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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 23, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: turkey's president says there's strong evidence thatjamal khashoggi was murdered in a planned operation, and he wants the killers tried in turkey. translation: information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. thousands of council workers are out on the steets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. the fast growth in fast food — there are more takeaways on our high streets than there've been for 10 years. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport — here's olly foster. hello. all eyes will be on old trafford tonight and the return of cristiano ronaldo. he has addressed the media, saying he is confident he will clear his name as it continues to fightan will clear his name as it continues to fight an allegation of rape against him. thanks, olly. and nick miller has the weather. well, the weather is changing and
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turning much colder at the end of this week, so we will take a look at that. right now, pretty quiet, but we will take you to a part of the world which is experiencing its most active cyclone season on record, and there is another major hurricane about to hit. thank you, neck. talk to you later on. also coming up... # wish that i could let you love me... i'm going to bejoined live by singer rita ora. her single is riding high in the charts and she's about to release her second album. but she also wants to talk about the issue of cyber—bullying. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. president erdogan of turkey says there's strong evidence that the journalist jamal khashoggi was savagely murdered in a planned operation. he dismissed the suggestion
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that his death, in the saudi consulate in istanbul, was an accident — and said those responsible must be put on trial in turkey. saudi arabia has insisted that the journalist was killed in a rogue operation. frank gardner reports. three weeks to the day since he disappeared, jamal khashoggi, outspoken saudi critic of his own government, last seen alive entering the saudi consulate in istanbul shortly before he was murdered by those inside. today, turkey's president erdogan addressed parliamentarians and gave his first full public reaction. translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. the details of this incident, this murder, is capable of hurting our hearts. lurid details ofjust how khashoggi died have been leaked to turkey's pro—government media.
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there's said to be an audio tape from a turkish surveillance device hidden inside the saudi consulate that recorded his agonising last moments. president erdogan made no mention of this today but he did challenge the latest saudi version of what happened. translation: this was a planned operation. it is not going to satisfy either us nor the international community that this was just a rogue operation by a few. over in the saudi capital riyadh, it appeared to be business as usual today. this was the grand opening of a huge investment conference dubbed davos in the desert. it's been boycotted by many multinational ceos due to the khashoggi murder. even the opening speaker could not avoid mentioning it. the terrible acts reported in recent weeks are alien to our culture and our dna.
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and i'm confident that with the support of the government, concerned authorities and leadership, the truth will emerge. the investment conference is the brainchild of saudi arabia's maverick crown prince mohammad bin salman. western governments suspect he ordered the operation against khashoggi, something saudi arabia denies. turkey's president conspicuously avoided mentioning the prince by name, praising instead the sincerity of his father, the ageing saudi king salman. but he also demanded answers to hard questions, such as where is the body? and who helped dispose of it? he also wants the suspects brought back to turkey for trial. translation: the 18 people must be tried in istanbul. this is my proposal. as the crime was committed in istanbul, they should be tried in istanbul. in life, jamal khashoggi had a huge following on social media
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but his violent death has rocked relations between the west and saudi arabia. after this, they may never be quite the same. our correspondent tim willcox sent us this update from riyadh, where the investment conference is taking place. this is the second year for this saudi future initiative conference, and in terms of the numbers of people, very little has changed, realistically. about 4000, a500 realistically. about 4000, 4500 people are here. some of the high profile speakers have pulled out, but it is certainly a busy conference centre, and ironically, involving the ritz—carlton hotel, where mohammed bin salman, the crown prince, locked up other members of the royal family in prince, locked up other members of the royalfamily in a bid to shake them down for money in a corruption probe. no sign of mohammed bin salman himself yet today. we
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understood he might be attending around lunchtime, but he did not come. we're not sure also if his father king salman might be attending as well. the pressure against the royal family is mounting, not least from that speech by president erred in one of turkey today. although it is interesting to note that when president urdu and began speaking, that coincided with the moment that several big players in the world of business pledged billions of dollars towards this conference in a bid to do business and continue to do business with saudi arabia. the conference itself lasts three days. it will be interesting to see whether the crown prince does turn up along with king salman, and it is also worth pointing out that some of the chief executives of the big firms who felt under pressure not to attend because of the killing ofjamal khashoggi, they have sent more junior figures as well, but the companies themselves are being represented. ken will cox.
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i'm joined now by our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. as we said, a lot of people very disappointed by what the turkish president said this morning, because he said he was going to tell all, and he did not. yes, in some ways, he has been revealing of the last couple of weeks, maybe felt that was enough for now. it felt to me like this process may be has some way to run, that whatever he is looking to gain from this whole episode from saudi arabia and perhaps also from the united states, it's not quite there yet. maybe he is intent on sidelining the crown prince once and for all. it was very notable, as frank said in his piece, that he said he had no doubt about the sincerity of the king, but made no reference at all to the crown prince. so maybe mr erdogan feels that he has not extracted enough of a confession from the saudis yet, and that is why we think this audio recording exists. some people are convinced it exists, but if it does, he is holding it back, perhaps for
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one last round of pressure. it is interesting, we have had the drip drip effect of news ever since the murderfrom drip drip effect of news ever since the murder from authorities drip drip effect of news ever since the murderfrom authorities in turkey, and that continues. we are hearing rumours that they say they have found a body that has been mutilated. oddly enough, this seems slightly different, in that it has come not from official channels, but from the leader of a small leftist party. i and the stunned the bbc has contacted the prosecutor's our first —— i understand, and we have been told that that is not the case, that nobody parts have been found. clearly, there has been an attempt to locate the body, and president erdogan referred to this in his speech is one of the big questions to be answered, where is the body of jamal khashoggi? it does seem odd, going back to president erdogan, that he had the world watching his every m ove that he had the world watching his every move this morning and did not
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seem to take advantage of that. no, andi seem to take advantage of that. no, and i think that was extremely deliberate. it seems he feels the pressure is still absolutely on the neck of the saudi authorities, that he can see from donald trump to the europeans, people essentially asking the same questions he is asking, and maybe therefore he felt there was no particular need for him to get so far out particular need for him to get so farout in particular need for him to get so far out in front by talking about what he has heard in an audio recording. it might seem a little unseemly, frankly, for the president to be doing that. so perhaps he feels that at the moment, he doesn't feels that at the moment, he doesn't feel like he needs to assert any additional personal pressure. the drip drip has worked, forced the saudis onto the back foot, the international community are rallying round and asking the same questions he is asking, and he is waiting to see what the saudis say next. and no sign that this is going away? no, if anything, it is getting worse, because the saudis have now advanced to macro, three, different versions of the disappearance of mr
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khashgoggi. each time they have had to come back and think of something more persuasive, and the world is waiting for them to do that. not the entire world. the russians don't seem entire world. the russians don't seem to be in the same place, and saudi arabia's allies in the gulf and elsewhere across the middle east have been very supportive also. but the western world, by and large, is still waiting to hear something rather more convincing than what we have heard so far.. paul, thank you very much. what is thought to be the uk's biggest ever strike about equal pay is under way in glasgow. thousands of council workers are striking for 48 hours, resulting in the closure of hundreds of schools, and affecting some care services. campaigners say many women are being paid £3 an hour less than their male counterparts, and that progress on the issue is too slow. lorna gordon is in glasgow. they say they are the workers who get glasgow up in the morning. the council carers, cleaners, dinner ladies and nursery workers in
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scotland's biggest city. on the march ina scotland's biggest city. on the march in a decade—long dispute over equal pay. i want the same wages as men. we have fought for this for 12 yea rs, men. we have fought for this for 12 years, and we want the pay here. we still haven't been paid. all we are asking is for the council to sort it out. there has been delay after delay after delay, and nothing has been done about it. the dispute dates back 12 years to when you pay scales were introduced with the aim of addressing pay inequality. but female employees complain it has instead resulted in men injobs of a similar level being paid more. this woman is one of those taking part in the strike. she holds down three jobs at two different schools, but each month, still struggles to pay the bills. we just want to be each month, still struggles to pay the bills. wejust want to be paid equally, same as everybody else. i mean, honestly, the wages are ridiculous. i'm working three jobs, and i'm still struggling month—to—month, borrowing off my own
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kids, which is shocking. it is not on. i mean, as soon as i get paid, i pay all my bills that day, and sometimes, i'm lucky if i have £50 left for the next four weeks. the action has affected her uncaring cleaning services, shutdown council nurseries. glasgow city council said it had been working hard to try to resolve the dispute. it added there was no justification for the disruption, which it says will hit the city's most vulnerable the ha rd est. the city's most vulnerable the hardest. it is really unnecessary. i don't think it is fair on the claimants. i don't think it is there oi'i claimants. i don't think it is there on the women. they all lose pay over the next couple of days, those who are not going to work, who are going to go out on strike, and there is going to be in on this disruption caused in glasgow, and to some of the most vulnerable people in the city. the council says it is committed to making an offer to those on strike. it has not been made clear how they will settle the bill, which could run to hundreds of millions of pounds. but those looking for equal pay say time has run out to recognise the true value
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of theirjobs, and they must now pay up. well, we can now go live to our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, who's at the picket in glasgow. a lot of anger around, and presumably a lot of money at stake? yes, there is. people are being coy about exactly what the final settle m e nt about exactly what the final settlement figure will be, but make no mistake, there will be a settle m e nt no mistake, there will be a settlement eventually. the council says they hope to have a figure on the table by the end of the year, and that the strike today has just slowed the process down, but the unions say they really feel that despite 21 talks and meetings over the space of ten months, there have yet to be any meaningful gautier gibouin is, —— meaningful negotiations, and the women who were out earlier on the march that you saw have had enough and say they felt they had no option but to take
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strike action. the figure is stealth is still unclear. hundreds of millions of pounds, certainly. some suggestions it could rise as high as £1 billion. how the council would pay that is not at all clear. they have dismissed suggestions they would do things like sell—off some of the council buildings or a masterpiece they have in a building here, but it is a lot of money that they are going to have to pay out, and the longer this dispute goes on, the higher that figure will be. lot of public services affected by this. is there a sense that the public are behind them? you know, ha rd to public are behind them? you know, hard to tell. these are women who do very ha rd hard to tell. these are women who do very hard jobs, or predominantly women, who do very hard jobs for pretty low pay. they do keep many parts of the city running, the council nurseries, they do the home ca re council nurseries, they do the home care work. we have spoken to people
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on the receiving end of the home care. they say they are very sympathetic, but of course, concerned that they get the help that they need. i think perhaps there is an understanding from many. i have certainly heard people beeping their horns in favour of the strikers as they have passed them by on the picket lines. so an understanding from many as to what is at stake here, because no one is disputing they will be an eventual pay—out. so some sympathy, perhaps, but it is unclear whether that will continue if further strike action ta kes continue if further strike action takes place. lorna gordon, thank you very much. the allegation of contempt of court against the former leader of the far right english defence league, tommy robinson, has been referred to the attorney general. mr robinson appeared at the old bailey this morning, to face an allegation that he'd committed contempt by filming people before a criminal trial. the attorney general‘s office says it will now consider all material afresh and then decide whether to refer the matter to the high court. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that jamal khashoggi
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was murdered in a planned operation, and he wants the killers tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the steets of glasgow as part on the streets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on high streets across the uk than there have been for ten years. and in sport, cristiano ronaldo faces his former club manchester united in the champions league tonight with juve enters. he is again firmly denying an allegation of rape against him, saying he is confident his lawyers will clear his name. england's cricketers have already won the series, but they happens at a massive 306 to seven to win the final one—day against sri lanka in colombo. and england netball have been given a boost after their current sponsor signed a new three—year deal, doubling their investment, which will protect the players‘ full—time contract beyond next year‘s world cup. more in the next 15 minutes. more
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now on one of those headline stories. the number of fast food businesses in the uk has risen by more than a third since 2010. research by bbc news found nearly 40,000 fast food outlets. the sharp rise comes at a time when doctors warn that costs of obesity could bankrupt the nhs. david rhodes reports. it is the food that is fast, convenient and an everyday part of some people‘s lives. i really hated how i looked. it‘s not normal to be 30 stone. at the age ofjust 16, joe from rotherham was morbidly obese. ina in a typical week, what were you eating? probably five chinese takeaway is, a couple of pieces, chips... joe has managed to shed overfive stone, but in rotherham, six in every ten food businesses take aways. you see more takeaway is then you
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are actually seeing corner shops. i think they should definitely limit the number of fast food places massively, because it isjust the number of fast food places massively, because it is just taking over. it‘s part of everyday life now. you haven‘t got time is a cut, mcdonalds. you have at times ago, we‘ll have a takeaway tonight. analysis of official figures by the bbc has found that in 2010 there were just over 29,000 fast food businesses in the uk. this year, that number has reached over 39,000, an increase of over a third in the space of eight years. there are over 170 fast food businesses in rotherham, for example, this vision chip shop has just begun to offer low fat fish and chips, but its owners say the town is being swamped by new takeaways in recent yea rs. is being swamped by new takeaways in recent years. i have seen a lot of little ones open up and close down. i have seen a lot that ijust afloat. i have seen a lot that are undercut. recently, iwent afloat. i have seen a lot that are undercut. recently, i went to a council meeting to propose an objection to another business that is going to be setting up soon, but
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unfortunately, my have rtz is going to be setting up soon, but unfortunately, my havertz weren't heard or weren't considered. six in every ten adults is a piece —— are obese, according to recent statistics. obesity is the biggest challenge facing the nhs. obesity has been linked with fast food, and we‘ve had projections that suggest that, by 2050, which is only one generation away, the direct and indirect costs of obesity will cost nearly £50 billion, and that‘s enough to bankrupt the nhs. the government and devolved administrations across the uk have all set out plans to reduce obesity levels whilst in england ministers say local councils can control the number and location of takeaways. but on current trends, the number of these food businesses is set to rise and the battle to control bulging waistlines looks likely to become harder. for more on this, i‘m nowjoined by alex homer from the bbc‘s shared data unit in birmingham, which carried out this
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investigation for us. it's it‘s quite a remarkable figure. do we have any idea why there are so many more takeaway than ten years ago? some people i have talk to have suggested it is to do with the high street failing, and takeaway is actually stepping into those jobs vacated by other businesses struggling with just lack of custom. and perhaps that also accounts for the regional differences here? and perhaps that also accounts for the regional differences here ?|j think so, yes. you can see, we have an interactive map online, with the data we have worked with, and you can see a very stark north—south divide, so perhaps the link is between deprived areas and rises and ta keaway between deprived areas and rises and takeaway outlets. so it is more about the business argument than our eating habits, is it? ithink about the business argument than our eating habits, is it? i think you wouldn‘t have so many fast food outlets opening up if you didn‘t have demand, so perhaps it must be a little bit of both. and as we heard in their report, the difficulty for the government is, this is a time when obesity is seen as the number one public enemy? absolutely, and
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this year, we have heard jeremy hunt say he wants to halve childhood obesity by 2030. in recent months, we have also heard various plans suggested, including stopping the sale of snacks and sweets at supermarket checkouts, possibly capping calorie counts on foods like pizzas, so you are absolutely right, it is in the middle of a huge battle against rising obesity levels. and this would tend to suggest that we are as lazy as we are up here, many of ask you macro perhaps so, and the convenience of ordering takeaway food obviously trumps the wish to cook for oneself that —— at home. you have a 45% rise in takeaway is between 2010 and 2015. by any percent, that is a massive rise. and interestingly, the amount of outlets per 100,000 people was 47 in 2010 and 61 now? yes, exactly. and
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why should we be bothered about this? essentially, because we have seen this? essentially, because we have seen research suggesting that more exposure to fast—food outlets is linked to higher likelihood of obesity. as the industry itself said anything about this? the industry has said that government proposals to introduce potential calorie labels on the news, the industry said that would push up the cost for their independent shops, so it is actually asking for government help to create some kind of online calculator that businesses may be able to use for free rather than create their own labels. thank you very much, alex. some breaking news. more on the murder ofjamal some breaking news. more on the murder of jamal khashoggi. we some breaking news. more on the murder ofjamal khashoggi. we are now hearing that the saudi crown prince has attended a meeting between the king of saudi arabia and members of the cash register family —— the khashoggi family. so this is
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crown prince mohammed bin salman, along with king salman and members of the khashoggi family. this following on today from president erdogan‘s statement that this was premeditated killing, and calling for saudi arabia to hand over those responsible. so no doubt, there will perhaps be photographs of that meeting, and if we see them, we will bring them to you. you are watching afternoon live. the longest sea bridge in the world has been opened by the chinese president, xijinping. the multi—billion pound bridge and tunnel project links hong kong, macau and mainland china. it has been designed to withstand earthquakes and typhoons and contains 400,000 tonnes of steel, enough to build 60 eiffel towers. but the construction has been dogged by safety concerns, and fears about its environmental impact as robin brant reports. it‘s another vast infrastructure project in china. this one took nine years and almost £12 billion to build. the mega bridge spans 34 miles, crossing the mouth of the pearl river in china‘s south.
