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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  October 23, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five, the latest on the murder of the saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. the saudi royal family meet relatives of the murdered journalist in riyadh. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that mr khashoggi was killed in a planned operation translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent savage murder. we'll have more on that coming live from riyadh, the saudi capital. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48 hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. the worlds longest sea bridge opens in china,made of 400,000 tonnes of steel, enough to build 60 eiffel towers. harry and meghan greet the crowds in fiji, 65 years after the prince's grandmother did the same, during her coronation tour. # mamma mia, mamma mia
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# mamma mia, mamma mia # mamma mia let me go... the magic of mercury — 25 years after his death — this is the scene live on the red carpet in wembley arema, where a film about his life will be premiered tonight. hello and welcome to bbc news. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that the journalist jamal was brutally murdered in a pre—planned operation. president erdogan dismissed the suggestion that his death, inside saudi arabia's consulate in istanbul, was an accident. he said those responsible must be put on trial in turkey. the saudi government has insisted mr the journalist died in a fight. frank gardner reports. hello and welcome to the convention
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centre here in riyadh, opulent building on this, the first day of the conference aimed at raising money and changing the future direction of saudi arabia. it was the brainchild of the prince the crown prince, and today he attended, in fact crown prince, and today he attended, infact in crown prince, and today he attended, in fact in the last hour. the events here however were overshadowed earlier today with the speech in the turkish parliament by the president in which he accused saudi arabia of planning the murder of jamal khashoggi, he said it was a planned operation. he dismissed the saudi version of events but there have been a fight inside the consulate, and that missed —— jamal khashoggi
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had died. he said he wanted all 18 people to be taken to turkey and charged with the murder. the crown prince and the king met the sun and brother earlier today in riyadh, we have also gotten a statement from the last hour or so from the g7 that there are many questions about the murder, which need to be answered. this report by our security correspondent, frank gardner. three weeks to the day since he disappeared, jamal khashoggi, outspoken saudi critic of his own government, last seen alive entering the saudi consulate in istanbul shortly before he was murdered by those inside. today, turkey's president erdogan addressed parliamentarians and gave his first full public reaction. translation: all information and evidence shows that jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent, savage murder. the details of this incident,
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this murder, is capable of hurting our hearts. lurid details ofjust how khashoggi died have been leaked to turkey's pro—government media. there's said to be an audio tape from a turkish surveillance device hidden inside the saudi consulate that recorded his last agonising moments. president erdogan made no mention of this today but he did challenge the latest saudi version of what happened. translation: this was a planned operation. it is not going to satisfy either us nor the international community that this was just a rogue operation by a few. over in the saudi capital riyadh, it appeared to be business as usual today. this was the grand opening of a huge investment conference dubbed
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davos in the desert. it's been boycotted by many multinational ceos due to the khashoggi murder. even the opening speaker could not avoid mentioning it. the terrible acts reported in recent weeks are alien to our culture and our dna. and i'm confident that with the support of the government, concerned authorities and leadership, the truth will emerge. the investment conference is the brainchild of saudi arabia's maverick crown prince mohammad bin salman. western governments suspect he ordered the operation against khashoggi, something saudi arabia denies. turkey's president conspicuously avoided mentioning the prince by name, praising instead the sincerity of his father, the ageing saudi king salman. but he also demanded answers to hard questions, such as where is the body? and who helped dispose of it? he also wants the suspects brought back to turkey for trial.
