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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 25, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. hardship on the high street: 4,000 jobs at risk as debenhams announce plans to close down up to 50 stores. i think it is not a surprise to any of our customers that customers are shopping less in our stores and more online. what we are doing is addressing the structural shift in the industry. police in the united states investigate another suspect package, this time sent to the restaurant owned by actor robert de niro. those in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. murder on tape: reports the director of the cia has heard recordings of the killing of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. two baby elephants — described as wonderful, charismatic little calves — have died — after falling ill with a rare virus at chester zoo. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh — good afternoon. it is a rare
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occasion to hear at length from pep guardiola who says he will be a mancini and for life he says it is not just because of mancini and for life he says it is notjust because of man city but because of the city. it certainly is all change. simon, you will have to get your mittens out. cold weather on the way arriving this weekend. more details in halfan arriving this weekend. more details in half an hour. also coming up — a nation remembers: a century on from the end of the first world war — the launch of this year's poppy appeal. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. we all knew the high street was in trouble, and now it's becoming clearjust
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how tough things are. 4,000 jobs are at risk after debenhams today announced plans to close up to 50 of its high street stores, about a third of its total, over the next five years. the chain lost half a billion pounds last year, and says it needs to make tough decisions. and debenhams is by no means alone in that. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. debenhams, if only all its shops could look like this, here in watford, a vision of the future. from blow—dries to gin bars, but there is sobering news today. it wants to close 50 of its stores in a radical restructuring of its business. customers are shopping less in—house stores and more online. what we are doing is addressing the structural shift in the industry. our plan is very simple, we want to have fewer but better stores, improve our shopping experience, grow our online business, and we're doing that in a way that makes debenhams a more profitable business.
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the going is tough. today debenhams posted a staggering £492 million loss in annual pre—tax profits. this was due to a series of accounting adjustments. 0nce those charges are taken into account, the company actually made a profit of £33 million. but that is 65% down on last year. the problem is these big stores are expensive to run, and its costs are growing faster than its sales. debenhams says most of its stores are still making money, but that is likely to change, and this is the reason why it was to close nearly a third of its shops over the next 3—5 years, affecting some 4000 jobs. but customers will have to wait to see whether their store will disappear. specific closures have yet to be announced. i think it is very sad for the people who work there, but i think it lacks a bit of pizzazz when there
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is so many more alternatives. i will miss debenhams, it is a little bit of everything, so you can comfortably go there and know that everything is under one roof. i think it is due to the online shopping. i think stores like this have got to rethink where they are. but closing stores, wherever they are, will not be easy. i am negotiating with all the retailers at the moment, and so they will not let them get away, they will have costly leases to get out of. on top of that they will have less money to invest in their stores in the future. that is one of the key things that they need to do to survive. this 240—year—old business is now in a race to adapt to our rapidly changing shopping habits, but the fallout will come at a cost to many high streets and town centres. emma simpson, bbc news. police in new york are investigating a suspicious package — sent to a business owned
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by the actor robert de niro. it follows the discovery of pipe bombs sent earlier this week to prominent democrat politicians including barack 0bama and hillary clinton, and the news network cnn. in the last hour, president trump has accused the mainstream media of stirring up anger in american society. from washington, chris buckler reports. the package carrying these pipe bombs were addressed to some of america's best—known public figures. sent to the homes of, among others, former presidential candidate hillary clinton and former president ba rack 0bama, both democrats and both critics of the current president. donald j trump! donald trump was in wisconsin for a campaign rally. at these events he often attacks opponents with unmistakably aggressive language. the tone was markedly different. those engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents
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as being morally defective. he didn't take responsibility for any of his own past rhetoric. in fact, he seemed to blame journalists. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and often times false attacks. one of the packages was found at cnn. the envelope containing the explosive device had been addressed to the former cia director and media commentatorjohn brennan. he believes whatever the investigation uncovers, mr trump must take some blame. as far as a lot of this rhetoric, it really is counter—productive. it is un—american.
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it is what a president should not be doing. more packages were found at the mail centre in los angeles. the and have on people to stay alert. while donald trump has warned others to watch their language, in this politically divided country many will be listening out to see if the president takes his own advice. the government has apologised to people who have been forced to take dna tests. well we spoke to our home affairs correspondent —
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daniel sandford — who started by telling us how the home secretary first reacted when the problem emerged injune. the review essentially identified three areas where people have been sent letters saying that they have to ta ke sent letters saying that they have to take dna tests. 0ne sent letters saying that they have to take dna tests. one was an andy fraud campaign —— antifraud campaign. letters were sent out saying that people have to have dna tests. seven of those people have their application refused, only because they had refused to take this mandatory dna test. that is people having applications refused because they didn't want to do something which the home office wasn't allowed to ask them to do. there were two other areas. one was
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in areas of gurkhas, in that case for people had had their applications refused because they had refused to take a dna test. similarly, people who had worked with the british military in afghanistan also sent letters saying that they had to have dna tests which was an incorrect thing to have happened. let's return to that story in new york. a suspicious package sent to a restau ra nt york. a suspicious package sent to a restaurant owned by robert de niro. donald trump has tweeted and said that the mainstream media have a role to play a nest. ears blaming the mainstream media. he has said it has gotten really bad. they have
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said that 90% of the coverage around the president is negative. she also said, ithink the president is negative. she also said, i think this is an important distinction that there is. she has said that there is a difference between comments and acts and the president has already said that what has happened is despicable. the president has been pushing back and saying that these things are wrong and that we will find these people but there is another part of this debate around what he calls fake news and the vilification of his supporters and him. if you dig down into the text of that prop tweet
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this morning, a mention of historicalfigures. my drag inevitably, there is an investigation on going into all of these parcel bombs that have been sent. the only thing that links these people is that they have been critical of donald trump in the past. robert and he wrote, the device that we are talking about this morning, he has been a very critical opponent of the president. he unleashed a tirade at an award ceremony in the summer. donald trump responded by describing robert de niro as having a low iq. they have formed between one another. you are right, we now have nine devices directed at eight people depending
quote
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on whether you count the device sent tojohn on whether you count the device sent to john brennan or sent on whether you count the device sent tojohn brennan or sent to cnn. that isa tojohn brennan or sent to cnn. that is a bunch of people who have been incredibly critical of the president. while we don't have a motive or any kind of leeds so far, it is impossible to ignore the fact that the connections between these potential targets and impossible to ignore the political motivation behind it. yesterday, the very first thing that the president did was come out and condemn the violence. the very first thing your network date out and blame the president. the first thing should have been to condemn the violence. what information do you have about the ongoing investigation? as you know
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it is an ongoing investigation. we will not get ahead of law enforcement. we will do everything that we can to provide the resources that we can to provide the resources that they need and hold the person responsible for this fully accountable and put the following extent of the law behind that. should the president ta ke behind that. should the president take at least partial responsibility for the state of the discourse just now? there is a big difference between comments made and actions taken? the president is not responsible for sending suspicious packages to people. the idea that this is at the hands of the president is ridiculous. but, gary, it is an argument that you will no doubt be questioned about again. yes, it is. it is a legitimate
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argument to say that the president has, at times, talked about violence rather explicitly. pretty recently he was encouraging people to laugh and to cheer about the idea of a republican congressmen body slamming a journalist if you months ago. that happened in the last week or so. i have been at rallies. i was at a rally in the run—up to the election where he was talking about people being punched and dulled with an old—fashioned way for objecting to him. he has not talked, obviously, about this kind of violence or encouraged it. but the accusation that that kind of atmosphere that is created where he does that and he gets people to round on the media at these events, chanting lock—up
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hillary clinton, etc, it allows the fringes to start freelancing and start assuming they know what the president mind is and that is the accusation that will be levelled at him. but of course, he has condemned it and pretty straightforward terms. he has said it is despicable and he says there should be unity and he says there should be unity and he says these people will be hunted down. what you get is a sort of noise where you are trying to pick out what is the salient theme or message and when you get those two different sorts of messages at the same time which we had last night from the president, on the one hand, damning, but on the other hand saying of course, the media, etc. the danger is that one side of the argumentjust the the danger is that one side of the argument just the first bit the danger is that one side of the argumentjust the first bit of the danger is that one side of the argument just the first bit of the speech and the other side is the second side and may decide he has both. it's reported that the director of the cia has
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been played audio recordings of the journalist jamal khashoggi being murdered at the saudi consulate in istanbul. gina haspel is believed to have listened to the tapes during her visit to turkey this week. mark lowen is in istanbul for us now. the feeling is that these tapes do exist? the feeling is that now they do. there was speculation earlier in the week and that turkey was using this as leveraged over the saudis. gino will be briefing donald trump later in washington. the tapes graphically revealed the way in which mr khashoggi was killed. it is
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very lunar it, macabre stuff. the question is is this the smoking gun to trace this back to the highest levels of the saudi state. they clearly show a meticulously planned operation and the prosecutor now corroborating that. of course, trying to find out who ordered those to rtu re rs trying to find out who ordered those torturers to do their dirty, dark work, that is still the big question. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called on the media "to stop the endless hostility," after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile us figures. meanwhile police in new york are investigating another suspicious package — sent to a restaurant owned by the actor, robert de niro.
