Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 24, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two: a warning that border controls, which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit, may not be ready in time. if there is a border that goes up between us and the rest of europe, there are already not enough trained staff. i was hearing from big supply chain operators, telling me they need 600 additional train staff. face to face — theresa may will faces her tory critics later, as she tries to rally them behind her in the brexit negotiations. america says it's revoking the visas of 21 saudi officials who they say were involved in the murder of jamal khashoggi. betting concerns — calls to a uk—wide gambling addiction helpline have risen by more than 30% over five years. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with katherine downes. good afternoon, yes, no red star belgrade fans at anfield, they have
2:01 pm
been banned from buying credits, so jurgen klopp has called on the liverpool fans to create the atmosphere. nick miller, the weather is all right at the moment? yes, but not for much longer, much colder by the end of the week, all your arctic weather details, plus wide is notjust mexican people concerned about hurricane will, because it is about to start a weather journey covering because it is about to start a weatherjourney covering thousands of miles. all that, coming up. also coming up... it is mega millions... a lottery ticket holder in south carolina has scooped the largestjackpot in us history a whopping $1.6 billion. that's £1,240,400,000. but would it make you happy? hello, everyone, this is afternoon live.
2:02 pm
the public spending watchdog says new border controls which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit may not be ready in time. the national audit office says businesses who rely on smooth border checks will pay the price, and that criminal gangs could take advantage of weaknesses. the government says it's still confident of striking a good deal with the eu. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. this is how easily goods flow into and out of the country now. roll on, roll off. and this is what might happen to the m20, according to the government and the national audit office, if we get a no—deal brexit next march. the government said if there is no deal, the border will be less than optimal. what exactly does that mean? if we get a no—deal brexit next march, the government says its priorities at the border will be security and traffic flow. what the national audit office says is that carries its own risks. if you neglect customs,
2:03 pm
you may exacerbate a problem as old as national boundaries — smuggling. the risks and patterns of movement through the border will not change on day one. over time, organised criminals could take advantage of any weaknesses in the regime that it perceives. that could mean that it is easier for goods to be smuggled into the country without paying the do customs duty. and it could be easier for people to be trafficked into the country. the national audit office also says there is a risk that in 11 out of 12 critical systems needed to manage the border will not be up to scratch by the day we exit the eu on march 29th. infrastructure to track goods coming in and out cannot be built for them. business will have to submit customs declarations for the first time, although the national audit office says it is already too late to ensure they are
2:04 pm
prepared for a no—deal, and businesses agree. i was hearing from a big supply chain operator and they told me they needed 600 additional trained staff if they were going to have do entries on all the european stuff. i would struggle to find six in felixstowe, let alone 600 at the biggest port we have. in the last few years, border force staff members have been cut by 7%. they are advertising for more staff, but there is a risk new recruits won't be deployed before brexit date, and the biggest uncertainty surrounds not only our border enforcement but the eu's. we need to understand, in the event of no deal, what will we be able to do to persuade french ports, dutch ports, they all gearing up and recruiting additional border force staff, i know, to persuade them to keep people and goods flowing. because that is the biggest challenge of all, in my book. brexiteers save the nao is playing up the risk. what we are working to make sure across a variety of areas
2:05 pm
is that we have the capacity and systems and plans in place to deal with all eventualities. i'm expecting the uk and the eu to reach a sensible agreement. all we are doing is what people would expect, to make sure we have done proper plans for all eventualities. if the government and the eu agree a deal, many of the risks will be put off until december 2020. but the nao's clear prediction is that by next march 29th, there will be much about our borders that will not yet be under control. andy verity, bbc news. 0ur correspondent richard lister is in dover. yes, you are absolutely right, this is europe's busiest ferry port, if you spend any length of time here, you spend any length of time here, you will see a lot of lorries, cars,
2:06 pm
motorbikes too, 2.6 million lorries a year are processed here, 2.2 million cars and motorbikes, 80,000 coaches. this is just million cars and motorbikes, 80,000 coaches. this isjust one million cars and motorbikes, 80,000 coaches. this is just one of 113 major entry points to the uk, and they are all scratching their heads over this report today, all of them wondering exactly what the future holds, because all of these vehicles are processed under a strict set of rules that everybody knows about, because we are part of the eu. when we are no longer part of the eu, after next march, what then? the a nswer after next march, what then? the answer is nobody knows, there may be answer is nobody knows, there may be a withdrawal agreement, in which case rules will be put in place, there may be no agreement, in which case i hard brexit means a whole other set of rules to prepare for, and the nao is quite clear that those preparations for a hard brexit, even though they have been under way for the past couple of yea rs, under way for the past couple of years, not under way for the past couple of yea rs, not really under way for the past couple of years, not really far and of advance for everything to be in place after next march. and, richard, what other
2:07 pm
proposals are there in place? we have been talking about the largest car park in the world, basically, that will be required of the motorway behind you. yes, as i was saying, partly depends on what rules are in place, because the government will hope very much that there will be no need for the big car park, either here or add any of the other boards affected, simply because they will have come to some kind of arrangement where trade cantlowjust as easily as it does now. —— can flow. but if there are different rules in place, perhaps the wto rules, there will need to be physical infrastructure, more staff, more computer systems, and the nao is saying very clearly that those things are in train, more staff are being hired, but border force says they probably will not be in place when they are needed in the event of a no—deal brexit, and of the 12 it systems which are being constructed for that eventuality, 11 look like they might not meet the deadline,
2:08 pm
and when it comes to infrastructure required for tracking and inspecting goods on those vehicles, well, there is no chance that we'll be in place by the end of march. the prime minister will meet her backbench mps this afternoon to address their concerns over her brexit plans. her appearance at the meeting of the 1922 committee comes after she suggested she could agree to an extension of the transition period. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright is at westminster. hello, yes, prime minister's questions is over, theresa may faced hardly any questions about brexit during that session. i think it will be different this evening when, as you say, she does meet tory backbenchers at the 1922 committee, one mp will be there is jacob rees—mogg, leading brexiteer, head of the erg group in parliament. what do you hope that theresa may well be saying to you when she comes later to your meeting? what i hope that
2:09 pm
the prime minister will do is reiterate commitments made in the conservative party manifesto and in his speech at lancaster house which said that the basis for leaving the european union, rather than the chequers deal which does not meet those commitments. do you feel she is in those commitments. do you feel she isina those commitments. do you feel she is in a perilous position now? no, i do not think there is a great mood to change the leader of the party but a strong feeling that the policy is not working, and that comes from all wings of the party, everyone feels that the chequers proposals do not work. there have been rumours in westminster for weeks that the chairman of the 1922 could be close to receiving the required number of letters, a8, to trigger a leadership contest after a vote of no confidence. what would you say to fellow tory mps thinking about that? we must always think very carefully, the tory party does best when it is loyal, when it is supportive, and when it has confidence in the leadership. and it is not a frivolous matter, it is not a matter
2:10 pm
to be taken lightly, and we are at a very important stage in the negotiations. you are most exercised, i think, negotiations. you are most exercised, ithink, about negotiations. you are most exercised, i think, about the idea of extending the transition period. after pmqs, the prime minister's spokesman said an indefinite transition period is not on the agenda. is there anything that can be said to you to get you to swing behind a deal that seems to be forming at the moment in brussels? well, i'm afraid the prime minister's spokesman keeps answering a different question, so will there be an indefinite period of being in the customs union as a backstop? that question has not been answered, and cabinet ministers give the impression there is no end date on the customs union proposal as a backstop, and no unilateral ability of the uk to withdraw, so they try to it like this into an extension of the transition, which is a different question. i asked the prime minister today about the jurisdiction of the european court, and she essentially gave an answer to a different question, so we have to be very precise on the questions we are
2:11 pm
asking. and you are willing to entertain an outcome that would mean no—deal at all? entertain an outcome that would mean no-deal at all? leaving on wto terms isa no-deal at all? leaving on wto terms is a perfectly reasonable deal, we would keep £39 billion of taxpayers' money which could be used to ensure that any difficulties that arose could be paid for, any people who had difficulties because of leaving without an agreement could have the issues eased for them with that very substantial amount of money, so, yes, leaving without a deal at least is clear, we could trade on wto terms, and that would get the advantages of brexit sooner. and you are not concerned about the fact that yesterday the cabinet was discussing, in a charge to meeting, how to get medicine and food into the uk if there is no—deal, because of the chaos people and displayed in calais, because france has to then implement different customs arrangements? this is the wrong way round. goods coming into the uk will be under the control of the uk government. we will be able to
2:12 pm
decide how we police our borders... no, the french would have to enforce eu customs laws. you are confusing outward with inbound traffic, we could ensure that all the lorries coming into the uk came through on the same basis. we could cut tariffs to the rest of the uk, lowering the cost to the least well off in our society, we should make sure that there are provisions in place that we can keep our borders open, which is our own authority, and then the eu will have to decide whether it obeys wto rules and its trade with us. donald tusk tweeted this morning that the question now of the irish border was 100% default of the brexiteers — you put these on the agenda, nobody else. simply not true, the backstop is not a question raised by brexiteers but by the european union, it is humbug of the highest order, and he knows it is. he has these little jokes, he did that funny instagram picture, rather
2:13 pm
rudely, about the prime minister. it is an obscure sense of humour that he has got. jacob rees-mogg, many thanks. simon, jacob rees—mogg will be joining thanks. simon, jacob rees—mogg will bejoining fellow tory thanks. simon, jacob rees—mogg will be joining fellow tory mps when they meet the prime minister later this afternoon. ben, tokyo later, thank you very much, but right there. —— talk to you later. the united states has announced measures against some of the saudi officials it has linked with the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. 21 of them will have their us visa revoked or see them refused in future. preisdent trump has described the killing, at the saudi consulate in istanbul, as "the worst cover—up ever". naomi grimley has more details. what really happened to jamal kashoggi? the saudi authorities have given up the pretense that he is still alive, claiming he died in a fist fight with rogue operatives. but does the world by that version of events? the turkish president, for one, is sure that the plot went higher up the chain of command. translation: we are determined not
2:14 pm
to allow a cover—up of this murder and to make sure all those responsible, from those who ordered it, to those who carried it out, will not be allowed to avoid justice. this was jamal kashoggi's body double, staged by his killers, to give the impression he was still alive. it is this level of premeditation and manipulation which has lost saudi arabia credibility in the eyes of its most loyal allies, as the evidence trail increasingly leads to the heart of the saudi state. we have identified at least some of the individuals responsible, some in the intelligence services, the royal court, the foreign ministry and some other saudi ministries we suspected to be involved in the death of mr khashoggi. we are taking appropriate actions which involve revoking visas and other measures. in london theresa may echoed that, saying the uk would also
2:15 pm
revoke the visas of any complicit officials. president trump was at first sympathetic to the saudi explanation of why the journalist disappeared. but a week on, he sounds incredulous. they had a very bad original concept, it was carried out poorly, and the cover—up was one of the worst in the history of cover—ups. it's very simple. bad deal, should have never been thought of. somebody really messed up. and they had the worst cover—up ever. and where it should have stopped is that the deal standpoint, when they thought about it, because whoever thought of that idea, i think, is in big trouble. is this the man who will ultimately take the blame? later today, at an investment conference in riyadh, the crown prince, mohammed bin salman, will speak for the first time in public since the story broke. he was the manjamal kashoggi criticised in his newpaper columns.
2:16 pm
and the grisly death of the journalist may yet decide his fate. naomi grimley, bbc news. calls to the national gambling helpline have increased by almost a third over the last five years, according to figures seen by bbc yorkshire. nearly 30,000 calls were made by gamblers to the helpline in the last year according to gamcare, the charity that runs it. the government says it's taking decisive action to ensure the most vulnerable people in society are protected from gambling—related harm. ali fortescue reports. sporty, funny and a loved son. alan lockhart took his own life because of a gambling addiction when he was a0 years old. i was just horrified, because i could not see what the attraction was, that it was so great that it could have this effect on my son. but sadly, alan's story is not unique. nearly 30,000 calls were made to the national gambling helpline last year, that's a 30% increase on five years ago. the proliferation of advertising
2:17 pm
and the concern that we have with the harm caused by the fixed—odds betting terminals, for example, whether this reflects an increase in problem gambling per se, i do not think it would be a great surprise to those of us who work in the area. for matt, it all started with card games when he was just 13 years old. he did not realise then that his addiction would end in a prison sentence. i ended up taking money from work. i had exhausted all lines of credit and itjust carries on and on because an addicted gambler cannot win, they willjust lose money. i thought about suicide daily, because i was in such a hole, i just could not get out. it does not just affect a gambler, it is not the numbers of gamblers that matter, it is the number of families that matter, the number of people in those families, they are the victims. unlike matt, alan lockhart was never able to start again. but his family hopes that his story, however short, will mean fewer lives lost. ali fortescue, bbc news.
2:18 pm
and at 2:30, we'll be talking to mike kenward from the organisation gamcare which provides treatment for problem gamblers. it also runs the national gambling helpline. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. there's a warning that border controls — which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit — may not be ready in time theresa may will face her tory critics later, as she tries to rally them behind her in the brexit negotiations. america says it's revoking the visas of 21 saudi officials who they say were involved in the murder ofjamal khashoggi. liverpool fans need to create the atmosphere tonight — that's according tojurgen klopp. red star belgrade fans are banned from travelling for tonight's champions league match at anfield. england cricket coach trevor bayliss has warned his one—day players they may miss out on the world cup next year if they repeat the performance that saw them thrashed by sri lanka in the final one—dayer.