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translation: the 18 people must be tried in istanbul. this is my proposal. as the crime was committed in istanbul, they should be tried in istanbul. in life, jamal khashoggi had a huge following on social media, but his violent death has rocked relations between the west and saudi arabia. after this, they may never be quite the same. frank gardner, bbc news. the saudi authorities claim that that debt has no influence on the number of people who came to the first of the conference in fact when the crown prince walked in, he was mobbed by people who wanted pictures of themselves with him, and were trying to shake his hand. there are two mode is to go, it remains to be seen though, how much more information about the death of a
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jamal khashoggi comes from turkey itself, you are watching bbc news. tim wilcox there, at the initiative conference in the saudi capital, but get more with frank, let's talk first of all about the speech you refer to in your report in turkey, much trail, but didn't live up to it public that the? no, it promised to tell us it is worth the naked truth, and it left an awful lot of things unanswered, but what it does tell us, is what t the turkish president believes because we have a trickle of lea ks through the believes because we have a trickle of leaks through the media, but there is no mention of the much wa nted there is no mention of the much wanted audio tape, the surveillance tape which was allegedly recording the last seven minutes of jamal khashoggi's life, it's hard to imagine it that exists. what is on it exa ctly 7 imagine it that exists. what is on it exactly? we have been given very lurid details, so either he does not
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exist or if it does exist, turkey is holding it back as a bargaining chip over saudi arabia. there was no mention directly of the crown prince his father was mentioned and the sincerity of slightly distancing himself from the crown prince, no mention of the bone saw, which the turkish media talked about. particularly gruesome. that's important because in addition to the forensic expert who the saudis hit —— sent over, the bostock came with them and can be produced it that's pretty mailing that they were having murderous intent for the beginning but there is no mention of that. we still do not know where the body is and we still do not know for sure who order this. on that question on who order this. on that question on who ordered it, we are remarkable photos, maybe they don't seem inside saudi arabia but of the king, and the crown prince, meeting jamal
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khashoggi's sign and offering condolences. you see that picture there, and there it is, he looks understandably pretty solemn and stern. there is the ageing king on the right, in the middle, next to the right, in the middle, next to the security guard, is the crown prince. who, many in the west are convinced has ordered this, because andi convinced has ordered this, because and i have to say, having spent yea rs and i have to say, having spent years working in the middle east there is no such thing as rogue operations inside arab countries. there is no such thing as rogue operations inside arab countriesm absolute monarchy. it is, to google to arrive for it, maybe 18 arrest, but the idea that this was hatched under his nose him knowing it hard to believe but, there is no direct proof so far evidence of it if turkey has guided its not releasing it. what are his prospects, the prince, it is used today king is ailing cities de facto ruler, what are prospects for him
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internationally in the future as a result of this case do you think it's going to be a problem?” result of this case do you think it's going to be a problem? i don't think he's a pariah, i think you'll a lwa ys think he's a pariah, i think you'll always be tainted by this, the uk canada france germany have come out strongly and a g7 statement came out demanding further answer thing they do not accept the explanation so far, but key to this is the position of the white house, and donald trump. he dispatched the cia director two anchor something and make him out of that, but at the moment, donald trump seems very relu cta nt to moment, donald trump seems very reluctant to really punish and castigate saudi arabia, he is hot and cold one menacing figure con squints his than saying we can't cancel arms deals. how important is this relationship between his son—in—law and the crown prince? very close i was there in may last year during the inaugural visit, when he came to visit riyadh, and the rapport built between his
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son—in—law and the crown prince is very very close. they had late night meetings were they essentially try to come up with a end it all solution to the palestinian rate —— israeli situation, which is not going anywhere at the moment, he has lobbied reportedly, he has lobbied the president to try to keep saudi arabia on side of not ostracizing it, other governments in the west are saying this simply is not good enough. we have got to draw a line here, because it really, the trail leads to the crown prince it's not the one we can do business with and yet, look at them all, look at all the deals being signed out of the people attending, billions of dollars of deals, saudi arabia still a huge influentialforce in the economic market. at plenty of people are prepared to turn a blind eye or close their ears towards all the negative publicity, don't want to know and they just want to do business. that may stick for lots of
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people. thank you very much. what's thought to be the uk's biggest ever strike over equal pay is taking place in glasgow. thousands of council workers are striking for 48 hours, resulting in the closure of hundreds of schools, and affecting some care services. campaigners say many women are being paid three pounds less an hour than their male counterparts, and that progress on the issue is too slow. lorna gordon reports. they say they are the workers who get glasgow up in the morning. the council carers, cleaners, dinner ladies and nursery workers in scotland's biggest city. 0n the march in a decade—long dispute over equal pay. i want the same wages as men. we have fought for this for 12 years, and we won the case last year. we still haven't been paid. all we are asking is for the council to sort it out. there has been delay after delay after delay, and nothing has been done about it. the dispute dates back 12 years to when new pay scales were introduced with the aim
