that it is liable for a data breach that saw thousands of its employees' details posted online. the court of appeal upheld the original decision against the supermarket, issued in december 2017. workers brought a claim against the company after employee andrew skelton stole the data, including salary and bank details, of nearly 100,000 staff. those affected can now claim compensation for "upset and distress". the case is the first data leak class action in the uk.
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it follows a security breach in 2014 when skelton, then a senior internal auditor at the retailer's bradford headquarters, leaked the payroll data of employees. what happens now? this was the largest class—action case of data breach in the uk. more than 5000 people involved in this. they are liable, sorry, the supermarket as things stand is liable to compensate them for the loss they have suffered but morrison's has said that actually, the court did not criticise the way it handles data and protects company data but found them vicariously
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responsible for a breach by someone who was an employee of theirs at the time and it looks as though they will take the case to further appeal to the high court. and we have had a statement. yes, that was the gist of it. ok. it's hardly fun and games for the us toymaker hasbro after its latest results. yes, you could say that. this is the us toy giant that makes monopoly and the nerf range of toys among others. its sales and profits in the third quarter of the year fell short of expectations. sales figures were down 12% to $1.57 billion - and earnings fell too — compared with a year earlier. it's partly because of the collapse of toys r us — they're a separate company, but of course, when that massive toy retailer went into administration and collapsed earlier this year, it means a major retail partner, where hasbro sold its toys had vanished. hasbro has then been scrambling to find new avenues to sell products. joining us now is our
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north america business correspondent, samira hussain. what is going on? why is it worse than expectations? i think the best way to really think about toys "r" us and its relationship with hasbro is it was really the biggest client, their biggest purchaser and now with them gone, the challenge is, where cammack to really sell their toys. of course there is a lot of online shopping is happening in albert hasbro does not really get too dominant —— dominate that. also selling to reconsider now is the fa ct selling to reconsider now is the fact that the kinds of things that people are buying has changed. how many times are people buying twister and monopoly as a gift versus buying gadgets? any kind of tech gift. that
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has become so much more popular. and thatis has become so much more popular. and that is also weighing on hasbro and also what is really interesting is if you look at hasbro, it is not just them that are being impacted, we are seeing that mattel, in other toy giant, they are trading lower today. even though they have not reported their learnings just yet. investors are reported their learnings just yet. investors a re really reported their learnings just yet. investors are really worried that they are going to be facing the same story as hasbro. has hasbro given any indication how it will try and deal with all of this? of course, there are still some things that hasbro does well. it is still seeing su ccesses hasbro does well. it is still seeing successes on hasbro does well. it is still seeing su ccesses o n toys hasbro does well. it is still seeing successes on toys that have been you know developed in conjunction with television or movies. my little pony orany of television or movies. my little pony or any of these other sort of big franchises. that has really helped them but really fundamentally, they are going to have to find a way to
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make upfor are going to have to find a way to make up for the fact they have lost toys r us as their big buyer. the ftse 100 is higher. some of the big gains coming from mining companies. their share prices are up as metal prices, including gold and copper, rose. that's partly thanks to a weaker us dollar. the markets benefiting generally from improved sentiment over political tensions and global economic growth. european shares were boosted by gains in italian banks after moody's kept the country's sovereign rating stable. that's all the business news. i would love to be able to say it is good to have you back. i would love to be able to say the same! there is a big change in the weather on the way by the end of this week. it will be hugely different from
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what we have experienced over the weekend with temperatures from scotla nd weekend with temperatures from scotland to southern england rose above 20 celsius. scenes like this for some going into this weekend. some snow into northern hills, single figure temperatures across—the—board, feeling single figure temperatures across—the—boa rd, feeling colder single figure temperatures across—the—board, feeling colder in across—the—board, feeling colder in a stronger northerly wind. it has not arrived yet. we still have high pressure a cross not arrived yet. we still have high pressure across much of the uk. it is not feeling as warm as it is over the weekend. the breezes picking above and northern half of the uk. some winds in excess of 60 miles prowl. but it is wet. temperatures in the mid to low teens. quite windy in northern scotland at times. a breezy picture across the northern half of the uk. it will be milder thanit half of the uk. it will be milder than it was last night. but the
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further south you are, no single figures in places, maybe one or two patches of mist and fog around. heavy rain running especially into the western highlands of scotland. another windy day, particularly across the high ground of scotland and northern england. as were most places drive. sunny spells. 18 degrees in the sunshine in aberdeenshire. wednesday, that rain in north—west scotland will be easing. a quiet day across most areas. this is the story on thursday, we are going to get a weather front. this area thursday, we are going to get a weatherfront. this area of thursday, we are going to get a weather front. this area of rain starting to push outbreaks of rain across more of scotland and later in the day into northern ireland. ahead of that, temperatures still in low teens. this weather front moving south on friday and the start of the weekend has the cold air behind it. we are all in the blue. you and on the wind as well and it is going to feel colder. there will be showers
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around, some sunshine but it could fall us know. a significant difference to what we have seen of late. it will feel like a shock to the system, that is for sure. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm... its‘s 95% done — theresa may's brexit message to the commons later — after a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. in brussels brexiteer former ministers met the eu chief negotiator michel barnier for talks — insisting they weren't there to undermine theresa may. the prime minister gets my full support. that's it, full stop. we are fully behind her. we've got article 50 passed, we've got withdrawal act passed, and now what we want to see is this end arrangement. saudi arabia's king and crown prince phone the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi — to send their condolences. calls to boycott ryanair — after staff refuse to move a passenger who hurled racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. coming up on afternoon live
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all the sport with kat. shows a mourinho seemed grumpy recently at manchester united but this afternoon he said he wanted to stay there till the end of his contract and beyond. i'll have more at 3:30pm. thanks, kat, and we'll be joining you for a full update just after 3:30pm. nick miller has all the weather. this is snow behind me. we have had some late summer weather but a big change on the way this weekend. big coat weather is coming back to the uk. i will have the full forecast for you. thanks, nick. also, coming up, back as a double—act — after a short break meghan rejoins husband prince harry as they visit fraser island off the queensland coast. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. the prime minister will tell the commons this afternoon that a brexit deal with the eu is now 95% complete. but theresa may is facing growing angerfrom some of her own mps — some of whom have been condemned for using violent language against her — with one reportedly saying she should be "knifed in the front". downing street has reacted by saying that — "personal vitriol has no place in politics". our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. back to westminster for what's sure to be another turbulent week. the prime minister must report back on the state of the brexit talks to parliament, to her cabinet, and to her own mps. it was always going to be the case that these negotiations would run to the wire, it was always going to have been the case that there would be lively debates about what should or should not be agreed, and the reality is that the negotiations that matter in the coming weeks will be between the prime minister,
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dominic raab, the brexit secretary, european counterparts, as they work to try and find the best resolution for everyone involved. but the former brexit secretary is one of those with other ideas. senior ministers also have doubts about the prime minister's strategy. and these former cabinet members, now prominent brexiteer backbenchers, made their own trip to brussels this morning to tell the eu theresa may's proposals wouldn't work. we are presenting some ideas which we think are constructive, and we had a constructive discussion, and now we're going to go back and talk to the government about it, and this is all within the power of what the government says they want to achieve, which is, ultimately, to leave on the best terms and the best arrangements. over the weekend, there were further attacks on the prime minister from within her own party. the tone of the anonymous comments drawing criticism from colleagues. we should be making a stand about how we speak about women, or indeed any politicians. is it acceptable to use terms like "hot knives
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being plunged into them", "bring your own noose"? this is really violent, threatening language which is wholly unacceptable, and, you know, they should put their names to those quotes, i'm afraid. theresa may insists the divorce deal with brussels is nearly done and there's been good progress on how the future will look too. but she faces hostility from all corners in westminster, and this week, winning support for her approach and her leadership will be her biggest challenge. leila nathoo, bbc news. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, who's in central lobby for us. it'll be the reaction to theresa may this afternoon that will tell us where we are. i think so. she is coming here to update mps on what happened at that summit last week but of course there was a huge amount of anger that already been
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expressed about the suggestion the transition period may be extended even longer and the fear among many mps is that the uk would be stuck in this holding pattern where we have technically left the eu but it doesn't feel like that at all because nothing has changed. she will have some explaining to do and it is really a matter of how much she can get away with not saying because whatever she says is going to cause a bit of aggro. let's discuss this some more, i am joined by sammy wilson of the dup. what was your reaction? i thought it was mad that she has not challenged the eu on an unnecessary and unworkable backstop. secondly, she is now offering to stay in the arrangements with the eu for another year. politically that is mad because that takes the decision closer to the next election. does the prime minister really want this hanging
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over her head coming into the next election? and of course, it is going to cost the exchequer another £80 million, or billion pounds sorry, if we do stay on for an extra year. but to what end ? we do stay on for an extra year. but to what end? while the backstop arrangement is there and while the eu insists that the backstop can only operate separate in northern ireland with the united kingdom then nothing will be solved. we could stay for another 100 years and we would still have the problem. what about those that say that the uk government signed up last december to there being no hard border and the understanding at the time would mean this backstop arrangement and now effectively she is trying to back on its? first of all, no hard border can be deliberate without any backstop because no hard border exists at present and all of the things that need to be done, checking for taxes to be paid and regulatory compliance and whatnot is done across the border at present and can be done after we leave the
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eu. there is no need for that. secondly, she made other promises in the agreement last december, namely that under no circumstances would northern ireland be separated from the rest of the united kingdom. so you have these two contradictory promises that were made. clearly that was a bit of a fudge and she can't get out of it. we pointed that out at the time and we insisted that the part of the eu had insisted on could be removed so we insisted that you could not have the break—up of the united kingdom, she agreed to do that as well and now of course the crows a re that as well and now of course the crows are coming home to roost and she has two face up to who she satisfies. does she satisfy those, both the remain and the lever camps that say under no circumstances can the united kingdom beeb broken up or that she satisfy the eu who are
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insisting that northern ireland will be part of the eu regulatory regime. how much trouble are you willing to cause given there are some conservative backbenchers who are going to put down amendments to a bail on wednesday which would effectively make the eu backstop idea illegal under our law? backing amendments on wednesday is on causing trouble. i would be surprised if the government doesn't like those amendments as well because they have already made a commitment. if there is to be a backstop in place then any changes and regulations would require ministers and the assembly in northern ireland is to agree those. sol northern ireland is to agree those. so i can't imagine the prime minister having agreed that then saying, minister having agreed that then .. by minister having agreed that then saying, " by the way, we would allow civil servants to make these decisions." theresa may is busily not your party leader but you are helping her in the arrangement you have here, supporting her
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government. what have you made this weekend about the tone of some of the language coming from those on her own side about her personally and a violent land would be news about her facing assassination, and needing to bring a noose to a meeting. i have had to say we have had this kind of trolling of mps and ido had this kind of trolling of mps and i do not think it is helpful. it is of no concern to i do not think it is helpful. it is of no concern to us i do not think it is helpful. it is of no concern to us who leads the conservative party and it would be arrogant of us to say who should lead it but we can have differences with your party leader but sometimes it is better not to use that kind of language that has been used. you can use it about your enemies but i don't think you need to use it about your party leader. and are you in any way concerned about the apparent instability about the government and theresa may's leadership. there is all this talk about her having a
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challenge is that something you're concerned about? we are very concerned. we are in this arrangement the government to try and give stability over the next five years and we were clear that we would give support to the brexit legislation and the domestic legislation and the domestic legislation so that this government could last the course for five years for the good of the country. if this kind of instability doesn't help, it stops the government getting its own legislation through and you're down to the lowest common denominator and it creates uncertainty at a time when we can well do without it. i would like to see the prime minister going in there, acting as the leader of the united kingdom, the fifth biggest economy of the world, telling eu negotiators that she will not be messed about or disrespected, she will not have our country abused in the way that the eu negotiators are doing and we will be behind her cheering her. sammy wilson, thank
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you very much indeed. some potential support therefore theresa may and there is a feast of brexit for you this afternoon, there will be too urgent questions both from conservatives of different wings of the party, john redwood asking how much it would cost to stay in a customs union and from the other side, dominic grieve asking whether mps will really get a meaningful vote on a deal if theresa may manages to bring one back to this place. we willjoin you for the feast a little later. vicky young in westminster, thank you very much. michael stirling has pleaded guilty at northampton crown court — to murdering midwife samantha eastwood — who was found buried in a shallow grave in staffordshire a week after being reported missing. he is 32 and the brother—in—law of her ex—fiance. miss eastward was last seen in uniform leaving the hospital where she works on the 7th
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ofjuly. her body was found in a shallow grave one week after being reported missing and in the last few minutes michael stirling has admitted murdering her and will be sentenced later. that is the latest from northampton crown court on the murder of the midwife semantic eastward. a man has admitted killing her. ——samantha eastwood saudi arabia says the king, and crown prince, have both offered their condolences to the son of jamal khashoggi, after their foreign minister admitted — following repeated denials — that the journalist was in fact murdered. western countries have increased their diplomatic pressure — germany, britain and france signing a joint letter demanding facts. this evening the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, will update the commons on the government's response to the murder.