2:19 pm
and the search is on for a successor to eddie jones as england rugby union's head coach, and the job could go to someone with no international experience at all. i'll be back with more on those stories just after half two. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has said he would be ready to call a special brexit summit whenever negotiators made what he called "decisive progress" on a deal. speaking to the european parliament in strasbourg, he said a meeting pencilled in for the 17th of november was still on hold. i'm joined now by our correspondent adam fleming in strasbourg. adam! hi, simon, yes, a similar message from donald tusk that meps urge to the one that we as journalists heard at the press conference at the end of the summit last week — in other words, not the decisive progress that the eu would have liked in the brexit talks, so no guarantee of a signing on the dotted line summit in
2:20 pm
the middle of november. we can discuss that with some meps from labour and from the conservatives. seb, the thing is they are making progress, 95% of the withdrawal agreement is done. or 8096, progress, 95% of the withdrawal agreement is done. or 80%, depending agreement is done. or 8096, depending on who you talk to! i'm sure if you add up all the words in the agreed text, i add up all the words in the agreed text, lam add up all the words in the agreed text, i am sure add up all the words in the agreed text, lam sure it add up all the words in the agreed text, i am sure it is 80/90% of the way there, but the remaining bed is crucial, the bits that unless we have an agreement on, we can't reform. it is all very much... wendy think you will be able to get your hands on a draft and start discussing it in this building?” have literally no idea, the sooner the better, but i fear that the government will want to take this to the house of commons as soon as possible to try to avoid any dissection of that deal. it is very important that everybody in this process has the time to properly go through what is agreed and to determine whether or not is in the interests of the country. as a
2:21 pm
labourmep, do you interests of the country. as a labour mep, do you have any influence over the brexit process at all? it depends what you mean by influence, we speak to our eu 27 colleagues, members of civil society in the uk and elsewhere around the eu, and yes, i think our voice is heard, the opinions that we have are taken into account, but influence when it comes to the government? no, nigel farage has more influence with the government than we do. john, last week at the summit, there was not the decisive progress that people hoped for, it was a bit of a disaster, wasn't it? it was not at all, there was decisive steps made in the conversations that were had, and the fact of the matter is that there was a significant mood change asa there was a significant mood change as a result of that council, and you can see that in every direction, guy verhofstadt, the pa rliament‘s negotiator, even he said he was sure that there would be a deal. look at all of the mood music, the body
2:22 pm
language that came out, the leaders of the 27 went out for a beer together, they were so confident and sure. yes, without the prime minister, because she had left to go elsewhere, we all know that. how does a better mood or a bit of optimism solve the irish border issue? that is a very real issue, and it has been clear from the start that it and it has been clear from the start thatitis and it has been clear from the start that it is something that needs solving, there is a range of technical matters that need to be looked at, but what the prime minister has always been about as trying to get a number of options on the table in a constructive dialogue with the european union, and that is happening, and i am confident there will be a deal that will emerge very soon. could you swallow a brexit treaty that had one sentence in it saying that northern ireland might have to stay in the customs union? that is what the eu is saying will have to be. that will not be the case, the prime minister and the cabinet's view, that is one i share,
2:23 pm
we wa nt cabinet's view, that is one i share, we want to push these matters along, we want to push these matters along, we wa nt we want to push these matters along, we want a really good, constructive trading relationship with the eu where there is no need for a border. but, seb, the eu side of insistent that clause will have to be in the agreement. is there a way you could have that and then something else that would keep john have that and then something else that would keepjohn happy? have that and then something else that would keepjohn happy7m have that and then something else that would keep john happy? it was agreed in december, this is what i don't understand about this whole thing. it was a condition of moving on to phase two of the talks that the irish backstop was agreed, and it was. and now we find that people cannot still make it, borisjohnson did not know what it was when he was told about it, blah blah blah, are we to believe the government can negotiate trade deals going forward when it can't disseminate the agreement that it has already put its name to here with its own members? it is quite astonishing. john, you talk about the mood, but the mood in the chamber earlier was appalling, social democrats compared to nazis by your leader. i know he has apologised for his remarks, but
2:24 pm
the mood is terrible, we look ridiculous, we are flailing around, and instead of having anything concrete to negotiate on, we are insulting our neighbours, it is astonishing. nigel farage said that theresa may is in thrall to her civil servants who were makers sign up civil servants who were makers sign up to civil servants who were makers sign uptoa civil servants who were makers sign up to a humiliating deal. indeed, you hear all these noises in the background. in terms of the specific you pick up on, in terms of the comments that were made, he has comprehensively apologised for those and is meeting the member that those words were said about later on today. just in terms of the mood, the mood is far better, we have been dealing with all kinds of issues — it is not right, and it is not for us it is not right, and it is not for us do you deal with issues to do with brexit yet, that will come in march of next year, when we will have an opportunity to have our say. meps won't get to vote on the final
2:25 pm
brexit deal until march, the arrangement is that it will get voted on at westminster before it arrives here. two men who stole half a million pounds worth of designer watches in an armed raid at the gleneagles hotel in perthshire have been sentenced to a total of 29 years. richard fleming and liam richardson used a gun, a machete and hammers in the robbery, at the hotel's mappin and webb shop injune last year. passing sentence, thejudge, lady carmichael, said the robbery was an act of serious premeditated criminality which would not be tolerated. tens of thousands of south western railway passengers are being warned not to travel today — as trains already affected by strike action were hit by a signal failure. the fault early this morning between woking and surbiton meant severe disruption at london waterloo. the signalfailure has now been fixed. the network is already operating on a reduced schedule because of a five—day strike by guards. storm willa continues to move across central mexico,
2:26 pm
with maximum winds of 125 mph. meteorologists in the united states say willa weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm after making landfall. heavy rains have resulted in power outages and toppled trees, though no deaths have been reported. we are staying with that theme, nick miller has the map to show what is going on. yes, we talk about this a lot, hurricanes, cyclones, they need the fuel of warm water to keep them going, and clearly it has moved inland in mexico, and that is not the case anymore, so is dissipating asa the case anymore, so is dissipating as a tropical weather system, maximum sustained winds have come down quite a lot, but this is the rainfall from it as it moved inland. but we're not finished yet with willa. it is not going to completely
2:27 pm
disappear, there is still energy and moisture associated with it, and it will begin a very long journey, strap yourself in, quite a ride. i will take you to texas, some of the moisture is from willa in texas later today and into thursday, and people in texas are not too happy because of this, these scenes from texas last week. they have already had significant flooding, actually from a former tropical weather system that had moved in there, and here comes another one, and some parts of texas have already had their wettest autumn on record, which is, well, still some way of autumn to go, that is quite something, including dallas, sosa moisture that is not wanted in texas. frequent opportunities during this for you to say what next, because there is a lot of that in this, so, simon... what is next, nick?! that moisture in texas, where is it going next, we will animate the board through time, hurricane
2:28 pm
michael howard that massive hit on the florida panhandle, this area of green will go across the same area later this week, so that clean—up is going on, that is not great news. and then look at what happens next, some of the energy and moisture from willa, wrapped up in a regular area of low pressure that deepens close to the big cities of the north—east of the usa, going into the weekend. this storm is a nor‘easter, one of those big storms that it's the north—east of the usa, so strong winds, coastal flooding north—east of the usa, so strong winds, coastalflooding possible, heavy rain too. these storms, in deep winter, would provide huge amounts of snow, because they tap into moisture from the atlantic 0cean. it is mostly going to be rain, a bit of snow on higher ground of new england. but we are not finished with what is left of willa yet. and it will still be cold willa, will it? does it return to being a hurricane over the sea ?
2:29 pm
that is an interesting story, i think it has lost another of its characteristics that even if it came back over sea, it would not be cold willa as it approached the uk, because it was such a long time ago. but it still has some of the moisture in there, we will not call it willa, call it a nor‘easter, then after that, just before it leaves north america, it looks like it split in two, one area, this is interesting, moving across the atlantic, but it looks like the first area dies a death before getting here. but the other part of the system, here it comes, starting to journey across the atlantic, and towards the end of next week part of an area of low pressure sitting to the west of us. interestingly, talking about much colder weather this weekend, south—westerly winds, so turning milder later next week, but it will be unsettled. so there is an idea about how everything is whether his length across the globe,
2:30 pm
a hurricane that has hit mexico, and a hurricane that has hit mexico, and a little bit of that, albeit indistinct and not called willa, is somehow incorporated in whether coming to us next week. that is either amazing, simon, or the biggest flannel you have heard for a long time! five minutes of my time i will not get back! all about the jet stream. so let's talk about the cold weather before that. here is the picture from earlier, from north yorkshire. the cold weather is coming, here is a picture of what plays out in our weather this afternoon. some patchy rain in northern scotland, southern and eastern areas likely to be seeing some sunshine, notjust now but through the rest of the afternoon. temperatures top out at 17 celsius. through tonight, this weather
2:31 pm
pattern of air coming in from the atla ntic pattern of air coming in from the atlantic bringing cloud into western areas will continue. still some patchy rain in northern and western scotland, clear spells here and there, maybe some mist patches. let's ta ke there, maybe some mist patches. let's take a look at how tomorrow will play out. more cloud than today, pushing a little further east across the uk, and the rain is gathering again across north—western parts of scotland and turning heavier on through thursday. this is a weather front which moves south thursday night into friday and will sweep away the last of the milder air in place. here comes the cold front moving south, it won't have a certain amount of rain in it, it is the arctic air that follows on behind ina the arctic air that follows on behind in a strengthening northerly wind. friday or saturday, many of us will be dry, there are showers showing up on some of these could fall of snow over the higher ground of scotland, the pennines, the north
2:32 pm
york moors, and temperatures will come down considerably. that sort of weather stays with us into the weekend. saturday, a lot of coastal areas at the risk of seeing these showers, a mix of cloud and sunshine, strong, cold, northerly wind, that is a winter direction for you, and hardly any of us into double figures on the temperatures, maybe in the very far south. factor in the wind and it will feel colder than that, the wind—chill factor will make it feel like it is in low single figures. not the coldest weather we have seen, of course, but a shock after what we have had. last weekend it was almost 20 celsius. so, much colder, some in showers, and an early taste of winter on the way. this is bbc news.
2:33 pm
our latest headlines: the national audit office is warning there could be queues, delays and criminal activity at the uk border if britain leaves the eu without a deal. theresa may will meet the influential conservative 1922 committee of backbench mps later to be questioned over her brexit plans. the united states will revoke visas for those suspected to be involved in killing the journalist jamal khashoggi. president trump's accused saudi arabia of the "worst cover—up in history". and there's been a 30% rise in the number of people calling the national gambling helpline over the past five years. a quick bit of news to bring you
2:34 pm
from new york, the new york times reported that an explosive device has been found in mail said stability hillary clinton, similar to one found at the home of the billionaire philanthropist george soros on monday. they say the vice was similar, not immediately clear where it was found, but mr soros‘s home in is in a suburb north of new york city, that was a length of pipe filled with explosive powder, and the the new york times suggesting that this is very similar, the one sent to bill and hillary clinton. we will bring you more on that as we get it. sport now on afternoon live with katherine downes. all eyes on anfield tonight? yes, it will be interesting to know
2:35 pm
how the atmosphere goes, red star belgrade were not allowed to celtic to theirfans belgrade were not allowed to celtic to their fans because of the behaviour of the fans during the play—offs, they invaded the pitch and set off some fireworks, so it will just be liverpool fans and set off some fireworks, so it willjust be liverpool fans in the stadium tonight. it could be a big liverpool party, or it could be one—dimensional and flat. here is whatjurgen klopp had to say about getting behind the team and creating an atmosphere tonight. we need to be ready to fight for each little square metre of space with all we have. for that, we need our crowd. that is very, very important. we learned last year that atmosphere can make a difference. that is what we have to make sure again. last night cristiano ronaldo was given a warm welcome back to old trafford, as his sidejuventus took on manchester united in the champions league. he didn't score, but did have a hand in the only goal which sealed victory forjuventus, his cross setting up paulo dybala.
2:36 pm
united travel to italy for the return fixture in two weeks' time. manchester city manager pep guardiola said his side played the best football of his time in charge as they beat shakhtar donetsk 3—0. bernardo silva added the gloss on the performance, coming on as a substitute to score. his manager had said before the game that his side were not ready to win the champions league. usain bolt could still sign to be a professional footballer in australia — despite the fact the club he's playing for can't afford him. he's been on trial with the central coast mariners, but they said it was unlikely bolt would sign with them, without a "financial contribution from a third party." now the australian football association says its working with the club "in regards to funding". england cricket coach trevor bayliss has warned his one day players that they'll be left out of the world cup next year if there's a repeat of the performance that saw them suffer their heaviest ever defeat — a 119—run thrashing by sri lanka in the final match of the series.
2:37 pm
they did take the series win, but bayliss has criticisied their attitude. i thought our performance in the field, our attitude in the field was no when it up to scratch for a numberone team, so no when it up to scratch for a number one team, so we've got some ha rd number one team, so we've got some hard work to do going forward. 0ne thing leads to another, and some dropped catches as well. i think fielding can give you confidence for the rest of your game, it's the one pa rt of the rest of your game, it's the one part of the game that we all do together. we we ren't part of the game that we all do together. we weren't on our game, andl together. we weren't on our game, and i think that showed, it passed over into our bowling and batting performance. india's virat kohli became the fastest batsman to reach 10,000 runs in one dayers — with his second consective century against the west indies. it was the 37th hundred of his one day career — and it's taken him 205 innings to reach that mark, beating the record of his compatriot and india legend sachin tendulkar — who took 259 innings. the rugby football union say they're prepared to consider appointing a premiership coach with no international experience to succeed eddiejones as england boss.
2:38 pm
jones is set to leave in 2021, but he could quit next year, if england underperform at the world cup in the autumn. the search for his replacement has already begun, and director of professional rugby nigel melville says they are looking at all the options, overseas and in the premiership, which may mean going for someone who's yet to coach at international level. finally, gloucester fly—half danny cipriani will face a disciplinary hearing in the next hour. it follows his sending—off for a high tackle during saturday's champions cup defeat by munster. cipriani was shown a red card after his shoulder made contact with rory scannell‘s head in the 29th minute. he faces a minimum six—week ban for the offence. it's not been a great week for him, his dismissal came two days after being left out of england's squad for the autumn internationals. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much.
2:39 pm
calls to a national gambling helpline have risen by 30%. nearly 30,000 calls were made in the last year. joining us from the gambling charity gamca re is development 0fficer mike kenward. are you surprised? this seems a very large increase. i think the numbers have been incrementally increasing over the last five years, so the jump over the last five years, so the jump from last year's statistics is around 2%, but over the last five yea rs, around 2%, but over the last five years, it is around 22, 20 around 2%, but over the last five years, it is around 22,20 3%, and thatis years, it is around 22,20 3%, and that is in line with the conversation around gambling and gambling related harm, because of programmes like this bring it up. gambling related harm, because of programmes like this bring it upm on the face of it whilst the figures look worrying, perhaps it is more people are aware and are picking up the phone? that's right. this could be good news, the broadly the levels
2:40 pm
of problem gambling in the country have stayed at the same level for the last ten ewels also, on the number of people that are contacting us number of people that are contacting us is increasing, so that means the penetration we have got into that group is greater. i know you have been on the other end of those phones in the past. what state are people in by the time they realise that it's time to ring the helpline? it depends, sometimes it is a state of real crisis and they are wanting to get support in the here and now. their finances are gone to pieces, their relationships are a problem. it might even be that their partner has said to them that they need to contact the helpline or else, but other times, people are earlier in the journey and they're just thinking they may be gambling more than they would like to, and they wa nt to than they would like to, and they want to keep a lid on it, and we would encourage people to contact our services as early as possible. we are trying to expand the spectrum of people, not just we are trying to expand the spectrum of people, notjust those at the very severe end, but everybody who thinks they might have a problem. when does someone have a problem?
2:41 pm
what is it they need to be aware of? that is a good question, one we asked often on the helpline. there is no specific... we wouldn't make a judgment as a body and say, you have a problem or you don't, because that could be unhelpful. generally for a person if they are experiencing the negative impact of a gambling problem in a cumulative fashion, it is not just problem in a cumulative fashion, it is notjust they have lost a few quid here and there, and that is the opportunity cost of gambling, we expect to lose money, it is a leisure activity. but if it is affecting their relationships, finances, work life, mental health and stress, that is when it is a problem. you talk about relationships and the effect on the individuals themselves, but we have already heard this hour from someone for whom the family was affected. it goes way beyond just the one person who is gambling. absolutely. i think around 75% of the people who contact our services are the problem gambler ourselves, but about a quarter are
2:42 pm
affected others cause as we call them, so it is a parent or a partner, somebody who was affected. every time i put the telly on, there is an advert for some kind of gambling or other. is there a problem with that? there is a great deal of advertising, and there is a broad call across the industry and across the regulator and others to review that. as a charity, we work with the people who have a problem at the end of it. the anecdotal feedback that comes back to us from them is that advertising does make it more difficult for them when they are trying to withdraw from gambling, but ultimately that is a question for the regulator and the advertising standards authority and others. it is good to talk to you, thank you for coming in. the british government has said it has serious and growing concerns about the human rights situation in north western china, after the bbc saw new evidence that the country is accelerating the construction of a network of detention camps for muslims. there are claims that as many as a million muslims are being held, indefinitely without trial.