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of addressing pay inequality. but female employees complain it has instead resulted in men injobs of a similar level being paid more. carol qua is one of those taking part in the strike. she holds down three jobs at two different schools, but each month, still struggles to pay the bills. we just want to be paid equally, same as everybody else. i mean, honestly, the wages are ridiculous. i'm working three jobs, and i'm still struggling month—to—month, borrowing off my own kids, which is shocking. it is not on. i mean, as soon as i get paid, i pay all my bills that day, and sometimes, i'm lucky if i have £50 left for the next four weeks. the action has affected home care and cleaning services, and shut down primary schools and council nurseries. glasgow city council said it had been working hard to try to resolve the dispute. it added there was no justification for the disruption, which it says will hit the city's
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most vulnerable the hardest. it is really unnecessary. i don't think it is fair on the claimants. fair on the women. they'll lose pay over the next couple of days, those who are not going to work, who are going to go out on strike, and there is going to be enormous disruption caused in glasgow, and to some of the most vulnerable people in the city. the council says it is committed to making an offer to those on strike. it has not been made clear how they will settle the bill, which could run to hundreds of millions of pounds. but those looking for equal pay say time has run out to recognise the true value of theirjobs, and they must now pay up. theresa may has been updating her cabinet colleagues on the latest in the brexit negotiations as she tries to shore up support for her plans, and the dispute with the eu over northern ireland's border. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster. first of all, news about theresa
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may's next encounter with her backbenchers. that's right, this is the 1922 committee which is the whole of the back bench of conservative your member over the weekend, lots of rather angry and some would say completely inappropriate language directed towards theresa may. 0ne theresa may. one of the things that was it should come to the meeting with a noose, others talking about assassination, so that is potentially the kind of atmosphere she's walking into, although i think it's fair to say that in the past there has been difficult moments for her, but in these times she tends to go into that room and actually, she quite often comes out unscathed and there is the ritual banking of desks in support, so i think when it comes to the moment, quite often those anonymous sources coming forward with that language, they actually,
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one based faced with a pr minister, it's not always quite so aggressive as it might look, not like the labour party moments when the leader germy corbyn is up against backbenchers and shouting scenes, think that's likely —— unlikely. today she was breathing her cabinet about progress they decided they're going to have weekly updates on the progress for the exit there is a deal but secondly if there is no do, they say there is preparation going on and the prime minister told the cabinet that the eu was ready to call an emergency summit in november, and there is progress should that deal happen. on that question there are reports that there had been briefed by brussels, that there is going to be some kind of fresh offer that would keep the uk in one arrangement rather than
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treating northern ireland separately, which of course is a situation that is unacceptable. up to these point these to have seen documents where it seems to suggest this, this of course is after we have left, after the transition period at the end of 2020 and the future relationship, the potential future relationship, the potential future trade deal is not ready, and no hard border, where she has asked for is a uk wide customs arrangement but she wants it to be legally safe if you would like, to reassure her own backbenchers i think that is where the problem will come, although she did say yesterday that he was working with the uk, two go to this idea of a uk wide customer arrangement. the eu is to not backing down now what happens if it's not ready, so there is the northern ireland only option which is still in there, and i would still bea is still in there, and i would still be a problem no matter how much it's buried way down in the document, the eu is also saying i don't think it's time to sort it out for the
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withdrawal agreement, they think that actually, there would have to bea that actually, there would have to be a separate treaty so there would have to be some kind of legal commitment to doing that it may not be enough to satisfy backbenchers but i'm sure that's what they discussed at premise of questions tomorrow and this music —— meeting. x very much. the headlines on bbc news... the saudi royal family meet relatives of the murdered journalist jamal khashoggi in riyadh. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that mr khashoggi was killed in a planned operation. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a forty—eight hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. the world's longest sea bridge opens in china — made of four hundred thousand tonnes of steel, enough to build sixty eiffel towers. more on that in a moment. and in sport... cristiano ronaldo prepares for a "huge, emotional night" as he returns to manchester united
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withjuventus in the champions league this evening. ronaldo has won this competition five times, the first with united 10 years ago. a downpour couldn't stop england's cricketers falling to their heaviest ever one day defeat. they were beaten by 219 runs in colombo but still win the series 3—1. and a new season structure in rugby union could reduce the physical demands on those at the top of the sport in england... the next three seasons will be longer... include breaks and limit players to a maximum of 35 matches. i'll be back with more on those stories (e.g. the longest sea bridge in the world has been opened by the chinese president, sheejinping. the multi—billion pound bridge and tunnel project links hong kong, macau and mainland china. it's been designed to withstand earthquakes and typhoons and contains 400,000 tonnes of steel, enough to build 60 eiffel towers.
