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tv   The Briefing  BBC News  October 23, 2018 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is the briefing. i'm ben bland. our top stories: as turkey prepares to reveal all about the murder ofjamal khashoggi, the us treasury secretary holds talks in riyadh with the saudi crown prince. president trump warns that the us will build up its nuclear arsenal to pressure russia and china as he threatens to pull out of a landmark treaty. spanning 55 kilometres, the world's longest sea bridge linking hong kong and macau to mainland china, is open for business. in the light of the khashoggi murder, top business leaders are pulling out of the major investment conference that kicks off today in saudi arabia — what difference will it make? a warm welcome to the programme, briefing you on all you need to know
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in global news, business and sport. and the united states is gripped by lotto fever. the latest mega millions draw on tuesday has a potentialjackpot of $1.5 billion — the biggest payout in history. —— of $1.6 billion — the biggest payout in history. so today, i'd like to know — if you struck lucky, what would you spend it on? let me know. just use the hashtag #bbcthebriefing. let's get started with the programme. in just a few hours, turkey's president erdogan is expected to reveal what he's called the "naked truth" about the murder ofjamal khashoggi at the saudi consulate in istanbul. for a while now, the turkish authorities have hinted they possess detailed information about the killing. it's led many countries to cancel their visits to a trade conference in riyadh, though the us treasury secretary steve mnuchin is now there. this report from eliza philippidis.
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the days, president erdogan has promised to reveal what he had called the naked truth about the murder ofjamal called the naked truth about the murder of jamal khashoggi on tuesday. he could be ready to deliver. translation: it is very important to find those who are responsible and punish them, ensuring nothing will remain in the dark. saudi arabia is an important country brass, a brotherly and friendly country. we don't want to damage these relations. it is widely believed turkey has audio recordings documenting jamal khashoggi's torture and killing. western governments think it all points to saudi's dfat ruler, bin salman, ultimately being responsible, but they lacked hard proof. we do not find the explanations that have been offered to date to be credible or
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consistent. that is a serious problem in canada. the german chancellor will hold all arms exports until the matter has been resolved. translation: look at the monstrosity that has happened in the saudi arabia consulate in turkey. that must be cleared. as long as this has not been cleared up, there won't be any arms exports to saudi arabia. i promise you this. on tuesday, a saudi investment conference opens. they have been setbacks with major players pulling out, including christine legato, head of the international monetary fund. but others say the investment opportunities are too important to miss. that includes the us treasury secretary steve and manish and. he planned to boycott the event but he is now in the gulf state for meetings. i don't want to lose all
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about investment that has been made in our country. i don't want to lose a millionjobs, i don't want to lose $110 billion in terms of investment. continuing investigations have been focusing on a diplomatic car found in an istanbul carpark. cctv seems to show something being moved between two cars. but turkish police we re between two cars. but turkish police were denied access to the vehicle, leaving one more stone unturned. as we heard, many delegates have withdrawn from that trade conference in saudi arabia, concerned by the allegations against the hosts. with me is the foreign exchange strategist jane foley. this conference, it has been described as a big deal the saudis, also to those who want to do business and in to the lucrative opportunities there. how important
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is the presence or absence of key western figures, do you think?m is the presence or absence of key western figures, do you think? it is important. this is all part of their strategy. this is their plan to open up strategy. this is their plan to open up their economy to foreign direct investment, to really shift the focus away from just being exclusively oil in the country, so they are billing themselves as a significant g20 country in the region and they want that investment from overseas to really push them into a new economic era. we have seen into a new economic era. we have seen a into a new economic era. we have seen a lot of western companies really pull out of this and that is interesting to, because that probably means that the focus perhaps will be on chinese investment, may be russian investment, may be russian investment, so there is a geopolitical senior, which is perhaps consistent with what we have been seeing elsewhere with the us china trade wars, the us and russian friction in the europe front —— russia friction as well. we saw these amounts that have been taken