2:43 pm
the chinese government denies the allegations. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth is in beijing. 0ur reporting has provided further evidence that these camps upright of a large and growing network of incarceration facilities holding many thousands of muslims without trial. there are reports that children are being taken to orphanages because both parents and their extended families have been taken to these camps, but the repressive reality goes far beyond this border. we have heard from uighurs that they despite
2:44 pm
having passports are not being allowed to leave. passports and telephone numbers, details of their universities, are being spread. 0ne told us that he does not feel safe despite his british passport. john sudworth reporting there. it's called the mega millions draw. someone in the united states has beaten the odds of one in 303 million to scoop a huge lottery win. it had been billed as the biggest jackpot of all time, but we understand it's come in just short of that. if you won, you probably won't give a... whatever. 0ur correspondent lauren moss has been looking into it and joins me now. we are splitting hairs. it isn't the biggest lottery win in history, but it is the biggest single lottery ticket win. 0ne it is the biggest single lottery ticket win. one point they thought that this was going to
2:45 pm
break the record, but instead, the winner of last night's lottery is going to getjust shy of the estimated figure. they will be very disappointed about that! so we are talking about the actual sales of the lottery tickets rather than what they might do? yes, it is all based on how many people have bought them and that is how they work out that the winning ticket is going to be worth. just to think about the excitement in aa states in america buying these tickets, 200 tickets a second it is estimated people were buying yesterday, and at $2 per ticket, the chances of winning were something like one in over 300 million, but one single ticket holder has won 1.5a billion pounds.
2:46 pm
do they know? we have to think about the time difference, they might not be up or even the time difference, they might not be up or even aware the time difference, they might not be up or even aware of it yet. and we don't know whether they will want to be public. there are different rules are different states, sometimes they have to go public, other times they don't. so i don't really know, would you want to be saying, i have one all this money? they will certainly enjoy the money. lauren, thank you very much. you are watching afternoon live. the duchess of sussex has been talking about the importance of education for women and girls in developing countries. making her first speech of the royal tour down under, meghan told students at the university of the south pacific in fiji that learning is key to economic and social development. earlier, a trip to a market was cut short because of security fears — royal officials said they weren't expecting so many members of the public to turn up. jonny dymond reports from suva. she is one of the most famous faces in the world. but since she married, we have heard
2:47 pm
almost nothing from her, until today. at at the university of the south pacific, the couple watched a dance about climate change. and then, for the first time in a long time, it was meghan's turn to speak. she spoke about the right to education and its particular importance to young women. when girls are given the right tools to succeed, they can create incredible futures, not only for themselves but all of those around them. and while progress has been made in many areas across the commonwealth, there is always going to offer more opportunities to the next generation of young adults and specifically to young women. from staff and students alike, enthusiasm for meghan markle and her message. having her come and do that, it is amazing because we were able to tell our girls, if she can come and talk, if she can come and inspire, if she can do all this work, you can too. she was lovely.
2:48 pm
and she was concerned about issues we had raised. she was honestly giving feedback and encouraging us in our work, and i was so touched and blessed to have that opportunity. without harry, but surrounded by adoring crowds, she went to the market to visit a project for women's empowerment. it is very rare on these tips for meghan to do a trip for herself. this is the second one today. and each time, the message has been about changing the way that women and girls are treated. it was a very brief visit, and there were a fair few disappointed fans. the authorities didn't expect the numbers that turned out, and security became a concern. here in
2:49 pm
fiji, meghan started to define her role. jonny diamond, bbc news, in fiji. more now on the news of a suspicious package being said stability hillary clinton. this from america, this happened in westchester county, new york. there was a second package, they say, addressed to the residents of the former president barack 0bama, intercepted by secret service personnel in washington. the packages were immediately identified during routine mail screening procedures as potential explosive devices, and were appropriately handled as such, according to the secret service. both were intercepted prior to being delivered to the intended location. they were not received by those addressed on them. this follows an incident involving someone else who was sent
2:50 pm
a suspect package, and that was george soros, the financier. he was under package to his home in the suburbs of new york city two days ago, and that was confirmed as a bomb. we will bring you more but as we get it, but a of suspicious packages sent to vips in the new york area. we will bring you more on that as we get it. jamie is here. he will be bringing us the business news in a minute. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. there's a warning that border controls, which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit, may not be ready in time. theresa may will face her tory critics later — as she tries to rally them behind her in the brexit negotiations. america says it's revoking the visas of 21 saudi officials who they say were involved in the murder ofjamal khashoggi. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. barclays bank have posted a surge in profits. it's because its investment
2:51 pm
banking and retail divisions picked up speed. the bank had a bumpy first half of the year, which saw barclays' profits hit by legal costs and settlements. all the numbers on mortgage lending are down according to the trade body uk finance. these are september figures compared with a year ago. the number of mortgages approved by the main high street banks — 9% lower. approvals for house purchase 10% down, remortgage approvals —7.a% down. but other numbers also from uk finance show we're borrowing more but not on mortgages — a lot of it on credit cards. again these figures compare this september with last september. 0utstanding credit card debt is up 5.7%. actual spending on credit cards — 3.a% higher. personal borrowing through loans and overdrafts, up 2.3%. so, no love lost at the moment
2:52 pm
between the white house and the fed? this has been going for a while, this. president trump has been talking about how he doesn't get on well with jerome powell. a little suspicious look to there. it isn't exactly a marriage made in heaven. he says, every time america does something good, they raise interest rates. he has raised them three times this year, and will probably raise them again because the economy is growing very fast. we have got the growth of a.2% in the second quarter, and we are expecting the next quarterly growth to come at about 3.3%, something like that. so the growth is there, and it is the job of the central bank to be independent, to do its own thing and to say, it is going too fast, we will put up interest rates to show
2:53 pm
everything down. —— slow everything down. the president does appoint him, but whether he can remove him is another matter, at trump does have a bit of a history of removing people within his employer, as it were. samir ait said sane is our north america business correspondent. they are not getting on that well, are they? he went on to say that it is a bit too early to tell, but maybe he made a mistake in appointing mr powell. but you are right in saying it is very rare to hear anything from the white house with regards to the federal reserve, and especially the chair of the federal reserve. the federal reserve is an independent body, and it remains so in order for it to go forward with its dual mandate, and its mandate really is to make sure that the employment outlook and the labour market is doing well, and to
2:54 pm
make sure that inflation is within its 2% goal. and the biggest way that it can do that is by maintaining these interest rates. so as you rightly pointed out, the economy is really doing well, and so what they have to do, they have to raise interest rates. the question is why mrtrump raise interest rates. the question is why mr trump does not like the fa ct is why mr trump does not like the fact that they are raising interest rates, but itjust means that people are not go to be borrowing as much money, and that means the economy might slow down a bit, and that means that somebody has to weeks away from mid—term elections, that is not a talking point can use. one interesting thing is if he doesn't put up interest rates in december, do think that will make people say that if he doesn't put up interest rates, that that is because mr trump is pressing him not to? it will be difficult for the federal reserve not to raise interest rates, the federal reserve is listening to any of the noise coming out of the white house. and it is good that is not
2:55 pm
doing that, because its primary concern is to deal with the us economy, so whatever the president says about the economy or whatever he says about mr powell and how he may regret having appointed him at this position, it doesn't really matter for the federal reserve and the board. what they are concerned about is how the economy is doing and what they can do to maintain a flourishing us economy. samira, thank you very much indeed. samira hussain. markets bouncing backwards and forwards yesterday, but those are the best performers on the ftse, we saw bt and ocado up and down. bt's we saw bt and ocado up and down. bt‘s figure looks impressive, up 5%, but it reached its peak in 2015, and it has never got back up there, and it has never got back up there, and it is still really struggling, looking for a new chief executive at the moment, and really having quite
2:56 pm
a hard time. jamie, thank you very much for that. a quick bit of breaking news. the head of the counter affairs terrorism select committee saying that a record number of terror investigations being conducted in the uk, many investigations being carried out, 80% including concerning islamic terrorism, 20% of others including the far right, 17 attacks foiled since then, and we will have much more on that in a while, but first of all here is a weather update with nick miller. an early taste of winter by the end of the week. this is the view from north yorkshire earlier today. it is not as windy as it has been, still
2:57 pm
some gusts around 50 mph or so in the northern isles, and a lot of cloud for western scotland and north—west england, into northern ireland, southern and eastern parts of the uk some sunny spells, and temperatures around 17 celsius today. the overall weather pattern isn't changing through tonight and much of tomorrow, some cloud in western areas, especially in north—west scotland, lowest temperatures across southern parts, but maybe a bit of mist, no frost to worry about. tomorrow, still the same idea, a lot of cloud coming in from the west, some sunny spells in the east, but it will be turning wetter in north—west scotland on through the day, and this is a weather front, through thursday night and into friday it will move its way southwards. there won't be a huge amount of rain on it, so that is not a significant concern, but what is the bigger story is what follows that weather front, arctic
2:58 pm
air, so the air turning blue, follows that weather front, arctic air, so the airturning blue, on follows that weather front, arctic air, so the air turning blue, on the graphics anywhere! a much colder feel on friday, many of us seeing sunshine, showers around with a peppering of northern scotland falling as snow in the hills, still some double figures the further south you are, but we will lose most of these by the time we get to saturday. still the showers coming in, particularly in coastal parts, drifting further inland at times, the rain, sleet and snow on the hills, hail possible, thunderstorms in some of these as well, and the strong northerly wind will make it feel colder than these temperatures suggest, is already much colder than it has been, if you factor in the wind it will feel more like mid single figures across much of the uk. so that is a significant change coming for the weekend. it will feel very different, we have established that, and there will be quite a bit of sunshine around, there will be showers, particularly in northern
2:59 pm
britain, and some icy patches where it has been wet. so let's talk about the cold weather before that. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at three: a warning that border controls might not be ready in time for a no—deal brexit, leaving queues, delays, and even criminal gang activity. i was hearing from a big supply chain operator, and they're telling me they need 600 additional train staff if they‘ re me they need 600 additional train staff if they're going to have to do entries on the european stuff. i would struggle to find six in felixstowe. theresa may will face her tory critics at a meeting of the backbench 1922 committee this afternoon. the us secret service has intercepted two suspicious packages — one addressed to former presidential candidate
3:00 pm
hillary clinton, and the other to former president barack obama. the men suspected of murdering saudi journalist jamal khashoggi will have their visas revoked, says theresa may, following a similar decision by the us. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with katherine downes. thanks very much, simon, what will it be like at anfield tonight? red star belgrade fans are banned, it will just be liverpool fans, jurgen klopp urging them to create an atmosphere for their champions league tie, all the build—up at 3:30pm, see you then. and nick miller has all the weather, it is about to change. standby for much colder air on the way to the uk by the end of this week, arctic air coming in, and whilst many of us will stay with sunshine, some will see snow. your full forecast just ahead. and we will be looking at what is
3:01 pm
happening off the coast of the united states as well. just one winner — a lottery player scoops the biggest single—ticket jackpot in us history, taking home nearly $1.6 billion. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the public spending watchdog says new border controls which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit may not be ready in time. the national audit office says businesses who rely on smooth border checks will pay the price, and that criminal gangs could take advantage of weaknesses. the government says it's still confident of striking a good deal with the eu. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. this is how easily goods flow into and out of the country now. roll on. . . roll off. and this is what might happen to the m20, according to the government and the national audit office,
3:02 pm
if we get a no—deal brexit next march. the government said if there is no deal, the border will be less than optimal. what exactly does that mean? if we get a no—deal brexit next march, the government says its priorities at the border will be security and traffic flow. what the national audit office says is that carries its own risks. if you neglect customs, you may exacerbate a problem as old as national boundaries — smuggling. the risks and patterns of movement through the border will not change on day one. over time, organised criminals could take advantage of any weaknesses in the regime that it perceives. that could mean that it is easier for goods to be smuggled into the country without paying the due customs duty. and it could be easier for people to be trafficked into the country. the national audit office also says there is a risk that in 11 out of 12 critical systems needed to manage the border will not be up to scratch by the day we exit
3:03 pm
the eu on march 29th. infrastructure to track goods coming in and out cannot be built for them. many business will have to submit customs declarations for the first time, but the national audit office says it is already too late to ensure they are prepared for a no—deal, and businesses agree. i was hearing from a big supply chain operator and they told me they needed 600 additional trained staff if they were going to have do entries on all the european stuff. i would struggle to find six in felixstowe, let alone 600 at the biggest port we have. in the last three years, border force staff numbers have been cut by 7%. they are advertising for more staff, but there is a risk new recruits won't be deployed before brexit date, and the biggest uncertainty surrounds not only our border enforcement but the eu's. we need to understand, in the event of no deal,
3:04 pm
what will we be able to do to persuade french ports, dutch ports, they all gearing up and recruiting additional border force staff there, i know, to persuade them to keep people and goods flowing. because that is the biggest challenge of all, in my book. brexiteers save the nao is playing up the risk. what we are working to make sure across a variety of areas is that we have the capacity and systems and plans in place to deal with all eventualities. i'm expecting the uk and the eu to reach a sensible agreement. all we are doing is what people would expect, to make sure we have done proper plans for all eventualities. if the government and the eu agree a deal, many of the risks will be put off until december 2020. but the nao's clear prediction is that by next march 29th, there will be much about our borders that will not yet be under control. andy verity, bbc news. our correspondent
3:05 pm
richard lister is in dover. this is europe's busiest ferry port, if you spend any length of time here, you will see a lot of lorries, cars, motorbikes too, 2.6 million lorries a year are processed here, 2.2 million cars and motorbikes, 80,000 coaches. this is just one of 113 major entry points to the uk, and they are all scratching their heads over this report today, all of them wondering exactly what the future holds, because all of these vehicles are processed under a strict set of rules that everybody knows about, because we are part of the eu. when we are no longer part of the eu, after next march, what then? the answer is nobody knows — there may be a withdrawal agreement, in which case rules will be put in place, there may be no agreement, in which case a hard brexit means a whole other set of rules
3:06 pm
to prepare for, and the nao is quite clear that those preparations for a hard brexit, even though they have been under way for the past couple of years, are not really far enough advanced for everything to be in place after next march. and, richard, what other proposals are there in place? we have been talking about the largest car park in the world, basically, that will be required on the motorway behind you. yes, as i was saying, partly it depends on what rules are in place, because the government will hope very much that there will be no need for the big car park, either here or at any of the other ports affected, simply because they will have come to some kind of arrangement where trade can flow just as easily as it does now. but if there are different rules in place, perhaps the wto rules, there will need to be physical infrastructure, more staff, more computer systems,
3:07 pm
and the nao is saying very clearly that those things are in train, more staff are being hired, but border force says they probably will not be in place when they are needed in the event of a no—deal brexit, and of the 12 it systems which are being constructed for that eventuality, 11 look like they might not meet the deadline, and when it comes to infrastructure required for tracking and inspecting goods on those vehicles, well, there is no chance that we'll be in place by the end of march. the prime minister will meet her backbench mps this afternoon to address their concerns over her brexit plans. her appearance at the meeting of the 1922 committee comes after she suggested she could agree to an extension of the transition period. our political correspondent ben wright is at westminster. simon, yes, an extension but not indefinite, the prime minister's spokesman was keen to say after pmqs, but theresa may will later
3:08 pm
this afternoon appear before backbench mps at the 1922 committee, someone who will be there is george freeman, a tory backbencher, what sort of reception will the prime minister gets? this is billed as a crunch meeting for her, do you think it is? they are all crunch meeting is now! i think the prime minister will get a thunderous reception, thatis will get a thunderous reception, that is my prediction. i think the vast majority of conservative collea g u es vast majority of conservative colleagues support her in trying to get a deal, in trying to square the circle, find a brexit that honours the people's wish to leave the political union, but equally honours our commitment to deliver this in the spirit of the whole nation, and make it a pro—business, pro—jobs, prosperity brexit. those are her instincts, and a lot of backbenchers have heard the talk of a leadership change now, a8 letters, or is it a7? and they are dismissing it, they wa nt to and they are dismissing it, they want to support to get a deal done, but also to begin to prepare, if people sabotage the deal, what is planned b? is there a chance that
3:09 pm
the numbers could step towards a8 by accident? there is no coordination but it happens accidentally?” accident? there is no coordination but it happens accidentally? i no idea. i have never contemplated writing a letter and putting it in the safe, i am told others have. i do not believe it happens by accident, i suspect very people suddenly wake up and think, that is an interesting idea. no, ithink suddenly wake up and think, that is an interesting idea. no, i think the vast majority of conservative collea g u es vast majority of conservative colleagues recognise the prime minister is in a tight corner, not least because there were some silly promises made during the referendum on both sides, and i think she sought last year to liberate herself from that and deliver a mandate to negotiate a brexit in her instincts, not least because of a woeful election campaign she lost the mandate, and that is the problem she got, the public are with her in trying to square the circle, but with no mandate in parliament, it gives mps license to cause her merry hell. she and the cabinet yesterday discussed the ramifications of no—deal, and a grisly, clearly, but
3:10 pm