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chancellor angela merkel says her country will no longer export arms to riyadh. eliza philippidis reports. our correspondent martin patience is in istanbul. almost with every hour we are getting a drip feed of facts coming out relating to the murder itself. it isjust out relating to the murder itself. it is just extraordinary. out relating to the murder itself. it isjust extraordinary. we have seen it isjust extraordinary. we have seen this over several days and the latest revelation according to one report in the turkish media is that a car apparently belonging to the saudi consulate that had diplomatic plates was found abandoned in an underground car park. i think all of this is designed to maintain pressure on saudi arabia. it is not coming officially. turkey has been relatively lenient. but unofficially we have seen this drip feed of allegations into the press. president erdogan, the country's president, he says he will speak tomorrow which is a speech or statement everyone is waiting for. he has said that he will reveal the full naked truth, as he put it. what
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i asked one former turkish ambassador about this issue, he said we willjust ambassador about this issue, he said we will just have ambassador about this issue, he said we willjust have to wait and see, don't expect the full story. for the turks, of course, it is how do they get this information in the first those? there is a sense that everybody bugs everybody but someone is going to have to show their hand here, aren't they? it was interesting. this is what the ambassador was saying. he said that no, at some point an agreement could be made and suddenly you have an agreement where donald trump agrees with the saudi version of events and turkey's official version of events, not an official which is being linked to the papers, but official version of events tallies in those countries say that this is a case resolved moved on. again, that ambassador stressed that the truth of what actually happened to jamal
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khashoggi could be sacrificed for national interest as turkey, america in saudi arabia see it. it is a personal tragedy for the family of the journalist but all these leaders are making the calculations and i think many of them will see what they can get out of it. what turkey knows is that america wants to salvage its relationship with saudi arabia. perhaps if turkey is giving concessions on a variety of issues thenit concessions on a variety of issues then it might choose to go along with it. what else is your source been telling you? he was very interesting. he said he had never known an incident like that. i think we are going to hear from him. i don't know whether we have a clip. i specifically asked him whether or not he thought that president erdogan would reveal the full story and he had this to say. i don't know if the clip is going to come up, simon. i think in the absence of a body,
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most of the interpretations and comments on this will remain within the bounds of speculation. once we have the body, plus once president erdogan is going to tell the world tomorrow at the group meeting of his party tomorrow, then we have a better grip. but at the end of today, don't expect a closure of the matter on the basis of a full disclosure of what really happened. that is not going to happen. very strong words there. he was saying that we probably won't get the full truth about this case but i think everybody here in turkey and many around the world will be waiting for president erdogan's statement and we're expecting that tomorrow tuesday. martin patience, thank you very much. here, the transport secretary chris
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grayling has called for police action to be taken after an elderly black woman was racially abused by a white man on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted. the incident was recorded by a fellow passenger and shared on social media. ryanair says it has reported what happened to the police but the airline is facing criticism after allowing the man to stay in his seat while the woman was moved. chichi izundu reports. i will tell you this, if you don't go to another seat, i will push you to another seat. this video has now been viewed more than 4.5 million times on facebook and more than 3 million on twitter. it shows an argument between two passengers on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted last friday. stop. there's no need for that at all. just stop. this man then becomes racially abusive to 77—year—old mrs gale, who sat next to him. david lawrence filmed it on his phone. i was expecting to see the cavalry turn up, the police, for them to escort him off the flight, for him to be arrested, charged, locked up, everything,
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like i often see happen to other passengers who do this. none of that was done. he was allowed to travel to his destination. rya nair's chief executive, michael o'leary, has been doing interviews this morning on the company's falling profits but the company has refused to comment further on friday's incident because they've handed the matter over to essex police. transport secretary chris grayling said authorities should be involved. what we saw was totally u na cce pta ble. the fact is, abuse, racist abuse of that kind is a crime. if a crime is committed, it should be dealt with appropriately and therefore i would hope, notwithstanding what took place on that day, that the police would want to take action in such an extraordinarily unacceptable case. the shadow transport minister, karl turner, says police may not have the power to act. the uk law only applies if the aircraft is travelling to a uk destination.
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it needs to be in flight, the definition of in—flight is that the aircraft engines are on and the plane is moving. it was stood on tarmac in barcelona. surprised, disgusted and hurt. that's how the family of mrs gale have described the incident to the huffington post and say they still haven't heard anything from rya nair. chichi izundu, bbc news. joining me now is kimberly mcintosh, a policy officer from the race equality think—tank, the runnymede trust. ijust wonder when you i just wonder when you saw this video yourself, what did you think should have happens?” video yourself, what did you think should have happens? i thought that the victim should not be the one that had to move. we should have seen that had to move. we should have seen the perpetrator of this abuse is being moved off the flight and we know that this is possible. in 2008
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when somebody on a ryanair flight felt that for passengers were terrorists, which was shown to be untrue, they were actually from a steel band that had been performing in italy, butjust on that one statement they were all removed from the flight. so we know that people who are seen as threatening or causing a risk can be removed and we did not see it happen in this case. what do you we did see which on the face of it looked as though people weren't really sure how to react to this? i think it is difficult being a bystander. what we would normally suggest is to talk directly to the victim and ignore the perpetrator. other compensation with them. ask them about their needs and really focus on them. we don't see that happening on the video. we do see passengers trying to intervene and saying that he should be removed but we don't see the staff responding appropriately sadly. the fact that it was an social media and has been seen it was an social media and has been seen by i think something likes 4
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million people does that suggest that this is happening much more than we are aware of. definitely. i think it is a real shame that we are having to rely on social media to secure justice rather than policy and procedure coming from companies themselves. but we also know that this is part of a wider trends. from march this year we have seen a 17% increase in hate crime, so this is not an isolated incident. this comes under the remit of a hate crime as far as you are concerned, it is now in the hands of police say ryanair. is that sufficient as a response from the airline? of course we should let the police look into this and thejuice should let the police look into this and the juice if should let the police look into this and thejuice if it is a should let the police look into this and the juice if it is a hate crime but what we should have seen from ryanair is an apology to the family of the victim. they have said this morning they still have not heard anything from rya nair. morning they still have not heard anything from ryanair. that may have changed as the day has gone on but we would have thought that was a
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priority. they have had no apology, no offer of compensation and they really should be trying to support this family now who are saying they will never fly with them again. this family now who are saying they will never fly with them againm somebody who was watching this right now is on a flight and they see this in the next few days, what would you advise them to do if the ryanair staff or whatever airline they do do not seem able to deal with it, what would you suggest they do?|j not seem able to deal with it, what would you suggest they do? i would suggest that they talk directly to the victim, ignore the perpetrator, we're not the victim, ignore the perpetrator, we' re not interested the victim, ignore the perpetrator, we're not interested in what they have to say. focus on the victim, how they are feeling, what their needs are and also speak to the staff and try and get them moved from the flight or at least moved away from the victim. and as far as you are concerned an apology is the least? the very least. thank you for coming in. thank you. three police officers have been found guilty of gross misconduct over the way they dealt with the aftermath of a fight outside a bedford nightclub five years ago, which left
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a man paralysed. a fourth officer was found guilty of misconduct. lauren moss reports. julian cole was a keen athlete, studying sports science. now he is paralysed and brain—damaged after a scuffle which led to his arrest outside a nightclub in bedford in 2013. four officers who were there of the night were accused of misconduct, including breach of standards of duties. julian broke his neck and suffered a severe spinal injury following an argument with bouncers and police after he had been asked to leave the club. an ambulance was not called until he was at the police station. his family arrived at court today hoping for answers. my hope is... i need justice. no matter what ever they did for him, it will not bring him back, but the only thing i need, justice. the officers were not accused of inflicting the injuries but of breaching standards of duty and not carrying out welfare checks. pcs hannah ross and sanjeev kalyan have been found guilty of gross misconduct and breaching honesty
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standards, along with pc nicholas oates, who was not in court today. ps andrew withey leavers was found guilty of misconduct ——ps andrew withey was found guilty of misconduct and breaching standards of duties and responsibilities. today's results may offer some comfort to julian's mother, but she still has unanswered questions about how her son became injured in the first place. julian cole will need 24—hour bedside care for the rest of his life. lauren moss, bbc news. the group representing hospitals, ambulance services and other nhs trusts in england is predicting that the strain on health services this winter will be worse than last year. nhs providers says the provision of cancer care and routine operations is already under severe pressure — that's before hospitals respond to the seasonal demand for emergency care. on top of that — they say work force shortages are intensifying problems. the deputy ceo of nhs providers, saffron cordery, spoke this morning to the bbc radio 4 today programme —
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and told them why they are predicting such a tough winterfor the nhs. we know the warning signs are out there. a&e performance has dropped. we've got to demand going up across all services. that includes routine operations and cancer care as well as emergency services. and, as you heard, the rising workforce shortages. so, yes, we think it's going to be a challenging winter ahead. and yet the nhs in england say," well, look, hold on, there is extra money going into a&e and extra money going into social care short—term and there is better national level winter planning." that is true. all that has happened and that is immensely welcome but would you have got to look at is a number of factors. you have to be clear about the scale of the challenge we are facing and also, when money goes into the system very late it is actually very difficult to deploy it effectively. we have had some really welcome capital funding, around £140 million, to make some changes in a&e
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departments but that came in september and has ——to be used by december so there are a number of issues about timing of funding. it is very welcome. after a short rest from royal duties, the duchess of sussex has rejoined her husband for a walkabout on fraser island off the coast of queensland. the couple, who are expecting their first child in the spring, are on a 16 day tour taking in australia, new zealand, fiji and tonga. our royal correspondentjonny dymond is travelling with them. chanting. on the edge of eastern australia, a traditional welcome for harry. this is fraser island, also known as paradise. take a photo! the duke came to declare the rainforest here part of the queen's commonwealth canopy — a conservation project stretching across dozens of countries. put simply, without trees and forests, we don't survive.