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linking hong kong and the casino hub macau with zhuhai on the chinese mainland. the big idea is to create a new bay area powerhouse to rival tokyo or san francisco, china hopes. it links to more than 60 million people in china‘s high—tech manufacturing base. it‘s the place where this country first experimented with economic reform, 40 years ago. translation: i think this bridge will bring great convenience to the whole of zhuhai, hong kong and macau and promote the economic development of the whole area of the pearl river delta. it was a brief, in fact very brief ceremony for china‘s president. xi jinping simply declared the bridge open and then went off to inspect it. what has immediately become a tourist attraction comes
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with a very heavy price tag. the bbc understands 18 workers were killed during construction. hundreds were injured. the structure is not all bridge — tunnels were built as well, dug to allow shipping to pass freely. but some in hong kong and in particular worry it‘s another in particular worry it‘s another symbol from beijing of encroaching sovereignty onto its special status. others claim it will be woefully underused. there are traffic quotas, different insurance requirements and the practicalities. on the chinese mainland, you drive on the right. in hong kong and macau, the left. now, some remarkable pictures. nasa scientists flying over antarctica have spotted this rectangular shaped iceberg. the iceberg, seen on the right, was seen floating among sea ice just off the larsen c ice shelf in the antarctic. scientists say the sharp angles
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and flat surface indicate that the iceberg probably recently broke off from the ice shelf. looks like an alien landing site if everi looks like an alien landing site if ever i saw one! that is just my conspiracy theory. time for a look at the weather. here‘s nick miller. i tell you what, i want to show you some pictures. this is what is happening in mexico right now, some pictures coming in of some rather turbulence... well, iam rather turbulent as well! but so are these. this is hurricane willa, is that right? that is correct, so the sea is picking up, as you might imagine, head of the major hurricane heading towards the coast of south—west mexico. hurricanes, a lot of the focus a lot of the times towards the usa, coming infrom focus a lot of the times towards the usa, coming in from the atlantic to the gulf of mexico, florence, michael, rightly so, major, major storms. this is a major hurricane,
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but ina storms. this is a major hurricane, but in a slightly different part of the world. it will have a major impact on the next few hours, because it is about to make landfall later today on the coast of mexico. we can pick it up on the satellite picture, and you canjust pick out the hint of an eye. it was more powerful at one stage. i will put this into perspective. you have central america, mexico and north america, so it is moving towards that mexico coastline. losing the definition of the eye one satellite picture, so it has weakened slightly, but still a major hurricane. we haven‘t talked in terms of wins, so these are 130 mph, with stronger gusts. the fact that we are on w now when we give hurricanes names suggest we have had more than usual? it has been a very active season in this pa rt been a very active season in this part of the world, especially when you look at this major hurricane moving into this part of next ago, and it will certainly get worse before anything improves. it will make landfall there with 450
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millimetres of rain possible, and the storm surge, all elements combined, and you are right, we‘re down to willa in the alphabet, so we have had 22 named storms so far in this is specific pacing, close to central america, this is specific pacing, close to centralamerica, mexico, this is specific pacing, close to central america, mexico, ha—ha california. that stretches out not far away from hawaii. 22 named storms is not a record. we have had 27 before, but there is an index called the ace index, which is the accumulated cyclone energy. so you ta ke accumulated cyclone energy. so you take the energy of all of these, put it through some equation and look at each season, and this, the experts say, is the most active storm season in terms of that accumulated cyclone energy that they have ever recorded, and those records go back to 19 is evans who won. so they have just been pounded by the storms. —— 1971. a lot of the storms wander ha rmlessly a lot of the storms wander harmlessly over the sea, but as we are seeing, they are very dangerous
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when they make landfall in mexico. if we are not in mexico, just here, what we have in store? not a huge amount to worry about just yet, but bala clava amount to worry about just yet, but balaclava weather later this week. it is still coming, the change to colder weather on the way, even though it is quiet at the moment. you think, what is the fuss about? it can change that much that quickly. it will. this is a picture from earlier today and highland scotland. a bit more rain for some of us, more cloud elsewhere, though that has been thinning. sunshine coming through. still high pressure in control. around that, cloud moving into western parts. we do see some rain into northern scotland, orkney, north of the mainland, incessa nt orkney, north of the mainland, incessant in the north—west highlands, still quite windy here as well. if you cross eastern england and parts of eastern scotland, some blue sky this afternoon. a windy picture across the uk compare with yesterday. not as much as the northern isles, but elsewhere, some
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cost of around 50 miles an hour, pennines, scotland. temperatures, 17-18 pennines, scotland. temperatures, 17—18 could be yours this afternoon in the sunnier parts of south—east england or eastern scotland. through tonight, we still have some rain in north—west scotland, quite heavy and strong winds. that means here, temperatures will not go down very far at all overnight, holding up into double figures. a very mild night to come. clearer skies for southern england and were, single figures, not as chilly as last night, one or two patches of mist and fog. for tomorrow, still some cloud running in that area of high pressures of the west of the uk. best of the sunshine in the east and south. the rain in north—west scotla nd south. the rain in north—west scotland has eased. a quiet day tomorrow. high pressure, close by exerting its influence, temperatures into the mid—teens. a little pretty similaron into the mid—teens. a little pretty similar on thursday, but something significant looking to the north of the uk starts to make its presence
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felt for scotland on thursday. the blue area expands and darkens. that is the rain coming in, getting heavier. it is a cold weather front, moving south on thursday night into friday. there will be a leading edge of colder air dragging down the blue, the colder air, following the arrows all the way back to the arctic. this is a big change compare it with what we have been used to, although nothing too unusual about this sort of thing at this time of year. we will feel the difference towards the weekend. temperatures dipping down into single figures. the strength of the wind, will make it feel colder. some of us will see some sunshine. clean arctic air, great visibility, the sort of whether many people do like. however, there will be patchy showers on the hills of scotland, northern england, and maybe in wales at times. some of us will see a bit of snow, but most of us will not. frost overnight. all change in our weather at the end of this week. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines... the turkish president, recep tayyip erdogan, has said that the saudi journalist jamal khashoggi was killed in a planned operation and all those responsible from "top to bottom" must be brought to account. translation: information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48—hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on uk high streets than there‘ve been for almost ten years, with a 34% increase in takeaway shops since 2010. and the duke and duchess of sussex have greeted well—wishers in fiji, 65 years after the queen and prince philip did the same. and still to come in the next half hour, i‘ll bejoined live
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by singer rita ora. her single is riding high in the charts and she‘s about to release her second album but she also wants to talk about the issue of cyberbullying. sport now on afternoon live with olly. most famous football is back. and that the it. when the draw was made for the champions league group stage this fixture jumped out because he will face his former club manchester united tonight with juventus, will face his former club manchester united tonight withjuventus, his new club. it‘s the second time he‘s gone back there. his goal knocked united out five years ago playing for real madrid. but over the last few weeks he has faced an allegation of rape against him. las vegas police say they have re—opened a case dating back to 2009 and an alleged incident in a hotel room. ronaldo called it fake news last month. this is him arriving in manchester yesterday,
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where he won the first of his five champions league titles. he had six seasons with united and won everything and now he is in his first season in italy. now, clubs have to put up the manager and a player ahead of these champions league matches, and under the cirumstances, it might have been expected for anotherjuve player to fulfil the obligation but ronaldo fronted up said that he has every confidence in his lawyers and that the truth will come out. i‘m very happy. my lawyers, they are confident and of course i am too. the most important is that i enjoy the football, i enjoy my life. the rest, i had people who take care of my life and of course the true a lwa ys my life and of course the true always coming in first position. so i‘m good. always coming in first position. so i'm good. he did answer the question
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that the british press at old trafford last night were effectively gagged and not given the opportunity to ask ronaldo anything am all of the questions came from the italian media. manchester city are the other british club in the champions league tonight, they are away in ukraine, facing shakhtar donetsk in kharkiv. apart from your you are good on the weather and you can tell us about in sri lanka! they have been touring in monsoon season and every match has been effected by the rain until the one today that doesn‘t really matter. england have played enough cricket to actually win the series 3—0, this is the final one—dayer in colombo, sri lanka won the toss, put themsleves into bat and batted brilliantly, making 366—6. the top four batsmen all reached half centruies. niroshan dickwella fell five short of a ton. kusal mendis made a very rapid 56 with six sixes. if england win this it will be
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the biggest successful run chase on that ground. that, england have lost three wickets in three balls in the first two overs. what an awful start for england as they look to make it 4—0 in the series. conor mcgregor says that he didn‘t train properly for his return to ufc. the irishman lost to khabib nurmagomedov earlier this month after a two—year absence. mcgregor says he "lost fair and square" and will return to the octagon with his "confidence high, fully prepared". and england netball have been given a "lifeline" after their current sponsor, vitality, doubled their investment in the sport. they are commonwelth champions but there were major concerns over funding their players with a home world cup coming up next year. they‘ve secured a new three—year deal that will pay for the national team‘s fulltime contracts beyond 2019.
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no more wickets have fallen but they asked of doing very badly, 6—3. —— they are still doing. the government‘s been accused of failing to address the problem of sexual harassment in public places. mps on the women and equalities committee say that while work is taking place to prevent sexual abuse and violence overseas, more needs to be done to tackle the issue at home. lisa hampele has more. the report says women and girls are being harassed on buses and trains, in bars and clubs, at university, in parks and on the street. such behaviour, it says, is relentless and becomes normalised as girls grow up. the most shocking thing was the way in which young women particularly were being forced to change the way they live their lives on a daily basis. whether that is what they wear, if they were running, if they were wearing headphones, they would avoid eye contact
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with people on the street because they been brought up to believe that if they did not take those precautionary measures then they could be subject to sexual harassment and that it would be their fault. the committee concludes that while the government has pledged to eliminate sexual harassment by 2030 there is no evidence of action to achieve this. it says ministers must set out a plan. the mps want public campaigns to help tackle the issue and a law criminalising the nonconsensual creation and distribution of intimate sexual images. the committee also says the government should treat the problem in a similar way to road safety or smoking and want train and bus operators to prohibit sexual harassment and the viewing of pornography. jamie is here to tell us what‘s happening in the business news. that will be in just a moment.