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but the construction has been dogged by safety concerns, and fears about its environmental impact. robin brant reports. it's another vast infrastructure project in china. this one took nine years and almost £12 billion to build. the mega bridge spans 3a miles, crossing the mouth of the pearl river in china's south. linking hong kong and the casino hub macau with zhuhai on the chinese mainland. the big idea is to create a new bay area powerhouse to rival tokyo or san francisco, china hopes. it links to more than 60 million people in china's high—tech manufacturing base. it's the place where this country first experimented with economic reform, a0 years ago. translation: i think this bridge will bring great convenience to the whole of zhuhai,
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hong kong and macau and promote the economic development of the whole area of the pearl river delta. it was a brief, in fact very brief ceremony for china's president. xi jinping simply declared the bridge open and then went off to inspect it. what has immediately become a tourist attraction comes with a very heavy price tag. the bbc understands 18 workers were killed during construction. hundreds were injured. the structure is not all bridge — tunnels were built as well, dug to allow shipping to pass freely. but some in hong kong in particular worry it's another symbol from beijing of encroaching sovereignty onto its special status. 0thers claim it will be woefully underused. there are traffic quotas, different insurance requirements and the practicalities. 0n the chinese mainland,
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you drive on the right. in hong kong and macau, the left. robin brant, bbc news. the film bohemian rhapsody is a celebration of the music of queen and its extraordinary frontman freddie mercury, and it premieres at wembley arena tonight. the word "flamboyant" could have been coined for mercury. but off stage he was very private. avoiding interviews when he could and shunning questions that touched on anything too intimate. in a moment i'll be talking to lesley—ann jones, a biographer who knew the side he hid from the outside world. but first lets go live to wembley. lizo mzimba is on the red carpet. you have lots of fans behind you. there are lots of fans of course we wa nted there are lots of fans of course we wanted the most popular rock groups of all time, lots of people listening right now, it's being held
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here, which of course just over the way at the stadium, the famous performance in 1985 took place here, where they really took the audience by storm and became a global super band. the film itself talks about to things, at talks about the band touring around to becoming rock icons that they were and remain and also pretty mercury's story, he of course was a front man and very private as well behind the scenes and struggles with his sexuality and all sorts of other areas and the film aims to try and represent all those different aspects of both the band and a pretty mercury, we are here with the stars tonight who blame her the band, —— to play the bandit, and... will be back later in
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the programme to see who turned up on the red carpet. lesley—ann jones who travelled with the band throughout the 1980s, the author of "bohemian rha psody", which calls itself the definitive biography of frddie mercury, is here. first, though, lets take a look at a clip from the film. stomp to this beat. come on. now, i want you to clap on the third beat. what's going on? you'd know if you were on time. i want to give the audience a song that they can perform. so, what can they do? imagine thousands of people doing this in unison. well? what's the lyric? # we will we will rock you. # we will, we will rock you.
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what else could it be thank you for being with us on bbc news, what are your memories of him? what aren't my memories, brady took over, he consumed us all. he was the most amazing character, he was the kind of performer who went on stage and trouble in size, and had audience of 80,000 people and the went backstage and dropped the start of you take your jacket off and and dropped the start of you take yourjacket off and became a small quy yourjacket off and became a small guy again he was not that much bigger than me and was very shy. that's what's surprising lots of people that talk about comedians who are not that funny when you meet them onstage but sing is you tend to think of as big characters even relied. indeed but he was not you wish i did not like interviews and shined the press and limelight he was very shined the press and limelight he was very private person and lived quite a separate by the light from
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the rest of the bandit, at one point when they were on the road he stayed in separate hotels from them. are you a bit worried about this kind of version of his life, do think it might be sanitized? version of his life, do think it might be sanitized ?|j version of his life, do think it might be sanitized? i have been nervous about it though when i started to see the trailers i thought 0k started to see the trailers i thought ok you know, this is an important story, he mattered, are they going to get it right and i have to say with the casting, they have to say with the casting, they have got it right, i wanted to see sasha baron as it and they cut to other actors, but they wound up here, andi other actors, but they wound up here, and i thought know but... he's not a well—known name but because of this he will be because he's a method actor berry supreme, he studied thousands of hours of friday on video and he's captured everything the cooking and the tong in the flirtatious as everything he's got it all. it's astonishing, growing up watching, and my
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generation we remember it very much, it's mesmerizing performer, and a senseis it's mesmerizing performer, and a sense is there a danger that kind of focus on friday, you openly said, i is definitive about it, freddie mercury, you adored him you really see him, but there was a whole band around of not just see him, but there was a whole band around of notjust him. stupendous bandit, massively competent, and incredible musicians in their own right, but freddie lifted them to a stratosphere and the magic was his and the blog —— lawlessness, the imagination and creativity everything that encapsulate in the songs that we know and love as the greatest rock anthem of all time, bohemian rhapsody. he was probably the most prominent victim of hiv related deaths in the 80s, the iconic figures to that with the terrible effects of that infection,
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he lived a pretty lively messy complicated private life. that's one of the things that sometimes international film is of the things that sometimes internationalfilm is not that they're portraying, is that an area you are uneasy about.” they're portraying, is that an area you are uneasy about. i feelthey sanitized it, they took out sex and drugs to a large extent but that was pa rt drugs to a large extent but that was part of that and of course they want younger people to see it so they have to comment down, but it was out there is we watched. do think it changed you think he changed didn't mellow him towards the end of his life? i mean as he got older, and he was 45 when he died and was living with a partner he can't download was middle he hated touring, the last one was that magic tour and 86 the following year he got diagnosed, and he closed a few doors but by then it was too late. what's your memory of