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it is a symbiotic relationship and one that so many people still fail to realise. and then some handshakes and some royal playing around. he played alone, meghan taking some time out. but harry was more than enough excitement for some. when he shook my hand, he asked our names and i, like, forgot my name for three seconds and then i was like, oh, destiny. "my name is destiny!" he seems like a nice fellow, down to earth. another location, another welcome. and more playing around from harry. there's no stopping him, but still, no meghan. if you want an idea as to why meghan is not taking part in this section of the tour, then check out the roads
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on fraser island. they are winding, they are bumpy and some would say they are no place for a pregnant woman. but at the end of the day, strolling on firmer ground, there she was, one hand pressed against her tummy. and they both made time to talk to those who had stood and waited in the sun. hi, guys! there is nothing like a double act — and this one has drawn the crowds across australia. one of life's little triumphs for a lover of royalty. jonny dymond, bbc news, fraser island. the radio 2 drivetime show with simon mayo and jo whiley is to end afterjust a few months on air. simon mayo is to leave bbc radio 2 altogether but will continue to present his 5 live film show with mark kermode. he has presented drivetime for eight
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years, but the station added jo whiley as a co—host in may — a move which led to a backlash from some listeners. she will remain on the station in the 7—9pm slot. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. it is feeling a little cooler across many parts of the uk compared to the weekend. a big change to much colder conditions by the end of this week. this is this afternoon's temperatures. what most places are dry there are some patches of cloud in the north—west and heavy rain in the northern ireland and north of scotla nd the northern ireland and north of scotland with gusts of wind up to 60 miles another. —— 60 miles an hour. a breezy night across the northern half of the uk meaning a milder night for some. but single figures for some with maybe an odd patch of
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mist orfog. heavy for some with maybe an odd patch of mist or fog. heavy outbreaks of rain in northern scotland through tuesday. elsewhere, plenty of fine weather to be had, it will feel a bit warm and in aberdeenshire we could see temperatures of 18 celsius in the sunshine. looking further ahead, wednesday is quiet, thursday the change begins and by friday much colderfor all parts. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: downing street has said personal vitriol has no place in politics, after anonymous brexiteers were quoted calling for theresa may to be "knifed in the front". meanwhile former cabinet ministers deny undermining
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the prime minister after meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. the king and crown prince of saudia arabia phone the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi to offer their condolences. authorities say he was killed by rogue operators. michael stirling pleads guilty at northampton crown court to murdering midwife samantha eastwood. she was found buried in a shallow grave in staffordshire in august. budget airline ryanair comes under fire for failing to eject a passenger who was filmed hurling racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. sport now on afternoon live. jose mourinho, he wants to stay. he does, after all that talk about whether or not he would like to leave, he has complained about not being happy in manchester, not being
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able to go out to dinner in case he gets mobbed by fans, high—profile stories about him falling out with the chief executive about transfers or not getting transfers during the window and falling out with his players. paul pogba notably. jose mourinho having a few run—ins with him. but he now says he wants to stay. he was answering questions about whether he would consider a return to real madrid, considering their position at the moment. he says he wants to stay at manchester united for the rest of his contract and beyond. he was talking ahead of the champions league game against juventus. he was asked about that and their star player cristiano ronaldo. he is on a level where and their star player cristiano ronaldo. he is on a levelwhere he doesn't need these questions and these answers. he is one of the best players of all time. and nobody can tell different
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than that. he is one of the best players of all times. simple as that. lewis hamilton, everyone believes he is on his way to a fifth championship. some say he could double that. but they different and interesting view from a former champion. yes, sirjackie stewart said he eventually got sick of the sport and needed a break and lewis hamilton will probably go the same way. hamilton will have to wait until next weekend for the next chance to win and he should do that. he only needs five points, which means coming seventh or better in mexico. you would say that should be fine. but michael schumacher has seven world titles. that will be lewis hamilton ‘s fifth. a lot of people say, why wouldn't he go after the record? but sirjackie stewart says he will retire before reaching that mark. he will burn out because as the
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success brings, he is now going into clothing for example and other things, he loves music, for example, and sooner or later, you get tired of it. i got tired at a very young age. 34 years of age, i retired. and i went on to other things. like in most sports, you burn out and he will burn out. he will choose to retire. the england and wales cricket board has dismissed allegations that a small group of england players were involved in spot fixing in seven matches. the claims were made in an updated documentary made by the qatari—based broadcaster aljazeera. the players were unnamed and the ecb says the limited information is poorly prepared and lacks clarity and corroboration. the documentary has also been dismissed by fast bowler mark wood who is with the england squad in sri lanka. itjust does not really bother me, to be honest. i mean, we get sort of corruption, anti—corruption training. i have a guy called peter o'shea who i trust a lot. he is on the end of the phone if i need him. all of this stuff has no sort of hit or anything like that to it. it is nothing new to me.
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if they came up with concrete evidence or a name and they could prove something, then i would be a little bit more worried. but at the minute, it does not bother me because they keep making accusations and there is nothing behind it. one match in the premier league this evening as well. arsenal take on leicester at the emirates. arsenal have nine victories in a row in all competitions. their head coach is not guaranteed a victory tonight. leicester is a very good team. and they are playing, i think, with one identity very clear. they are very competitive. they have very good players. and we need every single player and also our mentality together to be more strong
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than the last matches. i think they have good confidence in their play. thousands of people travelling from central american nations to try to enter the us have resumed theirjourney from southern mexico to the us border. yesterday the migrant caravan reached a town approximately 23 miles north of the southern mexican border. mexican authorities had earlier tried to stop them at a border bridge. but some managed to cross into mexico illegally by boat across a river. president trump has repeatedly warned the migrants to turn back, threatening to close the us border and cut aid to countries allowing the caravan to pass. the president has taken to twitter today, saying: early polls for the america's
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midterm elections have opened in parts of florida. in what is being seen as a crucial test of donald trump's presidency, vital house and senate seats are up for grabs, as well as the governor's office. hispanic voters will be hold the key to victory in florida, as katty kay reports now from miami. in miami, you don't call yourself hispanic. you are costa rican, where the frills are exuberant and the flowers are sweet. or you are bolivian, where the heels are sky high and the moves are sexy. oryou are cuban, and voting is a duty. are you going to vote in the election? oh, my god, that's a very difficult question. yes, i will vote. every 30 seconds here in america, a latina turns 18. therefore, eligible to vote.
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that is 66,000 potential new voters every month. for both republicans and democrats, it's a bonanza. the problem is, hispanics turn out to vote in lower numbers than any other group in the country. so, how does a democrat like eileen higgins get her solidly hispanic community to turn up on election day? particularly when she has one rather obvious hurdle. you don't look very hispanic. no! i don't. like, not at all. laughter. no, i can't trick anyone into thinking that. how much of a drawback is that, then, appealing to hispanic voters? i didn't find it a drawback at all. in miami, i always like to call it, this is the land of the free and the home of the spanglish—speaking. eileen has a message for other democrats in the country. keep issues local and connected to what we care about. the idea that hispanics will inevitably vote democratic isn't one that gets much support here in hialeah.