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here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. motor giant bmw has recalled more of its diesel—power cars on fears of a leaky exhaust cooler. it has recalled 1.6 million in total, included 480,000 recalled in august, and some 268,000 uk vehicles are affected. dyson, the uk—based company best known for its vacuum cleaners, has chosen to build its new electric car in singapore. the first car is scheduled to roll off the production line in 2021. dyson said the decision was based on the availability of engineering talent, regional supply chains and proximity to some key target markets. uber is planning to add a 15p a mile surcharge from next year to all fares booked via its app in london to help its drivers buy electric vehicles. it wants to raise more than £200 million over the "next few years" which it will then hand over in cash to 20,000 drivers to help them switch, with all its drivers,
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it estimates, going electric by 2025. the saudi investment conference is going ahead then? it‘s called the future investment initiative and the whole set. a lot of people had been pulling out of this but many are still going. we have seen the heads of companies pulling out and many deputies still going. deals have been done. aramco, the big energy company, has been
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doing deals with pack up and is and what the war in which it live it up. it is part of saudi of the future, to make the saudi economy more than just oil production and bring in other businesses to invest. it is one of the big elements which is difficult particularly for the uk and us to get to grips with because saudi is planning vast overseas investments, trillions of dollars of countries what you like to have a pa rt countries what you like to have a part of that and to get on the wrong side of saudi at this point, you risk losing some of that investment. and more, as others are finding out. is it having an impact anywhere other than saudi? not specifically but it is adding to the weight of problems in the marketplace in the
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stock market and bond markets. there are problems with the italian economy, we have word from the european commission as to whether it will approve the italian budget. there are problems with trade wars, a slowdown in china with think the us market will open down sharply on the back of some bad results. in fa ct, the back of some bad results. in fact, we can go over to the new york stock exchange to our north american business correspondent. can you put these problems in context? saudi, trade wars, the italian budget, a mass of worries in the market is having an effect on the us market? absolutely but in the more immediate in terms of what is happening on us markets today, i'm looking around and all! markets today, i'm looking around and all i can see is red because two really big companies are not performing as well as people expected. caterpillar, the big
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machine maker, they just expected. caterpillar, the big machine maker, theyjust recorded their earnings and they were good, in line with what investors were expecting but the problem was there forward guidance, what they're expecting in the next quarter. they said their bottom line would be hit really ha rd by said their bottom line would be hit really hard by the rising price of steel and of course those tariffs that are part of the big trade war between china and the us. that will have a direct impact on how much caterpillar makes. they are really important when it comes to the us markets because it is part of the dowjones industrial average. it is one of these benchmark companies and they are traded right over here and they are traded right over here and they are traded right over here and they are already down 8% in trading. interesting you say that about caterpillar because they are a global company with global interests. what you‘re saying is it to do with the global economy that people are worried about on the us
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stock market and, as a result, we all ought to be worried? absolutely. these kinds of global skirmishes that are happening have an impact around the world. everybody is going to be touched by it. despite the fa ct to be touched by it. despite the fact that we're only talking about it in terms of trade between china and the us, it has a ripple effect around the world and we are seeing that right now. and quick word on saudl that right now. and quick word on saudi, is it something anybody is talking about in the business community? we have seen big names pulling out of this investment conference but we are still seeing business being done and of course saudi has an enormously large and profitable relationship with the us. absolutely but there was a lot of public pressure so any company, any american company or business, that decided they would still participate in the conference, especially in any
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speaking role, that would have been very difficult. there were companies that send representatives, goldman sachs being one of them, but there was still so much pressure within the us on the business community for people not to attend or participate because of how much attention on what has happened with mr khashoggi has got. thank you very much. a quick look at the markets. when i last looked, the us market was starting about 400 points down which is about 1.5%. the currencies are not moving very much. it is those global issues which are pushing down the markets and the company results. we have three and 3m reporting in the us and the figures were not as good as people wanted. thank you very much. british music star rita ora is heading a campaign to try and combat what‘s known as ‘beauty cyberbullying‘, where somebody
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is bullied online as a result of their appearance. it‘s in association with the cosmetic brand rimmel, who have released the results of a survey suggesting almost a quarter of women have experienced beauty cyberbullying, with nearly half those going on to self—harm. well, rita ora joins us now from the southbank in london. good afternoon to you. hello, very nice to see you guys. it was a great explanation of what we are doing. nice to see you guys. it was a great explanation of what we are doinglj wa nted explanation of what we are doing.” wanted to ask you why you put italy wa nt to wanted to ask you why you put italy want to get involved in this. is it something that has affected you —— you particularly? i am here with rimmel to launch the i will not be deleted campaign which isa i will not be deleted campaign which is a decision you make with yourself on your social media to decide whether or not a picture is good enough or your followers will like
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it or whether the haters will feel that this is an attempt to attack you or myself also i have personally been a part of cyberbullying with what i decide to post. 44% of women actually report bullying. i think thatis actually report bullying. i think that is a really low figure. it really affects people and it damages people‘s mental health which is such a big issue for us, especially for someone a big issue for us, especially for someone like myself in the public eye who, for many years, has had this, i guess this cover of hair and make—up and wearing fancy dresses and doing shows. you feel, i‘ve had and doing shows. you feel, i‘ve had a platform to support women of any ages, and men, who feel like they are being attacked for being themselves which is just worst thing. it is quite a platform, you have 13.9 million instagram follows 6.8 million on twitter. i suspect
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you don‘t read them all but there must be some that still get to you? don‘t get me wrong, of course, earlier in my career i was com pletely earlier in my career i was completely obsessed with the comments and i saw some hurtful and horrible things that made me think twice about if i even wanted to do music or whatever my passion was at the time. i didn‘t like that somebody i didn‘t know was making me think twice about my dream and that was the worst feeling so i can only imagine what teenagers in schools are going through nowadays with the amount of pressure they have on social media. it is awful that i didn‘t have that in high school that ican didn‘t have that in high school that i can only imagine what people in secondary and elementary schools are going through. what . one thing is always young girls with this but what are the sort of comment that really do upset young people? for me, and i think for a
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lot of young women come it has a lot to do with appearance, how we look, what size we are, what kind of make—up we have on, what we choose to wear. i just think make—up we have on, what we choose to wear. ijust think it is so transparent, and it is very difficult to just stick up for yourself online because you really will get into a black or if you try to fight everything negative. my advice if i had any would be to just support your friends online and show as much support to somebody being themselves as you can. that really helps the person and it definitely helps the person and it definitely helps me. and inspired so many of my fa ns helps me. and inspired so many of my fans and! helps me. and inspired so many of my fans and i can‘t tell you how passionate i am about this campaign. it is showing through, absolutely. a lot of people look at you and say, and on, there you are, you have
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amazing career, you are beautiful and you can do whatever you want to do. are you the right sort of person to be giving this message when magazines and tv companies are all obsessed with image. we look at magazines, there is still a huge row about the role of airbrushing and things. is this the way to go in telling people how to look and be co mforta ble telling people how to look and be comfortable with it?” telling people how to look and be comfortable with it? i think there isa comfortable with it? i think there is a long way to go but up three mean—spirited that it will make you doubt everything you do. you don‘t wa nt to doubt everything you do. you don‘t want to have that issue with yourself. and on top of that, it is incredibly difficult to scream from the rooftops but having that support, for example, but my good friend who is also doing a campaign, ca ra friend who is also doing a campaign, cara delevingne, who also has a
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great platform, and it shows on different aspects you can represent who you are and where you come from which is a big dealfor me. especially, i emigrated from kosovo, came to the uk, and for me it was all about feeling accepted and wa nted all about feeling accepted and wanted in my school and class. when i relaxed that was not the most important thing, i started to finally be myself so this is a shout for all women and men to be themselves, especially growing up in this crazy cyber world we live in.” wa nt to this crazy cyber world we live in.” want to talk about you growing up. your dad runs pubs, he is a landlord, and he got you singing in the pub and this is how it started for you, a the pub and this is how it started foryou, afar the pub and this is how it started for you, a far cry from the cyber world! yes, sorry, you cut out, could you repeat that?” world! yes, sorry, you cut out, could you repeat that? i was looking at the start of your career, and you could credit your dad because he got you to sing in his pub. yes,
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thinking about it, maybe there was a recently asked me to sing also i thought it was to teach me a lesson or do something but it been so they get more customers! imac at . a .alot of . a lot of people look at you, and they don‘t realise the hard work has that has gone in. thank you for saying that. i wish it kind of happened overnight but it definitely did not. it took me a long time and a lot of grafting and sacrificed the opportunity to speak my mind and write the music i want to write and
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represent myself. i think with this album, phoenix, it is called that because i feel i have had a new lease of life. the phoenix is all about rising again and having the power to be yourself and i think thatis power to be yourself and i think that is what this is. and also the campaign, andjust me that is what this is. and also the campaign, and just me as a person, why not? why not do it for the women and the girls and anybody listening? it isjust, and the girls and anybody listening? it is just, why not, you and the girls and anybody listening? it isjust, why not, you know? you don‘tjust sing, you are in the pokemon maybe next year, aren‘t you? beware of the pokemon! yes, i am definitely in a pokemon movie! it is my first kids film and i‘m really excited about it. i can‘t go into too much detail but it will be announced very soon too much detail but it will be announced very soon but it‘s awesome and everybody should watch it. this is detective pikachu. yes! do you
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like pokemon? you know what, my son was obsessed with it and i still have all his cards and there were a lot of money! my goodness, i have just discovered that also. i think we can start a business, a really good business! but i‘m very honoured to be able to do so many parts of entertainment. i think it‘s the way the world is going and if you can do everything, why not? that is my point, why not! let's talk about phoenix because it has been a long time since yourfirst phoenix because it has been a long time since your first album so what has been going on in that time and how have you changed?” has been going on in that time and how have you changed? i think i've changed a lot, i‘ve definitely grown up changed a lot, i‘ve definitely grown up into more of a lady, if i do say so up into more of a lady, if i do say so myself! know, i‘ve learnt a lot about myself and what my feelings are and it is ok to be vulnerable. and also to be proud, to be a boss,
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and that‘s why i‘m wearing a suit. i felt i want to wear the trousers and represent myself and of i will not be deleted and to do something that is inspiring. pick up something about it having is actually looking at you. that‘s all i‘m trying to do. great because most of us read about you in the newspapers. are you a lwa ys you in the newspapers. are you always happy with the image you image you think you get from that? well, i don‘t think i can tell, i can‘t lie and say i‘m happy. but i definitely pick my battles. i‘m not the typical looking i guess pop star. i‘m a woman, i don‘t have the typical model physique or what people in magazines look like. but i do wish that, i guess, journalism
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and just media in generalfor public figures was not as negative as they are and we can almost find a way to pivot it into something positive and compliment someone on their achievements, for example. i think for me that is already a difference. we will see, i am only one voice, but i am definitely passionate. i don‘t know how far that will get me! it has done all right for you so far. we‘re out of time but it is a great pleasure to talk to you and i wish you well with everything. thank you so much for this platform and for have a great day for the thank you, rita ora. time for a look at the weather. here‘s nick miller. hello. most places are dry again today but there is a bit more cloud in the sky, the sunny spells are hazier as well. let‘s take a look at a weather watcher picture from scotland earlier today.
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a little rainbow so there are some showers around. in fact, there were some outbreaks of rain in western scotland. it‘s dry in derbyshire, hints of blue in the sky. it is around this area of high pressure we are bringing in the cloud from the atlantic and, close to a weather front, in northern and western scotland, here we have the strongest winds and some outbreaks of rain as well. and that leaves actually the best of the sunshine through southern and eastern parts of the uk. it is breezy wherever you are. the pennines, scotland, some gusts around 50—55 mph or so. these are your average wind speeds so those gusts are higher. as for the temperatures, it feels pleasant when you get to see some sunshine today and that is around 17, 18 degrees in the warmest parts of south—east england. not far from that as well in aberdeenshire because here it is quite windy but there are some sunny spells to be had. now, into this evening and tonight, we keep outbreaks of rain running into western scotland. it is always heaviest and most persistent in the north—west highlands. still some cloud drifting in on the westerly breeze. clear spells across southern parts of england and wales. in the mid—single figures
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in the chillier spots here, not as chilly as it was last night. there could be one or two patches of mist and fog, nothing widespread. into tomorrow, you will notice the rain in north—west scotland has eased. the breeze eases a bit as well. still some cloud coming in, particularly across north—western parts of the uk. some sunny spells in the south and east and temperatures around the mid teens. it will be pretty similar for most of us on thursday but notice the blue showing up again towards northern scotland, some outbreaks of rain here. this is a weather front that, through thursday night into friday, is going to move its way southwards with some outbreaks of rain. its significance, though, is in what follows that weather front, a cold front, a leading edge of colder air. so the blue, the colder airfrom the arctic, pushes south on friday in a strengthening northerly wind as well. so, by the time we get to friday and saturday, the weather is going to feel very different. there will be plenty of sunny spells, a few showers, mainly on the coasts and hills.
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some snow in those showers in northern parts of the uk. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3: turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that jamal khashoggi was murdered in a planned operation — and he wants the killers tried in turkey. translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. thousands of council workers are out on the streets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. the fast growth in fast food —
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there are more takeaways on our high streets than there‘ve been for 10 years. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport... that is with holly foster. hello, simon. cristiano ronaldo held court at old trafford last night, denying the allegation of rape against him. thank you, holly, we‘ll told do later on. with the weather forecast, here is nick miller. simon, our weather is all quiet now, but about a change at the end of this week. it will be much colder. arctic air comes in across the uk for the first real taste of winter. it is on its way, along with a forecast. thank you very much, neck. also coming up... # wish that i could let you love me... singer rita ora‘s single is riding
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high in the charts and she is about to release her second album. she is also addressing the issue of cyberbullying in a new campaign, and we have talked to her in the last half an hour. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. president erdogan of turkey says there‘s strong evidence that the journalist jamal khashoggi was savagely murdered in a planned operation. he dismissed the suggestion that his death, in the saudi consulate in istanbul, was an accident — and said those responsible must be put on trial in turkey, and the person who gave the order must be held to account. saudi arabia admits the journalist was murdered, but by rogue agents. frank gardner reports. three weeks to the day since he disappeared, jamal khashoggi, outspoken saudi critic of his own government, last seen alive entering the saudi consulate in istanbul shortly before he was murdered by those inside. today, turkey‘s president erdogan addressed parliamentarians and gave
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his first full public reaction. translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. the details of this incident, this murder, is capable of hurting our hearts. lurid details ofjust how khashoggi died have been leaked to turkey‘s pro—government media. there‘s said to be an audio tape from a turkish surveillance device hidden inside the saudi consulate that recorded his agonising last moments. president erdogan made no mention of this today but he did challenge the latest saudi version of what happened. translation: this was a planned operation. it is not going to satisfy either us nor the international community that this was just a rogue operation by a few.
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over in the saudi capital riyadh, it appeared to be business as usual today. this was the grand opening of a huge investment conference dubbed davos in the desert. it‘s been boycotted by many multinational ceos due to the khashoggi murder. even the opening speaker could not avoid mentioning it. the terrible acts reported in recent weeks are alien to our culture and our dna. and i'm confident that with the support of the government, concerned authorities and leadership, the truth will emerge. the investment conference is the brainchild of saudi arabia‘s maverick crown prince mohammad bin salman. western governments suspect he ordered the operation against khashoggi, something saudi arabia denies. turkey‘s president conspicuously avoided mentioning the prince by name, praising instead
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the sincerity of his father, the ageing saudi king salman. but he also demanded answers to hard questions, such as where is the body? and who helped dispose of it? he also wants the suspects brought back to turkey for trial. translation: the 18 people must be tried in istanbul. this is my proposal. as the crime was committed in istanbul, they should be tried in istanbul. in life, jamal khashoggi had a huge following on social media, but his violent death has rocked relations between the west and saudi arabia. after this, they may never be quite the same. our correspondent tim willcox sent us this update from riyadh, where the investment conference is taking place. this is the second year for this saudi future initiative conference, and in terms of the numbers of people, very little has changed, realistically.
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about 4,000, 4,500 people are here. some of the high profile speakers have pulled out, but it is certainly a busy conference centre, and ironically, involving the ritz—carlton hotel, where mohammed bin salman, the crown prince, locked up other members of the royalfamily in a bid to shake them down for money in a corruption probe. no sign of mohammed bin salman himself yet today. we understood he might be attending around lunchtime, but he did not come. we‘re not sure also if his father king salman might be attending as well. the pressure against the royal family is mounting, not least from that speech by president erdogan of turkey today. although it is interesting to note that when president erdogan began speaking, that coincided with the moment that several big players in the world of business pledged billions of dollars towards this conference in a bid to do business and continue to do business with saudi arabia. the conference itself lasts three days.