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him? how generous and kind he was i was ina him? how generous and kind he was i was in a hotel with him in 1986 and found him in a velvet smoking jacket and completely unlike him very fancy dressed and he was nervous because the press was about to arrive and he did not know how to converse, he did not like talking to strangers so he grabbed two bottles of champagne and filled all the glasses so he did not have to talk to anybody. that's a good night —— technique, thank you so much for coming in and talking, will be back later now time for your weather. pretty quiet up there is some of us have had the rainbow and more rain adding to the total as we receive across the northwest highlands of scotla nd across the northwest highlands of scotland and that rain tomorrow will use through the night, but more to come quite windy, they use a little through tonight and into tomorrow, some cloud pushing across northwestern parts of the uk,
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through the night, clear skies to the south and east i am mild night in scotland, chilly for some in southern england and southwest called last night, patchy morning, the rain in the far north of scotla nd the rain in the far north of scotland still patchy but easing in intensity tomorrow, lighter winds for many of us more cloud in the west compared to the east and south wales in southern england there are eastern england and scotland, some sunshine bear and the wind eases a bit average speed still gusty though in northern scotland and the temperatures are in the mid teens, big changes to colder weather is on the way at the end of this week. this is bbc news. the headlines. the saudi royal family meet relatives of the murdered journalist jamal khashoggi in riyadh. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that mr khashoggi was killed in a planned operation. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a 48 hour
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strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. the world's longest sea bridge opens in china — made of four hundred thousand tonnes of steel, enough to build sixty eiffel towers. let's cross to the bbc sports centre now. good afternoon. old trafford is getting ready for the return of cristiano ronaldo this evening. manchester united welcome his current team — juventus — in the champions league. 0ur sports correspondent david 0rnstein is at old trafford. a big reception surely awaits ronaldo tonight. he will be the name of everyone's lips. we have seen some fans arriving on the last night to try to
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get a glimpse of him when he and his juventus side arrived from manchester airport for the had a look around the pitch and then rinaldo gave a news conference, he was tight—lipped on the situation that has been hanging over him and perhaps takes a bit of loss away from his return to old trafford. those rape allegations that he faces. police in las vegas have reopened the 2009 investigation into sexual salt after, at the request of a woman who alleged that she was raped by cristiano ronaldo. these are allegations that he denies, he described them as they news insisting that his conscience is clear. but perhaps these are not the circumstances that he would have wa nted circumstances that he would have wanted to return in but he did say last night he is a happy man and that the truth will come out and that the truth will come out and that his people around him are taking care of it. he left this clap in 2009 for a world record £80 million then for real madrid. he had
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six glittering years and established himself on the world scene, winning the champions league title. he's now a five times champions league winner, and since leaving 0ld trafford has scored an incredible 455 goals in 448 games. so it really will be an interesting night here for ronaldo on his second appearance back here since moving to real madrid. and then of course going on to juventus last summer. and you mentioned his individual performances there but as a team juventus have such european credentials themselves of the club, something manchester united would wa nt to something manchester united would want to replicate going forward. just how tough is the challenge they face? a huge task, with seen the recentjuventus pedigree face? a huge task, with seen the recent juventus pedigree in face? a huge task, with seen the recentjuventus pedigree in recent yea rs. recentjuventus pedigree in recent
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years. 100% start to the domestic season and he could tell with a draw against genoa on saturday when of course cristiano ronaldo scored. the manager saying that their minds were firmly on old trafford. i hope that cristiano ronaldo will be the man to end their weight for a champions league title. manchester united have had a stuttering season as we know, jose mourinho coming under huge pressure but they may have turned a corner against newcastle when they came from 2— yl down to win and then chelsea when they put in a spirited performance only to be denied in the closing seconds. manchester united have got work to do in this group at the two points behind juventus. juventus have beaten their opponents and will come here as the favourite hugejob for manchester and will come here as the favourite huge job for manchester united going up huge job for manchester united going up against cristiano ronaldo. it
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should be a brilliant night here at 0ld should be a brilliant night here at old trafford, the atmosphere will be building in not too long even though it isa building in not too long even though it is a pretty miserable might. an eight o'clock kick—off. and that much covered on bbc radio 5 live. the other english side in champions league action tonight is the blue half of manchester — manchester city. they've travel to kharkiv to face ukrainian side shakhtar donyetsk. city have gone out in the last 16 and quarter—finals in pep guardiola's two seasons in charge. he believes the club's fans need to start demanding success in the competition. you have two push, notjust the manager, everyone has to be pushed and still we do not have that feeling. i think we are a good team, a really good team and it is a
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pleasure to work with them. but in competition you need something special that still looking for. england have suffered their heaviest ever one day defeat. they were beaten by 219 runs by sri lanka in the fifth one—dayer in colombo. the hosts had england on the backfoot from the start with their opeing four batsmen all reaching half centruies. niroshan dickwella made 95 as they set a target of 367. england couldn't have started worse falling to ‘4 for 3‘ in reply as they limped to an eventual "132 for 9‘ just as the heavens opened. despite the heavy loss, england still win the series 3—1. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories — and follow all the champions league games later — on the bbc sport website. as the centenary of the first world war approaches next month, events across the uk are taking place to commemorate the fallen soldiers one hundred years on.