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rene garcia is cuban american, republican and an old school politician. though it's not quite babies he's kissing, his voters are elderly, his challenge now is winning over younger, non—cuban hispanics. it's up to us now, the moderates, independents, pragmatic thinkers, to go out and reach out to the hispanics. does trump help with those voters? not with the cuban americans but with those hispanic voters. does he help or does he hurt? i think the immigration issue hurts. america's big demographic fight is over hispanic voters. there are lots of them and whoever can get them to actually vote stands a great chance of winning elections here. katty kay, bbc news, miami. thousands of homeowners thought they had been saved
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when the government took over their mortgages during the financial crisis. but ten years on, the former northern rock customers are still trapped on high interest rates and now their mortgages have been taken over by an aggressive private equity fund called cerberus. panorama has discovered that cerberus told the government before the sale it planned to offer new mortgage deals, which might have helped the homeowners, but they haven't done so. andy verity reports. it is lovely and bright india. lisa and mark are selling their home of 15 years. despite taking on extra jobs and borrowing from family and friends, they just jobs and borrowing from family and friends, theyjust can't keep up with mortgage payments of nearly £2500 a month. i love the neighbours and the house and everything but it has become like a rock around my neck. you feel like you are sinking. you can't get up. and i can't have
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that normal. they took out their mortgage with northern rock. when the government build out the banks, thousands of homeowners liked them we re thousands of homeowners liked them were trapped on interest rates of around 5%. they have been paying over the odds for years. if you had a competitive mortgage, this is what you might have been charged in interest. really? this is the difference. add that up over ten yea rs on the difference. add that up over ten years on a £30,000. that would have made a difference. we would not have been forced to have ta ken we would not have been forced to have taken on loans from family, borrowing from this, that and the other and struggling. for the last five years, we have struggled. i could have had a day off or two days off a week. i could have had a weekend. in 2015, the government announced it was selling the former northern rock mortgages to a private
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equity company from the united states called cerberus. cerberus told the government it was planning told the government it was planning to offer homeowners better mortgage deals but that simply never happened. regulators said cerberus could not offer new mortgages until you put the right systems and people in place. nearly three years later, the company still has not done that, which means homeowners like adrian and rachel are still stuck on high interest rates. it is a big additional cost. we have added it up and that is the extra you have paid. 20 grand over ten years. my reaction isa 20 grand over ten years. my reaction is a sinking feeling, in all honesty. it is completely... well... it is just daylight robbery, isn't it? i got into my business to progress it and make things better for me and my family and that kind of money would make a massive difference. cerberus say they are
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good corporate citizens, committed to compliance with the strongest ethical standards and all regulatory requirements but the private equity company continues to make big profits from the high interest rates. and you can see more on that story in panorama: trapped by my mortgage — tonight on bbc one at 8:30. the australian prime minister has made a national apology to victims of child sexual abuse. hundreds of people gathered in canberra to hear him deliver an emotional address in parliament. it follows a five—year inquiry which found tens of thousands of children had suffered abuse in the nation's institutions over decades. our correspondent hywel griffith reports from canberra. for kirra, today is about trust. abused as a teenager in care, she twice fell pregnant. the system failed her. now the authorities want to say sorry. she's come to canberra to listen. a lot of abuse survivors don't trust easily, and we're going to need
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to see some footwork and action as well as words. but sorry‘s a good start. as he delivered the apology, the australian prime minister said he did not expect forgiveness from victims. he acknowledged that, for years, so much abuse had been covered up. not just as a father but as a prime minister, i am angry too at the calculating destruction of lives and the abuse of trust, including those who have abused the shield of faith and religion to hide their crimes. outside, kirra tried to decide whether the apology, with all its emotion, would really make a difference. it's pretty hard to believe a politician, but i think, if they change half of what they promised to today, the world's going to be a better place. australia has spent much of the last decade confronting the spectre of abuse in churches, schools, homes and sports clubs. a five—year inquiry recommended the national apology and compensation
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for around 60,000 victims. some abuse survivors, like paul, say far more is needed. he says real change to protect children will only come with tougher laws to jail those who cover up abuse. in all of australia, there's only ever been one person convicted of covering up child sex abuse. and i ask you, i ask everybody, is that really good enough? while today's words do carry real weight, the test for many survivors is if they are followed by action. many here still feel a deep sense of frustration and anger, wounds that may never heal. hywel griffith, bbc news, canberra. the business news in a momnet, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may will tell mps this
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afternoon that the terms of the brexit agreement are 95% complete, following a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. saudi arabia is king and crown prince sabo from the sum of murdered journalist, khashoggi to send their condolences. —— jamal khashoggi. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. morrisons has lost its challenge against a high court ruling that it is liable for a data breach that saw thousands of its employees' details posted online. the court of appeal upheld the original decision against the supermarket, issued in december 2017. more on this in a moment. the tobacco giant urging people to quit smoking?! philip morris, one of the industry's biggest players, has been accused of staggering hypocrisy over its new ad campaign. the marlboro maker said the move was an important next step in its aim to ultimately stop selling cigarettes. but cancer research uk said
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the firm was just trying to promote its smoking alternatives. strong sales in europe and the middle east have boosted profits at uk footwear firm dr martens. earnings grew 33% to £50m in the year to march, with sales up 20% to £348.6m. the northamptonshire—based company, most famous for its distinctive boots, said it had seen double—digit growth in revenues and profits in all regions. we've had some news from addison lee today. that's right. addison lee is planning to offer self—driving taxis in the capital by 2021, following a tie up with self—driving software specialist oxbotica. a smart move if you consider the industry is expected to be worth £28bn in the uk by 2035. but the question is, would you trust a taxi with no driver? earlier we spoke to andy boland, chief executive, of addison lee. the move will pit it against rival
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ride—hailing app uber, which is also planning to roll out driverless cars on its network in the future, pending regulatory permission. there are so many issues that this raises but the main one has to be safety. they have been hailed as the future. they have been hailed as the future. they are described as being safer than human drivers. but there have been warnings that technology is being deployed before it is com pletely being deployed before it is completely ready. you may remember earlier this year uber suspended tests after there was a fatal accident. but there is political enthusiasm for self driving cars. the chancellor says he wants to see fully driverless cars in use by
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2021. the question is, would you trust a taxi with no driver. we spoke to the chief executive. i think what is exciting about today is that technology that has only really been thought about being deployed in silicon valley is coming to the uk and london, one of the major centres, major markets for the services we provide. this is the start of a piece of work that is going to prove out the model to bring self driving cars and self driving vehicles to the london streets. the first stage for us is that we are going to do 3—d mapping of the whole of london, so we will put devices on all our cars and map london as a first step. why ever technology into the operating app and then start trialling and testing services. but fundamental to that is public safety. but has to be the number one consideration and there
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is no way we or number one consideration and there is no way we or our number one consideration and there is no way we or our regulator are going to allow anything to go out on the streets without being 100% certain. and ryanair. strikes by air traffic controllers and ryanair pilots and cabin crew hit profits over the summer for ryanair. the airline reported a 7% fall in profits to just over a billion pounds for the six months to the end of september. profits were also hit by higher fuel costs and what michael o'leary called the worst summer of air traffic control disruptions on record. ryanairare
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ryanair are currently facing a lot of criticism after failing to remove a passenger accused of racist abuse on one of their planes over the weekend. john strickland is an aviation expert, he told me despite the problems, ryanair still delivered good results. we are still talking about a profit margin of 25%. they have had a rough summer. they have acknowledged that in theirfigures this summer. they have acknowledged that in their figures this morning but they think they will be a medium—term winner. they are battling with unions and negotiating with pilots about becoming a unionised company. that is a long and rocky road but it is one they will take in their stride. michael o'leary is very honest. he does not like having to accept the unions but he realises he has got. they will still have lower costs than their competitors. fuel prices are rising. but they are substantially hedged against that. much better in fact in terms of positioning than many of their competitors and of course they are still a very large and strong airline. they are not in the
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weaklings league, airline. they are not in the wea klings league, such airline. they are not in the weaklings league, such as some of those airlines that have failed in recent weeks. let's have a look at the markets. a bit of a downward turn as the afternoon has progressed. some uplift coming from mining company shares with the price of metal going up. morrison is one of metal going up. morrison is one of the fall is this afternoon after the court case, the supermarket was vicariously liable for a data breach by one of its former employees. the pound has gone lower against the dollar and you rope wrapped in anticipation of what may come out of the speech by theresa may later. ok. thank you very much. we're waiting to hear from theresa
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may, you will be on standby. good. michael stirling has pleaded guilty at northampton crown court to murdering midwife samantha eastwood. our correspondentjo black has been following the case. yes, samantha eastwood was 28 years old, she was a midwife. this is a job she had wanted to do say she was 12 years old. she actually realise that dream by becoming a midwife at the royal stock university hospital where she worked for six years. she was described by her colleagues as loving and caring and part of the hospitalfamily but loving and caring and part of the hospital family but back injuly, the end ofjuly, she went missing and failed to turn up for work. this was out of character, we are told. her colleagues reported her missing. a search then began and her body was discovered several days later buried ina discovered several days later buried in a shallow grave in staffordshire. michael sterling was subsequently
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arrested and charged with her murder. today he has appeared in court for a plea hearing. this is where a defendant officially enters a plea into the system. where he was asked what his plea was to the charge of murder, he replied that he was guilty. the defence barrister in this case talked a little bit to give some more detail with regards to this case. he said that this was not a premeditated act and in the context of the background of the killing, there were grows of —— days of growing tension and there had been an argument and whilst in a struggle, mr sterling had put his hands over her throat, mouth and nose and as a result, she died. we then heard that he panicked afterwards and buried her in an area which he had some knowledge. samantha eastwood ‘s family were in the public gallery and were very upset the public gallery and were very u pset after the public gallery and were very upset after hearing that guilty plea. they are traumatised, as you would expect. sentencing will take
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place at the beginning of december. thirty people have been injured after a floor collapsed during a party at a block of flats in the city of clemson in south carolina. this video captured by one of the partygoers shows how people tried to climb back out of a large hole after the collapse. it's believed that the party had been organised by students at the local university and that the floor collapsed while people were dancing. police say that it's not clear yet how serious some of the injuries are. ministers have been told that cutting the use of antibiotics and developing new drugs to replace them should be in the government's top five priorities. mps on the health and social care committee have called for more research to help tackle the resistance of infections to drugs. in the meantime, they say gps should be more sparing in prescribing anti—biotics. the government has said it is investing record amounts in developing new drugs. paddy mcguinness and andrew flintoff are to be the new presenters of top gear. the pair will take over from matt leblanc, after he steps down from presenting duties at the end of the next series. the comedian and former england