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it will be interesting to see whether the crown prince does turn up along with king salman, and it is also worth pointing out that some of the chief executives of the big firms who felt under pressure not to attend because of the killing of jamal khashoggi, they have sent more junior figures as well, but the companies themselves are being represented. tim willcox. our security correspondent frank gardner joins me. frank, in the last half—hour, picture has been released showing the saudi king in crown prince mohammed bin salman. here they are meeting jamal khashoggi‘s son. that isa meeting jamal khashoggi‘s son. that is a significant photograph. yes, it is, but i don‘t think you will be enough to assuage people‘s doubts about this. —— i don‘t think it will
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be enough. the saudi rulers have apologised publicly, or rather, sent their condolences to the family. on their condolences to the family. on the left, you see saudi king salman, and also in that earlier photograph, his controversial favourite son, crown prince mohammed bin salman. you got the sense from what president erdogan said this morning there may be an attempt to try to separate the two here and put the focus very much on the crown prince? yes, exactly. ithink focus very much on the crown prince? yes, exactly. i think the absence of mention of president erdogan‘s speech, any mention of the crown prince, is significant. he said, i believe in the sincerity of king salman, i have spoken to him on the phone, and i‘m certain he wants to get to the bottom of this, and that may well be the case, but certainly, western governments, perhaps not the white house, but in europe, are adamant that they do not accept the explanations of the saudis so far, nor does president erdogan of turkey, but turkey is on the other side of the political divide from saudi arabia. they are essentially political foes. so a
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saudi arabia. they are essentially politicalfoes. so a lot saudi arabia. they are essentially political foes. so a lot of negative publicity has come out in the turkish press which wasn‘t matched, actually, in president erdogan‘s speech. a lot of people very disappointed, because he trailed this as, this is the moment i reveal all. he revealed very little. it was going to be the naked truth. the pictures we are seeing there, of course, saudi crown prince mohammed bin salman, and thugs like king abdullah ofjordan next term. but yes, exactly, we were told it would be the naked truth, and we thought, great. will we hear about this audio tape about which much has been made in the turkish press? no mention whatsoever. have you heard it? i have not heard it, no. i am told a reliable person has heard it, but i have not been told to that person think there are two explanations here. either the tape never existed, or does exist, and it is so damning that the turkish government is holding onto it as a final bargaining chip with the saudis. or
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the turkish don‘t want everybody to know that they buy their own embassy? well, the fact that the news has come out that there is a tape, that kind it gives the game away. people do this, they embed these audio listening devices against rules, regulations and conventions, but it happens. they berdych others‘ embassies, and i‘m quite certain that this embassy was in some way bug. we have had quite a lot of condemnation of saudi arabia, but not any action from anyone at this stage in terms of sanctions or anything? we have from the germans. germany has stopped, or suspended, it‘s nearly half 1 germany has stopped, or suspended, it‘s nearly half1 billion euros arms shipment. you have mentioned money, money talks here. that is really about all this. absolutely. look at the davos in the desert. your reporter said very little has changed, and that is true. there is a cosmetic disapproval by ceos, some of whom have chosen not to go, but they‘re morejunior of whom have chosen not to go, but they‘re more junior middle of whom have chosen not to go, but they‘re morejunior middle managers have gone in most cases. saudi
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arabia is big business. it has deep pockets. it is the world‘s biggest oil producer. it is an absolute leviathan in many markets, and it is too big for people to ignore. so a lot of people are rather cynically hoping this will blow over and they can continue doing business as normal. western governments, though, specifically france, germany, the uk, and canada, say, we have got to get to the bottom of this. we‘re not going to move on until it is established who was really behind this. the cia directorjean asko has arrived in ankara. we do not know which way the white house will go on this, because president trump has blown hot and cold. one moment, he has said there will be severe consequences, the next saying that that‘s not cancel the arms deal as too manyjobs that‘s not cancel the arms deal as too many jobs in that‘s not cancel the arms deal as too manyjobs in the us will be lost. frank, thank you. what is thought to be the uk‘s biggest ever strike about equal pay is under way in glasgow. thousands of council workers are striking for 48 hours, resulting in the closure of hundreds of schools, and affecting some care services.
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campaigners say many women are being paid three pounds an hour less than their male counterparts, and that progress on the issue is too slow. lorna gordon is in glasgow. they say they are the workers who get glasgow up in the morning. the council carers, cleaners, dinner ladies and nursery workers in scotland‘s biggest city. on the march in a decade—long dispute over equal pay. i want the same wages as men. we have fought for this for 12 years, and we want the pay here. we have fought for this for 12 years, and we won the case last year. we still haven‘t been paid. all we are asking is for the council to sort it out. there has been delay after delay after delay, and nothing has been done about it. the dispute dates back 12 years to when you pay scales were introduced with the aim of addressing pay inequality. but female employees complain it has instead resulted in men injobs of a similar level being paid more.
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this woman is one of those taking part in the strike. she holds down three jobs at two different schools, but each month, still struggles to pay the bills. wejust want to be paid equally, same as everybody else. i mean, honestly, the wages are ridiculous. i‘m working threejobs, and i‘m still struggling month—to—month, borrowing off my own kids, which is shocking. it is not on. i mean, as soon as i get paid, i pay all my bills that day, and sometimes, i‘m lucky if i have £50 left for the next four weeks. the action has affected her uncaring cleaning services, the action has affected homecare and cleaning services, and shut down council nurseries. glasgow city council said it had been working hard to try to resolve the dispute. it added there was no justification for the disruption, which it says will hit the city‘s most vulnerable the hardest. it is really unnecessary. i don't think it is fair on the claimants. fair on the women. they'll lose pay over the next couple of days, those who are not going to work, who are going to go out on strike, and there is going to be enormous disruption caused in glasgow,
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and to some of the most vulnerable people in the city. the council says it is committed to making an offer to those on strike. it has not been made clear how they will settle the bill, which could run to hundreds of millions of pounds. but those looking for equal pay say time has run out to recognise the true value of theirjobs, and they must now pay up. and our scotland correspondent lorna gordon gave us an update from glasgow and said there was a lot of money at stake in this dispute. people are being coy about exactly what the final settlement figure will be, but make no mistake, there will be a settlement eventually. the council says they hope to have a figure on the table by the end of the year, and that the strike today has just slowed the process down, but the unions down, but the unions say they really feel that despite 21 talks and meetings over the space of ten months, there have yet to be any meaningful
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negotiations, and the women who were out earlier on the march that you saw have had enough and say they felt they had no option but to take strike action. the figure itself is still unclear. hundreds of millions of pounds, certainly. some suggestions it could rise as high as £1 billion. how the council would pay that is not at all clear. they have dismissed suggestions they would do things like sell off a salvador dali masterpiece they have in a building here, or some of the council buildings, but it is a lot of money that they are going to have to pay out, and the longer this dispute goes on, the higher that figure will be. a lot of public services affected by this. is there a sense that the public are behind them? you know, hard to tell. these are women who do very
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hard jobs, or predominantly women, who do very hard jobs for pretty low pay. they do keep many parts of the city running, the council nurseries, they do the home care work. we have spoken to people on the receiving end of the home care. they say they are very sympathetic, but of course, concerned that they get the help that they need. i think perhaps there is an understanding from many. i have certainly heard people beeping their horns in favour of the strikers as they have passed them by on the picket lines. so an understanding from many as to what is at stake here, because no one is disputing they will be an eventual disputing there will be an eventual pay—out. so some sympathy, perhaps, but it is unclear whether that will continue if further strike action takes place. lorna gordon, thank you very much. the allegation of contempt of court against the former leader of the far right english defence league, tommy robinson, has been referred to the attorney general. mr robinson appeared at the old bailey this morning, to face an allegation that he‘d committed contempt by filming people
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before a criminal trial. the attorney general‘s office says it will now consider all material afresh and then decide whether to refer the matter to the high court. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that jamal khashoggi was murdered in a planned operation — and he wants the killers tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the steets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on high streets across the uk than there have been for ten years. more on that in a moment. and harry and meghan greet the crowds in fiji, 65 years after his grandmother did the same during her coronation tour. in sport, cristiano ronaldo faces manchester united in the champions later night, withjuventus. he has again denied an allegation of rape against him, saying he is confident that his lawyers will clear his
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name. england‘s cricketers might have won the series, but they are heading for defeat in the final one—day sri lanka, chasing a final target of 367. they are currently 42—4 in colombo, joe root the latest wicket to fall. and england netball have been given a boost after their current sponsor signed a new three—year deal, doubling their investment, which will protect the players‘ full—time contract beyond next year‘s world cup. a full update in 15 minutes. the number of fast food businesses in the uk has risen by more than a third since 2010. research by bbc news found nearly 40,000 fast food outlets. the sharp rise comes at a time when doctors warn that costs of obesity could bankrupt the nhs. david rhodes reports. it is the food that is fast, convenient and an everyday part of some people‘s lives. i really hated how i looked. it‘s not normal to be 30 stone. at the age ofjust16, joe from rotherham was morbidly obese. so in a typical week, joe, what were you eating?
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probably five chinese takeaways, couple of pizzas, fish and chips. joe has managed to shed over ten stone, but in rotherham three quarters of adults are overweight or obese, and six in every ten food businesses are takeaways. you‘re seeing more takeaways than you‘re actually seeing corner shops. i think they should definitely limit the number of fast food places massively because it‘s just taking over. it‘s part of everyday life now. i mean, you haven‘t got time to cook? mcdonald‘s. it‘s, haven‘t got time to cook, we‘ll have a takeaway tonight. analysis of official figures by the bbc has found that in 2010 there were just over 29,000 fast food businesses in the uk. this year, that number has reached over 39,000, an increase of over a third in the space of eight years. there are over 170 fast food businesses in rotherham. for example, this fish and chip shop has just begun to offer low—fat fish and chips.
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but its owners say the town has been swamped by new takeaways in recent years. i've seen a lot of little ones open up and close down. i've seen a lot that are just afloat. i've seen a lot try to undercut. recently i went to a council meeting to propose an objection to another business that is going to be setting up soon. but unfortunately my efforts were not heard, or not considered. six in every ten adults in england are overweight or obese according to public health england, and some doctors believe obesity is the biggest challenge facing the nhs. obesity has been linked with fast food, and we‘ve had projections that suggest that, by 2050, which is only one generation away, the direct and indirect costs of obesity will cost nearly £50 billion, and that‘s enough to bankrupt the nhs. the government and devolved administrations across the uk have all set out plans to reduce obesity levels, whilst in england ministers say local councils can control the number and location of takeaways.
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but on current trends, the number of these food businesses is set to rise and the battle to control bulging waistlines looks likely to become harder. more than 100 conservative mps and 50 members of the house of lords are calling on the government to abandon plans to investigate decades—old crimes in northern ireland and other conflicts. in a letter to the prime minister, they say a new historical investigations unit puts former members of the armed forces at risk of unfair prosecutions. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. and mainly because it is decades old? that's right, simon. i guess at the heart of this is that wrestle that has been going on in northern ireland this time, the essential discussion around the good friday agreement 20 years ago, around one point you draw a line in the sand around what has happened in the
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past, and this is the heart of this latest row. in 2014, the stormont house agreement set out an idea that there would be this historic investigations unit to look into things that happened a long, long time ago, a good number of decades ago. the government has started and concluded a consultation period, 16,000 people contributing to that consultation, about this idea of a historic investigations unit. we have already seen some people and is in questions of the result of what happened long time ago. today, delivery of this letter, one of the signatories mark francois, former defence minister who used to serve the territorial army. the purpose of the territorial army. the purpose of the letter is to call on the prime minister to take action to end the witch hunting of army veterans who served their country in northern ireland, the falklands, iraq, afghanistan, and other theatres of conflict. we believe it is
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u na cce pta ble conflict. we believe it is unacceptable that these brave men, without whom there would, for instance, have never been a peace process in northern ireland, should be investigated again and again over incidents that took place in some cases over 50 years ago. now, we haven‘t yet got the response from the government to this consultation. that is expected relatively soon in the coming weeks and months, but you get a sense there, simon, of the challenge that they face. some sources have suggested, for instance, could there bea bar suggested, for instance, could there be a bar that is set where the attorney general, the most senior legalfigure in attorney general, the most senior legal figure in government, attorney general, the most senior legalfigure in government, decide whether a particular case should be pursued, but there is a danger there that politics start getting bald in an autonomous legal process, and would that be seen as legitimate? others have suggested there should bea time others have suggested there should be a time limit that restricts the point at which things can be looked into, of, say 20 years. so again,
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you come back to this central contentious element that was discussed in the good friday agreement and has been a source of discussion and dispute ever since, about the extent to which things are alleged to have happened in the past can be drawn over and left in the past in the name of peace, versus those who say no, there is always a case for seeking justice. thank you very much, chris mason. the duke and duchess of sussex have been offered roast pig, a whale‘s tooth and a traditional drink of kava as they were welcomed to fiji on the second leg of their southern hemisphere tour. the arrival ceremony, under cloudy skies in suva, mirrored one attended by the queen and duke of edinburgh back in 1953. our royal correspondent jonny dymond reports. they brought the british weather with they brought the british weather with them. but neither rain nor wind would get in the way of this welcome. fiji is a long way from pretty much everywhere, and this visit is a big deal. on the way in from the airport, the locals waited
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to catch sight of the royal guests. in the centre of suva, the crowds grew and grew. around 15,000 fijians have turned out in the heart of the capital to welcome them. they may be here for only the two days, but this looks like it‘s going to be a huge event for fiji. it used to be no cheering at a welcoming ceremony. cheering not any more. the couple watched as kava was prepared, a drink made from a plant of the same name with deep roots in fiji society. then for the duke, more than just a set. laughter applause after drinking, of course, dancing. more than six decades ago, the same
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ceremony for harry‘s grandmother, the queen. afterwards, she came out on her hotel balcony to greet the crowds. and tonight, so did harry and meghan. the fijians were thrilled. we just love them. and she is so beautiful. and harry, he‘s blessed to have her! you know? we love them to bits. the royals are like family to us fijians. and we fijians always think of them as a family to us. lots of royal history, then, here in fiji, and also a glimpse of the future. the longest sea bridge in the world has been opened by the chinese president,
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xijinping. the multi—billion pound bridge and tunnel project links hong kong, macau and mainland china. it has been designed to withstand earthquakes and typhoons and contains 400,000 tonnes of steel, enough to build 60 eiffel towers. but the construction has been dogged by safety concerns, and fears about its environmental impact, as robin brant reports. it‘s another vast infrastructure project in china. this one took nine years and almost £12 billion to build. the mega bridge spans 34 miles, crossing the mouth of the pearl river in china‘s south. linking hong kong and the casino hub macau with zhuhai on the chinese mainland. the big idea is to create a new bay area powerhouse to rival tokyo or san francisco, china hopes. it links to more than 60 million people in china‘s high—tech manufacturing base. it‘s the place where this country first experimented
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with economic reform, 40 years ago. translation: i think this bridge will bring great convenience to the whole of zhuhai, hong kong and macau and promote the economic development of the whole area of the pearl river delta. it was a brief, in fact very brief ceremony for china‘s president. xi jinping simply declared the bridge open and then went off to inspect it. what has immediately become a tourist attraction comes with a very heavy price tag. the bbc understands 18 workers were killed during construction. hundreds were injured. the structure is not all bridge — tunnels were built as well, dug to allow shipping to pass freely. but some in hong kong in particular worry it‘s another symbol from beijing of encroaching sovereignty onto its special status. others claim it will be
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woefully underused. there are traffic quotas, different insurance requirements and the practicalities. on the chinese mainland, you drive on the right. in hong kong and macau, the left. nasa scientists flying over antarctica have spotted a vast rectangular—shaped iceberg. the iceberg, seen on the right, was seen floating among just off the larsen c ice shelf in the antarctic. scientists say the sharp angles and flat surface indicate that the iceberg probably recently broke off from the ice shelf. don‘t forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag #afternoonlive all the ways to contact us on screen right now. now it‘s time for a look
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at the weather with nick miller. hello. more cloud coming in today compared with yesterday, but still some hazy, sunny spells around, particularly in southern and eastern parts of the uk, lifting temperatures to maybe 17-18 in uk, lifting temperatures to maybe 17—18 in south—eastern england, sunny spells in aberdeenshire. it is windy here, gusty winds in scotland and the pennines, 50 miles an hour orso, and the pennines, 50 miles an hour or so, more and the pennines, 50 miles an hour orso, more rain and the pennines, 50 miles an hour or so, more rain pushing into western scotland, especially the north—west highlands, today and tonight, and answered tomorrow morning, where other places stay mainly dry. a range of double—figure temperatures overnight in scotland, mid single figures in england and wales. not as chilly as last night. maybe the odd patch of mist and fog. into tomorrow, the rain easing in north—west scotland as well as the breeze. still cloud drifting in from the west on the breeze. the best of the west on the breeze. the best of the sunny spells in the south and west. temperatures in the mid teens, as they will be on thursday. from
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friday, the strengthening northerly wind will make it feel much colder. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the king of saudi arabia has met members of the family of the murdered journalist, jamal khashoggi, in riyadh. the crown prince mohammed bin salman, whom many suspect of ordering the killing, was also present. meanwhile the turkish president, tayyip erdogan, has described the murder — in the saudi consulate in istanbul, as savage and premeditated, and said that all those responsible from "top to bottom" must be brought to account. in other news, thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48 hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on uk high streets than there‘ve been for almost ten years, with a 34% increase in takeaway shops since 2010. and the duke and duchess of sussex have greeted well—wishers in fiji, 65 years after the queen and prince philip did the same. sport now on afternoon live
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with olly foster... all eyes on old trafford tonight as cristiano ronaldo returns in the champions league q2 england are up against it in the final the play of the year. this was the pick of the ties. man united against juventus, facing his former club in the champions league. it‘s the second time he‘s gone back there, his goal knocked united out 5 years ago playing for real madrid. but over the last few weeks he has faced an allegation of rape against him. las vegas police say they have re—opened a case dating back to 2009 and an alleged incident in a hotel room. ronaldo called it fake news last month. this is him arriving in manchester yesterday, he had 6 seasons with united and won everything and now
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he is in his first season in italy. clubs have to put up the manager and a player ahead of these champions league matches, and under the cirumstances, it might have been expected for anotherjuve player to fulfil the obligation but ronaldo fronted up said that he has every confidence in his lawyers and that that the truth will come out. iam very i am very happy, my lawyers, they are confident and i am too. so the most important thing is i enjoy football and i my life, the rest, i have people who take care of my life and the truth will always come out. iam good. and the truth will always come out. i am good. i and the truth will always come out. iam good. i know and the truth will always come out. i am good. i know that i am an example. i know 100%.