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but while we take a minute's silence to remember those who fought for britain — what about those on the other side of the trenches? a new game to mark the centenary — memories retold 11:11 — is encouraging people to look at the war from both sides, with its two lead characters — a young canadian soldier and a german whose son is missing in action — voiced by elijah wood and the german actor sebastian koch. sebastianjoins me now — but first let's have a quick look at the game — developed by the animators at aardman studios. the german's name was kurt. and he wasn't there for the fighting. he was a father, only there to find his son. missing in action. the boy's name was harry. a canadian. a photographer. he reminded me of my boy.
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so young. he should never have been at war. sebastian — welcome. they look almost more like paintings, very beautiful. yes, almost like an impressionistic painting and you can interact and swa p painting and you can interact and swap the characters. it is a wonderful piece of art. and that is why we did it, i had never done a video game before. and the producer, and it is a very famous company, very good at what they do, i was new to this whole thing and they told me how enthusiastic they were about the story and that convinced me and i
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said ok, let's go for it. it is interesting as a performer to play a character like this because you just have the voice like a radio drama but presumably the character, kurt, that depends how they play the game i suppose so it is not like conventional storytelling. how strange was that for you? that intrigues me and i was happy about that, about the different narrative. because it is a new part and you never know where it will lead. for me as an actor doing a lot of films, it isa me as an actor doing a lot of films, it is a new possibility to tell a story, and to interact as an audience, to swap character and even change camera positions. to be the bird of the animals in this wonderful game. a bird, a pigeon and
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a cat. you can even go into these characters and explore the world through these characters which is fantastic for me a completely new thing. the difficulty we have now in a sense, we are experienced in this country coming up to the 100th anniversary, all the participants are now dead, true in germany as well. do you think it will help in any sense interest or understanding for younger generations about that extraordinary and terrible experience of fighting in the war?” think it was and perhaps in a different way, it is emotional, it is not about shooting people down, getting points and being under pressure with a time limit and things like that, you can go into these wonderful scenarios and be there. of course you get the war and there. of course you get the war and the suffering and this terrible catastrophe. but you get it in a
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different feeling it is not a shooting game. if you have a decision to shoot someone you have to ta ke decision to shoot someone you have to take the consequences, the moral consequences. and you can swap the character and see the other view which is highly interesting as a player. you are wearing a poppy brooch and for us in this country thatis brooch and for us in this country that is a very potent symbol in the run—up to every year as we mark the armistice on the 11th of november. when the war came to an end. what about backcombing germany, is there any kind of regular commemoration of the events of the first world war? not so much, we are quite busy with the second world war. but this poppy thing, i adore this. yesterday we
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presented the game in the imperial war museum. and they plan to both parties from the ground up to the roof of the war museum which looked spectacular. and just commemorating with flowers is so beautiful. that does not exist in germany, i will have to invent that. why is that because germany suffered as much, german soldiers suffered as much as the british soldiers and the consequences for german history in fa ct were consequences for german history in fact were very traumatic. now with the centenary, there certainly will be events and commemorations. but this is not a habit right here or in france where people are silent for a minute. yes at the cenotaph near the houses of parliament, on the sunday
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nearest to the 11th of november. because the centenary this year will be on the 11th as well. did you have relatives who fought in the first world war? my grandfather was a pacifist, he was in australia and he came back and was a very protestant man not into war at all. my father was ordered after the war so in terms of direct family know war connection which is good in a way. but i had to do some research with u ncles but i had to do some research with uncles and so on. thank you very much. and you would recommend memories retold 11:11 for people to get some empathy with these events? absolutely, i played it yesterday and it was such a good thing to be in this impressionistic, wonderful world. thank you for being with us and for marking the commemorations here in this country as well. a pleasure to have you with us.