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and coming up, a nation remembers: a century on from the end of the first world war — the launch of this year's poppy appeal — we'll be joined by a veteran of tours in iraq and afghanistan. in sport, pepper wild yala tells bbc sport that he is mancunian through and through. there is contention after the first round in shanghai. tour de france have revealed the route for 2019 calling it the highest in history. you may have seen photos online or in the papers this morning of an american tv presenter posing
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with wild animals — a goat and a sheep — that she shot dead on a hunting holiday in scotland. la rysa switlyk, who describes herself as a "professional huntress", posted several pictures of herself smiling behind the animals. she shot them on the island of islay, on what's thought to be a private shooting expedition. the scottish government has now said that it's considering whether the law needs to be changed. charliejacoby presents a weekly hunting show on youtube called fieldsports channel. i think we need to emphasise that there is nothing unlawful going on. it is the sight of her with the dead animals that many people are objecting to. the scottish government actually once these animals to be shot. there are a few things going on here. people are not liking the idea of trophy hunting, they are not liking the idea of killing animals at all. they are
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particularly not liking the idea of somebody who shoots an animal and then posting a photograph of it. i think all of those three things are fine. from the shooting community point of view, there are an awful lot of us, we manage the depopulation, the deer that you see out of the window of your car are healthy. if we didn't do that, because they have no natural predators in this country, you will see deer staggering around and starving to death. in some ways, you can thank us for the lovely deer that you see. from the trophy side, ifiam that you see. from the trophy side, if i am going to manage some deer and somebody comes along and says i will give you £1000, as long as i am sure that they will be safe and humane, because if they are not i risk losing my rifle licence, then i get £1000, i am very happy about that. the third thing is the photograph. there we are into
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cultural differences. in america, thatis cultural differences. in america, that is perfectly acceptable. little bit less so over here. we are not such a trophy hunting area. i know tonne one, she is a friend of mine. i don'tjudge her badly for that. —— i know larysa switlyk. it is a matter of taste this, itjust looks bad taste? i don't take photos because i that i look smug and self—satisfied or gloomy. because i that i look smug and self-satisfied or gloomy. which is exactly how she looks in the folder that we are taking no.|j exactly how she looks in the folder that we are taking no. i like remembering the day that i stalked that particular animal. the thing is, we are looking at you and you don't look like she does. if i saw
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you shooting whatever you were shooting, i can understand that there is a job being done there and he looks a responsible member of society to be able to do that. if i see somebody who looks straight at the pages of hollywood posing and taking photographs, that seems to ta ke taking photographs, that seems to take us into a different realm. they are, it is their own choice to look at these photographs. she is not regretting it. she would fight back at this, i am sure. the point is, these photographs go out to our community and we watched by 9 million people on youtube. they
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don't mind these photographs. it is when somebody from the antihunting side reposts the photographs that we get all of these blow backs. some of the response has been pretty disgusting and obviously that is not something that anybody would condone. that is something that has happened this week. we have had quite a week of it. we had that pretty awful fat american shooting an elephant. the money that those things produce is what pays for conservation. if you are looking at it from the point of view of what is good for the animals, you might not like it but the money is good for conservation. inevitably you are going to look back at the photos of the dentist with a lion. sometimes people get it wrong. again, that turned out to be a legal hunt. it
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pays for an awful lot. u nfortu nately, pays for an awful lot. unfortunately, people go on photographic safaris, but they don't spend enough money to support the animals. it is slightly different in africa than it is over here. in africa, it is all about the money. if you don't have hunting, the locals go what is the point in all of these animals. they poison them. when you do have hunting, you have wildlife winners. don't forget, you can letters know what you think about this story... just to illustrate the point as to what she has been tweeting, here are the photographs that people have been objecting to. there is nothing
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illegal in what she is doing. you may have a different view. do let us know what you think. a lot of you are very upset by these images. some of you are making the point that charlie was, too. there's a special poignancy to this year's poppy appeal, which is launched today. it's a century since the end of the first world war in 1918. over the coming weeks, volunteers will be selling poppies as the nation remembers the victims of not just that war, but all conflicts. 0ur correspondent lauren moss is in greenwich where the appeal has been launched. lauren. it isa it is a beautiful sunny day here. people have been coming down to see
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the sculpture behind me and find out more about it. the puppy is quite a sight to behold, it is six metres tall and connected to the ground by a series of threats. each of these threads has a message on it. the threads has a message on it. the threads are also like a compass. reaching out to different areas in the uk. this place here is obviously home to greenwich mean time and it was 100 years ago during the war that daylight saving was first used. it is also the site of the old greenwich hospital and the record of the sailors who lost their lives during the conflict are kept here. the poppy, a symbol of hope, woven into the fabric of today. as this poppy appeal begins, we are asked to remember across the generations those who gave so much. barbara is 92 and a world war ii veteran.
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her parents both served and met in the first world war. she says the poppy still means so much. it is quite inspiring, really, because it could have faded away over the years. but i'm amazed at the very pleased to see so many young people taking an interest now. was helping on a stall in york a few weeks ago for the british legion and the number of young people coming along and contributing, and they weren't putting 50p pieces in. they were putting in £10 notes and £20 notes into our bucket. we did quite well out of it. former rugby union england captain lewis moody is supporting the campaign, honouring his relatives who fought. i think it is so important to remember the sacrifices. it is a centenary now, coming to the end of the centenary period, and to remember generations like my great—grandfather and my namesake, who gave up so much so that we can enjoy the privileges that we do today, freedom of speech
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and privileges and choice and the life that we have. it is 100 years since the end of the first world war when more than 1 million british and commonwealth soldiers lost their lives. this commemoration is one of 15 across the uk. each of these threads carried a message to those who served. 0ther installations that football stadiums in northern ireland and preston, a former mining town in wales, at parks and beaches, signify that the memories will not be washed away. the money raised during the poppy appeal, and this year we are trying to raise £50 million, is to our armed forces community, which is 6.7 million strong, which is serving veterans and their families. there are some amazing things that the money will go toward that it is lifelong support, whether that be providing care in old age, whether that be providing respite and breaks for service families who haven't seen each other for nine months,
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or whether that be research at places like the imperial college london centre the blast injury studies. the legacy is to never forget the sacrifices that were made in the past for the present. this installation and others around the country are open for the public to visit. this year, the royal british legion is hoping to raise £50 million to help current serving soldiers, veterans and their families. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz. you have been looking at a typhoon. not this cyclone, or ray cyclops, as my grandmother calls at! this is so
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far the most powerful this year. technology is so amazing now that we can peer right into the eye of the storm. the island is around there and itjust storm. the island is around there and it just so storm. the island is around there and itjust so happened that whilst this was moving in, it went right around the island. the reason why i am showing this to you is i think it is absolutely fascinating looking at all of these patterns. if you look at it carefully, there are guys within allies. —— eyes within eyes. when we talk about these winds, they
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arejust around when we talk about these winds, they are just around here. when we talk about these winds, they arejust around here. right in the middle, that is where there is com plete middle, that is where there is complete calm. we didn't have this yea rs complete calm. we didn't have this years ago, but that is that. now, just tell us the story. this is partially what got me into meteoric she —— meteorology. episodes went by, i was tuning in every week. i'm expecting to see a giant with one eye. and then i got a bit bored and went to ask my grandmother why are they saying cyclone rather than
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cyclops, she said it was a cyclone, a big wind. here i am talking about this. things are going to change, dramatically so. the winds are coming in from the north. we will all feel richer it doesn't necessarily mean they will be snow. far from doesn't necessarily mean they will be snow. farfrom it. a little bit of sleet over the hills of scotland. the relative temperature and the strength of the wind is notable. the winds are coming straight out of the
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arctic across to france, spain, portugal as well. we will be feeling the effects of this cold snap. a relative cold snap. a lot of broken cloud across the country. these are the temperatures for the middle part of the afternoon. temperatures are dropping rapidly now. that's because the cold front is coming in, we have cold air, the wind changes direction and we will see she was in the north with clear spells, wintry across their hills. south of that the cold air hasn't quite reached us. we have this cold current of air from the north referred to as a viking wind. you will notice lots of showers on that north sea, it's going to feel quite chilly, maybe in the north it will feel nippy. high pressure is
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close by, a lot of isobars here. that's the pressure which makes these winds blow across the country from the north, she was in the east, one 01’ from the north, she was in the east, one or two in the west as well. these wind speeds are 80 mph. double that if you get a ghost. a real gust of wind blowing through the air, you can add 8 degrees. that's the maximum temperature. that translates toa maximum temperature. that translates to a wind chill which feels like a temperature to war three degrees. it will feel like the equivalent with that wind. you will need your hats and gloves. sunday, talking about the fact it's going to be cold, but i want to emphasise that apart from the she was here and there will be a lot of sunshine with crisp weather. sunday, maybe a little less cold, the winds coming off sea, slightly milder. you probably won't notice much. but chilly weather will last into next week, that biting wind.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines. debenhams announces the closure of up to fifty stores, after making an annual loss of almost half a billion pounds. president trump is criticised for accusing the media of "endless hostility" after suspected explosives were posted to cnn and high—profile democrats including hilary clinton and barack 0bama. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and often times false attacks and stories.
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police in new york are also investigating another suspicious package sent to a restaurant owned by the actor, robert de niro. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. see him on the touchline or in press conferences — but it's not necessarily the full picture. having won 24 trophies in ten years, including breaking records at manchester city, he is seen records at manchester city, he is seen very records at manchester city, he is seen very much records at manchester city, he is seen very much as a records at manchester city, he is seen very much as a genius in the football community, and an enigmatic figure. we don't hearfrom him often. there has been a book written about him, and he sat down to talk
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read his life, politics, and his favourite music. one of the six songs around the interview is don't look back in anger, by oasis. many people will remember a year and a half or so ago it was important to manchester. the song united the city after the arena attack. he's revealed that his wife and daughters we re revealed that his wife and daughters were there, it also helped him to identify with the city. he says he feels at home there, as do his family, and not just feels at home there, as do his family, and notjust because of footballing success, in fact, do such an extent, pep guardiola can't think about being in charge of any other team. i will be mancunian for the rest of my life. i would be a manchester city fan. it will not be possible to train another team in england like manchester city. i feel love from the people here. i like to do it better, to seduce them, to make a better club, where they can believe we are strong enough to do better
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things. but it is what it is. it is an intriguing interview. he talks about the refugee crisis and playing football in the streets. it's also available as a podcast. you can listen on bbc five live from 7pm. and arsenal coming up tonight? yes, ten winds in a row, the best win for 11 years. it will be 11 winds later if they beat lisbon in the you will believe. arsenal reach the semifinals last season. it is seen as the poor brother of the champions league, but in reaching the last four arsenal actually made almost £38 million. an amount of money not to be sniffed at. and the game is considered a significant one. one of the early kick offs...
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as are celtic who are in germany to play rb leipzig. chelsea will be without eden hazard for their match against bate borisov. .. he's got a back injury. while rangers take on spartak moscow later as well. england have moved up to 5th in the latest football world rankings — their highest position for five years. gareth southgate's team have made a good start to the nations league... including victory over spain last time out. wales move up a place to 18th while northern ireland drop down to 34th scotland are 40th with belgium top of the rankings. england's matthew fitzpatrick and tommy fleetwood are in the mix after the first round of the world golf championships event in shanghai. american patrick reed leads the way but fitzpatrick is only three shots back on five under par. nd european ryder cup star fleetwood is one shot further behind after he carded a four under par round of 68. the world number eight karolina pliskova is into the semi—finals of the wta finals in singapore after beating petra kvitova in straight sets. pliskova had never beaten her fellow czech but ended that run with a 6—3, 6—4 victory to go through.
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kvitova finishes bottom of the group. defending champion caroline wozniacki and elina svitolina are on court now, contesting for the second semi—final berth. tour de france organisers have revealed the route for next year's race... calling it the ‘highest in history'. the event will include a record 30 mountain passes... and five summit finishes. brussells hosts the grand depart on the 6th ofjuly... but the riders face a gruelling final week, with a finish at more than 2000 feet in the pyrenees...then two more at that altitude in the alps, with the final ride into paris on the 28th. geraint thomas will be the defending champion after winning his first tour this year. that's all the sport for now. i shall talk to you later. thank you. and there is a special poignancy to
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this year's poppy appeal, on the centenary. there has been a special launch in greenwich. this was the scene this morning. this is the traditional build—up to events on armistice day, november the 11th, traditional build—up to events on armistice day, novemberthe11th, it happens to fall on a sunday this year. remembrance sunday and armistice day on the same day. let's talk about this, i am joined by the third—generation liam young who served in the military. i want to start, because your great grandfather fought in the first world war. when did you start to think, i'd like to know more about this? it wasn't until 2014, when i was discharged from the army that i started thinking i want to learn more. the centenary of the first world war was a big push as well. i
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just realised that within the family we didn't know a great deal about him. there is only one picture of him. there is only one picture of him. that's from 1946. how did you go about finding out? in that process , go about finding out? in that process, anyone who has been over to france, will see the number of schoolchildren who are out there, in the last few years, it's very encouraging for those who think it's important we remember. it was. i got in touch with the british legion, through being a member, and had a look into it. they said would you like to go to the somme? where your great—grandfather fought and look at the history of it. so we went out to the somme, we had four days out there, they sent a quy had four days out there, they sent a guy who did a lot of family history for me. they kindly gave up their free time to look at the whole thing. it was a real learning process. we've got pictures of the medals your great—grandfather one, from those you learn a lot about where it was, it is what he took part in.