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i am good. i know that i am an example. i know100%. on the i am good. i know that i am an example. i know 100%. on the pigeon outside of the pitch. i will only smile, i blessed and i play in a fantastic club, i have a fantastic family, i have four kids, i am healthy, i have everything. the rest doesn‘t defer on me. i am very glad. he seems that put everything off of the pitch, those claims out of his mind while playing forjuventus on the top of the league now they are. they are the italian champions. manchester city are the other british club in the champions league tonight, they are away in ukraine, facing shakhtar donetsk in kharkiv. there intimated he was. let‘s turn to cricket. for once you wish it was there interlink up. they cannot win, can they? but they have won one. —— reining in sri lanka. england have already won the one—day series against sri lanka which is good thing because they are getting thumped in the final one dayer in columbo...
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sri lanka won the toss, put themsleves into bat and batted brilliantly, 366—6, the top four batsmen all reached half centruies. niroshan dickwella fell five short of a ton. jason roy, alex hales, joss buttler fell in the space of two overs, joe root‘s gone too. tom and sam curran both in the team, the first brothers to play together for england since the hollioakes over 20 years ago. they have it all to do if they are to mark that on a high but england heading for defeat there. conor mcgregor has admitted he didn‘t train properly for his return to ufc. the irishman lost to khabib nurma—gomedov earlier this month after a two—year absence. mcgregor says he "lost fair and square" and will return to the octagon with his “confidence high, fully prepared“. and england netball have been given a lifeline after their current sponsors doubled their investment in the sport.
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they are commonwelth champions but there were major concerns over funding their players fulltime with a home world cup coming up next year. they‘ve secured a new three—year deal that will pay for the national team‘s fulltime contracts beyond 2019. in england, 85—4, a long way off that 367. an update in the next hour. thank you for that. ministers attending this morning‘s cabinet were told that the government is continuing to work "intensively" to solve the impasse around the future of the northern ireland border. the problem of course is that the government has guaranteed that there will be no hard border — no check or delays — between the republic of ireland and northern ireland after brexit under any circumstances. the two sides have been talking about this for quite some time. so what‘s going on?
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here to separate fact from fiction is our reality check correspondent chris morris. yesterday the prime minister said yesterday shaw replied with two words. backstop. she did. we have been talking about this for quite a while. better still the big issue. and the big problem remaining in the brig the negotiations. initially, with the eu said was the backstop and guarantee of no hard border, if we can sort this out in the future trade relationship, and affect nor the heilan would have to stay in the customs union and ham part of the eu single market. the uk said that no can do because that splits off northern ireland from the rest of the uk. it and said can we have a solution whereby the whole of the uk stays in a temporary customs arrangement. the eu said no because thatis arrangement. the eu said no because that is not to do with the withdrawal arrangement. there isn‘t time to do that. when i have to what we hope with the potential compromise where in they are discussing the possibility that the withdrawal agreement will have in it a legally binding commitment to
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negotiate a temporary customs arrangement after brexit. are you keeping up with me? yes. some as if they can. let‘s talk about the proposal being discussed now. —— so much that they can. this that replaced the original backstop version? this is one of the points of this field. the uk says we cannot have the northern ireland backstop because it splits up the country. that is the idea that borders down the irish sea. what is now being said know by the eu is the problem is if you are saying we need to have under all circumstances a guarantee, there will be no hard border in ireland and then ending and we have to have our backstop as the last resort, it has to be in the withdrawal agreement. it is sounds like a small technical issues, holding up the entire breadth of process. and it is. but that is because brigid is kind of about
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borders and if you look around all the edges of europe and the single market, there aren‘t no italian words. both sides agreed to do with mcfarlane is a success. the problem is one solution would threaten the integrity of the uk. the uk‘s union and the other solution the eu protect the integrity of their economic area of the single market. a lot of them see it as fundamental principles at stake. behind scenes now, they are looking for you and i my statement but it‘s but a enough covering language both sides can be co mforta ble. covering language both sides can be comfortable. —— you and i my statements. but both sides are still talking. you must have seen people come up and say there is a technical difference and this can be sorted. —— you and i my statements. difference and this can be sorted. -- you and i my statements. on a technical level, yes it can be sorted. as we saw last week it is on the political level. they are not really talking as on the political level now. but technically, intense
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discussions are going on behind the scenes but even if there was a technical discussion and agreement between the eu and uk, both sides said yes we can live with that as a political agreement, we still have to go to the house of commons and that of a whole different issue and i don‘t think anybody who tells you he guarantee will cut a deal might or might not get through the house of commons is probably not telling you the entire truth but is the truth is nobody really knows. the transition phase, retallick is it will stay? i expect it well. laughter -- will stay? i expect it well. laughter —— reality check will stay? good to see you. thank you. british music star rita ora is heading a campaign to try and combat what‘s known as ‘beauty cyberbullying‘ — where somebody is bullied online as a result of their appearance. it‘s in association with the cosmetic brand rimmel, who have released the results of a survey suggesting almost a quarter of women have experienced beauty cyberbullying, with nearly half those going on to self—harm. well, earlier i spoke to rita ora from her hotel room in central london and asked her why
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she got involved in this campaign. only o nly 44% only 44% of women actually report bullying. and i think that is a really low number and eberly affects people and it really damages people‘s mental health, which is such a big issue for us especially for somebody like myself in the public eye who for many years has had this cover of being in hair and makeup during all these fancy dresses and doing all of the shows and you feel like i really had a platform to support women of any age and men who feel like they are being attacked for being themselves, which really is the worst thing ever. quite a platform, 13 49 followed on histogram, 64 8 million on twitter, i suspect you don‘t read them all but there must be some that still get to you. don't get me wrong,
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earlier my career, completely obsessed with the comments and i saw some hurtful, horrible things, that made me think twice about to widen what to do music. what sort of comments that really didn‘t upset you? -- upset young people? for me and a lot of young women, is a lot to do with our appearance, how we look, what size we are, what kinda makeup we have on and what we choose to wear. i just think makeup we have on and what we choose to wear. ijust think it is so transparent and it is very difficult to stick up for yourself online because they really are going to get into like black all if you try to fight everything that is negative. so my advice if i had and he would be to really just so my advice if i had and he would be to reallyjust support so my advice if i had and he would be to really just support your friends on line and show as much support to somebody being themselves as you can. a lot of people look at you and say, there you are, you have
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an amazing career, you are beautiful, you can do whatever you wa nt to beautiful, you can do whatever you want to do, argue the right sort of person to be giving this message when magazines, tv companies, all obsessed with image and limited magazines, that instantly filling his route about the royal airbrushing and it‘s a way to go in just telling people that they can look other look and be comfortable with the? -- look how they look and be comfortable. there is a long way to go but this campaign up i cannot be deleted, means posting something and regret to get last minute and taking you down and that a psychological processes so damaging for your self—confidence it will make you doubt everything that you do and that is the biggest problem. he don‘t want to have the issue with yourself. on top of that, it is incredibly difficult to scream from the top of the rooftops but that support, for example, with one of my good friends also going to campaign
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with me who has a great platform also, it shows that from all different aspects you can really represent who we are and where you come from and what for me is a big deal. you new album is out next month called phoenix, the week of your birthday. also, you have broken a record, now! your birthday. also, you have broken a record, now i think the most successful female singer in this country for 30 years up against the likes of which an acquirer. what do you put that down to? a lot of people look at you not realise there isa people look at you not realise there is a lot of hard work involved here, is a lot of hard work involved here, is in the? thank you for saying that. —— isn‘t there? iwish is in the? thank you for saying that. —— isn‘t there? i wish it happened overnight but it definitely did not. it took me a long time lot of griping and sacrifice of really have the opportunity to speak my mind and write the music i wanted to write to represent myself and i think with this album which comes out next month, it is called phoenix because i really feel like i‘ve had a new lease of life and the eagle of the phoenix is all about re—arising and having the kind of power to be
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themselves and i think that is what this is and also this campaign, and is me asa this is and also this campaign, and is me as a person. why not? why not do it for the women and the girls and for anybody that was listening, why not? has been a long time since you first album, what is been going on ata you first album, what is been going on at a time? how have you changed? —— since that time? i think i have changed a lot. i‘ve grown up into more of a lady if i do say so myself. i really just more of a lady if i do say so myself. i reallyjust learned a lot about myself and what my feelings are and it is ok to be vulnerable and for example also to be proud and bea and for example also to be proud and be a boss and i think that is why i like wearing a suit today, i really feel like i wanted to wear the trousers and represent myself and the campaign of i will not be deleted. and do something that is inspiring and picking up something and not feeling that you are having stress and anxiety and actually
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looking at the news and feeling like that was a good section and i feel very happy. that is all i‘m trying to do. we changed it now. jamie robinson now. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that jamal khashoggi, was murdered in a planned operation — and he wants the killers tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the steets of glasgow — as part of a 48 hour strike about equal pay. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on high streets across the uk than there have been for ten years. more on that in a moment. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. dyson, the uk—based company best known for its vacuum cleaners, has chosen to build its new electric car in singapore. the first car is scheduled to roll off the production line in 2021. dyson said the decision was based on the availability
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of engineering talent, regional supply chains and proximity to some key target markets. motor giant bmw has recalled more of its diesel—power cars on fears of a leaky exhaust cooler. it has recalled 1.6 million in total — included 480,000 recalled in august — and some 268,000 uk vehicles are affected. uber is planning to add a 15p a mile surcharge from next year to all fares booked via its app in london to help its drivers buy electric vehicles. it wants to raise more than £200 million over the "next few years" which it will then hand over in cash to 20,000 drivers to help them switch — with all its drivers — it estimates — going electric by 2025. the number of fast food outlets is up by a third in the last eight years. there are issues about the health
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problems. is this a problem or business doing what business does? i think it is a broader question. it is to do with food choices about whether obesity in the rise the of obesity is a by a third in the last 12 years and those are the questions that the choices they make about food and fast food as a role to play there. but it is also to do with information, which people have now in terms of how much medication. the other side of the coin might be just this state intervene in it has done that like things with the sugar tax. on the side of giving people choices and people information that is a business opportunity there. joining us now is nadia el hadery, the founder and chief executive of yfood. what is your company and what they
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do? hello. we report on all the innovation changing the food industry. we tracked him from the ground up and from infancy on her way through to success. we literally catch all the early—stage startups and innovations in the food industry. what kind of role do you play in actually getting people information about food ? play in actually getting people information about food? and educating them? we really focus on educating them? we really focus on educating them? we really focus on educating the business side, so educating the business side, so educating brave brands in startups and investors and bringing them together to connect and drive innovation in a positive impact in this space. what sort of innovations? anything. in this environment for example, looking at the fast food industry will look at two types of innovations, addressing the problem space and stuff that is supporting industry and bannister would mean the fast food operators to make better decisions and better products for the consumer. so with a real pressure on margins at the moment and how they can actually
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create a better product that will meet consumer demand. does that address the question of obesity particularly? orjust a question of healthy eating or do theyjust address the question of making more money? i think the second part of it is actually it doesn‘t address the question of making the money, it is a question of enabling a better product in current environments and the second part we look at is from a consumer perspective and weaker create more transparency in the food ecosystem to empower the consumer to make better decisions. give me an example. some of the trends in technology we see, they have still been called a tested at that moment, starting to see a real combination of data around what is in your food, from a perspective of making assessments from having your dna tested and working the right types of food you should be getting based on your enzyme profile and using data that has been overlaid from the
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restau ra nt data that has been overlaid from the restaurant industry and looking at the types of product on the menu and enabling the consumer to make it better the system and what they‘re eating. give me an example of i walk into a supermarket in the future, looking at a pawn shop, i think this is going to be good for me. is there a way technology can help you make that decision? we are starting to see a lot of research and innovation having the space so really a good way to look at it from the fast food industry we are working with a sta rtu p industry we are working with a startup that is basically been creating a personalised approach to nutrition and delivering you a healthy milk at an affordable price within five minutes and actually creates nine different combinations so creates nine different combinations so you creates nine different combinations so you can creates nine different combinations so you can upload all your personal data based on your weight goals, your personal food preferences data based on your weight goals, your personalfood preferences in your personalfood preferences in your dna testing looks like, and we will start to see more more research as we do more more research into how it should be making decisions around food integrated with that and within
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a five—minute period they can deliver to you in the shop a meal that would be suitable for your nutritional profile. maybe it will bea nutritional profile. maybe it will be a workshop. laughter thank you. —— we had pawn shop. theyjust look at the porkchops? sometimes it speaks to me. laughter let's talk laughter let‘s talk aboutjohn lewis. they have stopped selling... these that the dvds? yes. sales are down by 40%. sales are down 40% as more people watch movies and shows on streaming platforms such as netflix and amazon. however, john lewis will continue to sell blu—ray players, which can also be used for standard dvds. the kind of things that are changing as you see on the shelves. one of the most popular things, one of 367% last year. a remote door bell. you
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press the door bell and becomes up on your phone. have you got one? have, actually. i‘m already talking to the converted. it is useful? yes. lows of them are available. —— lows of them. but talk about the future. buber is going electric. yes it is. quite a way to show it. rather pushing the green message a little too far.. little plug in the front there. they are taking a 15p charge from people and putting it into a fund that will go towards helping the drivers by an electric car and they hope they will go electric by 2025. they only are