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the duke and duchess of sussex have been offered roast pig, a whale's tooth and a traditional drink of kava as they were welcomed to fiji on the second leg of their southern hemisphere tour. the arrival ceremony, under cloudy skies in suva, mirrored one attended by the queen and duke of edinburgh back in 1953. 0ur royal correspondent jonny dymond reports. they brought the british weather with them. but neither rain nor wind would get in the way of this welcome. fiji is a long way from pretty much everywhere, and this visit is a big deal. 0n the way in from the airport fijians waited to catch sight of their royal guests. in the centre of suva, the crowds grew and grew. around 15,000 fijians have turned out in the heart of the capital to welcome them, they may be here for only two days but this looks like it's going to be a huge event for fiji. it used to be no cheering at a welcoming ceremony. cheering
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not any more. the couple watched as kava was prepared, a drink made from a plant of the same name with deep roots in fijian society. then for the duke, more than just a sip. laughter applause after drinking, of course — dancing. more than six decades ago, the same ceremony for harry's grandmother, the queen. afterwards she came out on her hotel balcony to greet the crowds. and tonight, so did harry and meghan. fijians were thrilled.
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we just love them. and she is so beautiful. and harry, he's blessed to have her! you know? we love them to bits. the royals are like family to us fijians. and we fijians always think of them as a family to us. lots of royal history then here in fiji, and also a glimpse of the future. jonny dymond, bbc news, suva. the headlines on bbc news... the saudi royal family meet relatives of the murdered journalist jamal khashoggi in riyadh. turkey's president says there's strong evidence that mr khashoggi was killed in a planned operation. thousands of council workers in glasgow are staging a forty—eight hour strike over the issue of equal pay. hundreds of schools are shut and home care services have been affected. the world's longest sea
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bridge opens in china — made of four hundred thousand tonnes of steel, enough to build sixty eiffel towers. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. two weeks today voters will go to the polls across the us, in the biggest electoral test for donald trump since becoming president. one key contest is for a senate seat in the usually staunchly republican state of texas. it's currently held by rival presidential candidate ted cruz. president trump has been campaigning in houston, in an attempt to see off a challenge from the democrats. from that city, james cook reports. the president came to texas to give aid and comfort to an old enemy.
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senator ted cruz once called donald trump utterly amoral, a snivelling coward and a pathological liar. now he will take any help he can to see off a left—wing challenge, yes, a left—wing challenge, here in conservative texas. you know what i am? i'm a nationalist, 0k? as the midterms approach, the polls are improving for the republicans. they are celebrating the confirmation of brett kavanaugh as a supreme courtjudge. and mr trump is reviving the animating passion of his presidential campaign — immigration. he has seized on this caravan of central american migrants who say they are trying to reach the us to escape poverty and violence at home. and in that caravan you have some very bad people. this will be the election of the caravan, kavanaugh,
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law and order, tax cuts and common—sense. that's what it is, common—sense. hello, vegas. after many months enduring the trump era in silence, the previous president is now campaigning hard again, telling democrats the stakes are high. the consequences of anybody here not turning out and doing everything you can to get your friends, neighbours, family to turn out, the consequences of you staying home would be profoundly dangerous to this country. to our democracy. but back in houston, trump supporters also think the nation is under threat from invasion. i didn't see a caravan full of refugees. i saw an army coming across our borders and it scared me. it an invasion of our country, an illegal invasion of our country, without weapons. mr trump is now threatening to cut aid to honduras, guatemala and el salvador trying to evoke a sense of crisis just as early voting begins.
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as he approaches the midpoint of his presidency, donald trump is supplying exceptionally divisive rhetoric, painting his opponents not just as a threat to the country, but as a disloyal radical mob. james cook, bbc news, houston. the number of fast food businesses in the uk has risen by more than a third since 2010. research by bbc news found nearly 40 thousand fast food outlets. the sharp rise comes at a time when doctors warn the costs of obesity could bankrupt the nhs. david rhodes reports. it is the food that is fast, convenient and an everyday part of some people's lives. i really hated how i looked. it's not normal to be 30 stone. at the age ofjust 16, joe from rotherham was morbidly obese. so in a typical week, joe, what were you eating? probably five chinese takeaways, couple of pizzas, fish and chips. joe has managed to shed over ten
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stone, but in rotherham three quarters of adults are overweight or obese, and six in every ten food businesses are takeaways. you're seeing more takeaways than you're actually seeing corner shops. i think they should definitely limit the number of fast food places massively because it's just taking over. it's part of everyday life now. i mean, you haven't got time to cook? mcdonald's. it's, haven't got time to cook, we'll have a takeaway tonight. analysis of official figures by the bbc has found that in 2010 there were just over 29,000 fast food businesses in the uk. this year, that number has reached over 39,000, an increase of over a third in the space of eight years. there are over 170 fast food businesses in rotherham. for example, this fish and chip shop has just begun to offer low—fat fish and chips. but its owners say the town has been swamped by new takeaways in recent years.