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out of equity markets in saudi arabia by foreign investors who currently have money there. hundreds of millions of dollars worth of investments being ta ken of millions of dollars worth of investments being taken out by investors. yes, huge. huge outflow from predominately west, it is there to say that without being able to see at the analysis of it right now, but dominant us. we had a story today that germany wants to have pull—out of selling arms and they are urging other eu nations to do the same. we could see an awful lot more potentially coming out of saudl more potentially coming out of saudi, probably from the west rather than the east. there is a certain amount of politics that plays into this, because as president trump has mentioned several times, the deals are worth billions, these arms deals with the saudis are worth billions to the us, and jobs depend on that. yes, and it is notjust with the us
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as well. there are other western nations that would say the same. this is saudi's trump card. they know they are a significant economic layout, the selling of arms to saudi does give a lot of people in jobs. that is something that western governments are going to have to think very carefully about. if they ban think very carefully about. if they ba n sales think very carefully about. if they ban sales of arms to saudi, what they say to people at home that are dependent on income for theirjobs? it is very delicate politically, it is interesting that germany has taken the now, that will put more pressure on western governments to potentially follow suit. clearly, we have not he had —— not heard the end, maybe just the have not he had —— not heard the end, maybejust the beginning of this story. the other aspect of the investment is a suppose it requires companies around the world in countries around the world to act in a certain degree of unity, because otherwise you have a situation where there will always be someone who
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will go in and say, actually, this is too good an opportunity to miss and will have perhaps fewer qualms about turning up and snapping up a deal that they might not have otherwise have got. this is really the concern for the us and for the west because there is a geopolitical, as i mentioned, the obvious geopolitical frictions right now, and the us, germany now are pulling out of arms, and other western countries pull—out of arms, it does leave a gap. that means there will be rate opportunities perhaps the russia and china to increase their influence in the region? that is something of course which could create problems down the road for other western governments. thank you very much for the moment, but we will see you later to go through the papers. more on that tory and others. see you shortly. —— on that story and others. donald trump has threatened to boost his country's nuclear forces to make russia abide by a major arms control treaty which he says he will quit. mr trump said the united states had more money than anyone else and would build up its nuclear
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arsenal until russia came to its senses. they have not adhered to the spirit of that agreement or to the agreement itself. china is not included in that agreement. they should be included in that agreement. until they get smart, there will be nobody even close to us. i don't have to speak to the russians. i don't have do. i am terminating the agreement. those comments by mr trump came as he was heading to a campaign rally in texas ahead of the midterm elections. his speech in support of senator ted cruz focused on the perceived threat from immigration. earlier, the president had vowed to limit american aid to three central american nations whose citizens are among a caravan heading to the us border. james cook reports. approaching the midpoint of his presidency, donald trump continues
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to deploy the divisive political rhetoric. he talked about his opponents in very stark terms, suggesting they were notjust opponents in very stark terms, suggesting they were not just wrong, that they actually were disloyal to the country and that they threatened the country and that they threatened the future of the united states. the president talked about this migrant ca rava n president talked about this migrant caravan moving up president talked about this migrant caravan moving up through mexico, migrants from central america who say they are desperate for help. he painted that as a grave threat to the united states. here are, that is a feeling that is echoed, a sentiment echoed. people say they are concerned about immigration. it remains the great animated clashing of many conservatives, many supporters of them upfront. here in texas, we are seeing an intriguing battle between, for the senate and between the republican ted cruise who used to be public enemy number one of donald trump, the two of them traded the most visceral insults during the 2016 presidential campaign. mrtrump, doing during the 2016 presidential campaign. mr trump, doing the same
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likewise. group —— cruz were that this rally. polls suggest mr cruz is in the lead. early voting has already begun here and democrats say they are enthused by the turnout so far. it is going to be an intriguing election and president trump is making clear that he will take this message of painting his opponents as dangerous right up to the vote. let's brief you on some of the other stories making the news. in brazil, the far—right presidentialfrontrunner, jair bolsonaro, says he will cleanse the country of what he's called "corrupt elements of the the left—wing workers party." mr bolsonaro made the threat in a videolink to supporters in sao paolo ahead of sunday's presidential run—off. mexico has issued an alert for parts of its pacific coast as it prepares for hurricane willa, now at the highest category of 5. willa is due to make landfall in mexico later on tuesday and experts are warning this storm is potentially catastrophic and life—threatening.