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suggesting that right now. i think the average route will be about 45 pence extra. not a huge charge. but this is the idea they wa nted charge. but this is the idea they wanted to start. that‘s all the business news. not very good at the moment. the ftse has gone down about half a percent. the european union has rejected italy‘s budget. ina in a totally unprecedented move the european commission has rejected it. and setting up a comment with a different budget in months‘ time. —— three weeks‘ time. we don‘t have any power to say you cannot do this but on the other hand, it makes much more expensive for italy tomorrow in the marketplace and the markets taking just negatively. jamie, thank you. the world‘s oldest intact shipwreck has been discovered,
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more than a mile deep in the black sea. a team of british and bulgarian researchers has carbon—dated the greek trading vessel to around 400 bc — and says its shape hasn‘t been compromised, despite spending more than two thousand four hundred years underwater. lucinda adam has the story. you down in the sea, archaeologists have been discovering rex. this record from the verizon team period about a thousand years old. but deeper down, beyond the reach of human divers are much older ships. this, the oldest ever found, a classical greek trading vessel that has laid here on the sea bed for 2400 years, from the time when aristotle was still alive. the first thing we saw when we came along the hull was this quarter rudder. and this is diagnostic in the sense that rudders weren‘t used in this
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way before the 1300s, and then this particular style goes back to the classical world. and then we actually excavated down the shaft of the rudder until we got to the end of the blade and that said it‘s greek and not roman. this and more than 60 other wrecks were discovered and mapped by rovs, or remote operated vehicles, delving more than two kilometres below the surface, where organisms that would normally eat the wood can‘t survive. we‘ve got this just astonishing preservation, an entire ship with its rudders in place. what‘s amazing about it is when you look at the pictures of it, you kind of recognise it. we‘ve seen these ships before and we‘ve seen them in paintings. the wreck looks something like this image, on a greek vase held by the british museum. the ship has a mast and a sail and a single row of oars. it‘s about 30 metres long. but it‘s unlikely that it will ever be raised. its timbers are much too fragile to be brought to the surface. because of that, preservation
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by recording means that, yeah, we are able to get all of this information up and we are able to leave the wreck so that future generations with better technology are able to come and use their skills to find out even more. for now, these wrecks will remain deep underwater but marine archaeologists will work to bring the history they hold to the surface. lucinda adam, bbc news. time for a look at the weather... here‘s nick miller. hello. most places are dry again today but there is a bit more cloud in the sky, the sunny spells are hazier as well. let‘s take a look at a weather watcher picture from scotland earlier today. a little rainbow so there are some showers around. in fact, there were some outbreaks of rain in western scotland. it‘s dry in derbyshire, hints of blue in the sky. it is around this area of high pressure we are bringing in the cloud from the atlantic and, close to a weather front,
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in northern and western scotland, here we have the strongest winds and some outbreaks of rain as well. and that leaves actually the best of the sunshine through southern and eastern parts of the uk. it is breezy wherever you are. the pennines, scotland, some gusts around 50—55 mph or so. these are your average wind speeds so those gusts are higher. as for the temperatures, it feels pleasant when you get to see some sunshine today and that is around 17, 18 degrees in the warmest parts of south—east england. not far from that as well in aberdeenshire because here it is quite windy but there are some sunny spells to be had. now, into this evening and tonight, we keep outbreaks of rain running into western scotland. it is always heaviest and most persistent in the north—west highlands. still some cloud drifting in on the westerly breeze. clear spells across southern parts of england and wales. in the mid—single figures in the chillier spots here, not as chilly as it was last night. there could be one or two patches of mist and fog, nothing widespread. into tomorrow, you will notice the rain in north—west scotland has eased. the breeze eases a bit as well. still some cloud coming in,
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particularly across north—western parts of the uk. some sunny spells in the south and east and temperatures around the mid teens. it will be pretty similar for most of us on thursday but notice the blue showing up again towards northern scotland, some outbreaks of rain here. this is a weather front that, through thursday night into friday, is going to move its way southwards with some outbreaks of rain. its significance, though, is in what follows that weather front, a cold front, a leading edge of colder air. so the blue, the colder airfrom the arctic, pushes south on friday in a strengthening northerly wind as well. so, by the time we get to friday and saturday, the weather is going to feel very different. there will be plenty of sunny spells, a few showers, mainly on the coasts and hills. some snow in those showers in northern parts of the uk. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4: the son of the murdered saudi
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journalist jamal khashoggi meets the saudi king and crown prince mohammed bin salman three weeks after his father was last seen alive. meanwhile turkey‘s president erdogan says the murder was a savage and premeditated attack, insisting the killers should be tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the streets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. the fast growth in fast food — there are more takeaways on our high streets than there‘ve been for 10 years. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. manchester united are against juventus tonight in the champions league. what a match that will be. we‘ll adapt to that. cristiano ronaldo back in town, and he has addressed that rape allegation against him. we will talk to you later about all of that. and nick has all the weather.
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absolutely, some sunshine for all of us absolutely, some sunshine for all of us today. much colder by the end of the week, and details of that change, and a hurricane heading into mexico coming up. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. the king of saudi arabia and his crown prince have held a meeting in riyadh with the son of the murdered journalist jamal khashoggi. they say that mr khashoggi was killed in a rogue operation and those responsible will be held to account. earlier president erdogan of turkey insisted the killing was a planned operation. he said those responsible must be put on trial in turkey, and the person who gave the order must be held to account. tim willcox is in riyadh. welcome to the lavishly decorated
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convention centre here in riyadh. it is the second year of a finance conference organised by the crown prince, but an event this year there has been overshadowed by events in another country. in fact, today, president erdogan of turkey said there was strong evidence that the journalist jamal khashoggi were savagely murdered in a planned operation, and he dismissed the story that the saudi arabians had given that he died in an accident. he said that those responsible for the killing of the journalist should be tried in turkey from the highest to the bottom levels. saudi arabia insists that mr khashoggi died after a fight insists that mr khashoggi died after afight in insists that mr khashoggi died after a fight in its consulate in istanbul, and it does not know where his body is now. that is the subject of great conjecture in turkey at the moment. let‘s get the very latest on what has been happening today, not only here in saudi arabia, but also
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in turkey. this report by frank gardner. three weeks to the day since he disappeared, jamal khashoggi, outspoken saudi critic of his own government, last seen alive entering the saudi consulate in istanbul shortly before he was murdered by those inside. today, turkey‘s president erdogan addressed parliamentarians and gave his first full public reaction. translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. the details of this incident, this murder, is capable of hurting our hearts. lurid details ofjust how khashoggi died have been leaked to turkey‘s pro—government media. there‘s said to be an audio tape from a turkish surveillance device hidden inside the saudi consulate that recorded his last agonising moments. president erdogan made no mention of this today but he did challenge the latest saudi version
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of what happened. translation: this was a planned operation. it is not going to satisfy either us nor the international community that this was just a rogue operation by a few. over in the saudi capital riyadh, it appeared to be business as usual today. this was the grand opening of a huge investment conference dubbed davos in the desert. it‘s been boycotted by many multinational ceos due to the khashoggi murder. even the opening speaker could not avoid mentioning it. the terrible acts reported in recent weeks are alien to our culture and our dna. and i'm confident that with the support of the government, concerned authorities and leadership, the truth will emerge. the investment conference is the brainchild of saudi arabia‘s maverick crown prince
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mohammad bin salman. western governments suspect he ordered the operation against khashoggi, something saudi arabia denies. turkey‘s president conspicuously avoided mentioning the prince by name, praising instead the sincerity of his father, the ageing saudi king salman. but he also demanded answers to hard questions, such as where is the body? and who helped dispose of it? he also wants the suspects brought back to turkey for trial. translation: the 18 people must be tried in istanbul. this is my proposal. as the crime was committed in istanbul, they should be tried in istanbul. in life, jamal khashoggi had a huge following on social media, but his violent death has rocked relations between the west and saudi arabia. after this, they may never be quite the same. well, a little earlier this
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afternoon, the crown prince and king salman met jamal khashoggi‘s afternoon, the crown prince and king salman metjamal khashoggi‘s two sons. we understand that was at the palace here in riyadh. previously, they had phoned these sons as well to express their condolences, very much distancing themselves from this operation, which they say was a terrible mistake, an operation which ended by mistake in their father‘s murder. in the last few minutes, actually, mohammed bin salman has just walked into this conference, and he was literally mobbed. we understand he will be taking part in a panel discussion on wednesday. he hadn‘t been here earlier, and some wondered if that was because he was concerned about the speech by president erdogan, but not a bit of it. i caught up with him a little earlier as he came in, and managed to shake his hand and ask him, in the light of things, how he had
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thought things were going this year. he said, great. more people, more money. and then his minders quickly whisked me away and there were no more questions. let‘sjust whisked me away and there were no more questions. let‘s just get an idea, though, where this whole row, this dispute between the regional rivals is going. we can go to america and speak to a policy a nalyst for america and speak to a policy analyst for the rand corporation, and someone from the turkish heritage organisation. if i can start with you, there are so many more questions about what happened to this journalist, not least, more questions about what happened to thisjournalist, not least, where is the body. how do you think this will be resolved ? so, it really remains to be seen how this is going to play out, but i do think that it's really important here to note what the white house has been saying. at first, after the saudi announcement, the white house, or at least president trump, said that he widely believed the saudi
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story, and that he found it to be credible. since then, folks at the white house, whether that is policy adviser jared white house, whether that is policy adviserjared kushner as well as vice president michael pence, have conceded that the white house and the us are still in a fact—finding phase and that they are trying to find out exactly what happened. that is one reason why the cia director jeanna haskell is in turkey, so while president erdogan didn't necessarily drop a bombshell in his speech today, if there is any concrete evidence that points fingers not only to the saudi government writ large, but also to high—ranking members of the saudi government and royal family, you can expect that the cia director will have seen it, and then it will be easier for us policy options than to move forward. there is obviously tension between what the white house wants as well as what the us congress, which has been calling for a variety of sanctions, arms sales
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holds, as well as other punishing policies, to be adopted. there is tension there, so how that is going to play out is still very much to be seen. to play out is still very much to be seen. and there was a big build-up before president erdogan‘s speech today. he promised to deliver the naked truth. in the end, he gave it a few more details, but not the gory or gruesome details of jamal khashoggi‘s last moments on earth, which appear to have been leaked in the turkish press. how much, though, is this to do with a play between two regional strongman here? one regional strongman, and one that, perhaps the crown prince, it wants to ta ke perhaps the crown prince, it wants to take over that position? president erdogan was so confident that it was planned murder, and turkey right now wants the us' support in order finalise the investigation. that is why the cia
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director is in turkey. and turkey is making pressure on saudis to confess what happened, and wants the united states to act. so turkey already has evidence, but because of the investigation still being ongoing, president erdogan did not reveal any evidence, and he is waiting. he is awaiting the final investigation results to share with the west in intel, because turkey does not want to deal with saudis alone. turkey wants the west involved and to finalise the reality of what happened to the journalist khashoggi. he can't honestly believe, can he, that the 18 suspects should be all would be returned to turkey to face trial? fa ct, returned to turkey to face trial? fact, only a handful, as i understand it, have even been arrested. the others have simply been dismissed. turkey once an
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international fair objective committee to solve the issue. yes, 18 suspects should be extradited, and have the trial in turkey. that way, it will be more objective, and very visible what happened. otherwise, the saudis might cower with different excuses. that is why president erdogan is going forward in this case, but not targeting mccain. indirectly, he has indicated that the prince is involved with this. —— not targeting the king. that is why he is very careful in what he said at his meeting today. ok, becca, a final thought to you, looking at the pragmatism of the business relationships between countries, america, for example, in saudi arabia and britain, and a lot of europe as well, really, everyone would like this to go away, because
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they don‘t want to jeopardise those business arrangements, do they? know that, they most certainly don't want to, and a lease on the us side, a lot of this has focused primarily on us defence deals with saudi arabia, predominantly arms sales. so the us defence industry for the most part has not wanted this to complicate any of their efforts. they are very worried about arms sales holds or halts in congress, but also, what we are seeing with the investment forum urs right now, there have been a numberof urs right now, there have been a number of high—ranking businesses and business figures that have pulled out. there is also a concern that the us and european businesses pulling out and seeding space, provides opportunities for other competitors, such as russia and china, to come in and fill that void, which i know in washington is definitely a concern. but for the
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most part, there are a lot of individuals as well as companies that want things to be business as usual. there is a certain amount of inertia in the system that wants to continue, in order to make sure that these businesses end up being successful, but also, that crown prince mohammed bin salman's economic reforms under vision 2030, which have a high business angle, or also successful. ok, thank you both very much. well, the delegates here at the convention centre having a break in between sessions. there will be a gala dinner here tonight. when we talk about a lot of european and western business decided to boycott this event, that is not strictly true, actually. there have been quite a few firms here where the cfo
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rather than the ceo have come, or senior executives have come, just to save the embarrassment, especially for shareholders, perhaps. several people i have spoken to have said, we did think about it, but actually, we did think about it, but actually, we made a commitment to come here, and we need that commitment from saudi arabia to deal with us as well. there is real business pragmatism here in the gulf. back to you. tim will cox there in riyadh. what is thought to be the uk‘s biggest ever strike about equal pay is under way in glasgow. thousands of council workers are striking for 48 hours, resulting in the closure of hundreds of schools, and affecting some care services. campaigners say many women are being paid three pounds an hour less than their male counterparts, and that progress on the issue is too slow. lorna gordon is in glasgow. they say they are the workers who get glasgow up in the morning. the council carers, cleaners, dinner ladies and nursery workers in scotland‘s biggest city. on the march in a decade—long dispute over equal pay. i want the same wages as men.