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i've seen a lot of little ones open up and close down. i've seen a lot that are just afloat. i've seen a lot try to undercut. recently i went to a council meeting to propose an objection to another business that is going to be setting up soon. but unfortunately my efforts were not heard, or not considered. six in every ten adults in england are overweight or obese according to public health england, and some doctors believe obesity is the biggest challenge facing the nhs. 0besity has been linked with fast food, and we've had projections that suggest that, by 2050, which is only one generation away, the direct and indirect costs of obesity will cost nearly £50 billion, and that's enough to bankrupt the nhs. the government and devolved administrations across the uk have all set out plans to reduce obesity levels, whilst in england ministers say local councils can control the number and location of takeaways. but on current trends, the number of these food businesses is set to rise and the battle
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to control bulging waistlines looks likely to become harder. david rhodes, bbc news, rotherham. more now on the premiere of ‘bohemian rhapsody‘ — the film charting the music of queen and it's frontman freddie mercury. 0ur entertainment correspondent — lizo mzimba is on the red carpet for us now. i'm joined by freddie sister and his nephew. just looking at the people around tonight, the impact that the music had thisjust around tonight, the impact that the music had this just huge. around tonight, the impact that the music had thisjust huge. it really is awesome and i'm proud to be here and so happy that everyone still likes freddie and queen music. were you worried about how he might be portrayed in the film? not really because i know the band and the management were going to do it right and you freddie proud. and what i
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have seen the movie, it is really good. and how important figure was freddie in your life? very important growing up, and i heard from my family how much influence he had so we're proud to be here and excited. you knew freddie better than most people, what would he have made of this, this huge world premiere, a movie dedicated to his band queen and his phenomenal talent? movie dedicated to his band queen and his phenomenaltalent? he would have said i think, have a good time and the show must go on! thank you so much for your time. we're here at the world premiere of bohemian rhapsody, named after the most famous song of queen. the stars are beginning to arrive and of course queen such a well loved band by people across the planet. what else are you expecting, or else are you
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hoping to see this evening? of course we will see the man who plays freddie, he has been spoken of as a contenderfor freddie, he has been spoken of as a contender for best at the oscars just a few months away now. also people like roger taylor and brian may from the band. of course to people who knew freddie incredibly well. they of course will be keen to make sure that his memory and the impact of what queen did for so many yea rs impact of what queen did for so many years is portrayed in a way that they feel happy with on the big screen. have a great night and thank you very much for that. as we heard, the show must go on. i will be back just after 6:30pm but now look at high pressure is in control, it has been worked across some western parts of scotland today. but we have
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some sunshine, here in north yorkshire. 17 degrees was the top temperature. but it has been windy across scotland with high pressure coming in from the atlantic. and also some outbreaks of rain. summer that will continue into tonight. we could end up with around 100 millimetres in the gauge altogether. but most places looking dry. double figures in scotland, mid single figures in scotland, mid single figures in scotland, mid single figures in the cold spots in the south. not as cold as last night. wednesday starts with the same whether pattering, the rain is lighter and more patchy in north—west scotland. a lot of cloud through western scotland and
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northern ireland and west wales. for eastern england getting some sunny spells and temperatures in the mid—teens. wednesday evening all fine but still some outbreaks of rain in the north of scotland. again a similar weather pattern on thursday with maybe a bit more clout around. and the rain gathering again in north—west scotland but the difference with this area of rain is that it difference with this area of rain is thatitis difference with this area of rain is that it is on the move into friday, weakening as it moves south. but notice these double—figure temperatures, the mild air is scooped out of the way and it changed by the end of the week. you can see that clearly here, that blue area is airfrom the can see that clearly here, that blue area is air from the arctic sweeping across the uk. feeling much colder thanit across the uk. feeling much colder than it has done. not wet everywhere, there will be some
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sunshine and good visibility but some showers around along the coasts and the hills. but not raining all the time. the murder of the saudi journalist in istanbul. now the turkish president demands justice is done. he calls for the men arrested in saudi arabia for the killing ofjamal khashoggi to be put on trial in turkey. translation: all information and evidence shows jamal khashoggi was killed in a violent savage murder. we expect those responsible to be exposed. meanwhile the man many suspect of ordering the killing, the saudi crown prince, meets the murdered journalist's son. all this while a business summit takes place in the saudi capital with foreign companies pledging tens of millions of dollars. also tonight: what's thought to be the uk's biggest ever strike about equal pay has workers out on the streets in glasgow. how elderly people are facing
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distressing and painful deaths due to poor care in some homes.
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