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cricket captain willjoin existing presenter and former racing driver chris harris to complete the new—look line—up. time now for the weather forecast. hello. there is a big change in the weather on the way by the end of this week. it will be hugely different from what we have experienced over the weekend when temperatures rose just above 20 celsius. scenes like this for some going into this weekend. some snow into northern hills. single figure temperatures across the board. it has not arrived yet. we still have high pressure across much of the uk. it is not feeling as warm as it did over the weekend but it is pleasant with sunshine for most areas. the
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breezes picking up over the northern half of the uk. in the northern isles, it is notjust windy, but it is wet and that rain starting to fall in northern scotland. temperatures in the mid to low teens. into tonight, heavy rain around across northern scotland at times. quite windy. a breezy picture across the northern half of the uk. it will be milder than it was last night but the further south you are, no single figures in places. maybe a few patches of mist and fog as well. this heavy rain continuing in scotla nd this heavy rain continuing in scotland through tuesday. another windy day across the high ground of scotla nd windy day across the high ground of scotland and northern england. elsewhere, most places dry with sunny spells. maybe up to 18 degrees in the sunshine in aberdeenshire. as we look at the forecast for wednesday, rain in north—west scotla nd wednesday, rain in north—west scotland will be easing. a quiet
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day. variable cloud and sunshine. this is the story on thursday and we are going to get a weather front, this area of rain, pushing across scotla nd this area of rain, pushing across scotland and later in the day into northern ireland. ahead of that, we are still finding temperatures in the low teens. but the start of the weekend, the cold air plunges southwards and we are all in the blue. you aren't on the wind as well and it is going to start to feel colder. showers could well be falling as snow. a significant difference compared to what we have seen difference compared to what we have seen of late. it will feel like a shock to the system, that is for sure. but your forecast. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm... its‘s 95% done — theresa may's brexit message to the commons later — after a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. saudi arabia's king and crown prince phone the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi —
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to send their condolences. a man admits murdering midwife samantha eastwood, whose body was found eight days after she was reported missing. calls to boycott ryanair — after staff refuse to move a passenger who hurled racist abuse at a windrush generation pensioner. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. is jose isjose mourinho is jose mourinho becoming isjose mourinho becoming more cheerful? he says he wants to stay at manchester united beyond his contract and he has been heaping praise on cristiano ronaldo. i think i saw praise on cristiano ronaldo. i think isaw him praise on cristiano ronaldo. i think i saw him smile as well. we will hear from i saw him smile as well. we will hearfrom him at 4:30pm. i'm not sure i believe you but we will speak to you later! nick has all the weather. i'm not smiling because it will be turning much colder at the end of this week. the warmth last week and will be a distant memory. we have the weather whether you want
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it or not coming up. at the very unpopular nick miller there. back as a double—act — after a short break meghan rejoins husband prince harry as they visit fraser island off the queensland coast. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i am simon mccoy. the prime minister is due to stand up in the commons — some time in the next hour or so — and she's expected to tell mps that a brexit deal with the eu is now 95 % complete. but theresa may is facing growing anger from some of her own mps. some of them have used such violent language against her — with one reportedly saying she should be "knifed in the front" — that they've been condemned by mps from all sides of the house. downing street has reacted by saying that "personal vitriol has no place in politics". our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. back to westminster for what's sure to be another turbulent week. the prime minister must report back on the state of the brexit
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talks to parliament, to her cabinet, and to her own mps. it was always going to be the case that these negotiations would run to the wire, it was always going to have been the case that there would be lively debates about what should or should not be agreed, and the reality is that the negotiations that matter in the coming weeks will be between the prime minister, dominic raab, the brexit secretary, european counterparts, as they work to try and find the best resolution for everyone involved. but the former brexit secretary is one of those with other ideas. senior ministers also have doubts about the prime minister's strategy. and these former cabinet members, now prominent brexiteer backbenchers, made their own trip to brussels this morning to tell the eu theresa may's proposals wouldn't work. we are presenting some ideas which we think are constructive, and we had a constructive discussion, and now we're going to go back and talk to the government about it, and this is all within the power of what the government says they want to achieve,
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which is, ultimately, to leave on the best terms and the best arrangements. over the weekend, there were further attacks on the prime minister from within her own party. the tone of the anonymous comments drawing criticism from colleagues. we should be making a stand about how we speak about women, or indeed any politicians. is it acceptable to use terms like "hot knives being plunged into them", "bring your own noose"? this is really violent, threatening language which is wholly unacceptable, and, you know, they should put their names to those quotes, i'm afraid. theresa may insists the divorce deal with brussels is nearly done and there's been good progress on how the future will look too. but she faces hostility from all corners in westminster, and this week, winning support for her approach and her leadership will be her biggest challenge. leila nathoo, bbc news. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, who's in central lobby for us. we are going to hear about 95% but
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everything today seems to be about numbers. that is a suggestion that 95% of the withdrawal bill, the divorce settlement, the idea that has been solved, labour have got up immediately and mocks that saying 95% of the titanic‘s journey was made successfully to lots of laughter in the house of commons. if the recent activity is anything to go buy it will be a tough afternoon for theresa may because already her brexit plans are getting absolutely no support from her own side and neither from the opposition. we have already have an urgent question from john redwood who is very much on the brexit side of the argument. he today wanted to know how much it would cost the uk, notjust to leave from that withdrawal bill, that figure of 35 to 39 billion we already know about, what he wants to note is how much more it might cost if this suggestion that after the
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transition period in december 2020 that was extended by a few more months as theresa may suggested to the european union last week. this is what he had to say. we are desperately in need of more money for our schools, hospitals and for our defence. we desperately need money so our defence. we desperately need money so that we can honour our tax—cutting pledges that we all made in our manifesto. now, the response from the treasury minister taking that question was to say that it is not expected that this extension would be required because the future relationship with the eu could well be sorted by the end of 2020 so that will not be a problem. he also said that the length and cost of the limitation period would be subject to negotiations. theresa may's problems are really summed up by the fa ct problems are really summed up by the fact thatjohn redwood from one wing of the party got up to sail this and
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on the other sidejustine greening, who is much more of a remainer, these were her thoughts of staying ina these were her thoughts of staying in a customs union. thank you, mr speaker. i in a customs union. thank you, mr speaker. lam in a customs union. thank you, mr speaker. i am very concerned about the government's plans because essentially it means staying in a customs union where we will have no say over the rules when the global economy is facing significant risks. can he explain how this is in the new quay's national interest? and thatis new quay's national interest? and that is only the beginning really goes after this we are going to hear from dominic grieve the former attorney general they will be asking very difficult questions about whether the mps will have a meaningful vote on any deal that theresa may brings back here. it is still pretty unclear about what choice mps will have, whether they will just be choice mps will have, whether they willjust be given a choice between a deal that's theresa may brings back and no deal at all, which is certainly not a deal for in this place. after that theresa may takes
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centre stage explaining what happened at the eu summit last week. she will be hoping for a bit more report —— support than she has had so report —— support than she has had so far. can we just talk about some of the unpleasant language, what are they saying they're about that? of the unpleasant language, what are they saying they're about that7m is the aggressive nature of some of these quotes. they were anonymous. it was apparently conservative backbench mps talking about twisting the knife, assassinations against the knife, assassinations against the prime minister, suggesting that if she comes to a meeting on wednesday here with backbenchers then she should bring her own anise. across the political spectrum there has been condemnation of all of that. they are saying that these people are cowards because it is not the type of thing they would say openly or on camera. many people are saying this is a sign of how much the brexit debate has poisoned the political debate. some people feel it is necessary to use this kind of language. it all leads to this
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discussion about possible leadership challenges and there is certainly no consensus here about whether that is on the cards but i think most people feel it is really undermining the argument of brexiteers if people are using this kind of language against their leader. i've just seen using this kind of language against their leader. i'vejust seen dominic grieve is on his feet at the moment. in terms of theresa may herself what time are expecting her to get to her feet? it simply depends how long this next urgent question will go on for. it will be at least 30 to 45 minutes and it can go on for as long as the speaker allows it to. if you remember last monday i don't think a single tory mp got up to offer her support so i think she will be hoping there might be a little more backing for her plans later on today. vicky, thank you very much. that is the key young there in the lobby of the house of commons. and as we were saying theresa may will update mps later on the process of brexit negotiations. around 5pm and
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we will have full coverage here on bbc news as and when that gets under way. saudi arabia says the king, and crown prince, have both offered their condolences to the son of jamal khashoggi, after their foreign minister admitted — following repeated denials — that the journalist was in fact murdered. western countries have increased their diplomatic pressure — germany, britain and france signing a joint letter demanding the facts on what happened. germany says it will no longer export arms to riyadh. there'll be more on the british response when the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, updates mps later. our correspondent matin patience is in istanbul — he brought us up to date with the latest. the latest revelation according to one report in the turkish media says that a car apparently belonging to the saudi consulate that had diplomatic plates was found by police abandoned in an underground parking lot. we have seen throughout this case leaks from the turkish press, leaks ——to the turkish press,
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all of this designed to maintain pressure on saudi arabia. what everybody is waiting for here is the statements by president erdogan which is due on tuesday and he has stated he will reveal the naked truth. when i asked one former turkish ambassador about this issue he said don't expect the full story. i think in the absence of a body, most of the interpretations and comments on this will remain within the bounds of speculation. once we have the body, plus once president erdogan is going to tell the world tomorrow at the group meeting of his party tomorrow, then we have a better grip. but at the end of today, don't expect a closure of the matter on the basis of a full disclosure of what really happened. that is not going to happen.
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i spoke to one journalist who said he had never experienced anything like this in 30 years of reporting in turkey. i think it is because the axe was so brazen, in turkey. i think it is because the axe was so brazen, that is what people do not understand. it is interesting the comment the former ambassadorjust interesting the comment the former ambassador just made there, interesting the comment the former ambassadorjust made there, many believe that potentially a diplomatic deal could be cooks up between saudi arabia, america and turkey and that president erdogan has in fact left at the door open to that kind of possibility. so he will speak tomorrow. he has not given any official statement and he will be choosing his words very carefully indeed. that was martin patience. here, a man has admitted murdering a midwife whose body was found eight days after she was reported missing. the body of samantha eastwood was found in a shallow grave in staffordshire, in august. our correspondentjo black has been following the case, she joins us now from northampton crown court.