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it is harrowing to think that if you look at them, places like cheap file, the number are staggering. hundreds of thousands of men on one day. families or received that information, relatively at the same time. it doesn't bear thinking about. when my regiment last guys in afghanistan it was horrible for everybody. the guys on the ground, the guys back at home and their families. you can't imagine what it was like for swedes of guys from one regiment to go at the same time. your father was also military man, that must mean an awful lot to someone that must mean an awful lot to someone like you, because you've seen someone like you, because you've seen it from all sides, if you like. asa seen it from all sides, if you like. as a son you've worried about your dad, you've been relieved when he came home, and you've done the same yourself. yes, definitely. when i was six i wa nt to yes, definitely. when i was six i want tojoin yes, definitely. when i was six i want to join the army, and i was a lwa ys
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want to join the army, and i was always in my hometown, always on the streets every november collecting with my grandad and my dad. and it didn't really hit home until i went to hospital, when i was brought back from afghanistan, and i thought how much worry i put my family through. it wasn't until years later my mum told me how much she worried about me and how she never wanted me to join the army. to those who say, here we are, it's a century since the end of the first world war, is it time we moved on, why is it so important. why do we need to remember?m why is it so important. why do we need to remember? it is more important now than it was 100 yea rs more important now than it was 100 years ago. when the puppy was conceived it was a niche thing to help servicemen and women and their families after world war i. now it's a completely different thing. we have things like mental health, ptsd, 100 have things like mental health, ptsd,100 years ago have things like mental health, ptsd, 100 years ago that was a mysterious beast. now we understand it better. it helps with financial care, jobs, getting guys and girls
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into employment. it also helps with the little things, you come out of the little things, you come out of the army and its daunting. the legion is always there, even if it's just popping down the pub for a pint with like—minded people. eventually your problems become someone else's problems and they can help you. on the day, as you have done every year on the 11th you will be remembering those, your friends, who on the 11th you will be remembering those, yourfriends, who didn't come home. how important is it that you look around you on that day, there are members of the publicly supporting that. it huge every year. where i live in norfolk the town is closed off because it is full of people. it's huge. it has such a big community when it comes to the armed forces. people who've never served will turn up people who've never served will turn up to pay their respects and that's what it's about. it's nice to see when you go outside of the legion, the outside forces family coming to help. will it be strange for you to know
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that your great—grandfather is also being remembered? 0n that your great—grandfather is also being remembered? on a personal basis, what will be going through your mind? it will be great. it's one of those situations where i am lucky enough to have met world war i veterans. i have an understanding from when i was very small. to me, it's more of the duty to us all to keep their memory alive. essentially, that's what they want. it is remarkable, because dunkirk memorials, d—day memorials, they are a lwa ys memorials, d—day memorials, they are always young children who just want to talk to the veterans themselves. that's a remarkable moment, because they don't seem to be a meeting of minds, the youngsters, those who served on the battlefields, there is something very special. definitely. they are getting their story across and passing it down to generations. those stories resonate with children who can inspire others to go on and do things like visit
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the battlefields or normandy, or dunkirk. that's the legacy we need to keep going. 0n the back of what all this has been about for the last five years. the medals your great—grandfather one, do you know what represent? ido, one, do you know what represent? i do, yes. right, those are your medals that you while wearing now. have you and your great—grandfather, what have you got in common? do you have the same medals? these ones are my great—grandfathers, he fought in the somme. the one on the left is the somme? yes, that's the somme star. that's the armed forces commonwealth medalfor somme star. that's the armed forces commonwealth medal for the first world war and that's a french victory medal. these are very common if you fought the entirety of the first world war. he doesn't have a good conduct medal, because i don't think he was a very good boy! if you don't get into trouble you get a nice medalfor it. this is the great thing as well. let's talk through yours, because,
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what do they all mean? we see these every year, and few of us have any idea what they represent. these are just my campaign medals, this one is iraq, the middle one is afghanistan, and the far end is the queen's diamond jubilee. iam queen's diamond jubilee. i am fascinated by your great—grandfather. i am fascinated by your great-grandfather. according to the reports i found he had a futile to is he shouldn't have got and got drunk when he shouldn't have! this film released in the last couple of weeks, by peterjackson with some of the first world war soldiers colourised, they've got lip readers to find out what sort of thing they we re to find out what sort of thing they were saying. anyone who has seen it says it could be today, they suddenly come alive. that's very much what we all do, everybody comes alive on that day, don't they? it is, it can be confused with a celebration of death, it's not that,
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it's a celebration of life and what people achieved in a life cut short. you read the stories, the things that very ordinary young men achieved, great and extraordinary things from very small villages across the commonwealth. notjust the uk but the commonwealth as well. it's a moment for everyone to say thank you, to them and to you. definitely, more so to them. thank you very much and as i say, we will all be alongside you on the 11th remembering those from all conflicts. thank you very much. mps say the bbc has failed to give its female staff equal pay and opportunities. the culture select committee says women at the corporation are earning far less than men for doing comparable jobs. the inquiry was sparked by the bbc‘s former china editor, carrie gracie, who accused her managers of pay discrimination. the bbc says much of the report is out of date but admits there is "more to do". 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. it was the culture select committee that grilled bbc bosses at the start of the year, when the case of carrie
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gracie, the corporation's former china editor, drew widespread condemnation. while their conclusions carry no legislative weight, the strength of the breadth of the criticisms are striking. the mps say the bbc‘s grievance procedures have been poor. they say there is still a shocking bias towards men when it comes to top pay. and they say the bbc should publish the top salaries of those paid out of its commercial arm, bbc studios. one of the biggest concerns we've had is, the bbc says these findings are well out of date, one of the biggest concerns we've had is, not just the fact there is this discrepancy in pay, but that many women have found it incredibly frustrating and difficult to take these grievances up with the bbc. it's been a tortuous process and a long process, and some feel there is no end in sight to that. what we've said through our report is the
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commitment the bbc should give now is to say that, for the current complaints lodged with the bbc, they should now be resolved and settled within the next six months. the bbc says these findings are well out of date, that while there is still work to do on equal pay, its gender pay gap is lower than across the rest of the media and has fallen dramatically. and that it has gone radically further on transparency than most companies across all sectors. in the last year our gender pay gap is one of the lowest in the media in the uk, if not the lowest. it's come down in the last year by 20%. and we're the only organisation in the uk committed to getting our gender pay gap down to equal by the end of 2020. the bbc says it wants to set the highest standards and is held to them. with many grievance procedures still outstanding, and some high earners leaving because they don't like the exposure, the big headache created by salary disclosure shows no sign of abating. amol rajan, bbc news. jamie has the business news in a
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moment. but first the headlines. debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called on the us media "to stop the endless hostility" — after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile democrats and to cnn. meanwhile police in new york are investigating another suspicious package — sent to a restaurant owned by the actor, robert de niro. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. as we've been hearing — half a million pound fine for facebook for what the data protection watchdog calles a serious breach of the law. the fine for the company's role in the cambridge analytica scandal is the maximum allowed under the old data protection law. fancy a new pair ofjeans with your bread rolls? sainsbury‘s is opening 0asis clothes outlets in its supermarkets, the latest move to diversify the way its store space is used. the mid—market fashion chain will open before christmas in sainsbury‘s in sydenham, south london, and in its new selly
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0ak store in birmingham. twitter shares are up 13% ahead of the official open on the us stockmarket. most people were expecting its results would show a fall in the number of users because it's closing down accounts it considers "spammy and suspicious". that's true, but its picked up business covering major league baseball games and other sports events. so the stock market, is it coming down? sort of. we had a sharp fall in asia and the usa, the usa has wiped out all the it had this year. the market fell sharply about 89 points and ben recovered and has started to fall back. we've also had the figures from wpp. it's not so
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much what the figures say that's important. because it's a global company, global growth is slowing which is worrying. advertising companies are very often at the forefront. what happens to an advertising company now is what might happen to the economy later on. bt, they sort of advanced yesterday, they have a new chief executive. actually, it is a buy on a whim and sell on a fast kind of thing. you ta ke sell on a fast kind of thing. you take your profit. so debenhams, that's fairly favourable. they are up that's fairly favourable. they are up 12%. now, the usa? the first came from tesla, the electric car maker.
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we go to north america correspondent in the new york stock exchange. what do you reckon about twitter? good figures, but it's odd the way they are making the money? it's actually are making the money? it's actually a bit ofa are making the money? it's actually a bit of a puzzle. here is what twitter reported just before markets opened here. they've lost 9 million users, bringing the total monthly active users to 326 million. that sounds like a bad thing, but here is the reason investors are cheering the reason investors are cheering the names. they are still generating quite a bit of revenue from the remaining users on the server. the revenue on twitter jumped remaining users on the server. the revenue on twitterjumped 29% compared to a year ago. that's the reason we've seen she compared to a year ago. that's the reason we've seen she is surging. there are something like 17% in early trading. it suggests that when it comes to the future, investors are happy that they are taking a proactive approach and weeding out
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some of these accounts that may be spam, that may be swaying elections here and elsewhere. as a result, they think this will be good for the company going forward. it is quite a delicate point in the market, we have a lot of volatility, lots of games since the beginning of the year and some big numbers coming up, amazon, what they call the fans in the facebook amazon apple, net flicks and google. they are the ones that really have. this is the statistic for you, we've seen on the dowjones average, this october has been the most volatile month in 118 yea rs. if been the most volatile month in 118 years. if you felt like you've been ona years. if you felt like you've been on a bit ofa years. if you felt like you've been on a bit of a roller—coaster, you're not alone. as you mentioned, perhaps things might not calm down but we'll get more insight into what the tech sector is doing in the us. we have
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readings from amazon, alphabets, and next week we have facebook. this will give us a better sense of what all of the various things happening in the usa are doing to tech company earnings. rising interest rates, tariffs, scrutiny user data. these are weighing on investors until they can see the numbers and see what companies are doing. they want to proactively deal with these concerns. thank you very much for that. a very quick about the markets. yes, the most volatile day in 118 years. the ftse is down. we'll talk about it later. the dial has been around for 118 years. we haven't got time now. bt, they are down a lot there. in little bit of a recovery but not great. i will grill you when you return. i look forward to it! time for a look at the weather.