at the same time it does not seem that tory mps will allow her to make any compromise that will get the deal done. she is an impossible position, how does she get out of this corner? well, in the end, the only way she gets out that is to negotiate fiercely, fearlessly, come back with something and use her authority to sell it. she is in a difficult situation, but i think probably she will come back with a deal, and i think in many people's eyes, it will be expensive, far from ideal, and we will all have to compromise and accept that we will not get perfection. does it have to bea not get perfection. does it have to be a deal that does not have chequers underpinning it?” be a deal that does not have chequers underpinning it? i don't know what that means, quite. if it is called chequers, it is probably dead, my hard—core brexit colleagues will not tolerate one or two red
3:11 pm
lines to do with continuity of sovereignty, being part of the ecj, for anything longer than a very limited transition period. my own view is the more important priority is that we deliver a brexit that doesn't worry business, that doesn't undermine investment, that doesn't undermining jobs, and accept that we won't be able to solve all of the long—term issues now. we need to ta ke long—term issues now. we need to take stage by stage. as far as the negotiation goes, we are in the endgame now, so your party is going to have to budge quite a long way to stem at the deal that she seems set to bring back, if she does get a deal. to quote churchill, i do not think this is the end, but it may be the beginning of the end. the received wisdom is that we have to have a deal agreed by christmas in order to get it legally ratified in the new year. whether that means christmas in january, the new year. whether that means christmas injanuary, i don't know, it is never too late and —— too late
3:12 pm
in life, but if her deal, based on the chequers negotiation, is voted down, which seems quite likely, because there is a lot of groups in the house of commons would like to give the prime minister a bloody nose, what is planned b? that is what people are beginning to think about now, and there might be some questioning in the 22, prime minister, if we can't get a deal, you'll deal has not got through parliament, what is plan b? our yea rs parliament, what is plan b? our years will be against the door, george freeman predict a thunderous reception, we will see. a quick line on those explosive devices sent to hillary clinton and barack obama, the white house is described as what it describes as violent attacks against public figures. we can get the latest from gary o'donoghue in washington. that
3:13 pm
breaking news underlining that this is being taken very seriously indeed. yes. at the moment, the secret service are describing these as suspicious packages that have been sent to hillary clinton and barack obama, to hillary clinton at her home in new york state, and to barack obama at his home in washington, dc. we do not know how close the packages got, or what the nature of the suspicion is around them, but they do come just two days after an explosive device, which was sent to george soros, the philanthropist, the billionaire who is very high—profile here in terms of supporting democratic forces under democratic politicians here. and of course he has been accused by a small number of people on the right of being involved in in funding the migrant caravan that has been marching up towards the us border through mexico. so i think the political context from this, now we have at the other two devices,
3:14 pm
depending on what they turn out to be, is difficult to avoid. none of these devices got through to the attended addressee, partly because the security is on top of things. yes, in the case of these two this morning and last night, there was a screening process. what happened on monday with the device addressed to george soros, someone who worked for him to get out of the mailbox, where they believe it had been put by hand, thought it was suspicious, called the bomb squad and the fbi et cetera, and they did a controlled explosion. so that had the potential, according to investigators, of killing someone if it had gone off, a pipe bomb with explosive powder inside, and it had a working detonator attached to it. they do believe it could have killed someone. we will see what these other devices are, but as you say, the white house describing it as a despicable act, saying those responsible will be punished. we have not had any claim of responsibility, or any indication of
3:15 pm
motive. gary o'donoghue, thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. there's a warning that border controls — which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit — may not be ready in time. theresa may will face her tory critics later as she tries to rally them behind her in the brexit negotiations. the us secret service has intercepted two suspicious packages, one addressed to former presidential candidate hillary clinton, and the other to former president barack obama. in the sport, liverpool fans need to create the atmosphere tonight, according tojurgen create the atmosphere tonight, according to jurgen klopp, create the atmosphere tonight, according tojurgen klopp, red star belgrade fans are banned from travelling to the champions league match at anfield. trevor bayliss has warned his one—day players they may miss out on the world cup next year if they repeat the performance that saw them thrashed by sri lanka in the final one day. and the search is on for a successor to eddiejones as england's rugby union head coach, and thejob england's rugby union head coach, and the job could england's rugby union head coach, and thejob could go england's rugby union head coach, and the job could go to someone with no international experience at all. i will be back with more on those
3:16 pm
stories just after half past. let's return to our main story, and there's a warning from the public spending watchdog that new border controls which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit may not be ready in time. let's talk to the general secretary of the public and commercial services union, mark serwotka. good afternoon to you, quite a warning. yes, i think it is welcome, the nag warning. yes, i think it is welcome, the nao report, because it confirms what our members, and we represent people doing the customs check, checking passports at our ports and airports, have been telling us for ages. we are already understaffed and under resourced, and given that the government triggered article 50 and essentially gave itself two yea rs and essentially gave itself two years to and essentially gave itself two yea rs to not and essentially gave itself two years to not just and essentially gave itself two years to notjust a political negotiations but to prepare for all eventualities, what we have really seen is a shambles, because theresa may is telling people that we will ta ke may is telling people that we will take back control of our borders, we will end freedom of movement, and
3:17 pm
the reality is, as we sit here today, that the moment the stuff coming through our ports, 90% comes from the eu, we do not even have the resource to look at the other 10%. at airports, we are so chronically understaffed that if, for example, we leave the eu without a deal, the e—gates which allow eu citizens to come through will mean that 100% of people would require checks, and there is no way on earth we would be able to perform those functions at ports or airports because of chronic understaffing and lack of preparation. when you talk about chronic understaffing, how many people are we talking about that you believe are going to be required, if there is a no—deal brexit? believe are going to be required, if there is a no-deal brexit? two things to say — the report talked about 570 being recruited. we think thatis about 570 being recruited. we think that is too little, too late. the problem now is that it is so late in the day that they cannot be trained and be fully up and running in time
3:18 pm
for a no—deal in brexit in march. we need considerably more than that, just really to have any hope of coping, let alone provide a proper service, and the people who are required were required a long time ago, because these are front line jobs that need proper training, not people recruiting at the last minute ina people recruiting at the last minute in a desperate attempt to get ready when the government should have been preparing for this for two years. when the government should have been preparing for this for two yearsm there not a technology answer to all this? there seems to be quite a belief that technology can replace a lot of people in this area. everybody talks about technology, and we are facing up to the fact is, however, that a no—deal brexit means that it would need to be in place by march next year. and the idea that any technology would be ready by then really is fanciful. i mean, if then really is fanciful. i mean, if the facts are that at the moment people who should be carrying out customs checks on the 10% of goods that come through our ports that is not from the eu are already diverted
3:19 pm
to check passports because we are understaffed, imagine what it would be like if 100% of goods require checking at our ports, or at airports, the people who currently use e—gates with eu passports can no longer use them because we have no deal. it will be chaos and will mean that the government are gambling on getting a last—minute deal, whereas any responsible government would have made preparations for all eventualities, and the nao report tells us they have not done that. the united states has announced measures against some of the saudi officials it has linked with the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi. 21 of them will have their us visa revoked or see them refused in future. preisdent trump has described the killing, at the saudi consulate in istanbul, as "the worst cover—up ever". naomi grimley has more details. what really happened to jamal khashoggi? the saudi authorities have given up the pretence that he is still alive, claiming he died in a fist fight with rogue operatives.
3:20 pm
but does the world buy that version of events? the turkish president, for one, is sure that the plot went higher up the chain of command. translation: we are determined not to allow a cover—up of this murder and to make sure all those responsible, from those who ordered it to those who carried it out, will not be allowed to avoid justice. this was jamal khashoggi's body double, staged by his killers, to give the impression he was still alive. it is this level of premeditation and manipulation which has lost saudi arabia credibility in the eyes of its most loyal allies, as the evidence trail increasingly leads to the heart of the saudi state. we have identified at least some of the individuals responsible, some in the intelligence services, the royal court, the foreign ministry and some other saudi ministries who we suspect
3:21 pm
to have been involved in mr khashoggi's death. we are taking appropriate actions which involve revoking visas and other measures. in london theresa may echoed that, saying the uk would also revoke the visas of any complicit officials. president trump was at first sympathetic to the saudi explanation of why the journalist disappeared. but a week on, he sounds incredulous. they had a very bad original concept, it was carried out poorly, and the cover—up was one of the worst in the history of cover—ups. it's very simple. bad deal, should have never been thought of. somebody really messed up. and they had the worst cover—up ever. and where it should have stopped is at the deal standpoint, when they thought about it, because whoever thought of that idea, i think, is in big trouble. is this the man who will ultimately take the blame?
3:22 pm
later today, at an investment conference in riyadh, the crown prince, mohammed bin salman, will speak for the first time in public since the story broke. he was the manjamal khashoggi criticised in his newpaper columns. and the journalist's grisly death may yet decide his fate. naomi grimley, bbc news. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has said he would be ready to call a special brexit summit whenever negotiators made what he called "decisive progress" on a deal. speaking to the european parliament in strasbourg, he said a meeting pencilled in for the 17th of november was still on hold. i'm joined now by our correspondent adam fleming in strasbourg. good prediction, simon, hopefully!
3:23 pm
what donald tusk said to meps was very similar to what he said at the end of the summit last week, not the decisive progress on talks that the eu was hoping for, and not enough progress to call the summit to seal the deal in the middle of november. let's chat to some meps about what he had to say, ashley fox from the conservative party delegation, and catherine from the lib dems. we hear that 95% of the withdrawal agreement is done, the last time i checked, the last time a draft was published, it was 80, what has been agreed in the meantime? they have reached provisional agreement on the arrangements for gibraltar and cyprus and some other technical issues. i think we are nearly there, andi issues. i think we are nearly there, and i think another a—6 weeks of ha rd and i think another a—6 weeks of hard work means that we will probably get an agreement. i am confident that we will, but it requires goodwill and flexibility from both sides. the 9596 figure is a bit ofan from both sides. the 9596 figure is a bit of an allusion, because until it is 100% done, it is not done at all. absolutely right, there are difficult issues to resolve, in
3:24 pm
particular the backstop, but the prime minister is working on that. everyone in the country should give her the time and space to come back to the house of commons and present that deal, and members can make that judgment. i can hear you tatting already! how much more time do you need? we have had two years already. before we discuss brexit, i want an apology from ashley for his leader and what was said in plenary this morning, calling labour colleagues, national socialist, nazis. ifind that absolutely deplorable, i do not know what has happened to the conservative party and the name—calling, andl conservative party and the name—calling, and i would like ashley... ashley does not have to, the leader already apologised in the chamberfor the leader already apologised in the chamber for any offence. it is a bit ofa chamber for any offence. it is a bit of a pointless thing to say, isn't it? she has apologised, that is the end of it, i do not be why she's bringing it up a second time. no, because the conservative party have turned... they used to be the nasty
3:25 pm
party, they are the horrible party now. are you not accepting his apology? he apologised within a couple of minutes and you're making an issue of it. you have mps calling mrs may awful names this week. we need constructive work on the brexit deal, we have had all this time, and we still cannot agree, the european union has been absolutely clear, no cherry picking, we need to have clear messages coming from the uk. what for me is really concerning is what is happening with the citizens. always it is nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, and these are people with real complicated lives who are left in limbo all this time, they do not know whether they are in europe or europeans in the eu. dominic raab has said, if there is no deal, the uk will look after eu nationals. like they looked after
3:26 pm
the windrush people? we have to have a copper bottomed guarantee that they are free to stay, that their status is the same, and we need agreement from the 27 others that they maintain freedom of movement for brits living in the european union. i for brits living in the european union. lam really for brits living in the european union. i am really concerned that this messing about with the backstop, we have agreed that, you agree that in december, the backstop, if we can't get an agreement on the border, we go to the backstop, that has been signed off in december last year, and now suddenly it is on the table again. that discussion about the backstop, are you messing around with that?” find it extraordinary that she cheers for the eu as every side. no mention that mrs may has said that even with no—deal, we would unilaterally guarantee the rights of eu citizens in our country. the eu has not made any such offer, and yet the lib dems are criticising britain for having offered a great deal more than the eu. and what we have seen
3:27 pm
since the referendum is, rather than trying to be constructive, the lib dems have scuttled across to brussels, done everything they can to thwart the will of the people, and being generally unhelpful to the british government's efforts to get a deal. and vince cable is coming over tomorrow. and he is coming over to see michel barnier, i was there on saturday with up to 1 million people watching, this is the will of the people, iamela people watching, this is the will of the people, i amela terzic that but i believe in the european union, i have always said that. —— i am a liberal democrat. what we don't know is the something else, and once we know what leave looks like, i say that we should put it back to the people and say, is this really what you wanted ? people and say, is this really what you wanted? if i was moving house, i wouldn't put my furniture on the street and say, what should i go and live in? i want to know where i am going, and if it is not a good deal, the people of the uk deserve the
3:28 pm
right to say no. we are running out of time, they will carry on without us, that is what the european parliament is all about! the meps will not get their hands on the brexit deal and be able to vote on it until after it is approved by westminster, probably looking at march next year. adam, good luck! we will talk to you later on. i want to show you some remarkable pictures from the erg courthouse, they tried to make a break for freedom, running out of the room, through the corridors, while still handcuffed. they then jumped several flights of stairs before opening a fire exit that lets to the outside. now, in the meantime, judge rw buzzard ripped off his tunic and gave chase, running through the corridors behind them. these security images show the judge
3:29 pm
eventually holding one of them at the exit door, while agents grabbed the exit door, while agents grabbed the other a few blocks away. but there we are, a dramatic escape attempt, and a judge who was going to have none of it and gave chase, catching up with them. the other was caught moments later just catching up with them. the other was caught moments laterjust a block or so away. that is lewis county court, where there is no escape! let's have a look at the weather with nick miller. or acquired oracquired in the or acquired in the weather today. —— all quiet. still some patchy rain, though, not as heavy as it has been, in scotland, northern ireland, north and west wales. no change in that weather pattern as we go through into tonight, temperatures not dropping too much in scotland, nowhere seeing a frost, maybe a
3:30 pm
little misty across southern parts as thursday begins. more cloud around during thursday, coming in again on this westerly flow, some sunny spells across eastern areas, rain gathering across north—west scotland, turning heavier, more persistent through the day, it is the weather front that will sweep away these double—figure temperatures as we go through friday into saturday, taking much colder air southwards across the uk. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the national audit office is warning there could be queues, delays and criminal activity at the uk border if britain leaves the eu without a deal. the prime minister will be quizzed by the influential conservative 1922 committee later today. the backbench mps will ask her about her brexit plans. the united states will revoke visas 21 people suspected to be involved in killing the journalist jamal khashoggi. president trump's accused saudi arabia of the "worst cover—up in history". the us secret service has intercepted two suspected
3:31 pm
explosive devices — one addressed to former presidential candidate hilary clinton, and the other to former president barack obama. the number of people calling the national gambling helpine has increased by nearly a third in just five years. sport now on afternoon live with katherine downes. a little earlier i said all eyes are on liverpool, but that is completely wrong, because very few eyes will be on liverpool. it depends on how you look at it, because they could be a situation where every seat is filled with liverpool fans, so it willjust be liverpool fans, so it willjust be liverpool fans, so it willjust be liverpool fans with their rise on liverpool. surely one of the reasons that fans sing in the first place is because the opposition fans singing, and there will be no opposition tonight, because read —— red star
3:32 pm
belgrade were not allowed to sell tickets tonight because of the behaviour of their fans in the group stages. jurgen klopp was a little worried that things were going to be quiet tonight, so he has appealed for people to come forward. we need to be ready to fight for each little square metre of space with all we have. for that, we need our crowd. that is very, very important. we learned last year that atmosphere can make a difference. that is what we have to make sure again. totte n ha m tottenham also play psv eindhoven later this evening. usain bolt could still sign to be a professional footballer in australia — despite the fact the club he's playing for can't afford him. he's been on trial with the central coast mariners — but they said it was unlikely bolt
3:33 pm
would sign with them, without a "financial contribution from a third party." now the australian football association says it's working with the club "in regards to funding". england cricket coach trevor bayliss has warned his one day players that they'll be left out of the world cup next year if there's a repeat of the performance that saw them suffer their heaviest ever defeat — a 219 run thrashing by sri lanka in the final match of the series. they did take the series they did take the series win, but bayliss says time is running out. it is one thing giving guys and opportunity, but what we are looking for is some of the guys to take hold of that opportunity. if they do, they might find themselves in a world cup squad. if they don't, they might miss out. there are not too many more opportunities before the world cup is picked, so some of the quys world cup is picked, so some of the guys will have to turn it around pretty quick. one other cricket line for you this
3:34 pm
afternoon. india's virat kohli became the fastest batsman to reach 10,000 runs in one dayers — with his second consective century against the west indies. it was the 37th hundred of his one day career — and its taken him 205 innings to reach that mark, beating the record of his compatriot and india legend sachin tendulkar — who took 259 innings. tennis, and kyle edmund has won over diego schwartzman. he took the first set 6—3 before winning the second on a tie—break. they continued his good run of form after winning his first atp tour title in antwerp last week. and angelique kerber has got the better of naomi osaka at the wta files in singapore, beating her in three sets. the match was a bit of a marathon, finally finishing after two and a half hours. the rugby football union say they're prepared to consider appointing a premiership coach with no international experience, to succeed eddiejones as england boss.