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samantha eastwood was a 28—year—old midwife and she had wanted to do thatjob since she was 12 years old and she actually realised that dream while working at the royal stoke university hospital. she worked there for around six years and her collea g u es there for around six years and her colleagues describes her as loving and caring and part of the hospital family. she went missing at the end ofjuly. she did not turn up for her shift which is very unlike her and out of character so her colleagues reported her missing. the police launched a search and sadly her body was discovered several days later in woodlands in rural staffordshire. now, michael stirling was subsequently arrested and charged with her murder. he came to northampton crown court today for a plea hearing which is where a defendant formally enters plea into the system. when he was asked how he
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would play into the murder of samantha eastwood, he said guilty. we have some more details about what would happen here from his defence barrister charles miskin who said this was not a premeditated act and there was an affair and days of growing tension and an argument and after a struggle, was on the floor, mr's after a struggle, was on the floor, mr ‘s sterling put his hands over her throat, mouth and nose and as a result of that she died. he panics afterwards, we were told, and he buried her in an area where he had some knowledge. we are told that sentencing will take place at the beginning of december. three police officers have been found guilty of gross misconduct over the way they dealt with the aftermath of a fight outside a bedford nightclub five years ago, which left a man paralysed. a fourth officer was found guilty of misconduct. lauren moss reports. julian cole was a keen athlete, studying sports science.
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now he is paralysed and brain—damaged after a scuffle which led to his arrest outside a nightclub in bedford in 2013. four officers who were there of the night were accused of misconduct, including breach of standards of duties. julian broke his neck and suffered a severe spinal injury following an argument with bouncers and police after he had been asked to leave the club. an ambulance was not called until he was at the police station. his family arrived at court today hoping for answers. my hope is... i need justice. no matter what ever they did for him, it will not bring him back, but the only thing i need, justice. the officers were not accused of inflicting the injuries but of breaching standards of duty and not carrying out welfare checks. pcs hannah ross and sanjeev kalyan have been found guilty of gross misconduct and breaching honesty standards, along with pc nicholas oates, who was not in court today. ps andrew withey was found
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guilty of misconduct and breaching standards of duties and responsibilities. today's results may offer some comfort to julian's mother, but she still has unanswered questions about how her son became injured in the first place. julian cole will need 24—hour bedside care for the rest of his life. lauren moss, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... theresa may will tell mps later this afternoon that the terms of the brexit agreement are 95% complete — following a weekend of vicious attacks from within her own ranks. saudi arabia's king and crown prince have both phoned the son of murdered journalist jamal khashoggi — to send their condolences. a man has admitted murdering a midwife whose body was found eight days after she was reported missing. the duchess of sussex rejoins her husband for a walkabout on fraser island off the coast of queensland. and in sports, jose mourinho says he
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wa nts to and in sports, jose mourinho says he wants to stay on as manager of manchester united into the end of his contract and beyond. lewis hamilton will burn out between reaching michael schumacher‘s record of seven formula 1 titles, that is according to sirjackie stewart. hamilton will have to wait until next week for a shot at his fifth title, third in the us was not enough. and west ham winger yarmelenko will be out after tearing his achilles on saturday. the transport secretary chris grayling has called for police action to be taken after an elderly black woman was racially abused by a white man on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted. the incident was recorded by a fellow passenger and shared on social media. ryanair says it has reported what happened to the police, but the airline is facing criticism after allowing the man to stay in his seat while the woman was moved. chichi izundu reports.
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i will tell you this, if you don't go to another seat, i will push you to another seat. this video has now been viewed more than 4.5 million times on facebook and more than 3 million on twitter. it shows an argument between two passengers on a ryanair flight from barcelona to stansted last friday. stop. there's no need for that at all. just stop. this man then becomes racially abusive to 77—year—old mrs gale, who sat next to him. david lawrence filmed it on his phone. i was expecting to see the cavalry turn up, the police, for them to escort him off the flight, for him to be arrested, charged, locked up, everything, like i often see happen to other passengers who do this. none of that was done. he was allowed to travel to his destination. rya nair's chief executive, michael o'leary, has been doing interviews this morning
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on the company's falling profits but the company has refused to comment further on friday's incident because they've handed the matter over to essex police. transport secretary chris grayling said authorities should be involved. what we saw was totally u na cce pta ble. the fact is, abuse, racist abuse of that kind is a crime. if a crime is committed, it should be dealt with appropriately and therefore i would hope, notwithstanding what took place on that day, that the police would want to take action in such an extraordinarily unacceptable case. the shadow transport minister, karl turner, says police may not have the power to act. the uk law only applies if the aircraft is travelling to a uk destination. it needs to be in flight, the definition of in—flight is that the aircraft engines are on and the plane is moving. it was stood on tarmac in barcelona. surprised, disgusted and hurt. that's how the family of mrs gale have described the incident
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to the huffington post and say they still haven't heard anything from rya nair. chichi izundu, bbc news. the bbc has spoken to one passenger — who wishes to remain anonymous — who was on the same flight from barcelona to stansted. he told us what he saw and heard. a lot of passengers did start intervening, did start calling out. it was wrong on social media when somebody commented that nobody else did anything, everyone just sat there. that wasn't the case. there were a lot of people who were intervening and who were supporting the lady and requesting that the racist gentleman stop using such appalling language. that lady should not have been addressed in the way that she was by a rather sad, rather angry, rather threatened elderly gentleman who was sat, hoping that the world would just leave him alone in his window seat.
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i'm not sure that ryanair could have done anything more at the time. the flight attendants did everything that they could. had they called the spanish police, i was told by another flight attendant it would have meant the flight, which had already been delayed by about an hour, the off—boarding of the gentleman and all the paperwork would have taken a couple of hours and i cannot believe that the hundred plus passengers would have been any happier with that outcome. the supermarket morrisons has lost its high court challenge about a data breach. it was appealing against a ruling that it was liable for a breach that saw the data of thousands of its employees — such as bank details and salaries — posted online. our legal correspondent clive coleman can tell us more... we are talking about a member of
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staff. it is an extraordinary story that goes back to 2014 and a man who at the time was a senior auditor had morrison's headquarters and he posted the payroll details of hundreds of thousands of morrison's staff online. this was a massive data breach including date of birth, bank details. the court heard that he harboured a grudge against the company because he had been accused of handling legal highs at work. he was tried for this criminal act and found guilty of fraud and disclosing personal data and he was jailed for eight years. morrisons has spent something like £2 million trying to deal with this breach but last year the high court ruled that the supermarket was liable for the acts of their work because they determined he was acting in the course of his employment and that is
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a phrase that lawyers argue over long and hard. it means this claimant group of around 5500 of these employees are entitled to compensation not for monetary losses but because of the stress and inconvenience knowing that your details are out there and you have to change your banking details and so to change your banking details and so forth. today morrisons went to the court of appeal, it is a really significant ruling this for industry generally, and the judge significant ruling this for industry generally, and thejudge dismissed the appeal and found that morrisons we re the appeal and found that morrisons were vicariously liable for the acts of andrew skelton. the consequences of andrew skelton. the consequences of this are potentially huge. a lot of this are potentially huge. a lot of companies and organisations will be very worried they will be held responsible for the rogue criminal a cts responsible for the rogue criminal acts of an employee who discloses data. it will have big implications for you trust to hold data, it is a
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really big deal. it says to me that this is not the end of the matter when you put it like that. morrisons have already said they don't think they should be held responsible and they should be held responsible and they will appeal this. we will not see any compensation payments any time soon because if it goes to the supreme court and if morrisons lose that it would have to go back to the high court for them to determine the level of compensation. it is not huge amounts of money for any one individual in these circumstances, a few hundred to a few thousand pounds but if you think that the other 94,000 employees but if you think that the other 94, 000 employees could but if you think that the other 94,000 employees could potentially now also seeks compensation, you could have compensation running into tens of millions of pounds if morrisons lose at the supreme court. after a short rest from royal duties, the duchess of sussex has rejoined her husband for a walkabout on fraser island off the coast of queensland. the couple, who are expecting their first child in the spring, are on a 16 day tour taking
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in australia, new zealand , fiji and tonga. our royal correspondentjonny dymond is travelling with them. chanting. on the edge of eastern australia, a traditional welcome for harry. this is fraser island, also known as paradise. take a photo! the duke came to declare the rainforest here part of the queen's commonwealth canopy — a conservation project stretching across dozens of countries. put simply, without trees and forests, we don't survive. it is a symbiotic relationship and one that so many people still fail to realise. and then some handshakes and some royal playing around. he played alone, meghan taking some time out. but harry was more than enough excitement for some. when he shook my hand, he asked our names and i, like, forgot my name for three seconds and then i was like, oh, destiny. "my name is destiny!"
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he seems like a nice fellow, down to earth. another location, another welcome. and more playing around from harry. there's no stopping him, but still, no meghan. if you want an idea as to why meghan is not taking part in this section of the tour, then check out the roads on fraser island. they are winding, they are bumpy and some would say they are no place for a pregnant woman. but at the end of the day, strolling on firmer ground, there she was, one hand pressed against her tummy. and they both made time to talk to those who had stood and waited in the sun. hi, guys! there is nothing like a double act —
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and this one has drawn the crowds across australia. one of life's little triumphs for a lover of royalty. jonny dymond, bbc news, fraser island. time for a look at the weather... we have nick miller here. it has been lovely. it has. let's talk about that and nothing else. 20 degrees was the top temperature on saturday and sunday. in saturday it was in aberdeenshire and on sunday in suffolk. so from north to south we had some splendid warmth. not just over the north to south we had some splendid warmth. notjust over the weekend but of course for a long time since, actually the 1st of april which is the last day i can find winter
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bridges were widely as cold as they are going to be this weekend. we have got some snow on the way for some of us, northern hills and that sort of thing. temperature is taking a big plunge, the airfrom the arctic. first real taste of winter. nothing massively unusual about that at this time of year and i'm sure temperatures will go up again. we have been spoils, we? absolutely. notjust in the summer but also how warm autumn has been so far. a taste of pre—reality, taste of winter coming. is this the jet stream bringing this in? we can find some clues in the jets would stream that ijet stream. clues in the jets would stream that i jet stream. a clues in the jets would stream that ijet stream. a big area of warmth to the west of the usa and canada you will see warm colours, to the east you can see you will see warm colours, to the east you can see a you will see warm colours, to the east you can see a dip in thejet strea m east you can see a dip in thejet stream with some cold, it is a
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meandering jet stream with another big surge of warmth in the atlantic and then another dip in the jet stream. so if you have got warm, cold, cold, you have the cold coming down across the uk from the arctic across this weekend. high pressure from the east and that clockwise flow m ea ns from the east and that clockwise flow means air coming down from the arctic. so turning cold, with wind and we will see some snow showers in the northern hills. the risk of ice and frosty nights as well. the big change. but there's a few days before the weekend. it is a long time before the weekend comes and i wa nt to time before the weekend comes and i want to show you an area of high pressure because this is what we have at the moment. high unsettled weather across much of the uk. some rain in the northern isles. the far north of has been very windy today. but across southern england is we
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have some lovely sunshine so a big range of whether from north to south across the uk. most of us with fine conditions today. let's move onto tonight and the rain will hit fringes of scotland, that keeps the temperature up overnight so it is not as chilly as it was last night over northern scotland but it will be quite chilly the further south you are. a few mist and fog patches but nothing widespread. this will change tomorrow with further pulses of rain running into scotland's heaviest in the hills, scotland and northern england with 50 mile an hour gusts, that sort of things. many places will be dry, southern and eastern parts will see the best of the sunshine and you could have 18 sources in aberdeenshire so a bit more warmth the go. a quiet day on wednesday with high pressure and the rain easing and most places are dry.