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here's tomasz shafernaker. it looks like we have to dig out the hats and gloves if you haven't done so hats and gloves if you haven't done so already. it's been quite snippy. we've got the coldest weather since april this year on the way. temperatures are expected to be in single figures with a wind—chill as well. today he is still relatively warm. temperatures 13 to 1415 degrees. the colder is reaching scotla nd degrees. the colder is reaching scotland tonight. this is a cold front, behind it we've got northerly winds from the arctic. the temperatures drop rapidly through the course of tomorrow. sunshine, she was, strong winds as well. those wind arrows coming in. not the
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cold est of wind arrows coming in. not the coldest of days, by saturday around five, six, seven or 8 degrees. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. hardship on the high street: 4,000 jobs at risk as debenhams announce plans to close up to 50 stores. i think it is not as a prize to any of our customers that customers are shopping less in our stores. we are addressing a structural shift in the industry. police in the united states investigate another suspect package — this time sent to the restaurant owned by actor, and prominent trump critic, robert de niro. those in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. murder on tape: reports that the director of the cia has heard recordings of the killing of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. two baby elephants — described as wonderful, charismatic little calves — die at chester zoo after falling ill with a rare virus.
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coming up on afternoon live all the sport. manchester city boss pep guardiola usually stays very private but gives us an insight to his life in england and his experience of last year's manchester arena bombing. all the sport to come at 3.30. it is relatively mild weather, we have got a cold snap on the way. the cold est have got a cold snap on the way. the coldest weather since april this year. also coming up: a nation remembers. a century on from the end of the first world war — the launch of this year's poppy appeal. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy.
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we all knew the high street was in trouble — and now it's becoming clearjust how tough things are. 4,000 jobs are at risk after debenhams today announced plans to close up to 50 of its high street stores — about a third of its total — over the next five years. the chain lost half a billion pounds last year, and says it needs to make tough decisions. and debenhams is by no means alone in that. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. debenhams, if only all its shops could look like this, here in watford, a vision of the future. from blow—dries to gin bars, but there is sobering news today. it wants to close 50 of its stores in a radical restructuring of its business. customers are shopping less in our stores and more online. what we are doing is addressing the structural shift in the industry.
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our plan is very simple, we want to have fewer but better stores, improve our shopping experience, grow our online business, and we're doing that in a way that makes debenhams a more profitable business. the going is tough. today debenhams posted a staggering £492 million loss in annual pre—tax profits. this was due to a series of accounting adjustments. 0nce those charges are taken into account, the company actually made a profit of £33 million. but that is 65% down on last year. the problem is these big stores are expensive to run, and its costs are growing faster than its sales. debenhams says most of its stores are still making money, but that is likely to change, and this is the reason why it wants to close nearly a third of its shops over the next 3—5 years, affecting some 4000 jobs. but customers will have to wait to see whether their store will disappear. specific closures have
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yet to be announced. i think it is very sad for the people who work there, but i think it lacks a bit of pizzazz when there is so many more alternatives. i will miss debenhams, it is a little bit of everything, so you can comfortably go there and know that everything is under one roof. i think it is due to the online shopping. i think stores like this have got to rethink where they are. but closing stores, wherever they are, will not be easy. negotiating with all the retailers at the moment, and so they will not let them get away, they will have costly leases to get out of. on top of that they will have less money to invest in their stores in the future. that is one of the key things that they need to do to survive. this 240—year—old business is now in a race to adapt to our rapidly changing shopping habits, but the fallout will come at a cost to many high streets and town centres. emma simpson, bbc news.
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police in new york are investigating a suspicious package — sent to a business owned by the actor robert de niro. he's been publicly and highly critical of president trump. it follows the discovery of pipe bombs sent earlier this week to prominent democrat politicians including barack 0bama and hillary clinton, and the news network cnn. president trump — who's labelled the media the enemy of the people and regularly launches intense personal attacks on leading democrats — has accused the media of stirring up anger in american society. from washington, chris buckler reports. the packages carrying these pipe bombs were addressed to some of america's best—known public figures. sent to the homes of, among others, former presidential candidate hillary clinton and former president ba rack 0bama, both democrats and both critics of the current president. donald j trump! donald trump was in wisconsin for a campaign rally. at these events he often attacks opponents with unmistakably
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aggressive language. the tone was markedly different. those engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. he didn't take responsibility for any of his own past rhetoric. in fact, he seemed to blame journalists. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and often times false attacks. one of the packages was found at cnn. the envelope containing the explosive device had been addressed to the former cia director
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and media commentatorjohn brennan. he believes whatever the investigation uncovers, mr trump must take some blame. as far as a lot of this rhetoric, it really is counter—productive. it is un—american. it is what a president should not be doing. more packages were found at the mail centre in los angeles. while donald trump has warned others to watch their language, in this politically divided country many will be listening out to see if the president takes his own advice. 0ur correspondent gary 0 donohue is in washington. the focus of this investigation is
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donald trump's the behaviour.m the focus of this investigation is donald trump's the behaviour. it is. not a scrutiny that he welcomes his spokesman sarah sanders welcomed this morning. she rejected that he had anything to do with what had happened. she said there was a difference between comments and attacks. the point she is trying to make is that what donald trump doors does not go anywhere nearjustifying or explaining the sending of these devices in the post. there have been times when donald trump has indulged in straightforward violent rhetoric. he talked the other day about a congressman body slamming a journalist. he has talked before at rallies about wanting to punch protesters. there is a violent
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strea k to protesters. there is a violent streak to some of his language. his view is that, yes, these acts are despicable and yes the perpetrators will be found, but he says the media has to take responsibility for a of the anger to day. 90%, according to his spokeswoman, 90% of the coverage is negative about him. thankfully, none of these devices has gone off. that will be a help to the investigation? at the last count, we have nine devices sent to eight different individuals, depending on how you were to count the one sent to cnn. they all seem to be fairly similar in design. they all have the same markings on them. they have the same markings on them. they have the same return address, to another leading democrat, which is slightly
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bizarre. they will be looking at all of the detail of these and trying to piece together who might have sent them. i don't know if you were remember that the boston bomber, if you months ago, i covered that story —— the austin bomber. it took three weeks to catch him. they caught him by using a cctv. this could take a while, even with the sophisticated data analytics that they have at their hands today. politically, could this have any impact on the midterms? it is interesting. it certainly heightens the tension and the atmosphere. i think, in some
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ways, if you are taking this and looking at this through a purely political lens, i don't think this helps the republicans. they were focusing very much on images of this migrant caravan that was making its way up from central america into mexico. there was definitely a sense from the white house that this was a really good piece of information and a good story that they could focus on to galvanise and motivate their base. getting them to vote is the big issue in two weeks' time. that has been knocked off the air, in large part, by this whole series of attempted assassinations. i think in that sense the republicans will be a bit wary of this sort of story and it may have that kind of impact. we will have to see how long it lasts and whether the democrats choose to try and capitalise it, although that
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is fraught with political difficulties, as well. it's being reported that the director of the cia has been played audio recordings of the journalist jamal khashoggi being murdered at the saudi consulate in istanbul. gina haspel is believed to have listened to the tapes during her visit to turkey this week. in the last hour i spoke to our correspondent in istanbul mark lowen and i asked him if these audio recordings really exist. i think there is very little doubt that they do. there was speculation earlier in the week and the idea possibly that they didn't exist and turkey was using this as leveraged over the saudis. confirmation that the cia director was played them and she will be briefing donald trump on the contents. judging from the leaks of those tapes, they graphically reveal the way in which jamal khashoggi was killed. they are said
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to show the screams, torture, dismemberment of the body. the question is whether this is the smoking gun to trace the line of responsibility directly to the highest levels of the saudi state. they clearly show a meticulously planned operation, based on the evidence that turkey has provided saudi arabia, they believe it was a premeditated murder. trying to find out who ordered that hit squad to do their dirty, dark work, that is still the big question. the government has apologised to people who were forced to take dna tests to prove they were entitled to live in britain. the home secretary, sajid javid, told the house of commons that some relatives of gurkhas and afghan nationals employed by the uk government were among dozens affected. let's talk to our assistant political editor norman smith. an apology a long time coming?