3:35 pm
jones is set to leave in 2021 but he could quit next year, if england underperform at the world cup in the autumn. the search for his replacement has already begun and director of professional rugby nigel melville says they are looking at all the options, overseas and in the premiership, which may mean going for someone who's yet to coach at international level. gloucester fly—half danny cipriani will face a disciplinary hearing in the next hour. it follows his sending off for a high tackle during saturday's champions cup defeat by munster. cipriani was shown a red card after his shoulder made contact with rory scannell‘s head in the 29th minute. he faces a minimum six—week ban for the offence. it's not been a great week for him, his dismissal came two days after being left out of england's squad for the autumn internationals. that's all the sport for now. katherine downes, thank you very much. let's get more now on warnings about the uk's plans
3:36 pm
if there's a no—deal brexit. the public spending watchdog, the national audit office, says new border controls which will be needed may not be ready in time. the report goes onto say businesses who rely on smooth border checks will pay the price. the government says it's still confident of striking a good deal with the eu. i'm nowjoined by a former home office minister for immigration and border, lord timothy kirkhope. thank you forjoining us this afternoon. on the face of it, this is very worrying. yes, and i think that if we were to find ourselves in a position where we were going to crash out without any kind of arrangements or deals relating to our borders and our immigration arrangements, then it would be very serious indeed for the country, and indeed it would be serious for europe as well, so i do share the government's reasonable optimism that we are going to have a deal, because frankly we have to have a deal. it is not in my view a cce pta ble deal. it is not in my view acceptable at all for the british people certainly to have anything other than a deal which deals with
3:37 pm
these matters. and yet it is still a possibility, and haven't the government left the door wide open here, because frankly we are not ready. if they make too much of this, it panics people and worries people, but of course once we made the decision to leave the european union, it was inevitable that in the negotiations these are matters that had to be dealt with and would come toa had to be dealt with and would come to a successful conclusion. i think it is important for people to understand that when we are dealing with our borders and the immigration questions, we have always had control over our borders, as have every other european country, but it is the single market, the trading relationship, the movement of goods and services and indeed people which has been agreed under the single market arrangements where we might have problems if we don't reach a suitable agreement, such as a new single market arrangement for this country with europe or a customs
3:38 pm
union. it is not might have problems, it is will have problems. we have heard evidence from one who said that 600 people minimum will be required to deal with the very problem you have just highlighted. they can't get six at the moment. we are facing a problem in march if there is no deal. and with the best will in the world, none of us knows whether there will be or not at this stage. that is correct, but manning the borders has always been an issue where the question of resources has been challenged on one side or the other, and all i would say on that, andi other, and all i would say on that, and i really do want to emphasise this, is the fact that we do have a situation at the moment that we can just about manage, where we do have free flow and the agreements order in place, as now we have to replicate that, the government will have to replicate that in some way if it is to avoid what i would leave would be a very unsatisfactory situation. what does theresa may need to do now? i think she has to
3:39 pm
keep talking. she has to keep talking to our eu partners about this. but the difficulties she has is that she has a large number of people in politics in westminster and elsewhere trying to dictate specific terms to her which many of us, those who have a specific view about this, believe are unsustainable, and would be damaging to this country, and i think people have now, quite rightly the audit office is saying what they are saying, but a lot of other entities in groups of people and businessmen and alsojust in groups of people and businessmen and also just members of the public should be underlining the fact that they want to continue to enjoy free movement to the extent that they can passin movement to the extent that they can pass in and out of this country and into other european countries without undue impediment. lord timothy kirkhope, thank you for your time. we arejust timothy kirkhope, thank you for your time. we are just hearing that the turkish president, president
3:40 pm
erred —— president erdogan, has been talking to the saudi crown prince about the killing ofjamal khashoggi. he talked about the king, king solomon, in glowing terms yesterday, but did not mention the once the name of crown prince mohammed bin salman, with many suggesting that when he suggested that the blame for the killing lay within the saudi family, he was pointing the finger at the crown prince. the two men have spoken on the phone, they have discussed steps needed to bring to light all aspects of the killing ofjamal khashoggi. mark lohan will be joining of the killing ofjamal khashoggi. mark lohan will bejoining us of the killing ofjamal khashoggi. mark lohan will be joining us from turkey a little later on. you are watching afternoon live.
3:41 pm
the british government has said it has serious and growing concerns about the human rights situation in north western china, after the bbc saw new evidence that the country is accelerating the construction of a network of detention camps for muslims. there are claims that as many as a million muslims are being held, indefinitely without trial. the chinese government denies the allegations. our correspondentjohn sudworth is in beijing our reporting has provided further evidence that these camps are part ofa evidence that these camps are part of a large and growing network of mass incarceration facilities holding many thousands of muslims without trial from xinjiang's main muslim minority, the uighurs. the effect on daily life in that region is incalculable, on individuals, on families, in particular on children, with reports saying that many are being taken to orphanages because both parents and their extended families have been taken to these camps. but the repressive reality of this system we have also heard reaches far beyond china's borders. we have spoken to uk uighurs who
3:42 pm
tell us that despite having british passports, they still feel the threats and intimidation from the chinese police, using theirfamily members back home to pressure them to either stop campaigning on this issue or to provide details of their private lives, passport, telephone numbers, details of the university courses, that sort of thing. one uk uighur told me this, courses, that sort of thing. one uk uighurtold me this, it courses, that sort of thing. one uk uighur told me this, it is like an invisible hand. despite my british passport, do not feel safe. john sudworth reporting there from china. calls to the national gambling helpline have increased by almost a third over the last five years — according to figures seen by bbc yorkshire. nearly 30,000 calls were made by gamblers to the helpline in the last year according to gam—care, the charity that runs it. the government says it's taking decisive action to ensure the most vulnerable people in society are protected from gambling—related harm. ali fortescue reports sporty, funny and a loved son.
3:43 pm
alan lockhart took his own life because of a gambling addiction when he was a0 years old. i was just horrified, because i could not see what the attraction was, that it was so great that it could have this effect on my son. but sadly, alan's story is not unique. nearly 30,000 calls were made to the national gambling helpline last year, that's a 30% increase on five years ago. the proliferation of advertising and the concern that we have with the harm caused by the fixed—odds betting terminals, for example, whether this reflects an increase in problem gambling per se, i do not think it would be a great surprise to those of us who work in the area. for matt, it all started with card games when he was just 13 years old. he did not realise then that his addiction would end in a prison sentence. i ended up taking money from work. i had exhausted all lines of credit and itjust carries on and on because an addicted gambler cannot win, they just lose money. i thought about suicide daily, because i was in such a hole, i just could not get out. it doesn't just affect a gambler, it is not the numbers of gamblers that matter,
3:44 pm
it is the number of families that matter, the number of people in those families, they are the victims. unlike matt, alan lockhart was never able to start again. but his family hopes that his story, however short, will mean fewer lives lost. ali fortescue, bbc news. let's return to the breaking news from new york and washington. both cities rather tense with news that suspected suspicious explosive devices have been discovered in new york at the home of bill and hillary clinton, and in washington at the home of the former american president barack obama. ijust want to show you what is happening in new york city at the time warner building. this is the home of cnn which has been evacuated in the last hour after a suspicious package which had been mailed the was found in the cnn mailroom. this is according to new york police. cnn confirming this. not immediately known whether the package found were
3:45 pm
similarto known whether the package found were similar to the suspicious packages sent to the white house and the homes of former president barack obama and hillary clinton. one of the suspicious packages sent to the white house, that is the first i've seen of that, we have no confirmation of that, but that is according to the reuters news agency. the package was reported to police at 9:53am local time earlier today. so as i say, new york and washington, two cities that are feeling edgy, with reports of suspected packages being sent through the mail. the american secret service intercepting those sent to hillary clinton and barack obama, and as you can see, the cnn building in new york being evacuated asa building in new york being evacuated as a result of the concerns there. we will bring you more on that as we get it. jamie is here and will bring us the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines
3:46 pm
on afternoon live. there's a warning that border controls — which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit — may not be ready in time theresa may will face her tory critics later as she tries to rally them behind her in the brexit negotiations. and the us secret service has intercepted two suspicious packages — one addressed to former presidential candidate hillary clinton and the other to former president barack obama. your business headlines on afternoon live. barclays bank have posted a surge in profits. it's because its investment banking and retail divisions picked up speed. the bank had a bumpy first half of the year, which saw barclays' profits hit by legal costs and settlements. all the numbers on mortgage lending are down according to the trade body uk finance. these are september figures compared with a year ago. the number of mortgages approved by the main high street banks — 9% lower. approvals for house purchase 10% down, remortgage approvals 7.a% down. but other numbers also from uk
3:47 pm
finance show we're borrowing more but not on mortgages — a lot of it on credit cards. again these figures compare this september with last september. outstanding credit card debt is up 5.7%. actual spending on credit cards — 3.a% higher. personal borrowing through loans and overdrafts, up 2.3%. many of us remember that moment when we heard that the concorde had crashed outside paris. their talks ofa crashed outside paris. their talks of a replacement? it is quite surprising there wasn't anything sooner, because technologically, supersonic travel hasn't got any more difficult, and in many respects the technology is better. concorde when it was developed was using 19505 technology, very old
3:48 pm
technology. by the time it came out of service, they still had to have an in—flight engineer on—board as well as the normal cabin crew and all the rest of it, so it was an old machine. but it still looks stunning, it still looks ahead of its time even now. it is extraordinary, the most beautiful thing. when you use to see it go overhead, you would say, that is the concorde, but there were 1a flying, and another six prototypes. it was a gorgeous looking machine, and the reason why it crashed was to do with hitting a bit of metal on the runway which ignited the fuel tanks and set it up in flames. and then of course there was 9/11, and that didn't help either. it was very expensive, when it was developed it was considered to bea it was developed it was considered to be a huge white elephant, but let's talk about this with sally getting, head of getting's in—flight news. why has there been no
3:49 pm
replacement of the supersonic market? it is not for want of efforts. richard branson wanted to revise the old concorde, but perhaps we needed a grieving period in the consumer market in order to mourn the loss, and to spur on the appetite for a replacement, which as you just said, there are some exciting developments going on now, and possibly, i'm very optimistic that by 2025, we could be looking globally at a replacement for concorde in terms of supersonic flight. concorde in terms of supersonic flight. richard branson and nasa are both interested. can you tell me some of the ideas floating around? there are three major initiatives going on, all led by and large by the united states, so the first one which we would be looking at from a consumer market point of view would be boom supersonic, which has the
3:50 pm
backing of the virgin group and also ofjapan airlines as well. the virgin group are putting money into it, but they are providing engineering and logistical expertise, and asking for options on the first ten aircraft. the other projects or demonstrator projects, so they are looking at solving and combating sonic boom problems, so nasa has a project that has been working with halliwell and lockheed martin, and there is a private jet businessjet project martin, and there is a private jet business jet project formed martin, and there is a private jet businessjet project formed by martin, and there is a private jet business jet project formed by a company called area. that hard-nosed business point. is there a market for it? one of the problems with concorde was people were not flying supersonic, they didn't think it was worth it to fly one side of the atla ntic to worth it to fly one side of the atlantic to the other in three and a half hours. in its heyday, it was
3:51 pm
viable and did produce profits from british airways. now we are in a different market, but technology has come on a lot. we have different materials for aircraft, carbon fibre will bring costs down and make it cheaper, the maintenance will be a lot easier. obviously as you said, concorde was designed really on paperand concorde was designed really on paper and now we are in the digital e, paper and now we are in the digital age, so we are looking at a completely different business argument for the new supersonic flight. having said that, yes, it is a stratospheric enterprise, so to speak in terms of the finance. it could cost billions. i had a conversation yesterday with boom supersonic which is leading this project, it would take 55 passengers and they do see it going ahead. sally gethin, thank you very much. thank you very much. we will look at
3:52 pm
the market a little later on. it's called the mega millions draw and someone in the united states has beaten the odds of one in 303 million to scoop a huge lottery win. it had been billed as the biggest jackpot of all time — but we understand it's come in just short of that... it is tuesday october 23rd and the mega millions jackpot is a record—breaking 1.6 billion dollars... is this the moment your life could change forever, thanks to just six little numbers? 28. 70. 5. 62. 65. and the mega ball, numberfive. after scooping the biggest jackpot in world history, one lucky winner is making all the headlines. welcome to cbs this morning. the search is on in south carolina for the winning ticket of the record—breaking $1.6 billion jackpot. there has been a lotto frenzy across the us with people queueing around the block to buy tickets.