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but as i show you the picture on thursday you can see this area of rain here which is the leading edge of the change that is coming. it is a weather front which will push change southwards. it hasn't made much progress on thursday but it will start to move further south with temperatures in the mid to low teens and just looking at the weather front again, as teens and just looking at the weatherfront again, as it teens and just looking at the weather front again, as it moves southwards thursday night into friday it would drag the cold air in behind from the arctic, the wind picks up as well. it is sunshine and showers but the higher up you are northern england and scotland but maybe wales, he might see a bit of snow as well. we'll keep you updated on that as we go through the rest of this week. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: downing street has said personal vitriol has no place in politics, after anonymous brexiteers were quoted calling for theresa may to be "knifed in the front". meanwhile, former cabinet
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ministers deny undermining the prime minister after meeting the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. a senior turkish official dismisses saudi arabia's claim that the journalist jamal khashoggi was killed in the country's consulate in istanbul during a fistfight. saudi authorities said he was killed by rogue operators. michael stirling pleads guilty at northampton crown court to murdering midwife samantha eastwood. she was found buried in a shallow grave in staffordshire in august. ryanair says it's been in touch with the police after one of its passengers was filmed racially abusing a disabled black woman sitting nearby. the budget airline came underfire for not ejecting the passenger. sport now on afternoon live. we are watching the commons to see if theresa may is getting to her feet. but we start with jose mourinho. yes, it says quite a lot about him and the season he has had so far,
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him saying he wants to stay at old trafford beyond his current contract has generated almost as much interest as if he had said he wanted to leave but it has not been the easiest of seasons for him and he was speaking at a press conference this afternoon ahead of another big test for manchester united, a game againstjuventus in the champions league tomorrow. he was also asked questions about that fracas you may remember on the touchline in the game against chelsea on the weekend. one of the assistant coaches had sent something that had provoked him and he had to be held back by the stewards. jose mourinho has been reminded of his responsibilities, that is the way it has been phrased. he does not wa nt to way it has been phrased. he does not want to see the assistant given any extra punishment by chelsea, here's what he had to say. he apologised to me and i accept his apologies. i think he deserves a
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second chance. i don't think he deserves to be sacked. i don't think he deserves anything more than the fa ct he deserves anything more than the fact that his club was strong with him and he went through a situation that in the end he recognises that he was wrong. so i hope everybody does the same as i did. which is to don't disturb a career of a young quy- now, lewis hamilton didn't win his fifth championship yesterday but is widely expected to get it. an interesting view from a former champion as to how much longer he can do this. he hinted at the end of last season that he may be only had a couple of yea rs' that he may be only had a couple of years' racing left in him. but a lot of people saying, win this fifth one at the weekend and why wouldn't you push on to try and equal or break the record of michael schumacher with seven world championships? but sirjackie stewart has said it is a lock to ask of an athlete to keep going, keep winning these multiple
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world championships at a lock to ask. jackie stewart expects lewis hamilton will retire before he gets to michael schumacher ‘s mark. he will burn out. because as the success brings, you then, he is getting into clothing for example and other things, he loves music, for example. sooner or later, you get tired of it. i got tired at a very young age. 34 years of age, i retired. and i went on to other things. in most sports, you burn out and he will burn out. he will choose to retire. the england and wales cricket board has dismissed allegations that a small group of england players were involved in spot fixing in seven matches. the claims were made in an updated documentary made by the qatari—based broadcaster aljazeera. the players were unnamed and the ecb says the limited information is "poorly prepared and lacks clarity and corroboration." the documentary has also been dismissed by fast bowler mark wood who is with the england squad in sri lanka. itjust does not really
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bother me, to be honest. i mean, we get sort of corruption, anti—corruption training. i have a guy called peter o'shea who i trust a lot. he is on the end of the phone if i need him. all of this stuff has no sort of hit or anything like that to it. it is nothing new to me. if they came up with concrete evidence or a name and they could prove something, then i would be a little bit more worried. but at the minute, it does not bother me because they keep making accusations and there is nothing behind it. there's one match in the premier league this evening. arsenal take on leicester at the emirates. since losing their first two games of the season arsenal have won nine in a row in all competitions, but head coach unai emery doesn't think another victory‘s guaranteed tonight. leicester is a very good team. and they are playing, i think, with one identity very clear. they are very competitive.
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they have very good players. and we need every single player and also our mentality together to be more strong than the last matches. west ham winger andriy yarmolenko could be out for up to six months after tearing his achilles tendon during saturday's defeat to tottenham. the ukrainianjoined the hammers from borussia dortmund during the summer and has scored twice this season. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the group representing hospitals, ambulance services and other nhs trusts in england has forecast that the strain on health services this winter will be worse than last year. nhs providers says the provision of cancer care and routine operations is already under severe pressure. on top of that, they say
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the problems are worsened by workforce shortages. the deputy ceo of nhs providers, saffron cordery, spoke this morning to the bbc radio 4 today programme — and told them why they are predicting such a tough winterfor the nhs. we know the warning signs are out there. a&e performance has dropped. we've got to demand going up across all services. that includes routine operations and cancer care as well as emergency services. and, as you heard, the rising workforce shortages. so, yes, we think it's going to be a challenging winter ahead. and yet the nhs in england say, "well, look, hold on, there is extra money going into a&e and extra money going into social care short—term and there is better national level winter planning." that is true. all that has happened and that is immensely welcome but would you have got to look at is a number of factors. you have to be clear about the scale of the challenge we are facing and also, when money goes into the system very late it is actually very difficult to deploy it effectively. we have had some really welcome capital funding, around £140 million, to make some changes in a&e
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departments but that came in september and has to be used by december so there are a number of issues about timing of funding. it is very welcome. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide, and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to carol malia in newcastle, where look north have been looking at the financial difficulties faced by the johnstone press publishing company, and the consequences this might have for the future local newspapers in the north east. it seems rather sad. i don't know
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about you but that is where i started off my journalism about you but that is where i started off myjournalism career. but that of course is owned by the johnston press. major concerns about thejohnston press. johnston press. major concerns about the johnston press. this johnston press. major concerns about thejohnston press. this is a company that owns 15 titles locally in our region but 200 across the uk. it has gone into trouble. forgive me, but there are very few ladies that take precedence but we are going to have to go and hear from theresa may in the commons. mr speaker, on the european council in addition to brexit, there were important discussions on security and migration. first at last monday's foreign ministers meeting, my right honourable friend the foreign secretary and his french counterpart secured agreement on a new sanctions regime on the use of chemical weapons. at this council, i argued along with the dutch prime
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minister that we should also accelerate work on further measures, including sanctions to respond to and to deter cyber attacks. the attempted hacking the organisation for prohibition of chemical weapons in the hague earlier this year was a stark example of a very real threat that we face. we must impose costs on all those who seek to do us harm, regardless of the means they use and this council agreed to take that work forward. second, in marking anti—slavery day, i welcome to the continued commitment of all eu leaders in working together to eliminate the barbaric crime of people trafficking. we reaffirmed our shared commitment to doing more to tackle the challenges of migration upstream. following the council, i met the premiere of china, president of south korea and prime minister of singapore at the summit. since 2010, ourtrade
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prime minister of singapore at the summit. since 2010, our trade with asia has grown by almost 50%, more than with any other continent in the world. i want to develop that even further. indeed, mr speaker, the ability to develop our owned new trade deals is one of the great opportunities brexit. at this summit, we discussed how the uk can build the most ambitious partnerships with all our asian partnerships with all our asian partners as we leave the european union. and we also agreed to deepen our operation across shared threats to security. turning to brexit, mr speaker, let me begin with the progress we have made on both the withdrawal agreement and the political declaration on our future relationship. as i reported to the house last monday, the shape of the deal across the vast majority of withdrawal agreement is now clear. since sulzberger, we have agreed a broad scope of provisions for our withdrawal agreement. we have developed a protocol relating to the
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sovereign base areas in cyprus. following discussions with spain, and in close cooperation of the gamut of gibraltar, we have also developed a protocol and a set of underlying memoranda relating to gibraltar, heralding a new era in our relationship. —— government of gibraltar. and we have broad agreement on the future relationship with progress made on issues like transport and services. this progress builds on the areas where we have already reached agreement on citizens‘ rights, the financial settlement, the implementation period, and in northern ireland, agreement on the preservation of the particular rights for uk and irish citizens and on the special arrangements between us, such as the common travel area, which has existed since before either the uk or ireland ever became members of the european economic community. mr speaker, taking all of this together, 95% of the withdrawal agreement and its protocols are now
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settled. there is one real sticking point left, but a considerable one, which is how we guarantee that in the unlikely event our future relationship is not in place by the end of the fermentation period, there is no return to a hard border between northern ireland and ireland. the commitment to avoiding a hard border is one this house emphatically endorsed and enshrined in law in withdrawal act earlier this year. as i set out last week, the original backstop proposal from the original backstop proposal from the eu was one we could not accept, as it would mean creating a custom is bordered on the irish sea and breaking up the integrity of our united kingdom. i do not believe that any uk prime minister could ever accept this and i certainly will not. but i said in my mansion house speech, we chose to leave and we have a responsibility to help find a solution. earlier this year we put forward a counter proposal
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for a temporary customs territory for a temporary customs territory for the backstop. and in a substantial shift in their position, lee—lo now actively working with us on this proposal. but a number of issues remain. the eu argue that they cannot give a legally binding commitment to a uk wide customs agreement in the withdrawal agreement. furthermore, mr speaker, people are understandably worried that we could get stuck in a backstop that is designed only to be temporary and there are also concerns that northern ireland could be cut off from accessing its most important market, great britain. during last week ‘s counsel, i had good discussions with claudejunker and president macron and angela merkel and others about how to break this impasse. i believe there are four steps we need to take. first we must make the commitment to a