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indeed. the question is how big a home office immigration mistake their servers. is this another potential windrush? at the moment, it doesn't look like that. but we know that the windrush scandal started with very small numbers of people affected and crew. what seems to have happened is that home office officials were demanding that some seeking immigrant visas to come and settle in britain, very often for family reasons, they had reasons relatives here, had to prove that they had dna. it now transpires that ina number of they had dna. it now transpires that in a number of cases, particularly seems involving the relatives of gurkha soldiers and afghan interpreters, they were told that if
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they wanted to come than they had to give that dna evidence and, in some limited cases, because they did not a lwa ys limited cases, because they did not always unable or could not afford to provide that evidence, they were unable to come here. at the moment, it seems we are only talking about a handful of cases. it has been seized on by the opposition as further evidence of the hostile environment climate created by theresa may when she was at the home office. the accusation being that home office officials were encouraged to make life difficult for people trying to come here to try and drive down the immigration numbers into the tens of thousands which theresa may has a lwa ys thousands which theresa may has always said that she wanted to reach. the provision of dna evidence must be entirely voluntary. at the end ofjune, it was brought to our
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attention that there was some immigration cases where the provision of dna evidence had been made a requirement for a visa or to grant leave to remain and it was not simplya grant leave to remain and it was not simply a request. such demands are unacceptable. today, i want to take this opportunity to apologise to those who have been affected by this practice. clearly, the hope is that by fronting up, they pierce the boil and move on. they will reimburse those affected by this?|j and move on. they will reimburse those affected by this? i think compensation is certainly going to be on the cards. i suppose the bigger, looming fear, is that even if this is much more limited than windrush, we don't know yet, is that we know the home office, the immigration staff are facing the biggest shake—up and challenge, part they have ever faced. 0nce biggest shake—up and challenge, part they have ever faced. once we leave they have ever faced. once we leave
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the eu and have to bring in an entirely new immigration system. and have two register all of those eu citizens living here to give them the right to remain. any sense that the right to remain. any sense that the home office is struggling to cope with the existing immigration regime willjust cope with the existing immigration regime will just compound cope with the existing immigration regime willjust compound fears that they will not be able to deal with they will not be able to deal with the huge shake—up that is looming down the line. i think, there is perhaps a desire by sajid javid that he is getting to grips with the events of the past and trying to present himself as a freshfaced at the home office in a climate where the home office in a climate where the roles also people trying to position themselves in the event that theresa may is toppled or stands aside in the future. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called
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on the us media "to stop the endless hostility" — after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile democrats and to cnn. meanwhile police in new york are investigating another suspicious package — sent to a restaurant owned by the actor, robert de niro. and coming up, a nation remembers: a century on from the end of the first world war — the launch of this year's poppy appeal — we'll be joined by a veteran of tours in iraq and afghanistan. pep guardiola tells bbc sport he is mancunian through and through and he could not imagine managing another clu b could not imagine managing another club in the premier league. tour de france organisers have revealed the route for next year's race. karolina pliskova has reached the last four of the wta
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finals in singapore after beating petra kvitova in straight sets. it was also her first win over her czech compatriot. mps have accused the bbc of failing to give staff equal pay and opportunities. the culture select committee says women at the corporation are earning far less than men for doing comparable jobs. the inquiry was sparked by the bbc‘s former china editor, carrie gracie, who accused her managers of pay discrimination. the bbc says much of the report is out of date but admits there is "more to do". 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. it was the culture select committee that grilled bbc bosses at the start of the year, when the case of carrie gracie, the corporation's former china editor, drew widespread condemnation. while their conclusions carry no legislative weight, the strength and breadth of their criticisms are striking. the mps say that the bbc‘s grievance procedures have been poor. they say there is still a shocking bias towards men when it comes to top pay. and they say the bbc should publish the salaries of those paid out of its commercial arm, bbc studios. the mps also said the bbc
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should compensate those presenters who were told to set up personal service companies but now face huge bills of unpaid income tax and national insurance contributions. one of the biggest concerns we have had is notjust the fact that there is this discrepancy in pay, but that many women have found it incredibly frustrating and difficult to take these grievances up with the bbc. it has been a tortuous process and a long process, and some feel there is no end in sight to that. that is what we have said throughout our report. the commitment the bbc should give now is to say that for the current complaints that have been logged with the bbc, they should now be resolved and settled within the next six months. the bbc says that these findings are out of date, that while there is still work to do on equal pay, its gender pay gap is lower than across the rest of the media and has fallen dramatically, and that it has gone radically further on transparency than most companies across all sectors. in the last year, our gender pay gap is one of the lowest in the media in the uk, if not the lowest. it's comes down in the last year
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by 20%, and we are the only organisation in the uk who's committed to getting our gender pay gap down to equal by the end of 2020. the bbc says it wants to set the highest standards and is held to them. with many grievance procedures still outstanding and some high earners leaving because they don't like the exposure, the big headache created by salary disclosure shows no sign of abating. amol rajan, bbc news. the number of attacks on prisoners and prison staff in england and wales has increased to another record high. the figures cover the 12 months to the end ofjune, where there were over 32,000 attacks overall — up 20% on the year before. assaults on staff rose 27%. smoke alarms which use a recording of a mother's voice rather than a high—pitched beep may be significantly more effective, according to american researchers. 176 children took part in the nationwide children's hospital study which found only half woke up to the blaring noise
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of a conventional smoke alarm. but nine—in—10 woke up to the voice alarms. researchers now want to test whether any voice will do or if it has to be the mother. care home companies are accusing local councils of trying to get services on the cheap. the uk home care association says only one in seven councils covers even the minimum costs of providing home care for elderly and disabled people. local authorties say the system needs to be properly funded. here's our social affairs correspondent alison holt. this should be a half—hour call for 88—year—old's doreen's co—workers. they will prepare her meal and then give her her medication and hoist her into the bathroom. hoisting takes around half an hour to do.
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we're here usually 45 minutes. we deal with medication, then obviously if we are cooking her a meal we have got to wrap all of that up in the time we've got to do it because we are setting us back on other people's calls. their local authority pays one of the lowest home care rates in the country according to today's report. the knock—on effect for care staff is low pay. is this a job you can see yourself doing in the long term? i would like to think so, but financial—wise, not really, to ten, and if you've got a house to run you're not knowing where your hours are coming from. the association representing organisations that provide home care in the uk calculates that they need at least £18 an hour to cover increases in the minimum wage, pensions, travel and other costs, but on average councils pay just over £16 an hour. we manage to get through on a day—to—day basis. for those who manage care companies that means balancing the books and finding staff is a battle. it is a mess, it's a great mess, and all the time you're not thinking
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about sometimes the customers. it's thinking about how much is this going to cost? how can we do this? how can we do this on a restricted budget? 90% return, that's what we think about before anything else, the budget. can we do it? it shouldn't be like that. we should be thinking what does this person need? how can we do that? and it shouldn't matter how much it costs. council officials insist they're not trying to get care on the cheap. my colleagues across the country are doing their level best to meet need in their local areas at a price they can afford. however, in some parts of the country that is becoming now untenable and the government must recognise that it must put more money into social care for adults. the government says it has put extra money into caring for older and disabled people and that it will put forward its plans for reforming the system soon. alison holt, bbc news. lord hain has used
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parliamentary priviledge to name retail billionaire sir philip green as the businessman behind the injunction by the daliy telegraph newspaper. lord hain's comments have now been widely reported across the media. the bbc can not confirm the allegations and sir philip green this was lord hain in the house of lords and with someone intimately involved in the case of a powerful businessmen using... about racists and sexual harassment and bullying, i feel it is my privilege to name sir philip green to. 0ur legal correspondent
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clive coleman has been following the story and joins me now. people will remember the super injunction stories that were so huge a fuel years ago. you will remember the ryan giggs injunction. these are court injunctions, that is the rule of law in action. again, using parliamentary privilege, parliamentarians and the judiciary were very concerned that these two powerful limbs of our constitution, parliament and the courts, , constitution, parliament and the courts,, parliamentary constitution, parliament and the courts, , parliamentary privilege should not be used to undermine the rules, and to get court orders. a great effort was made, from that time, the time of ryan giggs, to ensure that this didn't happen
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again. i'm surprised that it's happened. i think the judiciary aren't going to be pleased. this was an orderfrom aren't going to be pleased. this was an order from the court of appeal, this was an injunction granted by three of the most seniorjudges in the country. they had before them a lot of facts, and evidence to consider. they came to a ruling, we talked about it a lot yesterday, they came to a ruling which was pretty emphatic. they found that in relation to these particular non—disclosure orders, they said there is a real prospect that publication by the telegraph will cause immediate, substantial and irreversible harm to all the claimants. in the case of the claimants. in the case of the claimant companies, this may have implications for their employees. they then went through and looked at the nature of these nondisclosure agreements and said, i'm coding directly, there is no evidence that any of the settlement agreements we re any of the settlement agreements were skewered by bullying,
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harassment, or undue pressure. each employee received independent advice by entering into the settlement, and each settlement agreement contains provisions authorising disclosure to regulatory bodies, statutory bodies, like the police, for instance. they looked at it very carefully, and they came to the conclusion that an injunction ought to be ordered. you know, i wouldn't say we've got a constitutional crisis on our hands here, but we've got a real significant development in terms of the way in which parliamentary privilege is seen to be used. in relation to court orders. clive, thank you very much. there's a special poignancy to this year's poppy appeal, which is launched today. it's a century since the end of the first world war in 1918. over the coming weeks, volunteers will be selling poppies as the nation remembers the victims of not just that war, but all conflicts. 0ur correspondent lauren moss is in greenwich, in south london, where the appeal has been launched.
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this installation is an usual, people have been coming down all morning to see it. the puppy is mounted six metres in the air connected to the ground by a series of threads —— the poppy. each has a message commemorating be significant relationship between the first world war generation and today's society. these threads act as a compass pointing in the directions of places in the uk with world war i heritage. they found those who serve the country. the royal british legion is hoping to raise £50 million for serving soldiers, veterans, and theirfamilies. the poppy, a symbol of hope, woven into the fabric of today. as this poppy appeal begins, we are asked to remember across the generations those who gave so much. barbara is 92 and a world war ii veteran. her parents both served and met in the first world war. she says the poppy
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still means so much. it is quite inspiring, really, because it could have faded away over the years. but i'm amazed at the very pleased to see so many young people taking an interest now. i was helping on a stall in new york a few weeks ago for the british legion and the number of young people coming along and contributing, and they weren't putting 50p pieces in. they were putting in £10 notes and £20 notes into our bucket. we did quite well out of it. former rugby union england captain lawrence moody is supporting the campaign, honouring his relatives who fought. i think it is so important to remember the sacrifices. it is a centenary now, coming to the end of the centenary period, and to remember generations like my great—grandfather and my namesake, who gave up so much so that we can enjoy the privileges that we do today, freedom of speech and privileges and choice and the life that we have.
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it is 100 years since the end of the first world war when more than 1 million british and commonwealth soldiers lost their lives. this commemoration is one of 15 across the uk. each of these threads carried a message to those who served. 0ther installations that football stadiums in northern ireland and preston, a former mining town in wales, at parks and beaches, signify that the memories will not be washed away. the money raised during the poppy appeal, and this year we are trying to raise £50 million, is to our armed forces community, which is 6.7 million strong, which is serving veterans and their families. there are some amazing things that the money will go toward that it is lifelong support, whether that be providing care in old age, whether that be providing respite and breaks will service families who haven't seen each other for nine months, or whether that be research at places like the imperial
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college london centre the blast injury studies. the legacy is to never forget the sacrifices that were made in the past for the present. the installation and the 14 others around the country will be open and available for the public to visit for a feud days and on monday the 29th of october. and then remembrance sunday is on the 11th of november. thank you, lauren in greenwich. thank you, lauren in greenwich. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it looks like we're going to need the thick coats, hats and gloves if you haven't done so already. we've got the coldest weather since april this year on the way. temperatures are widely expected to be in single figures with wind—chill as well. todayis figures with wind—chill as well. today is still relatively warm, 13
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to 14 degrees. the colder it reaches scotla nd to 14 degrees. the colder it reaches scotland tonight. she was in scotla nd scotland tonight. she was in scotland will be wintry, sleet and snow. here is a cold front. we've got northerly winds coming in from the arctic. the temperatures drop rapidly. through the course of tomorrow, sunshine and she was. strong winds as well. you can see those arrows coming in. not the cold est of those arrows coming in. not the coldest of the day, by saturday we are talking around five to 8 degrees. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. lord hain uses parliamentary privilege to name the businessman at the heart of the injunction story covered by the daily telegraph. debenhams announces the closure of up to 50 stores, after making an annual loss of almost half a billion pounds. president trump is criticised for accusing the media of "endless hostility" after suspected
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explosives were posted to cnn and high—profile democrats including hilary clinton and barack 0bama. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and often times false attacks and stories. have to do it. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. we've seen a revealing interview from pep guardiola? pep is seen as the gold standard in football, he's won 24 trophies in 10 years, including breaking all those records with manchester city last season — journalist guillem balague has sat down with him to talk about his life, his politics and also his favourite music.