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we have fought for this for 12 years, and we won the case last year. we still haven‘t been paid. all we are asking is for the council to sort it out. there has been delay after delay after delay, and nothing has been done about it. the dispute dates back 12 years to when new pay scales were introduced with the aim of addressing pay inequality. but female employees complain it has instead resulted in men injobs of a similar level being paid more. carol qua is one of those taking part in the strike. she holds down three jobs at two different schools, but each month, still struggles to pay the bills. wejust want to be paid equally, same as everybody else. i mean, honestly, the wages are ridiculous. i‘m working threejobs, and i‘m still struggling month—to—month, borrowing off my own kids, which is shocking. it is not on. i mean, as soon as i get paid, i pay all my bills that day,
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and sometimes, i‘m lucky if i have £50 left for the next four weeks. the action has affected homecare and cleaning services, and shut down council nurseries. glasgow city council said it had been working hard to try to resolve the dispute. it added there was no justification for the disruption, which it says will hit the city‘s most vulnerable the hardest. it is really unnecessary. i don't think it is fair on the claimants. fair on the women. they'll lose pay over the next couple of days, those who are not going to work, who are going to go out on strike, and there is going to be enormous disruption caused in glasgow, and to some of the most vulnerable people in the city. the council says it is committed to making an offer to those on strike. it has not been made clear how they will settle the bill, which could run to hundreds of millions of pounds. but those looking for equal pay say time has run out to recognise the true value of theirjobs, and they must now pay up. you‘re watching afternoon live.
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these are our headlines: turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that jamal khashoggi was murdered in a planned operation — and he wants the killers tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the streets of glasgow as part of a 48—hour strike about equal pay. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on high streets across the uk than there have been for ten years. and also coming up — harry and meghan greet the crowds in fiji, 65 years after his grandmother did the same during her coronation tour. and in sport, cristiano ronaldo returns to manchester united with juventus in the champions league this evening. he has won this competition five times with united, the first ten years ago. england‘s cricketers have won the series that are heading for defeat in the final one—day against sri lanka. they occur in 131—8, chasing
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367. an england netball had been given a funding boost, with a new sponsorship deal to protect their players‘ full—time contract beyond next year‘s world cup. a full update on the next 15 minutes. more now on our main story. that is the diplomatic racers facing saudi arabia in the aftermath of the killing of the journalist jamal khashoggi. president erdogan of turkey says there‘s strong evidence that the journalist jamal khashoggi was savagely murdered in a planned operation. with me is galip dalay, a visiting scholar at the university of oxford and a friend of jamal khashoggi. thank you forjoining us. first of all, there were a lot of expectations about what the president of turkey was going to say this morning. did what he said live up this morning. did what he said live up to those expectations?” this morning. did what he said live up to those expectations? i think the words naked truth were credited with much more expectation, and that also created an expectation of some new revelations, which were not made, so there was a bit of this not
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meeting the expectation, but to be asked, i did not expect many big revelations, because this is still a process , revelations, because this is still a process, and i don‘t think turkey will come with bombastic explanations. so turkey, as we have seen, explanations. so turkey, as we have seen, are explanations. so turkey, as we have seen, are going through a drip by drip process. what was important at this stage was erdogan giving formality to what has thus far been lea ked formality to what has thus far been leaked from anonymous turkish sources. so it is no longer leaks from anonymous turkish sources, it is an official stance from the president of turkey, president erdogan, from turkey. so this was crucial. the second crucial part was, he was very careful not to incriminate saudi arabia as a state, and makea incriminate saudi arabia as a state, and make a distinction between king salman and mohammed bin salman. he mentioned the king in bother to terms, but he didn‘t mention the crown prince. exactly. he did not utter the name of the crown prince even once. and i think that is where the focus will be. this is not a saudi crisis, a king salman crisis, this is a salmon crisis. regulars ——
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it mohammed bin salman crisis. a reckless young leader who has a track record of one controversy or another. writers just came up with the story of the beating up of the prime minister of lebanon already during his detention in saudi arabia. —— reuters. so in a sense, this is a clear sign that saudi arabia is not equal to mohammed bin salman. there are many other crown prince is who will be available to ta ke prince is who will be available to take thejob, prince is who will be available to take the job, and prince is who will be available to take thejob, and it is not a choice between a crown prince that is supposedly also the protector of western interests, and someone that is supposedly against western interests. first and foremost, all the existing princes in saudi arabia, most of them are pro—west and pro—us as well. arabia, most of them are pro—west and pro-us as well. but is he indispensable? is there a way that the king can get out of this mess, and it is a mess the saudi arabia,
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—— for saudi arabia, without losing the crown prince in his role? well, i think saudi arabia is not like iraq or syria, or libya. so saudi arabia for a long time has relied on close relationships with western political elites, and also a consensus within the family. right now, it is completely different. the consensus within the family is gone. mohammed bin salman try to consolidate power in his own hands. and secondly, he is more and more copying gaddafi, saddam, orsome type of dictatorial leadership. i think mohammed bin salman is very much dispensable, and i think is dispensable at it will not affect much of western interests, because anyone, whoever comes after mohammed bin salman, will know very much the goal relies on the us provided security structure. the us is not only selling arms and weapons to saudi arabia, it provides the
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security structure within which the saudi regime operates, and this cannot be provided either by china or by russia. so mohammed bin salman can go and maybe bio some weapons from someone else, but it cannot buy the security, because this is where the security, because this is where the us power is centred. secondly, all the previous saudi kings have had very close relationships with the us. do we know any saudi leaders who were anti—us or anti—western? this is one of the distinctions between the saudi kings and monarchs and figures like saddam hussein or gaddafi. so whoever is coming after mohammed bin salman is not going to be anti—saudi. if anything, they will be much more effort to build relationships with the west. thirdly, i cannot imagine any time soon any western thirdly, i cannot imagine any time soon any western leader would be willing to shake hands with the crown prince. and this is a very major thing for saudi arabia,
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because as i said, it was previously different from iraq, syria. they very much relied on a cosy relationship with western political leadership. this will essentially create, i think, leadership. this will essentially create, ithink, a leadership. this will essentially create, i think, a crisis within. create, i think, a crisis if leadership. this will essentially create, i think, a crisis if the us indicated is willing to look for an alternative, i think we will hear more and more new voices from the al saud family that will express their unhappiness, disappointment and grievances with mohammed bin salman. because there are grievances accumulating there. fascinating stuff. thank you very much forjoining us. the duke and duchess of sussex have been offered roast pig, a whale‘s tooth and a traditional drink of kava as they were welcomed to fiji on the second leg of their southern hemisphere tour. the arrival ceremony, under cloudy skies in suva, mirrored one attended by the queen and duke of edinburgh back in 1953. our royal correspondent jonny dymond reports. they brought the british weather with them. but neither rain nor wind would get in the way of this welcome.
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fiji is a long way from pretty much everywhere, and this visit is a big deal. on the way in from the airport, fijians waited to catch sight of the royal guests. in the centre of suva, the crowds grew and grew. around 15,000 fijians have turned out in the heart of the capital to welcome them. they may be here for only the two days, but this looks like it‘s going to be a huge event for fiji. it used to be no cheering at a welcoming ceremony. cheering not any more. the couple watched as kava was prepared, a drink made from a plant of the same name with deep roots in fiji society. with deep roots in fijian society. and then, for the duke, more than just a sip. laughter
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applause after drinking, of course, dancing. more than six decades ago, the same ceremony for harry‘s grandmother, the queen. afterwards, she came out on her hotel balcony to greet the crowds. and tonight, so did harry and meghan. fijians were thrilled. we just love them. and she is so beautiful. and harry, he‘s blessed to have her! you know? we love them to bits. the royals are like family to us fijians. and we fijians always think of them as a family to us. lots of royal history, then, here in fiji, and also a
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glimpse of the future. nasa scientists flying over antarctica have spotted a vast rectangular—shaped iceberg. the iceberg, seen on the right, was seen floating among just off the larsen c ice shelf in the antarctic. scientists say the sharp angles and flat surface indicate that the iceberg probably recently broke off from the ice shelf. orasi or as i believe, aliens used it to ta ke or as i believe, aliens used it to take off! time for a look at the weather. here‘s nick miller. you have got your satellites out as well. hurricanes, and there is one heading up the coast of southern america at the moment? that's right. we have the map here showing central
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america to mexico, and in the usa about that. a broad area of cloud, you can see an eye in that, although you can see an eye in that, although you lose that as i animate every time. that is the sense that it is still going a little bit. this is hurricane willa. we talk about hurricanes a lot in the gulf of mexico, the atlantic, florence and michael, but this is a different hurricane basin, if you like, the eastern pacific. so it is central america into mexico, baja california, that get these stories. often these storms just wander around the sea and don‘t hit land, but this is making his way towards mexico as a major hurricane. is the water warmer there, because it is a lot to do with water temperature as arik air in few absolutely. they have to be over warm water, upper 20s in celsius to get the fuel and power they need to sustain themselves over time. it is really warm in the water because of mexico, it is late in the season as well, so he has really built up over the summer, and that is why it has built
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up summer, and that is why it has built up to the strength. everybody along this part of mexico hopefully is taking precautions, because it will make landfall this evening. that will be mexico time, close to mazatlan, and as with any hurricane, we‘re talking of high winds, possibly 125 mile hour winds, 450 millimetres of rain flooding, landslides, and it is a big deal in this part of the world. it seems ever since we gave these things names, we have more of them. we are already with w. , they have about. i we‘re running out of letters ? about. i we‘re running out of letters? we are a long way down the alphabet on this one, that is the shore. there is not too far to go. we go to the greek alphabet of the runout of names. so what will come after willa? what runout of names. so what will come after willa ? what is runout of names. so what will come after willa? what is the only name that starts with an letter x? xavier rush macro yes, xavier kouassi might be others. i was going to say zander, and that would have thrown you completely! and not sure how they pronounce it. i think zeke
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follows that, and then it would be a crust of the greek alphabet. it has been such a busy season. 22 named storms, the most since 1992. but actually, i‘ll another measurement, the most active season they have ever had in this part of the pacific. that is the ace index, accumulated psychosurgery, the dates all of these storms together, if you like. like if you judge a football tea m like. like if you judge a football team natalie by the amount of games they have one, but by the penalties they have one, but by the penalties they had scored, the headers, the passes they had successfully made. i thought about just waiting to come on! that was very good! thank you very much! all that together makes it the most active season on record since records began in 1971. so a major storm heading into mexico. and a very busy season. whenever i walk past the desk up there, you are up there own little plug—in later working it out. statistics! yes, and this is a fascinating one as well. that is set against the backing climate change,
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warmer air, more against the backing climate change, warmerair, more moisture translating into heavy rain, warmer ocea ns translating into heavy rain, warmer oceans as well. you can‘t pinpoint one thing, but that is the background. this is fascinating. what is the forecast for rescue macro really quiet at the moment, but as i hinted earlier, cold change on the way. enjoy some of the sunshine today, because there is one than that, and sunshine will come again into the weekend, but not a huge amount of warmth to be found as the wind comes from different directions. at the moment, atlantic airfeeding into the uk around this area of high pressure. some outbreaks of rain across northern and western parts of scotland, and noticeable wind, though not as windy as yesterday for some. really wet into the north—west highlands, while many of us enjoy a dry afternoon, good sunshine across eastern parts of the uk. the windsor average speeds, higher gusts into the pennines and scotland, around 50 miles an houror pennines and scotland, around 50 miles an hour or so. as the temperatures, the mid—teens, most of
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us, some around 17 degrees this afternoon, which is the low 60s in fahrenheit. tonight, that rain still continues to affect north—western parts of scotland. by the time it has finished, some will end up with around 100 millimetres of rain, so a proper soaking going on. elsewhere, it looks try. without cloud and rain into parts of scotland and the breeze, temperatures hold up. still quite chilly the further south you are, not as cold as last night where some got very close to freezing. one or two batches of mist and fog. this is how wednesday shapes up. no significant change in the weather anywhere across the uk. more clout to the north—west than to the south and east, although the rain eases in north—west scotland. temperatures similar, again, looking at the mid—teens. they will be similar again on thursday across most part, broken clouds and occasional sunny spells. either way, you can see some sunshine. but the cloud around by thursday, and notice the expanding area of blue, getting darker, north
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north—west scotland. this is rain coming back in, and it is a cold weather front that will move south thursday night ended to friday. the significance is not really the rain that will bring, but the cold air that will bring, but the cold air that follows on behind which is the main story. from the arctic, strengthening northerly wind, and there will be a chill on that friday to saturday. the chill is enhanced by the fact we haven‘t felt anything like that for quite some time, with single figure temperatures and the wind blowing as well. there will be a lot of sunshine around, clean, crisp airfrom the a lot of sunshine around, clean, crisp air from the arctic, great visibility, but they will be showers, many falling as brain. in the hills especially, you will find snow out of these, especially in the hills of scotland, england, northern ireland and wales. that is how the changes look into the weekend. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. the king of saudi arabia has met members of the family of the murdered journalist, jamal khashoggi, in riyadh. the crown prince was also present. the saudi leadership maintains the killing was the result of a rogue operation. meanwhile the turkish president, erdogan, has described the murder — in the saudi consulate in istanbul, as savage and premeditated, and said that all those responsible from "top to bottom" must be brought to account. in other news, thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48 hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on uk high streets than there‘ve been for almost ten years, with a 34% increase in takeaway shops since 2010. and the duke and duchess of sussex
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have greeted well—wishers in fiji, 65 years after the queen and prince philip stood on the same balcony. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. cristiano ronaldo is back at old trafford tonight. exactly. what a match they should be. —— this should be. manchester united against juventus in the champions league cristiano ronaldo returning to face his former club again. he did it with real madrid five years ago and scored the winner to knock them out. this is him back on the pitch last night that he used to grace for six seasons with united, winning every trophy going. he actually used the platform of yesterday‘s pre—match new conference to address the allegation of rape against him. vegas police say they have re—opened a case dating back to 2009 and says he has every confidence in his lawyers to clear his name and he says he is a happy man and the truth will come out. we will see how happy
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he is later tonight, he will be the man that united have to stop. let‘s hear from united let‘s hearfrom united striker lukaku. this looked the way he plays in the way how he performs. —— just look at. in the way he prepares himself for the big game. he is a quy himself for the big game. he is a guy that has been consistent for the last ten years. he is an example for all the young players coming up. manchester city are the other british club in the champions league tonight, they are away in ukraine, facing shakhtar donetsk in kharkiv. let‘s talk cricket. in the news there? it‘s raining again in sri lanka but it doesn‘t really matter, england have already won the one—day series against sri llanka,
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so this is a bit of dead rubber, the final one dayer and they are getting thumped in columbo. sri lanka won the toss, put themsleves into bat and batted brilliantly 366—6, the top four batsmen all reached half centruies. niroshan dickwella fell five short of a tonne. england limped to 132—9, liam plunket the last wicket down just as the heavens opened. tipping down there, very unlikely they‘ll come back out, england well short of what is required, even when the duckworth—lewis stern method is applied. it could be england‘s biggest one day defeat. a sari into the one—day series, a series that england have already won but sri lanka already on top. after beating conor mcgregor, khabib nurmagomedov is ready