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it's expected to bring torrential rains, major flooding and landslides. 29 nobel prize—winning scientists have urged britain and the european union to secure a deal on brexit in order to protect scientific research. they've written a letter to the british prime minister, theresa may, and the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. in it, they stress that science requires the free flow of people and ideas to flourish. the world's longest sea bridge has been officially opened in china, connecting the special administrative regions of hong kong and macau to the mainland. chinese president xijinping led the opening ceremony held in the mainland chinese city of zhuhai. the bridge is due to open to traffic on wednesday, but has already become a tourist attraction, as katie silver reports.
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a last—minute selfie ahead of the opening ceremony of what supporters are calling an engineering marvel. the crossing, which includes a snaking road bridge, also goes underwater by two artificial islands, allowing ships to pass. after nine years of construction, enthusiasm is rife. translation: i think this bridge will bring great convenience to the whole of hong kong and macau and promote the economic development of the whole area of the pearl river delta. translation: today i am of duty so i have ta ken my translation: today i am of duty so i have taken my child to see the bridge. now it is almost open to traffic. it is magnificent. the hong kong bridge spans 55 kilometres and will allow commuters to travel from macau to hong kong along the pearl river history in about an hour. the
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distance is 20 times the length of san francisco's goldengate ridge. but it is only a third of the grand bridge which, at 165 kilometres come is the world's longest bridge, connecting shanghai. the bridge has been dogged by delays and budget overruns. there have been corruption prosecutions and even the deaths of construction workers. it comes a month after a high—speed rail link was launched, connecting hong kong to d oze ns was launched, connecting hong kong to dozens of cities in mainland china. critics say these infrastructure projects are examples of ageing tightening its grip on the semiautonomous city. others say they will bring both sides great economic benefits. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: a chance to be a billionaire overnight. americans in the grip of lotto fever. a historic moment that
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many of his victims have waited for for decades. the former dictator in the dock, older, slimmer, and as he sat down, obedient enough. dawn, and as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside korem, it lights up a biblicalfamine, now, in the 20th century. the depressing conclusion — in argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper your walls with money. we've had controversies in the past with great britain. but as good friends, we have always found a good and lasting solution. concorde bows out in style. after almost three decades in service, an aircraft that has enthralled its many admirers for so long taxis home one last time.
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you're watching the briefing. our headlines: as turkey prepares to reveal all about the murder of the the journalist, jamal khashoggi, at the saudi consulate in istanbul, the us treasury secretary has held private talks in riyadh with the saudi crown prince. president trump has warned that the us will build up its nuclear arsenal to pressure russia and china after threatening to pull out of a landmark treaty. archaeologists have found what they believe to be the world's oldest intact shipwreck. the 23—metre vessel, thought to be ancient greek, was discovered with its mast and rudders more than 1.6 kilometres below the surface of the black sea. a lack of oxygen is thought to have preserved the wreck, as andy moore reports. deep down in the black sea,
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archaeologists have been discovering dozens archaeologists have been discovering d oze ns of archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved in archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved in the archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved in the dark archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved in the dark depths archaeologists have been discovering dozens of wrecks almost perfectly preserved in the dark depths where there is little oxygen. we even have there is little oxygen. we even have the coils of line, rope, still in the coils of line, rope, still in the stern when the ship went down. this is unique. this is from the buyers and time period around 1000 yea rs buyers and time period around 1000 years old. deep down in march all the ships —— byzantine. the oldest from the classical greek period was discovered and mapped by rovs or remote operated vehicles, in a state of preservation that is said to be utterly amazing. when you think that the ship is often the most complex a rtefa ct ever the ship is often the most complex artefact ever made in preindustrial civilisations, if you find a whole one from a period when aristotle was still alive that is quite amazing.