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—0ne of his favourites is don't look back in anger from 0asis, with liam gallgher and his brother noel being massive city fans of course. you may also remember there was an impromtu renditition of the song at the vigil for the victims of the manchester arena bombing attack last year. pep told us the song has grown in importance to him because it was the song that helped unite the city whilst also describing his reaction to knowing his wife and daughters were there at the time. she called me but immediately broke the line. she told me something happened. but the people didn't know what happened. and broke the line. we tried to call her again. it doesn't work. we went to the arena. afterfive minutes, six minutes, she called me again. "we are out!" of course, life is like this. we were maybe in a better position than the other ones, unfortunately, for the times
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we live right now. it's an intriguing interview and podcast — you can download it from the bbc sport website or app or listen on bbc radio 5live from 7 o'clock this evening. and also this evening, more action on the and also this evening, more action on the pitch, and also this evening, more action on the pitch, arsenal and also this evening, more action on the pitch, arsenal are and also this evening, more action on the pitch, arsenal are on and also this evening, more action on the pitch, arsenal are on a and also this evening, more action on the pitch, arsenal are on a good run? arsenal are on a good run? ten wins in a row, arsenal's best run for 11 years, 11 wins later if they beat sporting in lisbon. arsenal reached europa league semis last season.fans of the big 6 in the premiere league don't fancy the competition much butin getting to the last four they made almost £38 million. and unai emery considers today's game a significant one. some big clubs across britain are
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involved as well. one of the early kick offs as are celtic who are in germany to play rb leipzig. chelsea will be without eden hazard for their match against bate borisov, he's got a back injury. while rangers take on spartak moscow later as well. former arsenal and manchester united striker robin van persie says he'll retire at the end of the season. the 35—year—old won an fa cup and a premier league during his time in england. he also scored 50 goals in 102 internationals for the netherlands — including this memorable one against spain at the 2014 world cup. the 2019 tour de france is set to be the ‘highest in history‘ according to the organisers after they revealed the route for the race. it will include a record 30 mountain passes, and five summit finishes. brussells hosts the grand depart on the 6th ofjuly, but the riders face a gruelling final week with a finish
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at more than 2000 feet in the pyrenees, then two more at that altitude in the alps with the final ride into paris on the 28th. geraint thomas will be the defending champion after winning his first tour this year. the world number eight karolina pliskova is into the semi—finals of the wta finals in singapore after beating petra kvitova in straight sets. pliskova had never beaten herfellow czech but ended that run with a 6—3, 6—4 victory to go through. kvitova finishes bottom of the group. defending champion caroline wozniacki is out with elina svitolina taking the second semifinal spot. kyle edmund is currently on court in his round of 16 match against spain‘s fernando verdasco at the vienna 0pen. he lost the first set 4—6 but stormed back to take the second. it‘s currently going with serve in the final set, six games to three. that‘s all the sport for now. we‘ll have more for you in the next hour. you may have seen photos online
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or in the papers this morning of an american tv presenter posing with wild animals, a goat and a sheep, that she shot dead on a hunting holiday in scotland. la rysa switlyk , who describes herself as a "professional huntress", posted several pictures of herself smiling behind the animals. she shot them on the island of islay, on what‘s thought to be a private shooting expedition. the scottish government has now said that it‘s considering whether the law needs to be changed. let‘s talk to stewart stevenson msp, a member of snp who also sits on scottish environment committee. good afternoon. she‘s done nothing illegal, so do you understand why people are upset? she‘s done nothing illegal, but she‘s done something that doesn‘t help burgeoning tourism industries for the ireland, —— island. this isn‘t the sort of image we want to
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see for our beautiful landscape, and for animals that are not particularly common, fell goats and sheep. they are wonderful additions to what people see when they go to places like this. we‘ve already heard from another hunter, on the island, who says they carry this out because the animals, quite legitimately, are species that are fit, young and going well on the island. it's entirely proper that we manage resources such as island. it's entirely proper that we manage resources such as wild goats and sheep, deer for that matter. manage resources such as wild goats and sheep, deerfor that matter. but we need to do so in a framework that protects the interests of these animals, and make sure there is no suffering. we need to make sure that we do preserve sustainable stocks of these wild goats and sheep, they are
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magnificent animals to look at. they are something that people come to the island and other places to see. and having this sort of pretty haphazard uncontrolled approach for the self modification of some person from america with a gun, simply isn‘t an image we want. it‘s not the approach we want to take to having a properly managed population. this is the point though, nicola sturgeon yesterday said it is understandable why the images of dead animals held up as trophies is upsetting. it‘s these images that seem upsetting. it‘s these images that seem to have got people upset. upsetting. it‘s these images that seem to have got people upsetlj seem to have got people upset.” think people do correctly respond to images of someone who has described themselves as a professional hunter, i‘m not sure that‘s an accurate description. she describes herself in those terms. she travels the world hunting and makes money out of it, so that is exactly what she is.
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i want is exactly what she is. iwanta is exactly what she is. i want a debate that, but the bottom line is that we‘ve got a comparatively small localised population of beautiful animals that contribute to the local ecology, pa rt contribute to the local ecology, part of the tool is an ideal and other places around scotland, and i think it‘s entirely proper that we revisit the regime that covers such shooting expeditions to make sure that we have a environment for this. i think we need to send a very different image from scotland that we welcome people who come to see our natural environment and want to view our wildlife, be that feral or truly wild, we welcome you to come and visit. am i right in thinking that you are calling for a total ban on this sort of hunting? hunting has a proper place in our economy, years of mismanagement, of deerfor example, economy, years of mismanagement, of
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deer for example, mean there economy, years of mismanagement, of deerfor example, mean there is economy, years of mismanagement, of deer for example, mean there is a commercial opportunity to bring people in to shoot deer. that is a significant economic value. it‘s less certain in relation to these beautiful goats and sheep. the bottom line is, we need a better regulated regime, to manage this, we will, of course, from time to time have two col animals. but we need to protect the environment in which they live. the bottom line is, we can‘t have this kind of image going from scotland, which is a to reflect tourist destination, we would rather people came to see it these animals in their natural habitat, augmenting it. they will draw tourists to this and this image doesn‘t grow. it. they will draw tourists to this and this image doesn't grow. thank you so much for your time this afternoon. almost eight months after the poisoning in salisbury of the former russian spy sergei skripal, the bbc has pieced together the extent to which he‘d been briefing foreign intelligence
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agencies before the attempt on his life. far from living quietly in retirement, skripal had been travelling extensively across europe and to the united states providing information to western security services about russian intelligence, including its alleged links with the mafia. richard galpin has been investigating. sergei skripal, a colonel in russia‘s military intelligence agency, the gru, who‘d betrayed his country, was brought to britain in 2010 in a spy swap. so why were he and his daughter attacked eight years later? perhaps part of the reason lies here in the czech capital, prague. this is the first place where it‘s revealed he‘d been actively assisting european and other western intelligence agencies. sources here telling me the czech secret services were in a battle with russian spies operating in the country, claiming they were trying to subvert the czech government. so intelligence experts say the insights mr skripal provided into the workings of russian military intelligence
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were important. given the track record of mr skripal, i could imagine that he would be very valuable. i am not aware whether there would be any more, let‘s say, interesting defectors right now in the hands of intelligence. while it‘s not unusual for defectors like skripal to brief the intelligence services of allied countries, a well—placed source said czech intelligence officers probably did ask him for names of russian spies operating in the country. and this seniorjournalist believes skripal still had relevant information. he was working in a high level position. he had to have the knowledge about the guys from gru who are all over europe. so he would have known names, exactly what they were doing? most likely he had that information about the guys who are still working for gru. if he had been uncovering russian spies, that could have been a motive for moscow trying to kill him.
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but one source here in prague told me that czech intelligence officers were also interested in what mr skripal knew about russian organised crime and said that mr skripal was planning to produce analysis about it. my source said that potentially could have been part of the reason why mr skripal was eventually attacked. this is spain, another of at least five countries skripal is believed to have travelled to in recent years. the costa del sol has been a favoured location for russian mafia who have been accused of money—laundering and links with moscow officials. i was told skripal‘s planned analysis on the russian mafia and its alleged links with russian intelligence agencies was to be shared with the spanish secret services. so if skripal‘s visit was about russian organised crime, there‘d be a parallel with the former russian spy alexander litvinenko, who worked for m16 and spanish intelligence on the issue,
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but was murdered before he could give evidence to spanish prosecutors. the litvinenko and skripal cases are almost identical. litvinenko helps the british, spanish and other secret services. he‘s an enemy of the russian government and they decide to silence him. his story is repeated with skripal. the exact same thing happens. proving these theories is extremely difficult but sergei skripal was far more active than expected of an intelligence officer who had betrayed his country and been allowed to settle in britain as part of a spy swap which would normally mean a very quiet life. richard galpin, bbc news, spain. jamie is here in the studio now to bring us the business news after the headlines. debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores,
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putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called on the us media "to stop the endless hostility" — after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile democrats and to cnn. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. half a million pound fine for facebook for what the data protection watchdog calles a serious breach of the law. the fine for the company‘s role in the cambridge analytica scandal is the maximum allowed under the old data protection law. fancy a new pair ofjeans with your bread rolls? sainsbury‘s is opening 0asis clothes outlets in its supermarkets, the latest move to diversify the way its store space is used. the mid—market fashion chain will open before christmas in sainsbury‘s in sydenham, south london, and in its new selly 0ak store in birmingham. twitter shares are up 13% ahead of the official open on the us stockmarket. most people were expecting its results would show a fall in the number of users because it‘s closing down accounts it considers "spammy and suspicious".