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to change the octagon for the boxing ring and take on floyd mayweather, just as mcgergor did. the russian is unbeaten in his 27 ufc bouts after his victory over mcgregor earlier this month, and mayweather has called for the 30—year—old to ‘come into his world.‘ nurgomedov belives the fight would bring in a world record broadcast audience. he wants to do it in moscow. and england netball have been given a lifeline after their current sponsors doubled their investment in the sport. they are commonwelth champions but there were major concerns over funding their players fulltime with a home world cup coming up next year. they‘ve secured a new three—year deal that will pay for the national team‘s fulltime contracts beyond 2019. it is still raining. an update in
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the next hour. that is all the sport for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to phil bodmer in leeds, where look north have been looking in greater detail at the rising number of takeaways, something we‘ve been covering throughout the day. however, yorkshire and the humber is exceptional, having seen the biggest percentage increase in the number of fast food outlets of any region in the last 8 years. charlie rose in tunbridge wells for us. he‘s been visiting accomodation for veterans built by the royal british legion, who have announced £14 million plans to buld a dedicated veterans village, to mark the centenary of the end of world war one. first of all, phil, i undertsand that there are now almost 4,000 takeaways in yorkshire — up 67% since 2010. how concerned should
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we be by these figures? i think they are. we already know the you gave as one of the highest proportions of overweight and obese children in the european union. —— and of the uk has one. the age between ten and 11 is a record high by more than a third to 2000 624 442%. according to public health england and there is some data evidence to suggest that the reasons for the highest percentage of adults with axis weight i‘ve also seen the largest growth in fast food outlets. this year health secretaryjeremy huntand this year health secretaryjeremy hunt and scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon set targets to have childhood obesity by 2030 and planes in england include banning the sales of the drinks to children in stopping the cello of sweets and snacks at check out some possible ca la snacks at check out some possible cala recaps on popularfoods snacks at check out some possible cala recaps on popular foods like pizza. yorkshire has got one of thoseissues pizza. yorkshire has got one of those issues in particular. why is that? people in yorkshire have the
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opportunity to frequent more ta keaways, opportunity to frequent more takeaways, we filmed and razma were more than 70% of adults that are classed as being overweight according to public health england. more than half of all food outlets ta keaways fast more than half of all food outlets takeaways fast food restaurant so surely it is no question is that nearly three quarters of people deemed to be or obese, we will be seeking to do a reached 30 stone after hitting a daily diet of take away food. i really hate it all up. it is not normal. it is not easy to be fit. it is not right or healthy or good for anyone to eat that much. you see more takeaways did you see... “— you see more takeaways did you see... “ a you see more takeaways did you see... —— a limited number of fast food places massively. it isjust taken food places massively. it isjust ta ken over. food places massively. it isjust taken over. it's part of life now. if you haven't got time to cook, mcdonald's or take away. no time to cook breakfast, we will go get breakfast. it is easy. it is
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convenient. and it is cheap. here is a staggering statistic. section ten people here in yorkshire are classed as overweight or obese and doctors say the amount of fast food weed is central to the problem. —— six and ten. i really it all up. is not normal. it is not easy to be fit. the food is not good for anyone. you see more takeaways did you in corner shops, things based... that at the wrong clip i think. we were hoping to talk to the doctor but simon, back to you. that was our fault. thank you very much. but the look north tonight. let‘s go to charlie. tell us about this charity tonight, it isa tell us about this charity tonight, it is a hundred years since the end of the first world war. it is. the charity is called the rb li, stands for the royal british legion
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industry, a sister charity to the british legion but this one was set up british legion but this one was set up in1919, british legion but this one was set up in 1919, after the first world war to care for soldiers discharged with tuberculosis. the rb li aim is to provide care and support and employment to ex—servicemen and women whom i have a disability or an injury which had percent chance of getting on in life and the chances of finding employment. last year, the rbli open to brand—new blocks of accommodation on his purpose built site in maidstone and can‘t. fischer, the charity has announced a brand—new fund raising campaign and says that it wants to raise £14 million over the neck opening blocks a purpose built accommodation and that the houston extra 100 veterans. i have been speaking to garry kassel, a former soldier, 59, but 20 yea rs
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years ago, his leg was destroyed bya landmine in bosnia. since then he has struggled with mental health and other parts of his life. but last year he managed to move into one of these lads in maidstone. —— one of these lads in maidstone. —— one of these flats. i can move around in my wheelchair. i don't have to worry about tight corners, about tight corners, thin area were i couldn't move through. it was just so great seeing the amount of space that they had in the apartment. being here, we both felt that life is a lot more calmer now and we are not isolated. it is not just it is notjust about housing, is it? this charity has an integrated lifestyle and what does that mean for vetera ns ? lifestyle and what does that mean for veterans? that his health care on—site, community centres and employment in the form of a factory
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and that factory, the veterans worked there and make signs for kent cou nty worked there and make signs for kent county councils and also signs for network rail. i haven‘t speaking to the chief executive of the rbli got his name is steve chery. —— i have been speaking to. it is distinct that we have this accommodation which provides the stability for the veterans or their families to start on their progress back to independence. it is being able to bring together our health care and welfare and our employment offers at the right time along with support from our charities and national resources of the images and assistance to come onto site and provide the support when it is needed. —— of the images. provide the support when it is needed. -- of the images. but more tonight. absolutely. and full port at 6:30pm. on southeast today on bbc one. thank you, charlie. and thank you phil. that is nationwide. if you like to see more on any of
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stores, you can access them via the bbci player. and we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 430 here on afternoon live. british music star rita ora is heading a campaign to try and combat what‘s known as ‘beauty cyberbullying‘ — where somebody is bullied online as a result of their appearance. it‘s in association with the cosmetic brand rimmel, who have released the results of a survey suggesting almost a quarter of women have experienced beauty cyberbullying, with nearly half those going on to self—harm. well, earlier i spoke to rita ora from her hotel room in central london and asked her why she got involved in this campaign. only 44% of women actually report bullying. and i think that is a really low number and it really affects people and it really damages people‘s mental health, which is such a big issue for us, especially for somebody like myself in the public eye who for many years has had this cover of being in hair
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and makeup and wearing all these fancy dresses and doing all of these shows and you feel like i really had a platform to support women of any age and men who feel like they are being attacked for being themselves, which really is the worst thing ever. quite a platform, 13.9 followers on instagram, million 64.8 million on twitter, i suspect you don‘t read them all but there must be some that still get to you. don‘t get me wrong, earlier in my career, i was completely obsessed with the comments and i saw some hurtful, horrible things, that made me think twice about do i want to do music. what sort of comments really upset young people? for me and a lot of young women, is a lot to do with our appearance, how we look, what size we are, what kinda makeup we have
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on and what we choose to wear. ijust think it is so transparent and it is very difficult to stick up for yourself online because they really are going to get into like a black hole if you try to fight everything that is negative. so my advice would be to reallyjust support your friends online and show as much support to somebody being themselves as you can. some breaking news now — downing street has confirmed the prime minister will appear before the 1922 committee tomorrow night. this coming amid a little earlier today suggested that the chairman of the committee, graham brady, has
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received enough letters to mount a ball of no confidence. that was later denied but obviously, huge pressure still on the prime minister which makes this in front of the 1922 committee highly significant. she is not appeared in front of them sincejuly she is not appeared in front of them since july and that was the last time when there was a suggestion that there will letters circulating asking for a vote of no—confidence to held. confirmation, a tweet from tom newton, we have confirmed that she will affect the apparent in front of the 1922 committee tomorrow. full coverage or on bbc news of that. jamie is here. we will have all the business news ina we will have all the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that jamal khashoggi, was murdered in a planned operation — and he wants the killers tried in turkey. thousands of council workers are out on the steets of glasgow — as part of a 48 hour strike about equal pay. new figures suggest there are more fast food outlets on high streets
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across the uk than there have been for ten years. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the european commission has told italy to revise its budget, an unprecedented move towards a eu member state. italy now has three weeks to submit a new, draft budget to brussels. dyson, the uk—based company best known for its vacuum cleaners, has chosen to build its new electric car in singapore. the first car is scheduled to roll off the production line in 2021. dyson said the decision was based on the availability of engineering talent, regional supply chains and proximity to some key target markets. more than 40 football clubs and 170 professional footballers and 31 agents are having their tax affairs investigated by the tax man. it‘s not the first time. uk tax authorities have clawed back in excess of £330million in tax revenue from the football industry in the last two years. hmrc has recovered £332 million of extra tax from professional
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mr dyson has decided to manufacture his electric car in singapore. not exactly a vote in favour of brexit which he has championed. well, he‘s not really british manufacturer, he makes most of his goods in malaysia. when you buy one of the hairdryers, they confirmation. —— come from asia. he does however do a great deal of r&d here, in wltshire he has 400 of r&d here, in wiltshire he has 400 engineers employed on it and is recruiting more. that is what he sees the uk for. although of the reasons he gives for chosing singapore is its technical expertise.
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he has to work out whether a british or not. he is british stone. —— british zone. but it is very predictable. it is what he has done before. he‘s never been shy of amid admitting where it is. mark is looking a little shaky today. the overall debt in italy and have been told to a budget. they are pa rt have been told to a budget. they are part of the euro. they have submit the budget to brussels to be be decided. they say it is... they said mae. they said they were spending
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too much. and they will probably stomach to see but we will reach a bit of an impasse. the european commission doesn‘t have much teeth than this. they can‘t do very much. let‘s get a bit more advice. joining us now is james hughes, chief market analyst at axitrader. what can the europeans do? agree to disagree on this? book under sanctions can they take against italy? they can't really do too much to be honest. the problem that we have a twin italy in the european commission and the use is that the italian coalition government, which is shaky at has the issue they have is shaky at has the issue they have is that for a long time, the election promises were mainly on the budget that were about spending increasing the amount of spending and if the european commission didn't necessarily agree with what they thought, what they did previously was even offered the
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electorate an option to say you can go to leave here eu and the euro, now the issue that the european union have is that how do they play this? do they punish italy hard and then forced the italian coalition government who have promised everything in terms of election promises today forced them to have a referendum on eu membership and euro membership or do they let italy off easily and almost let them have this a budget and place? from this point of view, from now, they have played ha rd ball of view, from now, they have played hardball and said you can't accept this but when you look at some of the spending numbers, spending 214% of gdp and that is almost three times more than what the european union would recommend. but the problem is that she said, they can't really do anything. that is playing with the markets but the other thing wearing them is that the us market,
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wearing them is that the us market, we had a couple of unimpressive numbers from two big companies, caterpillar and 3m. numbers from two big companies, caterpillar and sm. caterpillar is a big no wait company, almost a worldwide go away, in terms of that industry. it's been big, but you have to say the arctic that we have seen so have to say the arctic that we have seen so far, the majority have been positive. —— the profits that we are if you see the big names like caterpillar post with numbers are within the markets there is something the market does not like but at the moment there are so many nerves around stock markets especially on wall street that it doesn't actually take too much to spark a big sell—off. ever since a couple should go, when the markets rose strongly we have seen an aggressive sell—off and actually, we look at the snp 500 companies bear, all reporting at the moment and over 7596 all reporting at the moment and over 75% of them at the moment have reported better—than—expected. but
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it has been some of those bigger companies and some of the headlines within that that have disappointed which causes that never seems to return and we can really shake that at the moment. thank you, james. he summed up the markets was quite nicely. there you go. for the price coming down there. what is happening with the balance? it is a little bit off there. —— with the pound. that is more of a bread and worry. that particular detail has been waived by the day before. the dog is being waived by the tele brexit. sorry. thank you. the longest sea bridge in the world has been opened by the chinese president, xijinping. the multi—billion pound bridge and tunnel project links hong kong, macau and mainland china. it has been designed to withstand earthquakes and typhoons and contains 400,000 tonnes
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of steel, enough to build 60 eiffel towers. but the construction has been dogged by safety concerns, and fears about its environmental impact as robin brant reports. it‘s another vast infrastructure project in china. this one took nine years and almost £12 billion to build. the mega bridge spans 34 miles, crossing the mouth of the pearl river in china‘s south. linking hong kong and the casino hub macau with zhuhai on the chinese mainland. the big idea is to create a new bay area powerhouse to rival tokyo or san francisco, china hopes. it links to more than 60 million people in china‘s high—tech manufacturing base. it‘s the place where this country first experimented with economic reform, 40 years ago. translation: i think this bridge
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will bring great convenience to the whole of zhuhai, hong kong and macau and promote the economic development of the whole area of the pearl river delta. it was a brief, in fact very brief ceremony for china‘s president. xi jinping simply declared the bridge open and then went off to inspect it. what has immediately become a tourist attraction comes with a very heavy price tag. the bbc understands 18 workers were killed during construction. hundreds were injured. the structure is not all bridge — tunnels were built as well, dug to allow shipping to pass freely. but some in hong kong in particular worry it‘s another symbol from beijing of encroaching sovereignty onto its special status. others claim it will be woefully underused. there are traffic quotas, different insurance requirements and the practicalities. on the chinese mainland,
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you drive on the right. in hong kong and macau, the left. robin brant, bbc news. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with shaun ley. time for a look at the weather. here‘s nick miller. more cloud come again today compared to yesterday but still some hazy sunny spells around. especially in southern parts of the uk. looking at temperatures around 17 and 18 degrees. and some sunny spells and ever denser even though it is windy here, 50 miles an hour or so and more rain pushing into western scotland, especially the northwest highlands until today and tonight and into tomorrow morning as well one of the places to a mentally range of temperatures overnight in double digits around scotland and mid—single in the cool spots. not actually as it was last night, maybe the odd patch of mist and fog, and
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to them all the rain in northwest scotla nd to them all the rain in northwest scotland using along with the breeze, so cloud drifting in from breeze, so cloud drifting in from breeze, but the best of the sunny spells still in south and east and the temperatures the mid teens, as there will be again on thursday but from friday, the strengthening northerly wind and it will feel much colder. today at five, the latest on the murder of the saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. the saudi royal family meet relatives of the murdered journalist in riyadh. turkey‘s president says there‘s strong evidence that mr khashoggi was killed in a planned operation translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent savage murder. we‘ll have more on that coming live from riyadh, the saudi capital. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48 hour
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