3:53 pm
the odds of winning the top prize were 303 million to one. but many were hoping that fate was on their side. i believe i've already won, because i believe in the law of attraction, so what was meant to be is already going to be. i read something that said you can't win it unless you're in it and that made perfect sense. the winner has not yet come forward but they can choose to receive their money in an immediate cash payment of $90a million, a huge £698 million. or have it spread out over 29 years, that would work out as just over £a1 million per year. every day they do not claim their prize, they could be missing out on interest payments of $60,000. so if you suddenly became richer than adele, elton john and madonna combined, what would you do with all the money? probably buy a couple of houses, travel the world, just enjoy life. to be honest it is a bit eccentric but i would buy a 747 jet. have it renovated and
3:54 pm
convert it into a home. mega millions winners have up to a year to claim their prize, theyjust need to make sure they do not lose that winning ticket! lauren moss, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's nick miller. a taste of wintry weather to come. this is the view in yorkshire. gusts of wind around 50 mph or so, and here in northern scotland, some patchy rain. southern and eastern parts of the uk seeing some sunny spells, and high temperatures of
3:55 pm
around 17 celsius, so very pleasant if you're underneath blue sky. the overall pattern doesn't change much tonight, western areas have a bit of patchy rain or drizzle at times, particularly with northwest scotland, maybe a bit of missed, but no “— scotland, maybe a bit of missed, but no——a scotland, maybe a bit of missed, but no —— a bit of mist, but no fog to worry about. it will be turning wetter in north—west scotland on through the day, and this is the weather front, through thursday night and into friday, there won't bea night and into friday, there won't be a huge amount of rain on it, but the big story is what follows it, arctic air, so the air turning blue, on the graphics anywhere, and picking up in the north, a much colder feel on friday, many picking up in the north, a much colderfeel on friday, many of seeing sunshine, showers around, peppering especially northern scotland, and falling snow on the
3:56 pm
hills, still some double figures the further south you are, but we will lose most of these by the time we get to saturday. still the showers coming in, a few drifting further inland at times, rain, sleet and snow on the hills, hail possible, thunderstorms and some of these as well, and a strong northerly wind will make it feel colder it averages suggest, is already much colder, but you factor in the wind, they will feel more like me to single figures across much of the uk. so that is a significant change coming for the weekend. it will feel very different, we have established that. there will be quite a bit of sunshine around, there will be showers, some of those of wintry mix, particularly on the hills of northern britain, and overnight, a touch of frost on the hills of northern britain, and overnight, a touch of frost and some icy patches. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at four: a warning that border controls might not be ready in time for a no—deal brexit, leaving queues, delays, and even criminal gang activity. i was hearing from a big
3:57 pm
supply—chain operator, and they're telling me they need 600 additional train staff if they're going to have to do entries on the european stuff. i would struggle to find six in felixstowe. meanwhile, theresa may will address tory backbench mps who are concerned about her progress in brexit negotiations. the us secret service has intercepted two suspicious packages — one addressed to former presidential candidate hillary clinton, and the other to former president barack obama. britain will revoke the visas of all the men suspected of murdering saudi journalist jamal khashoggi, following a similar decision by the us. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. the ward is applied at a football match without any opposition fans to sing and chant? —— what is it light. you will find out at anfield tonight when they take on red star belgrade
3:58 pm
in the champions league, more build—up at 3:30pm. nick miller has the forecast, all change. 19 degrees in southern england today, with sunshine, you will be lucky to get nine at the weekend, details of that change coming up, plus hurricane willa is weakening in mexico, but what is left of it will start a weather journey mexico, but what is left of it will start a weatherjourney covering thousands of miles, we will follow it, coming up. also coming up, we talk to one of the doctors involved in pioneering surgery, operating on two babies with spina bifida in the womb. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the public spending watchdog says new border controls which will be needed if there's a no—deal brexit may not be ready in time. the national audit office says businesses who rely on smooth border checks will pay the price, and that criminal gangs could take advantage of weaknesses.
3:59 pm
the government says it's still confident of striking a good deal with the eu. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. this is how easily goods flow into and out of the country now. roll on. . . roll off. and this is what might happen to the m20, according to the government and the national audit office, if we get a no—deal brexit next march. the government said if there is no deal, the border will be less than optimal. what exactly does that mean? if we get a no—deal brexit next march, the government says its priorities at the border will be security and traffic flow. what the national audit office says is that carries its own risks. if you neglect customs, you may exacerbate a problem as old as national boundaries — smuggling. the risks and patterns of movement through the border won't change at day one. over time, organised criminals could take advantage
4:00 pm
of any weaknesses in the regime that it perceives. that could mean that it is easier for goods to be smuggled into the country without paying the due customs duty. and it could be easier for people to be trafficked into the country. the national audit office also says there is a risk that 11 out of 12 critical systems needed to manage the border will not be up to scratch by the day we exit the eu on march 29th. infrastructure to track goods coming in and out cannot be built before then. many business will have to submit customs declarations for the first time, but the national audit office says it is already too late to ensure they are prepared for a no—deal, and businesses agree. i was hearing from a big supply chain operator and they told me they needed 600 additional trained staff if they were going to have do entries on all the european stuff. i would struggle to find six in felixstowe, let alone 600 at the biggest port we have. in the last three years,
4:01 pm
border force staff numbers have been cut by 7%. they are advertising for more staff, but there is a risk new recruits won't be deployed before brexit date, and the biggest uncertainty surrounds not only our border enforcement but the eu's. we need to understand, in the event of no deal, what will we be able to do to persuade french ports, dutch ports, they all gearing up and recruiting additional border force staff there, i know, to persuade them to keep people and goods flowing. because that is the biggest challenge of all, in my book. brexiteers save the nao is playing up the risk. what we are working to make sure across a variety of areas is that we have the capacity and systems and plans in place to deal with all eventualities. i'm expecting the uk and the eu to reach a sensible agreement. all we are doing is what people would expect, to make sure we have done proper plans for all eventualities.
4:02 pm
if the government and the eu agree a deal, many of the risks will be put off until december 2020. but the nao's clear prediction is that by next march 29th, there will be much about our borders that will not yet be under control. andy verity, bbc news. our correspondent richard lister is in dover. very much on the front line of all of this, richard. it certainly is, simon, and as you can see, traffic flowing as normal at the port of dover today, 2.6 million lorries a year process that this port, 2.2 million cars and motorbikes, 80,000 coaches processed, something like 12 million people come through here, and this is just one million people come through here, and this isjust one port million people come through here, and this is just one port of many, one of 130 in major access points to the uk, all of which will no doubt be scratching their heads over this
4:03 pm
report from the nao today. the reason why this traffic can flow as it does in a fairly straightforward way is because the rules are well—established, everyone knows how it works, and the system is up and running and has been for years. the problem is, at the end of march, when the uk leaves the eu, we still don't know what sort of rules will ta ke don't know what sort of rules will take the place of the rules governing this traffic here, and thatis governing this traffic here, and that is a real problem. richard, in terms of what happens there at dover, concern is notjust about trade, obviously, but the impact on that whole region of kent, because we have talked about plans to talk it into a huge car park at this rate. yes, one of the key problems thatis rate. yes, one of the key problems that is highlighted by the nao report is the fact that the infrastructure that would be required by customs and excise in order to track goods and process these tracks as they come through in these tracks as they come through in the event of a no—deal brexit, that
4:04 pm
infrastructure is simply not going to be ready by the end of march, and the report is unequivocal, so if there is a brexit with no withdrawal deal in place, the infrastructure will not be there, and that will have a huge knock—on affect not only at this port but others around the country which deal with sizeable numbers of lorries carrying freight to and from the continent. there will be tailbacks, questions about where these vehicles will be checked, and how. ok, richard, thank you very much, richard lister in dover. the saudi crown prince is addressing delegates at the investment forum in the saudi capital, riyadh, and he's just spoken publicly for the first time about the death of the journalist jamal khashoggi. translation: the crime was really brutal to all saudis, and i believe it is painful to every human in the world. it is a heinous crime that cannot be justified. today, world. it is a heinous crime that cannot bejustified. today, saudi arabia is carrying out all legal
4:05 pm
things to finalise the investigations, to work with the, cooperate with the turkish government, and to present the perpetrators to the court and take theirjudgment. this perpetrators to the court and take their judgment. this is perpetrators to the court and take theirjudgment. this is the expected thing that all governments would do once they see a crime. undoubtedly, the co—operation today between the saudi and turkish government is unique, and we know that many are trying to use this painful thing to create, to drive a wedge between saudi arabia and turkey. i want to send them a message — they will not be able to do that, as long as there isa be able to do that, as long as there is a thing called king salman. applause and a crown prince called mohammed
4:06 pm
bin salman in saudi arabia... applause and a president in turkey called erdogan. this wedge will not happen, and we will prove to the world that the two governments are cooperating to see that all perpetrators are taken to court and justice will be seen at the end, this is what i can say. crown prince mohammed al owais? —— mohammed bin salman. we havejust heard him speak, and there are those, including president trump, who have pointed theirfinger at him in terms of being responsible for this. those fingers will not stop pointing as a result of this brief appearance, people had been waiting for him to speak, the whole occasion
4:07 pm
was deeply weird, he was sitting next to the prime minister of lebanon, the very man he personally kidnapped last year and holds to saudi arabia and tried to get him to resign, so that was pretty strange. he talked there about no—one driving a wedge between saudi arabia and turkey. we understand that he spoke personally to present erdogan of turkey earlier in the day, but of course the thing that people need to remember is when erdogan was briefing members of his party on this whole hideous saga, he singularly failed to mention mohammed bin salman, the crown prince, by name, while praising his father, the king. mammoth bin salman knows that present erdogan has it in for him and that he has not given up on that yet. —— mohammed bin salman. we have not seen any sign from turkey that they are ready to let this go. and he mentioned king salman, could he turn around and
4:08 pm
say, actually, you are a liability? he could, and there are some people who are arguing that he should. i think it highly unlikely. the crown prince is now deeply embedded in the power structures of the kingdom. he effectively runs saudi arabia. he has many allies who are either genuine allies or allies because they need to be allies, and he also has, notwithstanding the criticisms that have come from places like washington, and importance in terms of washington's involvement in the middle east that is going to be very difficult to shake. donald trump, his administration's whole middle east strategy depends in part on its relationship with saudi arabia, and in particular with the crown prince. so even though we are hearing from britain, from the united states that they are not done with this matter yet, and we heard from both countries talk of visas being revoked and all the rest of it, and
4:09 pm
mike pompeo, the us secretary of state saying, in his words, these penalties will not be the last word on the matter, i think people would be very, very surprised if the king, britain or the united states decides to cut their relationship with mbs right now. in the meantime, he fronts it out. thank you. the prime minister will meet her backbench mps this afternoon to address their concerns over her brexit plans. her appearance at the meeting of the 1922 committee comes after she suggested she could agree to an extension of the transition period. our correspondent leila nathoo is in the lobby in parliament for us now. simon, this meeting will begin in about an hour simon, this meeting will begin in aboutan hourand simon, this meeting will begin in about an hour and a half, the first time theresa may will face backbenchers in private, she is taking questions on brexit already twice this week in the commons, and survived those encounters, but this meeting this evening is billed by some as being a bit of a showdown
4:10 pm
over her brexit strategy, some unnamed tory backbenchers over the weekend using very aggressive, threatening language to warn the prime minister that this was going to be crunch time for her over her strategy. i'm joined by one tory backbencher, damian green, the former deputy prime minister, damian green, is this a moment of truth?” doubt it, experience tells me that all these big events that are built up all these big events that are built up as the greater showdown often turn into something of a damp squib, soi turn into something of a damp squib, so i mean, it will be a good session, i am sure the whole parliamentary party will be there, the prime minister will be there to a nswer the prime minister will be there to answer questions as well as make a speech, so a good chance for her to explain where we have got to the negotiations, but i suspect less dramatic than some have been portraying it earlier in the week. theresa may went into the start of the week looking isolated over her strategy, criticised by both the remain and the leave wings of the party — can she count on your support over her strategy so far?