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that‘s true, but its picked up business covering major league baseball games and other sports events. wpp shares have had a bad day. why? shares in wpp have fallen as much as 22% after the advertising giant warned that growth in the business is slowing. the firm, whose former boss sir martin sorrell stepped down in april after a scandal, reported lower—than—expected third quarter sales and slashed its full—year outlook. it ran into problems with the digital age of advertising, it had competition from facebook, what it has to do now is what the new chief executive calls radical thinking. it needs to rethink its whole plan and sell off assets. it is a retreat
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from empire, that‘s the best way to describe it. people are worried. and figures today are disappointing. they are down about 12%. we should say that scandal overstates this, he left under a cloud. there‘s a new list lgbt influencers oput today — it includes people from very highly levels of companies. barclays, the bank of america. really important people who, because of their sexuality, can influence people at the same time. suki sandhu, ceo and founder of involve, membership organisation that drives diversity in business. this may seem naive, but why your
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sexuality important when it comes to the workplace? thanks for having us, first and foremost. it‘s great to talk write something positive for a change. what i would say, is that you still have up to 50% of people in the workplace who don‘t feel comfortable coming out at work. if they can come out at work they are 32% more productive. which business wouldn‘t wa nt productive. which business wouldn‘t want more out of the workforce? how do you know that? that's from research that took place last year. so, this list of quite impressive, very impressive executives who have come out, being role models, does it big difference? absolutely. we see more more openly lg bt absolutely. we see more more openly lgbt ceo absolutely. we see more more openly lg bt ceo is absolutely. we see more more openly lgbt ceo is coming out. we get
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cou ntless lgbt ceo is coming out. we get countless stories from people who are proud to be who they are and encouraging others to come out of the closet to. we also have the allies list, straight leaders who are driving collusion. they are in the majority in a position of power. that is super important. we are encouraging others to do more as well. is this a campaign you are running? 0r is this a campaign you are running? or is it is this a campaign you are running? 0ris ita is this a campaign you are running? or is it a network? it's a bit of both. it‘s a movement for change, for inclusion. if we get lgbt inclusion i did benefit everybody. it means the working mum can come into work and talk about her children without worrying about promotion. it benefits everyone. give me an example of the obstacles lgbt people have in the workplace, specifically, rather than socially? it's rather than socially? it‘s more around the there of coming out or discrimination from being lgbt. there out or discrimination from being lg bt. there is out or discrimination from being lgbt. there is the there of not being able to go forward for the
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next role. if the company is international and they want to relocate to, say, the middle east, where you could be murdered for being lgbt, where you could be murdered for being lg bt, that where you could be murdered for being lgbt, that will prevent them going forward. it‘s hindering their career. that means we are being held back.” like to think that we live in the uk and we are tolerant and understanding, we can debate back to the cows come home, but when you talk about international companies, and moving abroad, in some countries, you have very large obstacles. there are still nine countries in the world that being homosexual is punishable by death. so we do have a long way to go. you can‘t do anything about that? international? we are a global organisation. we have the most internationalist so far. we are absolutely global. can you influence countries, as you say, who don‘t allow homosexuality? we can certainly try. a lot of the
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companies follow an embassy model where policies they have respected within four walls. lgbt pupil feel safe and within four walls. lgbt pupil feel safe a nd co mforta ble within four walls. lgbt pupil feel safe and comfortable within that environment. thank you very much indeed. thank you. let‘s look at the markets. yes, it took a long time for the ftse to get back above when it started. we started off strong, bouncing back. i wouldn‘t be too confident. the pound is looking fairly weak, down below £113. is looking fairly weak, down below £1 13. that's is looking fairly weak, down below £113. that‘s against the udall, i can‘t say which way things are going to go. it will be dictated by the states at the moment. a quick word about debenhams. it underlines what we‘ve been talking about for a long time, difficulties on the high street. all businesses are saying we pay too much to be on the high street, we are up against the internet and we can‘t compete. there are so many internet and we can‘t compete. there are so many of these companies
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taking out cba ‘s, voluntary agreements, which are corporate volu nta ry agreements, which are corporate voluntary agreements, which bring all their creditors together and they discuss what they will do. their costs, and the landlords, they are saying, look, either in director cut rents all we need to close. the landlords are backing and down saying, 0k. landlords are backing and down saying, ok. this is producing a lot of problems for landlords but bringing down their rents. these companies are surviving, but it is an incredibly competitive and difficult marketplace out there. one of the first and most important things to get down as the rant. that‘s what‘s happening on the high street. thank you very much for that. more from you later. we have a sad story from chester zoo now. to baby elephants have died after falling in with a rear virus. the animals, three years old and 80
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months old, were described as wonderful, confident and energetic -- 18 wonderful, confident and energetic —— 18 months old. they were rare asian elephants. they had blood transfusions, but succumbed to that of virus this morning. that‘s the news coming in from chester zoo. we hope to have some report from chester later this afternoon. time for a look at the weather... some very big changes going on right now. all of us are in for a cold snap. it‘s expected to be the cold est snap. it‘s expected to be the coldest weather we‘ve had since april this year. widely across the country in single figures. they will bea country in single figures. they will be a wind—chill as well. 0ver country in single figures. they will be a wind—chill as well. over the next few days, peaking on saturday, we see winds swinging from the north, all the way from the arctic
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pushing milder air indicated by the yellow towards the south. we get the wind turning easterly, north—easterly. at the moment bearable amounts of cloud, some sunshine across eastern areas. here that curve in the cloud is a cold front approaching. its approach in scotland, by 5pm it‘s approaching scotland, by 5pm it‘s approaching scotland, by 5pm it‘s approaching scotland, by five bmx gansu stornoway, —— it‘s gone through stornoway. this weather front is swinging the wind direction, screaming northerly coming in by 5am. screaming northerly coming in by sam. the cold areas in place across scotland, northern ireland and the north of england. relatively mild. you can see the cold front clearing away. here it goes, here it goes. into the continent, and then we have that northerly winds and chilly air arriving. temperatures might touch ten or 11 degrees. around about
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eight to 10 degrees in the south. 0n saturday these isobars, whenever you see that pattern, that‘s where the area is coming from. the wind is following the ice bars, a straight northerly blowing through with showers for the eastern coast. increasingly wintry across the hills. these wind speed arrows show around 18 mph, that‘s a strong wind. the temperature plus the wind, you get something that feels colder than the thermometer suggests. hats, gloves, thick coats. some sunshine on the way for us, so it‘s not all bad. sunday is a crisp started a bit ofa bad. sunday is a crisp started a bit of a breeze, but looking relatively sunny. it is going to be warmer. goodbye from now. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4: lord hain has used
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parliamentary privilege to name sir philip green as the businessman at the heart of the daily telegraph injunction story. feel it‘s my duty under parliamentary privilege to name philip green as the individual in question, given the media have been subject to an injunction. hardship on the high street: 4,000 jobs at risk, as debenhams announce plans to close down up to 50 stores. i think it‘s not a surprise to any of our customers that customers are actually shopping less in our stores and more online. what we‘re doing is we‘re addressing this structural shift in the industry. more investigations of suspect packages sent to critics of president trump — one to a restaurant owned by robert de niro, another to former vice—presidentjoe biden. murder on tape: reports that the director of the cia has heard recordings of the killing of saudi journalist jamaljamal khashoggi. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with hugh woozencroft.
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hello again. we will be hearing from the catalonian who says he is now a true mancunian. the man city boss pep guardiola says he can‘t see himself coaching another premier league team ever. we have more to come at around half past stop i thank you. and tomasz schafernaker has all the weather. it will certainly turn colder in the coming days. one more relatively mild day today and then the temperatures will drop like a stone. thanks, tomasz. also coming up: a nation remembers... a century on from the end of the first world war, the launch of this year‘s poppy appeal. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy.
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lord hain has used parliamentary priviledge to name retail billionaire sir philip green as the businessman behind an injunction against the daliy telegraph. lord hain‘s comments have now been widely reported across the media. the bbc can not confirm the allegations. sir philip green has been asked to comment, but has so far not responded. this was lord hain speaking in the house of lords. ..someone intimately involved in the case of a powerful businessman, using nondisclosure agreements and substantial payments to conceal the truth about serious and repeated sexual harassment, racist abuse and bullying, which is compulsively continuing. i feel it‘s my duty under parliamentary privilege to name philip green as the individual in question, given that the media have been subject to an injunction preventing publication of the full details of a story which is clearly in the public interest. 0ur legal correspondent clive
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coleman has been following the story and brought us this update. these are court injunctions. that is the rule of law in action, and the piercing, as we had in the ryan giggs case, of the injunction, again, using parliamentary privilege, was pretty much frowned upon. parliamentarians and the judiciary alike were very concerned that these two powerful limbs of our constitution, parliament and the courts... parliamentary privilege should not be used to undermine the rule of law and to undermine court orders, and i think a great effort was made from that time, from the time of ryan giggs, to ensure that this didn‘t happen again. so, i‘m surprised that it‘s happened. i think that the judiciary are not going to be pleased. this was in order, simon, from the court of appeal. this was an injunction that was granted by three
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of the most seniorjudges in the country, who had before them a lot of facts and evidence to consider and came to a ruling, and it was, we talked about it a lot yesterday, they came to a ruling which was pretty emphatic. they found that in relation to these particular nondisclosure orders, they said... "there is a real prospect that publication by the telegraph will cause immediate, substantial and possibly irreversible harm to all the claimants. in the case of the claimant companies, this may have an implication for their employees." they then went through and they looked at the nature of these nondisclosure agreements and said, i‘m quoting directly from the judgment here, "there is no evidence that any of the settlement agreements were procured by bullying, harassment or and undue pressure by the claimants. each employee received independent legal advice before entering into the settlement agreement. each settlement agreement contained provisions authorising disclosure to regulatory bodies,
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statutory bodies, like the police, for instance." so, they looked at it very carefully and they came to the conclusion that an injunction ought to be ordered. so, i wouldn‘t say we‘ve got a constitutional crisis on our hands here, but we‘ve got a really significant development, in terms of the way in which parliamentary privilege is seen to be used in relation to court orders. and court orders from the court of appeal. we all knew the high street was in trouble, and now it‘s becoming clearjust how tough things are. 4,000 jobs are at risk, after debenhams today announced plans to close up to 50 of its high street stores — about a third of its total — over the next five years. the chain lost half a billion pounds last year, and says it needs to make tough decisions. and debenhams is by no means alone in that. here‘s our business correspondent emma simpson. debenhams — if only all its shops could look like this. here in watford, a vision of the future. from blow—dries to gin bars,
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but there‘s sobering news today. it wants to close 50 of its stores in a radical restructuring of its business. customers are actually shopping less in our stores and more online. what we‘re doing is we‘re addressing this structural shift in the industry. our plan is very simple. we want to have fewer but better stores. we want to improve our shopping experience. we want to grow our online business, and we‘re doing that in a way that makes debenhams a more profitable business. the going‘s tough. today, debenhams posted a staggering £492 million loss in annual pre—tax profits. this was due to a series of accounting adjustments. 0nce those charges are taken into account, the company actually made a profit of £33 million. but that‘s 65% down on last year. the problem is these big stores are expensive to run, and its costs are growing faster than its sales.
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debenhams says most of its stores are still making money, but that‘s likely to change, and this is the reason why it wants to close nearly a third of its shops over the next three to five years, affecting some 4,000 jobs. but customers will have to wait to see whether their store will disappear. specific closures have yet to be announced. i think it‘s sad, very sad for the people who work there, but i think it lacks a bit of oomph and pizzazz when there‘s so many other alternatives. i will miss debenhams. it's a little bit of everything, so you can comfortably go there and know that everything is under one roof. i think it's due to the online shopping. i think stores like this have got to rethink where they are. but closing stores, wherever they are, won‘t be easy. landlords are negotiating with all retailers at the moment, it appears, so they‘re not going to let them get away. they‘ll have costly leases to get out of.
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on top of that, they‘ll have less money to invest in their stores in the future. that‘s one of the key things that they need to do to survive. this 240—year—old business is now in a race to adapt to our rapidly changing shopping habits, but the fallout will come at a cost to many high streets and town centres. emma simpson, bbc news. police in new york are investigating a suspicious package — sent to a business owned by the actor robert de niro. he‘s been publicly and highly critical of president trump. and in delaware, a suspect package addressed to former vice—president joe biden has been intercepted. it follows the discovery of pipe bombs sent earlier this week to prominent democrat politicians, including barack 0bama and hillary clinton, and the news network cnn. president trump — who‘s labelled the media the enemy of the people and regularly launches intense personal attacks on leading democrats — has accused the media of stirring up anger in american society. from washington, chris buckler reports.