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it looks something like this image ona it looks something like this image on a greek vase held by the british museum. the ship has and sale and a single row of oars. it is about 20 metres long. the details and images of the ship will be released today but it is unlikely it will ever be raised. its timbers are probably much too fragile to be brought to the surface. because of that, preservation by recording means that, yes, we are able to get all of this information up and we are able to leave the wreck so that future generations with better technology are able to come and use their skills to find out even more. andy moore, bbc news. mysteries of the deep. let's have a look now at some key news events happening later on tuesday. this morning, the campaign group, human rights watch, launches a report about alleged abuses carried out by both hamas in gaza and the palestinian authority on the west bank. later, russian president vladimir putin and us national security adviserjohn bolton will appear before
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journalists at a news conference in moscow. finally, this evening, fans of the rock group queen will be out in force for the premiere of bohemian rhapsody — a film about the band's tumultuous career. that's taking place in london. now, it's time to get all the latest from the bbc sports centre. hello, i'm tulsen tollett, coming up in your tuesday sport briefing: cristiano ronaldo gets set to return to old trafford asjuventus take on manchester united in the champions league. sri lanka and england head out in the final match of their one—day international series. and the wta finals continue in singapore. cristiano ronaldo returns to old trafford later on tuesday as hisjuventus side face manchester united in the champions league. the 33—year—old portuguese won this competition with united in 2008 and then went on to win it four more times at real madrid before his almost $130 million transfer to the italian champions. now if we play good, if we play the
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way the coach wants, i think we have a good chance to win the game, but of course, as i said before, we have to respect manchester united, because they are a fantastic team, they have an experienced coach, but i expect and i look forward and think we will win the game. england will play their final match of a rain—affected one—day series with sri lanka on tuesday in colombo. the tourists lead the series 3—0 and not one match has been completed over the 50 over length. it's certain that eoin morgan side's will be much changed and might give a chance to bowler mark wood with jostling for world cup spots now starting in earnest with the tournament less than a year away. reigning champion caroline wozniacki will face petra kvitova in the wta finals later, knowing a win is vital if she's to have a chance of defending the title in singapore. both wozniacki and kvitova lost their opening matches on sunday and a loss for either would mean
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that qualifying from the white group for the semi finals would then be out of their hands. in case you missed it, arsenal moved fourth in the premier league after they came from a goal down to beat leicester city 3—1 at home. mesut ozil was at the forefront of the gunners play, scoring the first, with pierre emerick aubameyang picking up the other two goals for the home side, who made it a record equalling 10 consecutive wins in all competitions for the first time since 2007. every match is a big challenge and we need to continue winning, it will be difficult, and also today for us it is very important because they are niasse in the table and we wa nted are niasse in the table and we wanted to win against them and also
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it was a big difference against them. it must be something in the water — sergio garcia has won the andalucia masters for the third successive time, his victories spread over seven yea rs. it was shortened to sa holes and was only completed on the fifth day. the former masters champion had struggled for most of 2018 but he's finished the year by starring at the ryder cup and winning here. now this one has been doing the rounds of social media, given that real madrid have lost four of their last five played in all competitions. it's captain and centre back sergio ramos hitting the ball against team—mate sergio reguilon. is it a sign of tension in the camp? the player later apologised on social media and the 21—year—old also sent out his own message, saying he always supports the team and the captain. you can get all the latest sports news at our website, that's bbc.com/sport. but from me, tulsen tollett, and the rest of the team, that is your tuesday sport briefing. once again, much of