4:11 pm
absolutely, we all knew the brexit negotiations would get more difficult, the closer to the end we got, because inevitably you leave the difficult parts to the end of any negotiation, and we are now at the end of that phase, so showing support for the prime minister is particularly important not just support for the prime minister is particularly important notjust for the party but in the national interest as well. these are hugely important negotiations for our future as a country, for decades to come, so now is the time for people to get behind the prime minister. watched you think she needs to do this evening to reassure some of your more critical colleagues who are kicking off about the direction she is taking the talks? two areas of concern that people have expressed, that we might not be getting to a deal, and others who disagree with the whole notion of a deal. i think, disagree with the whole notion of a deal. ithink, to disagree with the whole notion of a deal. i think, to some extent, there will be a few people, a small number, who are irreconcilable with any deal, they will votes against any deal, they will votes against any deal, they will votes against any deal and cut all ties with the eu, which would be disastrous. the
4:12 pm
larger group of people which she will want to reassure, and i hope she will be able to reassure, actually, although these negotiations are at a difficult stage, we are still moving forward, and at some stage between now and christmas, possibly as late as the december council, maybe november, we will be able to clinch a deal. there has been a lot of speculation that the critical number of a8 letters of no confidence have gone into or are about to go into the chairman of the backbench committee, what would you say to those colleagues who are thinking about sending in letters undermining theresa may's leadership? don't! it would be seen as an act of inward looking self—indulgence by people at there who know we are at an important stage of the negotiations. this is exactly the wrong time to be doing that type of thing, and also, incidentally, i have been told every day this week that a8 letters are in, and every day this week it has been false, so i think the interest
4:13 pm
in the subject is waning. theresa may is looking like she is getting through this week, your predictions and ideas of no fireworks — isn't it and ideas of no fireworks — isn't it a bit late in the day for your collea g u es a bit late in the day for your colleagues to demand a change of course? she is showing no sign of deviating from her path.” course? she is showing no sign of deviating from her path. i do not think it is too late, i think it is wrong, i don't think they should be doing it. we all know that when you enter into a complex negotiation, nobody will get 100% of what they want, and we all have to be realistic and pragmatic about this. what is the best deal that is obtainable for this country, and thatis obtainable for this country, and that is what she has been working towards. damian green, many thanks for joining towards. damian green, many thanks forjoining us, one of many tory mps who will be at this meeting beginning in an hour and a half upstairs. the public spending watchdog says that new border controls would not be needed in time for a no—deal brexit. i'm nowjoined by mike spicer, director of research and economics
4:14 pm
at british chambers of commerce. that would be the worst possible news for your members. yes, less than six months away from the reality of brexit, just under six months from that, and for companies entering into deals now, brexit has effectively already happens, those due to receive goods from overseas after that date, or due to ship goods abroad after that date, they are doing that without knowing entirely what the customs border will look like, what regulations they will be operating under, so thatis they will be operating under, so that is a lot of uncertainty, particularly for businesses looking to export for the first time. the hope presumably is that things stay the day after as they were before, that it the day after as they were before, thatitis the day after as they were before, that it is as easy to travel between the two with what ever your changes. businesses want frictionless trade, but in the event of no deal, which
4:15 pm
is the substantive part of the nao report, the enforcement of the policy will be just as important as the reality of the policy, so if we are talking about a customs border, whether or not officials are checking every third container as opposed to every container will make a big impact on the state of access to ports. what is your worst case scenario? the government seems to be working on every possibility, you must have done the same. the worst possible scenario is that businesses do not have the answers they need to the questions about business continuity, they do not know where they need to look, what regulations apply, and the technical notices to go some way to providing reassurances, but as our risk register shows, which we publish, there are lots of unanswered questions, basic questions of business continuity, and we need clarity. the argument up until now has been pretty much hold your
4:16 pm
nerve, we are working on things, but we are entering a period where if you have not got ready by now, you are in trouble if it goes wrong in march. businesses have to plan ahead for transactions, and if they are entering into contracts knowing how to write a contract when you are not sure what taxes are payable, for instance, or even how long it will ta ke to instance, or even how long it will take to ship a good from a to big brother:, these are critical questions. of the businesses making these decisions will not commit, they are just these decisions will not commit, they arejust going these decisions will not commit, they are just going to wait, which is going to cost? we are seeing a chilling effect on businesses looking to enter into you transactions. for those businesses that are already committed, a lot of those are really starting to ask serious questions of government. we see, in our mailbag of member queries about what to expect and what to plan for, research that we published just last month show that quite sizeable proportions of the
4:17 pm
business community would take quite defensive actions in the case of a worst—case scenario no—deal. defensive actions in the case of a worst-case scenario no-deal. good to talk to you, thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. speaking for the first time since the murder ofjamal khashoggi, crown prince mohammed bin salman of saudi arabia says those responsible for killing the journalist will brought the journalist will brought to justice. time is running out — a warning that border controls won't be ready for a no—deal brexit. and the us secret service intercepts two suspicious packages — one addressed to former presidential candidate hillary clinton, the other to former president barack obama — more on that in a moment. and in sport, liverpool fans need to create the atmosphere tonight according tojurgen create the atmosphere tonight according to jurgen klopp, create the atmosphere tonight according tojurgen klopp, red star belgrade fans are banned from travelling to the champions league match at anfield. trevor bayliss has warned his one—day players they may miss out on the world cup next year if they repeat the performance that saw them thrashed by sri lanka in the final one—day match. and
4:18 pm
angelique kerber has been us open champion naomi osaka in three sets at the wta finals. —— has beaten. i will be back with more on all those stories just after half past. federal authorities in the united states are investigating suspicious packages which were sent to former president barack obama and former first lady hillary clinton. a single package addressed to hillary clinton was recovered yesterday, while a second package addressed to the residence of barack obama was intercepted by secret service personnel today. and in the last two hours it has been reported that the time warner building in new york, home to broadcaster cnn, has been abandoned after a suspicious package was found. gary o'donoghue is in washington, what we do know is that we are talking about two very edgy cities at the moment. we are, and we
4:19 pm
are talking about a very febrile atmosphere. of course, this comes just after monday's incident where what they are describing as an explosive device was found at the house of george soros, the billionaire philanthropist who lives not a million miles away from where hillary clinton has a home in new york state, a democratic sympathiser, something of a hate figure amongst some of the right. then these other two packages to the clinton household, by the way, i can just tell you that chelsea clinton, hillary clinton's daughter, has just tweeted, saying, i'm grateful everyday to the men and women of the united states secret service, so obviously thinking that something quite bad could have happened to them. also this morning, reports that cnn is at a suspicious package similarto that cnn is at a suspicious package similar to those sent to the cli nto ns similar to those sent to the clintons and george soros, delivered to its offices in the time warner building in new york, they have been
4:20 pm
evacuated, they are out on the street a couple of blocks away, there are ambulances there, but no reports of injuries at this stage. and we are getting other reports in the last couple of minutes, saying that there are potentially another macro package which may have been sent to another democrat politician, not much confirmation on that at this stage. important, simon, to say, that there has been no claim of responsibility at this stage, no motive, but, and this is a big but, i don't think, given the geographical pattern and in terms of those involved, it is impossible to ignore a political or potential political context here. in the sense that george soros, cnn of course, another object of hate from some on the right, they often used to call it the clinton news network, obviously barack it the clinton news network, obviously ba rack obama it the clinton news network, obviously barack obama and hillary clinton, those two people, obvious in that sense. add just a couple of weeks out from the mid—term
4:21 pm
elections, while there is no claim of responsibility at this stage, authorities taking it enormously seriously, and the context of those elections will have many people here speculating that there is a political motivation behind this individual, group or whoever turns out to be responsible. gary o'donoghue, thank you. two babies with spina bifida have had their spinal cords repaired while they were still in the womb in the first such operations to be carried out in the uk. the pioneering operations were performed during the summer by teams from university college hospital. let's talk to one of the doctors involved, professor anna david. welcome, many congratulations, we perhaps should just explain, spina bifida, what is it? why so drastic? well, it is a defect that develops in the baby before it is born, a problem with the spine, the vertebral columns do not form properly, leaving the bottom part of the spine open to the elements,
4:22 pm
perhaps with a weak covering, so what happens is that area of the spine is damaged, and so when children are born, they have long—term problems such as mobility issues, not being able to walk, and bladder and bowel problems too. what you and your team have been able to do, effectively cover it in the womb to keep it safe, and the child then grows up normally? that is right. we know from studies that have been donein know from studies that have been done in the us that if you repair the deep ekka before birth, it im proves the deep ekka before birth, it improves the outcome compared to after birth. —— if you repair the defect. we felt we really wanted to bring this to our patients in the nhs to make sure they had the options for treatment. this is the first time we have been able to do this in the country, previously you went to europe to train? yes, the nhs did find patients to go to belgium and switzerland for the surgery, but it is a bit of a journey, parents and family cannot go with them, so we worked with the
4:23 pm
tea m go with them, so we worked with the team in belgium, trained with them, did his surgery on our nhs patients there, then we brought the training back and conducted the first two surgeries in the uk. what is it like doing something like that, presumably the mother is under general anaesthetic? the mum has an epidural and is asleep, and we give the baby anaesthetic as well, a painkilling injection, and it was the most privileged thing i have ever felt, the most privileged thing i have everfelt, scanning the most privileged thing i have ever felt, scanning a the most privileged thing i have everfelt, scanning a baby inside, and you can see it exposed, and you feel privileged to be able to look after mum and baby. it went very smoothly, both of the surgeries, because we had spent a long time training the team to make sure we did it properly. how many people are actually involved in that moment? we are 27 people in the theatre, so it isa are 27 people in the theatre, so it is a bit ofa are 27 people in the theatre, so it is a bit of a dance, moving around the theatre, everyone has their place, so we have two anaesthetists, we have the obstetric doctors that plan where to make the cut in the
4:24 pm
womb, neurosurgeons that repair the defect on the back of the baby's spine, midwives, scrub nurses, neonatologists, but everybody has their role to play, and we all work together to make sure we have a good outcome. and that what point can you judge the outcome has been good?m is fairto judge the outcome has been good?m is fair to say you want to wait until the baby has been born and developed for a few months, so the thing is, some women who have surgery will deliver early, because you are making a hole in the tissues around the baby, so the average age of the babies being born is about 3a weeks, so we have to wait quite a few months to make sure that the ba by‘s few months to make sure that the baby's outcomes are good. very quickly, this costs, where is the money coming from? the funding for this surgery is coming from great ormond street charities, but in the future we hope that the nhs will roll it out, because overall it is cost—effective. roll it out, because overall it is cost-effective. well, it is great
4:25 pm
news, isn't it? many congratulations. thank you very much. storm willa continues to move across central mexico with maximum winds of 120 miles per row, meteorologists say it we can from a hurricane after making landfall. heavy rains have resulted in power cuts and toppled trees, though no deaths have been reported. we can get more on that now, i'm joined by reported. we can get more on that now, i'mjoined by nick reported. we can get more on that now, i'm joined by nick miller, who has the forecast, we have been talking about this for a couple of days, and it is not over yet, is it? in terms of a tropical weather system, it is, they have said that it has dissipated as a tropical weather system, the wind is now around 25 mph, so if you think, it made landfall winds over 100 mph, now down to 25, onlyjust into mexico, it shows you how these weather systems need the fuel of warm ocean water to keep them going.
4:26 pm
over land, that is almost the end of the story, but it has got a long way to go, what is left of willa, because there is still energy and moisture in the atmosphere. rather a lot, looking at that! absolutely, that is the rain in land into mexico, where is that moisture going? it is going to drift further east, this is a huge map of north america, the bit with the blue is texas, and they are interested in re m na nts of texas, and they are interested in remnants of willa heading their way, because i want to show you some pictures from last week. they have just had that? tremendous flooding, they have opened some of the dams to let water out, they have had several former tropical weather systems dumping a lot of rain, and parts of texas have had their wettest notjust october but autumn on record, and there is still a bit of autumn to go. that shows you how wet it has been. and there is a bit more to come from what is left of willa, because it continues to move further east, this
4:27 pm
area of rain. hurricane michael, a devastating hit into the panhandle of florida, that intense green area is rain piling misery on misery in that part of the world. and then it is going to lift up close to the eastern side of the usa, following this journey, now eastern side of the usa, following thisjourney, now friday, you can see the word low, a deepening area of low pressure, isobars getting closer together, stronger winds, a developing nor‘easter storm, you may have heard that term before. a lot of rain, close coastal flooding, winds, if this was late winter we would be seeing masses of snow coming from it, so we won't get a huge amount of snow, just a lot of rain. and looking to the east coast, that move towards us, does it? it picks up the jet stream and begins its journey across the atlantic, everything is collected in
4:28 pm
weather. nothing happens in isolation. it blitzing two as it —— it splits in two as it leaves the coast of the usa, and this first pa rt coast of the usa, and this first part fizzles out, but the later part of me still have a bit of moisture and comes into this area of low pressure later next week, but we're talking about a cold change coming our way, the south—westerly wind coming in and other direction. maybe that area of low pressure will change things, it is about to go into the arctic fridge and bring us the temperatures later in the week. bala clavas the temperatures later in the week. balaclavas at the ready. it is getting colder, 19 celsius this afternoon in the sunshine in southern england, we will be lucky to get nine by the town we get to the weekend, so it is pretty nice out there, this is how this afternoon is going. the best of the sunshine is across southern and eastern parts of the uk, still seeing some patchy rain running into the west and north—west of scotland,
4:29 pm
not amounted to much, not as windy, temperatures topping out at about 19 degrees, a lot of cloud still with us, into western scotland, that is still around tonight, and we will start to push a bit more of that cloud further east across the uk. temperatures are not going down too far, particularly where we have a bit of patchy rain in north—west scotland, mid single the coolest spot, maybe misty in places, the default patch going into tomorrow morning, it is tomorrow for most of us, all quiet. expecting a bit more cloud where we have seen so much sunshine in the past couple of days, some sunny spells in eastern areas, and the rain gallinetta north—west scotland, turning right into the afternoon. this is a cold front, the rain will move south, thursday night ata rain will move south, thursday night at a friday it will sweep away the milder air. not much in the wake of rain on it, but the significant thing is the change of colour indicating the much colder air coming down from the arctic into the uk by the end of friday, and we will
4:30 pm
all be feeling that. some of us at the start of friday, snow showers in the start of friday, snow showers in the hills in scotland at the higher parts of the pennines at north york moors, a lot of the showers will be in coastal parts, exposed areas in the northern wind, for many of us it will be sunshine, crisp and clear, great visibility, but a much colder field things that stays with us through the weekend and into saturday, some coastal showers, hail and thunder possible, good sunny spells elsewhere, temperatures coming down a little further and there is quite a strong northerly wind as well. so what it will say on the thermometer is hardly anything in double figures, when you factor in that wind it will feel even colder than that. we're talking about low single figures. clearly not the coldest weather we have ever seen, but after what we have experienced, that will be a bit of a shock to the system. so some pointers, much colderfeel, plenty of sunshine that there will be showers around, they will be wintry in some northern hills, maybe a
4:31 pm
little frost overnight, icy patches where it has been wet, but those temperatures will start to come up again as we go deeper into next week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the saudi crown prince has vowed to punish all the culprits responsible for the murder of journalist jamal khashoggi in turkey. mohammed bin salman says the crime was "painful to all saudis". the national audit office is warning there could be queues, delays and criminal activity at the uk border if britain leaves the eu without a deal. theresa may will meet with the influential conservative 1922 committee of backbench mps later today to be questioned over her brexit plans. the us secret service has intercepted suspected explosive devices addressed to former presidential candidate hilary clinton, and to former president barack obama. sport now on afternoon live with kat downes.
4:32 pm
there could be an interesting atmosphere at anfield tonight. yes, red star belgrade fans have not been allowed to buy tickets, they are being punished for invading the pitch and throwing fireworks during a play—off game, so it willjust be liverpool fans. they could be one big liverpool party, or it could be a big flat and one—dimensional. jurgen klopp would of course prefer the former. here is what he had to say. we need to fight each little square metres of space or whatever. we need our crowd, so that is very important. we learned last year, not only what we learned last year especially the atmosphere can make the difference, and that is what we have to make sure again. eden hazard will miss chelsea's europa league home game against bate borisov tomorrow because of a back injury.
4:33 pm
hazard is the club's top scorer this season with eight goals in 11 appearances. his manager maurizio sarri says they're "trying to solve the problem for sunday" when they travel to burnley in the premier league. usain bolt could still sign to be a professional footballer in australia — despite the fact the club he's playing for can't afford him. he's been on trial with the central coast mariners — but they said it was unlikely bolt would sign with them, without a "financial contribution from a third party." now the australian football association says its working with the club "in regards to funding". england cricket coach trevor bayliss has warned his one day players they could miss the world cup next year if performances don't improve. his comments come after england suffered their heaviest ever defeat — a 219—run thrashing by sri lanka in the final match of the series. they did take the series win, but bayliss says time is running out for some fringe players: come world cup time, we are going to need more than 11 guys in form, so
4:34 pm
there is an opportunity to give some of those guys a little bit of game time. it is one thing giving guys an opportunity, but what we are looking for some of those guys to actually ta ke for some of those guys to actually take hold of that opportunity, and if they do, they might find themselves in a world cup squad, and they might miss out. there is not too many more opportunities before the world cup is picked, so some of the world cup is picked, so some of the guys will have to turn it around pretty quick. india's virat kohli has become the fastest batsman to reach 10,000 runs in one day internationals after a second consective century against the west indies. it was the 37th hundred of his one day career. it's taken him 205 innings to reach that mark — overtaking his compatriot and india legend sachin tendulkar who did it in 259. tennis and top seed angelique kerber gave her semifinal chances a boost at the wta finals in singapore with a hard fought win over naomi osaka. kerber was serving for the match in the second set but osaka fought back to force a decider.