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temporaryjoint customs territory legally binding sodhi northern ireland only proposal is no longer needed. this would not only protect relations north, south, but also vitally east, west. this is critical. the relationship between northern ireland and the rest of the uk is an integral stand of the belfast good friday agreement. to protect that agreement, we need to preserve the totality of relationships it sets out. nothing we agree with the eu under article 50 should risk a return to a hard border or threaten the delicate constitutional and political arrangements underpinned by the belfast good friday agreement. the second step is to create an option to extend the fermentation period as an alternative to the backstop. i have not committed to extending the fermentation period. i do not want to extend the implementation period andi to extend the implementation period and i do not agree that extending it will be necessary. ——
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implementation. by far the best outcome for the uk, for ireland and for the eu is that our future relationship is agreed and in place by the 1st of january 2021. i have every confidence that it will be and the european union say they will show equal commitment to this timetable but the impasse we are trying to resolve is about the insurer ‘s response at dutch policy this does not happen. if at the end of 2020, our future this does not happen. if at the end of 2020, ourfuture relationship is not quite ready, the proposal is that the uk would be able to make a sovereign boys —— choice between the customs backstop a short extension of the implementation period. there are some limited circumstances in which it could be argued that an extension to the implementation period might be preferable if we we re period might be preferable if we were certain it was only for a short time. for example a short extension to the implementation period would
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mean only one set of changes for businesses at the point we moved to the future relationship. but in any such scenario, we would have to be out of this implementation period well before the end of this parliament. the third step, mr speaker, is to ensure that will we to need either of these insurance policies, whether the backstop or the short extension to the implementation period, we could not be kept in either arrangement indefinitely. we would not accept a position in which the uk having negotiated in good faith and agreement which prevents a hard border in northern ireland nonetheless finds itself locked into an alternative inferior arrangement against our will. the fourth step, mr speaker, is for the government to deliver the commitment we have made to ensure full continued access for northern ireland‘s to the whole of the uk internal market. northern ireland ‘s businesses rely heavily
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on trade with great britain and we must protect this in any scenario. let us remember that all of the steps a re let us remember that all of the steps are about insurance policies that no one in the uk or the eu wa nts that no one in the uk or the eu wants or expects to use, so we cannot let this become the barrier to reaching the future partnership we all want to see. we have to explore every possible option to break the impasse and that is what i am doing. when i stood in downing street and address the nation for the first time, i pledged the government i lead will not be driven by the interests of the privileged few but of ordinary working families... and... and that is... and that... and that is what guides me every day in these negotiations. before any decision, i ask how do i
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best deliver the brexit that the british people voted for? how do i best ta ke british people voted for? how do i best take back control of our money, borders and laws? how do i best protect jobs and make borders and laws? how do i best protectjobs and make sure nothing gets in the way of our brilliant entrepreneurs and small businesses? how do i best protect the integrity of our precious united kingdom and protect the historic progress we have made in northern ireland? and if doing those things means i get difficult days in brussels then so be it. far too much noise in the chamber. everybody knows from all the record there is plenty of opportunity to question the prime minister on these occasions but the prime minister must be heard. the brexit talks are not about my interests, they are about the national interest and the interests of the whole of the united kingdom. serving our national interest will
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demand that we hold our nerve through these last stages of the negotiations, the hardest part of all. it will mean not giving in to those who want to stop brexit with a politicians vote. politicians telling the people they got it wrong the first time and should try again. and it will mean focusing... and it will mean focusing on the prize that lies before us, the great opportunities that we can open up for our country when we clearly is final hurdles in the negotiations, thatis final hurdles in the negotiations, that is what i am working to achieve andi that is what i am working to achieve and i commend this statement to the house. thank you, mr speaker. i thank the prime minister for the advanced copy of her statement and i am pleased she has condemned the horrific murder ofjamal khashoggi she has condemned the horrific murder of jamal khashoggi in she has condemned the horrific murder ofjamal khashoggi in the saudi consulate in istanbul. but condemnation is not enough. what matters now is what action the
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government is prepared to take. will they now end arms sales to saudi arabia? moving on to brexit, i hope our debate today will be conducted without some other language reported in the press over the weekend. i have to say, every word on brexit was anticipated, a mixture of failure, denial, and delusion. the conservative party has spent the la st two conservative party has spent the last two years arguing with itself instead of negotiating a sensible deal in the public interest. and even at this crucial point, they are still bickering amongst themselves. the prime minister says 95% of the deal is done, but previously she had told us nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. which is it? they're brexit negotiations have beena they're brexit negotiations have been a litany of missed deadlines, shambolic failure and now they are begging for extra time. they promised the interim agreement would
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be done by october 2017, then december 2017, and finally agreed in march 2018. the prime minister even missed a deadline for publishing her own governments white paper on brexit, saying it would be published injune, it brexit, saying it would be published in june, it arrived brexit, saying it would be published injune, it arrived in mid—july, lacking any clarity on the key issues and crucially after the eu summit at which britain's proposals we re summit at which britain's proposals were supposed to have been tabled. and just last week, the government missed its october deadline for greening the terms of the execute with the eu. instead the prime minister went to brussels to beg for an extension. the eu had... the eu had already offered to convene a special summit in november to help the prime minister but it now seems this has been withdrawn as she won't be ready by then either. so now, december is being talked about. and the prime minister claims her extension of the transition period
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will only be for a matter of months. is that three, six, 12, 18? how many months is it? who knows? but certainly the prime minister does not. but can the prime minister give one a straight answer? what will it cost an extra payments to the eu per month during this extension? the government is only proposing this extension because of its own incompetence. we have had two one half years watching the tories failure to negotiate, now even the prime minister doesn't have confident she can negotiate a deal by december 2020. that is another 14 months. what faith can anyone have that extending that deadline by a matter of months will help? perhaps the prime minister can inform the house. the prime minister also begged european leaders to create with that creative solutions. the
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prime minister is pleading with the eu to work out how to do it. it does not sound like taking back control, it sounds like a government and a prime minister that is losing control. this government is terminally incompetent, hamstrung by its own divisions. the prime minister of lithuania summed up the situation when he said, we do not know what they want, they do not know what they want, they do not know themselves what they really want, that is the problem. i am sure... i want, that is the problem. i am sure... lam want, that is the problem. i am sure... i am sure the whole house would love... order. there was too much noise when the prime minister was addressing the house. you are a distinguished minister of the crown. i cannot believe that you were taught to behave in that way. mr jeremy corbyn.
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lam sure jeremy corbyn. i am sure the whole house would love to heartheir i am sure the whole house would love to hear their precise and detailed blueprint. perhaps when she comes back to the dispatch box, the prime list could set out plan. whole country is waiting... the whole country is waiting... the whole country is waiting for a plan that works for britain, not another fudge ca ke works for britain, not another fudge cake of the can down the road to keep her party in power. much of the current impasse is due to the northern ireland border. hardly an issue that can come of a surprise to government. there is a simple solution. a comprehensive customs union with the eu, a solution that not only benefits northern ireland but would help to safeguard skilled jobs in every region and nation britain. no hard border in ireland and no hard border down the irish sea and good jobs for every region and nation. that is a deal that
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could command a majority of subordinate house and the support of businesses and unions. it is labour's plan. a comprehensive customs union with a real say for britain, with no race to the bottom on regulations, standards and rights. the alternative is not no deal but a workable plan. this government does not even trusted zone benches to have a meaningful vote, with the brexit secretary submitting a letter that told us we must choose between a disastrous no deal and a government deal. a deal which does not yet exist, for which there is now no deadline. brexit was supposed to be about taking back control. but what much of her cabinet campaign forand control. but what much of her cabinet campaign for and where we have —— cabinet campaign for and where we have — — where cabinet campaign for and where we have —— where have we ended up? because of this government 's desolation, five years on from the referendum, we could still be paying
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into the ee with no meps, no seat at the council of ministers, and no say for this country. instead of taking back control, they are giving away our say and paying for the privilege. what an utter shambles. having utterly failed to act in the public interest, will the prime minister do so now and make way for a government that can and will. cani... a government that can and will. can i... can i... can! a government that can and will. can i... can i... can i first of all say to the right honourable gentleman, there was an awful lot in his comments about process but not that much about substance and what they actually want to see. can i... cani they actually want to see. can i... can i also say to him can i also say to him this, but i think it is incumbent on all of us in public life to be careful about the language that we use. there are passionate beliefs and passionate views that are held on this subject and other subjects but the subject,
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we should all be careful about our language. there was a lord that a lot about process , there was a lord that a lot about process, he seemed to be asking us at one point two be asking us to set out our plan. we set out our plan in the summer. he talks about a future relationship of a customs union but whatever future relationship we have come we do have to deal with this backstop issue because without a backstop issue because without a backstop in the withdrawal agreement, there will be no withdrawal agreement, without the withdrawal agreement, without the withdrawal agreement, without the withdrawal agreement, there will be no future relationship, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, so agreed until everything is agreed, so doesn‘t matter what future relationship you want, we do actually need to deal with this backstop issue. his position has been... his position has been that no deal is not acceptable in any circumstances. well, that means accepting any deal the european union wants to give us. including... including a deal which would carve northern ireland out away from the united kingdom, although perhaps of
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course as a shadow chancellor... from the commons a shadow chancellor make me he might actually welcome mat when he said he was lobbying for a united ireland. all i have to say to the right honourable gentleman is throughout all of this, all we have seen throughout all of this, all we have seen from the labour party and him is playing politics with this issue. one minute they want to accept the referendum, the next they want a second referendum. one minute they wa nt to second referendum. one minute they want to say free movement will end, the next they say it is on the table. one minute they want to trade deals, the next they want to be an customs unions that. them from doing trade deals. he is doing everything he can to frustrate brexit and trigger a general election. he has voted against a sufficient progress and tried to block the withdrawal act and vowed to
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