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the united states is in the grip of lotto fever. the latest mega millions draw will take place on tuesday, with a potentialjackpot of $1.6 billion, the biggest pay—out in history. another draw, the powerball, is also taking place, but the winner of that one will only get a measly $600 million. the bbc‘s tim allman has the story. hope springs eternal on the streets of manhattan. especially when a combined prize of over $2 billion is on offer. no—one has won the mega millions or the powerball so the jackpot keeps getting bigger and bigger. i believe i have already won. i follow the law of attraction. it was meant to be and it will be. people just go crazy and panic. but if you already believe you have
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won. it isjust a chance to see if i can win some millions, help some people. it could be you. but the odds are not on your side. the chances of winning the jackpot stand at one in 303 million. in context, your chances of being eaten by a shark are only one in 3.7 million. and there is a one in 300,000 chance that you could be killed by lightning. if you do win the mega millions, this will be your dilemma. take $1.6 billion over a period of 29 years or just settle for around $900 million in a lump sum? decisions, decisions. and what if no—one wins? then we try again. and the jackpot gets bigger still. yes, fingers crossed, and if you are
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going for it, remember who your favourite friends are. halloween, the remake of the classic from the 19705, the remake of the classic from the 1970s, has raked in over $77 million during the opening weekend. it makes it the biggest debut ever for a horror film with a female lead, jamie lee curtis, and the biggest debut everfor any jamie lee curtis, and the biggest debut ever for any film with a female lead over 55, but in spite of the obvious commercial success of the obvious commercial success of the film has received mixed reviews from critics. stay with me on bbc news, i'll be back with the business briefing in just a few moments — we'll have more on the saudi investment conference in riyadh and the impact of top business leaders pulling out in the light of the murder ofjamal khashoggi. stay with me for that. i will see you soon. hello there.
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good morning. most of the weather action is happening towards it end of this week as arctic wind brings a shock to the system. we still have high pressure sitting close by on tuesday. those weather fronts still across northern parts of scotland and quitea across northern parts of scotland and quite a few isobars too. not as windy on tuesday, still a0 or 50 mph over scotla nd windy on tuesday, still a0 or 50 mph over scotland and the pennines. most of the rain in the north and west of scotland. otherwise it will probably be dry. areas of cloud pushing down in the brisk winds, south and east might have the best of the sunshine, and temperatures higher than yesterday with 16 or 17 degrees, evenin yesterday with 16 or 17 degrees, even in eastern scotland with sunshine. through the evening and overnight we still have the cloud pushing down from the north—west. still a breeze although the wind is continuing to ease. it probably won't be as cold on wednesday morning. temperatures comfortably above freezing. wednesday sees a
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little more cloud especially in the north and west of the uk. further south and east is where we see the best of the sunshine. the rain is easing off in the north—west scotland. the wind won't be a strong. temperatures up to 16, maybe even 17 degrees. we have high pressure. we still have some weather fronts in the north, this is significant. it is behind that where we will start to see some cold air coming in. notjust yet, mind you, still looking relatively mild on thursday although temperatures will bea thursday although temperatures will be a little bit lower on thursday. most be a little bit lower on thursday. m ost pla ces be a little bit lower on thursday. most places dry with some spells of sunshine but the rain will begin to gather towards the north—west of the uk. temperatures will be a shade lower, 12 to 1a degrees. cold front will bring the rain in the north—west. that one there. and behind that we will change the wind direction. the wind coming all the way the arctic, bringing with it a chill across the country. on the cold front, there it is to southern parts of england, there will not be
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much rain. sunny spells, showers follow, wintry over high ground in scotland. a cold wind, it will feel close to freezing in scotland. temperatures perhaps in double figures further south. last weekend it was 20 degrees. this weekend we are struggling to make double figures. most places will have sunshine. it will be a touch wintry over high ground. this is the business briefing. i'm sally bundock. the us treasury secretary flies in as investors fly out. steve mnuchin meets saudi arabia's crown prince despite business leaders shunning a major investment conference. would you pay your taxes to a country that has no terittory or passports but tries to do good in the world? and on the markets: saudi arabia was supposed to be
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celebrating its vision for the future and its potential
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