4:35 pm
however the us open winner produced too many unforced errors of her own — including this at match point down — to give the wimbledon champion a three set victory. kyle edmund's return to court after his first atp tour title began well as he beat diego schwartzman in the vienna open first round. edmund won the european open in antwerp last week and followed it up with a 6—3 7—6 win today against the argentinian. the rugby football union say they're prepared to consider appointing a premiership coach with no international experience to succeed eddiejones as england boss. he's set to leave in 2021 but he could quit next year, if england underperform at the world cup in the autumn. the search for his replacement has already begun and director of professional rugby nigel melville says they are looking at all the options, overseas and in the premiership, which may mean going for someone who's yet to coach at international level. gloucester fly—half danny cipriani will face a disciplinary hearing this afternoon. it follows his sending off for a high tackle during saturday's champions cup defeat by munster.
4:36 pm
cipriani was shown a red card after his shoulder made contact with rory scannell‘s head in the 29th minute. he faces a minimum six—week ban for the offence. it's not been a great week for him, his dismissal came two days after being left out of england's squad for the autumn internationals. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to mary rhodes in birmingham where midlands today have been investigating the growing trend of parents attempting to delay their child's first year of school because they were born in the summer. and janine jansen is in plymouth for us where spotlight has been speaking to an animal rights campaigner, who has raised concerns about cruel treatment of badgers during the ongoing cull.
4:37 pm
let's go to mary first of all. can parents legally delay their children starting school? they can. to fit you in on the background, the law requires children to be in full—time education from the age of five, but some, especially those born in the summer months, enter classes soon after their fourth birthday. summer months, enter classes soon after theirfourth birthday. here in the west midlands, 160 children delayed the start of school until this autumn, that is a rise of aa% from 2017. so although those figures aren't huge, it does seem that an increasing number of parents say that four is too young, and they wa nt to that four is too young, and they want to keep them at home for another year. lorraine is one parent who decided that four was too young to source —— start school, her daughter poppyjust to source —— start school, her daughter poppy just turned to source —— start school, her daughter poppyjust turned four, but will be going to school to another year. to be going into school five days a week for six hours was going
4:38 pm
to be too much for her, and i wanted to be too much for her, and i wanted to give the best start. i understand the children will thrive and cope better, but i didn't want my child to cope, ito thrive. better, but i didn't want my child to cope, i to thrive. and what is the official advice to people doing the official advice to people doing the same sort of thing? the government school admissions code is open to interpretation, it is fair to say. some children are refused a postponement entirely. others are allowed to delay but only if they skipped reception class, leapfrogging to year one and then being forced to play catch up with the curriculum. as for research into this area, evidence suggests that the youngest in each school class ten to perform worse academically than their peers born earlier. we found that it was very large at the beginning of schooling, as you might expect, with the children are relatively less mature, and the one—year differences are much bigger proportion of their life. it then decreased as they got a bit older, but it was still largely irrelevant by the time they got a secondary
4:39 pm
school. the department for education says it has given councils clear advice so families can make the right wrist each child, and the majority of parents‘ requests are granted. but campaigners say it is too inconsistent, amounting effectively to a postcode lottery. plenty more on this on midlands today at half past six. mary, thank you very much. janine, concerns about the badger cull in your part of the world. this is carried out to stop badges infecting cattle with tuberculosis, and the cull zone is now cover most of the south—west. this takes place over a six—week period, usually betweenjune and december, but it can be extended, and the government says that this call really does reduce cases of bovine tb. we have been contacted by an animal welfare campaigner who opposes the call, and she says she released a badger which she found trapped in a cage in somerset. this video shows the badger in a cage close to where campaigners say they had been monitoring a sett in south
4:40 pm
somerset, and they claim it could have been in never many hours, and they say the animals should be checked as soon as possible after dawn, but by midday at the latest, and they say they found it at 12.10, and they say they found it at 12.10, and they say this shows that regular monitoring wasn't effectively carried out within licensing guidelines. the campaigner said she was so concerned for the badger‘s welfare she released it. her words have been revised to protect her identity. there was no way of knowing if this was a legal trap or an illegal trap. there were no markings on the cage. the cull zone boundaries are not made public, so nobody knows where they are. so what has been the response to these claims from those overseeing the call? defra says that all suspected wildlife offences must be reported to the police, and it can't comment on any individual breach which may have taken place. also they say anyone involved in the official call gets extensive training. the
4:41 pm
somerset badger group confirms it was made aware of a badger cub being found after midday on the 30th of september. it said it reported the incident to avon and somerset police, but to date it has had no official response. the national farmers' union says it is hard to comment about this particular incident, but it insists cull zone needed, and they need to be carried out properly. it is part of the government's tb eradication plan. the one part include movement restrictions on cattle, enhanced testing and surveillance, that sort of thing. but it is basically designed to try to stop the cycle of infection between badgers and cattle and vice versa. the latest data from defra, last year, 2017, shows that thousands of badgers were culled in the south—west. in cornwall, there we re the south—west. in cornwall, there were 358, somerset 1123, devon,
4:42 pm
118a, the highest number of badgers called wayne dorset, 3a50. we'll have more on this in spotlight tonight. adages you and justin? me and andy! and you said that you were had a dream that you are an nationwide? yes, it was splendid, but it was about cats who knit. all ican but it was about cats who knit. all i can say is that i was off work yesterday with a bit of a fever, i'm sure that explains it. i'm sure you'd love to talk about cats who knit. no, enough! thank you both very much indeed. that is nationwide tonight. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you could access them via the bbc iplayer. we
4:43 pm
go nationwide every weekday afternoon at a:30pm here on afternoon live. president trump has said the us is facing a national emergency — that's how he's describing the caravan of 7,000 mostly honduran migrants heading to the southern us border. he's threatened to close the border completely. the migrants are currently in chiapas state, nearly 30 miles north of the guatemalan border, and at least two more groups appear to be following the same route. our correspondent will grant reports. they've been described as an army, an invasion, as gang members and as illegal. but right now it would be hard to describe these people as anything other than just exhausted. for days they have travelled through central america and southern mexico, much of it on foot. it's only now that they have taken a day to recover, to rest weary limbs and treat injuries. and to quietly mourn. one of their number, a young man, died en route as he fell from a truck he was hitching a lift on. his death is a sign of the risks
4:44 pm
that migrants run on this perilous route north to the united states. wendy, who has been carrying her six—month—old baby with her, says she's acutely aware of the dangers involved, but has little choice given the situation back home. we came because things are worse at home. there are nojobs in our country and we need to secure a better future for our children. it is exactly because of the inherent dangers of this journey, from the threat of extortion or violence from people trafficking gangs, through to tragic accidents on the road, that these people are choosing to travel together in the first place. for safety in numbers. meanwhile, the trump administration has repeated its position on the migrants. that they will not be permitted entry into the united states under any circumstances. the united states also has a message for those who are currently part of this caravan or any caravan which follows. you will not be successful in getting into the united states illegally.
4:45 pm
no matter what. i repeat, the caravan will not cross our southern border illegally under any circumstances. mexico can often be a hostile place for migrants from central america. yet one of the most noticeable features around this caravan has been the help from local people. whether clothing, food, or words of support, the people of this small town in chiapas have tried to lift the morale of those passing through their state. despite the ground covered, the migrants are gathering themselves for the next marathon ahead. they still have around 1000 miles to go before they reach a us port of entry. but between here and there, many say they are simply trusting their fate to god. will grant, bbc news, mexico. jamie is here and we'll be bringing us all the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live.
4:46 pm
the crown prince mohammed bin salman of saudi arabia says those responsible for killing the journalist, jamal khashoggi, will be brought to justice. time is running out — a warning that border controls won't be ready for a no—deal brexit. and the us secret service intercepts two suspicious packages — one addressed to former presidential candidate hillary clinton, the other to former president barack obama. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. barclays bank have posted a surge in profits. it's because its investment banking and retail divisions picked up speed. the bank had a bumpy first half of the year, which saw barclays' profits hit by legal costs and settlements. all the numbers on mortgage lending are down according to the trade body uk finance. these are september figures compared with a year ago. the number of mortgages approved by the main high street banks — 9% lower. approvals for house purchase 10 % down, remortgage approvals 7.a% down.
4:47 pm
but other numbers also from uk finance show we're borrowing more but not on mortgages — a lot of it on credit cards. again these figures compare this september with last september. outstanding credit card debt is up 5.7%. actual spending on credit cards — 3.a% higher. personal borrowing through loans and overdrafts, up 2.3%. so, short—term lending is up, but they're asked —— there are quite strong figures. uk finance says this is about brexit concerns, when you have an uncertain future, the prospect of yourjob, you don't take on big debts. but the bank of england governor says property prices will fall. that won't help,
4:48 pm
and we have seen prices fall, slowing growth in property if you look across the country, london prices have come down. it is not a dramatic falloff, but a lot of people being quite negative about the future of property prices. but when you see that things like actual lending to buy houses down 10%, that is september this year against september last year, it is really quite considerable. shanti keleman, senior portfolio manager, coutts bank, is here. what do you think of this?” what do you think of this? i think stamp duty is also a factor, because we have increased the cost of moving houses, so there is a worry about how much tax you pay if you have to move home, and also the fact that mortgage lending standards are tight
4:49 pm
at the banks, and they have increased considerably by the bank of england and regulators in recent years, which means that people who might have been able to get alone might have been able to get alone might not be able to today. shanti, if there is a brexit solution, we all suddenly feel confident, that doesn't necessarily mean because of what you have been saying that the market will bounce back? not necessarily. house prices have risen dramatically in the past ten years, andl dramatically in the past ten years, and i think that we probably will certainly not see house prices fall sharply if we had a good outcome with brexit, but it doesn't mean they are going to rise ten or 20% because they are at extreme levels relative to income. the banks depending on this, we have had figures from barclays which are pretty good today. yes, and they relied on the performance of the investment bank for their
4:50 pm
performance, investment bank for their performance , revenues investment bank for their performance, revenues from trading, stocks and bonds from a from mergers and acquisitions, that was what really drove their growth. i think it will be interesting to see tomorrow what results from a bank like lloyd's look like, which doesn't really have an investment bank, and is a lot more focused on mortgage lending, credit cards, general banking in the uk. what about the pound and brexit? we saw the pound falling sharply against the pound falling sharply against the dollar today, and a lot of that is to do with brexit nerves, isn't it? the pound is being driven by brexit. i think it is. there is not a bank of england rate rise insight anywhere soon, we not expecting a rise in economic growth, and you have to remember it is sterling versus dollar versus euro, and the only sign of that is what is happening in the and europe. in the us in particular, the economy has been pretty good, interest rates have been rising there, so even if we didn't have all of this bad news
4:51 pm
about brexit, it is possible the pound would still be fairly weak against the dollar, just because the us economy has been so strong. and expecting high interest rates next month. shanti keleman, thank you very much indeed. lets have a look at the markets. there we go. the ftse100 managed to make a small there we go. the ftse100 managed to makea small gain, there we go. the ftse100 managed to make a small gain, the dow falling about 200 points. good thing is coming from boeing earlier on, and that surged upwards, then people began to worry about some of the other earnings we had, facebook, amazon, netflix and alphabet or falling something like 1%, sojust worries about future earnings, even though boeing was fairly optimistic. netflix was shown some amazing results in terms of subscriptions around the world. it is to do with global growth and actually looking forward , global growth and actually looking forward, and i think what you saw was at the beginning of the year you have the tax reforms in the states, a great surge of economic activity, a great surge of economic activity, a surge of optimism about future
4:52 pm
growth and future profits, but now we just getting to that point about, next? we have done that paradigms shift, you should remember that from yea rs shift, you should remember that from years ago, it jumps shift, you should remember that from years ago, itjumps up and then what? and then you have got all the worries about brexit, italy's budget which is worrying people, you have got worries about saudi, you have got worries about saudi, you have got worries about global growth generally, and people are thinking, what next? jamie, thank you very much. staying with money, because it is called the mega millions draw. someone in the united states has beaten the odds of one in 303 million to scoop win. it had been billed as the biggest jackpot of all time — but we understand it's come in just short of that, as lauren moss reports. it is tuesday october 23rd and the mega millions jackpot
4:53 pm
is a record—breaking 1.6 billion dollars... is this the moment your life could change forever, thanks to just six little numbers? 28. 70. 5. 62. 65. and the mega ball, numberfive. one lucky winner is making all the headlines. after scooping the biggest single ticket jackpot in after scooping the biggest single ticketjackpot in history. welcome to cbs this morning. the search is on in south carolina for the winning ticket of the record—breaking $1.6 billion jackpot. there has been a lotto frenzy across the us with people queueing around the block to buy tickets. the odds of winning the top prize were 303 million to one. but many were hoping that fate was on their side. i believe i've already won, because i believe in the law of attraction, so what was meant to be is already going to be. i read something that said you can't win it unless you're in it and that made perfect sense. the winner has not yet come forward but they can choose to receive their money in an immediate cash payment of $90a million, a huge £698 million. or have it spread out over 29 years, that would work out as just over
4:54 pm
£a1 million per year. every day they do not claim their prize, they could be missing out on interest payments of $60,000. so if you suddenly became richer than adele, elton john and madonna combined, what would you do with all the money? probably buy a couple of houses, travel the world, just enjoy life. to be honest it is a bit eccentric but i would buy a 747 jet. have it renovated and convert it into a home. mega millions winners have up to a year to claim their prize, theyjust need to make sure they do not lose that winning ticket! lauren moss, bbc news. now to washington state in america where a pair of handcuffed inmates made a break
4:55 pm
for it during a court appearance. as 22—year—old tannerjacobson and 28—year—old kodey howard made a run for it out of the courtroom in lewis county, thejudge was forced to removed his robe and give chase. the inmates first bolted for the door, with one of them losing his shoe at one stage. the pair could then be seen scrambling down three flights of stairs. thejudge managed to grab one of the men just as he was about to make it out onto the the street. authorities apprehended the other inmate a few blocks away. lewis county court, there is no escape. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with jane hill. time for a look at the weather. here's nick miller. all quiet in the weather this afternoon, head of that big change to much colder weather by the end of this week. some sunshine across eastern and southern parts, the midlands and east anglia, north—east england and parts of eastern scotland, still some patchy rain in northern scotland, not as heavy as it has been, a lot of cloud through
4:56 pm
northern ireland in the north—west, drizzle in most places, and no change in that weather pattern as we go through into tonight, temperatures not dropping too much in scotland, nowhere seeing a frost, maybe a little misty across southern parts is thursday begins. more cloud around during thursday, coming in again on this westerly flow, some sunny spells across eastern areas, rain gathering across north—west scotland, turning heavier and more persistent through the day. it is the weather front that will sweep through these double figures temperatures as we go from friday to saturday, taking much colder air southwards in the uk. today at five — saudi's crown prince vows to punish all culprits responsible for the murder ofjournalist, jamal khashoggi.
4:57 pm
in his first public comments since the killing in istanbul — mohammed bin salman insisted there will be no rift with turkey. we will prove to the world that the two governments are cooperating to see that all perpetrators are taken to court and justice will be seen in the end. we'll be getting the latest on this from our security correspondent frank gardner. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the us secret service says suspicious packages have been sent to the home of barack obama, and to hillary clinton. theresa may prepares to face conservative mps within the hour as she tries to convince her party to support her brexit plans.
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on