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the packages carrying these pipe bombs were addressed to some of america‘s best—known public figures. sent to the homes of, among others, the former presidential candidate hillary clinton and the former president, barack 0bama — both democrats and both critics of the current president. donald j trump! donald trump was in wisconsin for a campaign rally. at these events, he often attacks opponents with unmistakably aggressive language, but the tone was markedly different. those engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. he didn‘t take responsibility for any of his own past rhetoric. in fact, the president seemed to blame journalists, who mr trump normally encourages crowds to boo. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone, and to stop the endless hostility
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and constant negative and often times false attacks and stories — have to do it. one of the packages was found at cnn. its anchors were forced to broadcast from outside their own building in new york, after it was evacuated. the envelope containing the explosive device had been addressed to the former cia director and media commentator, john brennan. he believes whatever the investigation uncovers, mr trump must take some blame. as far as a lot of this rhetoric, it really is counter—productive. it is un—american. it is what a president should not be doing. hours after the discovery of packages on america‘s east coast, more were found at a mail centre in los angeles. the fbi are warning people to stay alert, as they search for who is responsible. and we will make
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america great again... while donald trump has warned others to watch their language, in this politically divided country many will be listening out to see if the president takes his own advice. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. 0ur correspondent gary 0‘donohue is in washington. i will talk to you about this in just a moment but news we are hearing is president trump is ordering troops down to the border with mexico and this is because of the caravan migrants heading that way? yes, i think we talked in the last hour about the migrant caravan being a big political issue for donald trump in the midterms and how these devices were obscuring that. i think this you are seeing is perhaps pa rt think this you are seeing is perhaps part of the pivot back to the issues which donald trump thinks he is strong and for these elections. what we are hearing is possibly 800
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federal troops will be sent down to the border. there are tricky rules about what us military can do, internally in the united states, going back to their founding fathers and so on. they won‘t be able to do any kind of apprehension of fighting, other than self defence. they will be assisting, but it will still be the border patrol that does the intercepting and arresting. bearing in mind, this caravan is miles and miles and miles away. it is on foot and is travelling as quickly as you can walk in a day. it's quickly as you can walk in a day. it‘s not going to get there anywhere before the mid—term elections or anything like it. but they feel the need to reinforce the border with these extra numbers. it's difficult to say this without a wry smile. we have president... i almost forgot his name, president trump calling for a more civil tone in public discourse. president trump! yes, calling for unity, calling also for people to stop sort of denigrating their opponents in political
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discourse. he has an interesting reference in one of his tweets comparing people with historical villains, as he puts it. i think that‘s probably a reference to himself and the comparisons that have been drawn by some between him and others in the past, mussolini and others in the past, mussolini and hitler, those have been used against him on a number of occasions by people here and abroad. but, yes, he is saying there should be a more civil tone. but he is also blaming the media for the anger, he says, thatis the media for the anger, he says, that is out there in society. let‘s be clear, he does attack people pretty viciously at these rallies, the rallies of his face that he‘s been conducting over the last few weeks. there are times where he does talk directly about violence. he talked about violence, in terms of a congressman doing a body slam on a journalist. i‘ve been up rallies before where he has talked about people wanting to punch protesters,
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him wanting to punch protesters who we re him wanting to punch protesters who were making a noise at his rallies. so he‘s not certainly ever advocated this kind of action but there has been violent talk in the past. he now seems to think it is time for all of that to come to an end. but he said that the acts were despicable and they would be hunted down. we will see how quickly that can happen. we will see people‘s responses to his call on whether he will heed his own advice, that is the bottom line, isn‘t it? will heed his own advice, that is the bottom line, isn't it? gary, thank you very much. it‘s being reported that the director of the cia has been played audio recordings of the journalist jamal khashoggi being murdered at the saudi consulate in istanbul. gina haspel is believed to have listened to the tapes during her visit to turkey this week. a vigil has just started outside the saudi consulate in istanbul forjamal khashoggi. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is in istanbulfor us now. how do you assess the mood of that vigil? there is clearly a continued
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desire to put pressure, to keep the pressure on the saudi authorities to get answers. frustration that more than three weeks afterjamal khashoggi was murdered in the saudi consulate behind if they still haven‘t found his body and still don‘t know on whose orders the saudi hit squad operated. let me show you the scene behind me. it is pretty chaotic. the crowd gathering behind, this is the barrier towards, just in front of the saudi continent. you can see the face, the illustrated face of jamal khashoggi. these can see the face, the illustrated face ofjamal khashoggi. these are friends of the murdered saudi journalists who have gathered here to demand answers. we are expecting a press statement to be read out as vigil continues. they‘ve been handing out these masks, these faces ofjamal handing out these masks, these faces of jamal khashoggi, that handing out these masks, these faces ofjamal khashoggi, that some of his friends and colleagues are wearing. there will be a lot of hope, i think, in the cia director who was here in turkey, was played these audio recordings from inside the
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consulate, hope that that might persuade the us government to harden its line on the saudi authorities and that might be the evidence needed to persuade donald trump to ta ke needed to persuade donald trump to take a tougher stance towards his allies in the riyadh. how much embarrassment for the turkish officials here? what‘s becoming is quite clear is that building behind you has been bugged. yeah, i think there is a sort of a reluctance to release the audio recordings to publicly here because they don‘t wa nt to publicly here because they don‘t want to show maybe they bugged the consulate, maybe they used an insider inside the consulate to record things. to be frank, i‘ve spoken to diplomats quite a lot in the last few weeks and they all say they assume they are being bugged here constantly and in other parts of the world as well. so yes, a mild amount of embarrassment but more embarrassing would be the contents of those audio recordings, if they lead to the highest echelons of the saudi state. that is clearly the feeling here in turkey, even last
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night the crown prince and president 0‘brien, they said they won‘t allow people to drive a wedge between turkey and saudi arabia. —— president erdogan. we will have to see when gina haspel briefs donald trump later this afternoon quite what she will reveal. clearly those people gathering behind you want to keep this story up there. they don‘t wa nt keep this story up there. they don‘t want people to move onto the next story? no. and clearly they can't really move on until they find a nswe i’s , really move on until they find answers, untiljamal khashoggi‘s family continue their grieving process , family continue their grieving process, when they find a body, when they can actually hold a funeral. it's they can actually hold a funeral. it‘s been more than three weeks and in islamic tradition you would hold a funeral the next day. they haven‘t been able to do that here. they want to keep the pressure on they‘d know the turkish government is doing that with their policy of kind of leaking through to the turkish media here.
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we will have to see whether that policy of leaks continues, given the audio recordings are in the hands of the american government, so there is very little more to leak once donald trump at the american government is in possession of what the turkish government believes what went on inside your. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: lord hain has used parliamentary privilege to name sir philip green as the businessman at the heart of the daily telegraph injunction story. debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called on the us media "to stop the endless hostility" — after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile democrats and to cnn. and in sport, manchester city boss pep guardiola tells the bbc he is mancunian through and through and couldn‘t imagine managing another
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clu b couldn‘t imagine managing another club in the premier league. there will be 13 mountain passes and five summit finishes at next year‘s tour de france. 0rganisers say it will be the highest in history. and britain‘s kyle edmund is out of the vienna open after losing in three sets to fernando verdasco. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. the government has apologised to people who were forced to take dna tests to prove they were entitled to live in britain. the home secretary, sajid javid, told the house of commons that some relatives of gurkhas and afghan nationals employed by the uk government were among dozens affected. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith says it‘s too early to telljust how big an issue this could be for the government... the question is exactly how big a home office immigration foul up is this? is this another potential windrush? at the moment, it doesn‘t look like that, but, of course, we know the windrush scandal itself started with very small numbers of people affected and then
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grew and grew and grew. but what seems to have happened is that home office officials were demanding that some immigrants seeking visas to come and settle in britain, very often for family reasons, they had relatives here, were told they had to provide dna evidence that they had family here. now, that was beyond the right of home office officials. people can provide that evidence if they want, but they do not have to do. however, it now transpires in a number of cases, particularly, it seems, involving the relatives of gurkha soldiers and afghan interpreters, they were told that if they wanted to come, then they had to give that dna evidence. and in some limited cases, because they did not or were unable or could not afford to provide that evidence, they were unable to come here. now at the moment, it seems we are only talking about a handful of cases, but it has been seized on by the opposition as further
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evidence of the hostile environment climate created by theresa may when she was at the home office. the accusation being that home office officials in effect, encouraged to make life difficult for people coming here to try and drive down the immigration numbers into the tens of thousands, which mrs may has always said she wanted to reach. today, mrjavid said he wanted to get the bottom of what happened and he offered this apology. the provision of dna evidence must be entirely voluntary. at the end ofjune, it was brought to our attention that there were some immigration cases where the provision of dna evidence had been made a requirement for the issuance of a visa or to grant leave to remain and it was not simply a request.
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such demands are unacceptable. today, i want to take this opportunity to apologise to those who have been affected by this practice. clearly the hope is that by fronting up like this, sajid javid pierces the boil and they can move on. and they will reimburse those affected by this? i think compensation is certainly going to be on the cards. but i suppose the sort of looming fear, even if this is much more limited than windrush, and we don‘t know yet, sajid javid doesn‘t know yet, that‘s what he‘s trying to get to the bottom of, exactly how extensive a problem there is, is that we know the home office, the immigration staff, are facing the biggest shake up challenge they have perhaps ever faced, once we leave the eu and have to put in an entirely new immigration system and have to register all those eu citizens currently living here, to give them the right to remain. so any sense that the home office is struggling to cope with the existing immigration regime willjust
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compound fears that it will not be able to deal with the sort of huge shake—up that is looming down the line. i think, two, there is perhaps a desire by mr sajid javid to demonstrate he is a new broom in the home office. he is getting a grip of events that have happened in the past and is trying to, perhaps, present himself as a freshfaced in the home office, in a climate where, let‘s be honest, there is also lots of speculation about people trying to position themselves in the event that mrs may either is toppled or stands aside in the future. a new study suggests that the "beep beep" of a traditional smoke alarm may not be the best way to wake up your child in an emergency. researchers at the nationwide children‘s hospital in ohio found that this might be more effective. beep. wake up, the house is on fire! well, the researchers found that
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smoke alarms that activated a recording of the child‘s mother‘s voice was much more likely to wake up the children tested, while normal smoke alarms only managed to wake up half of them. i‘m nowjoined by professor niahm nic daeid, who has been engaged in some similar research at the university of dundee. you got involved after the death of the six philpott children, who died of smoke inhalation despite the smoke alarm going off. does your research back this up? you are right. we were asked, myself and my colleagues, from those involved in the philpott fire scene investigation and we were asked a question which was relating to whether or not conventional smoke alarms would wake up young people, because as you quite rightly said, six young people tragically died in that fire. the work that we did
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looked at initially existing smoke alarms, to see what, how good they we re alarms, to see what, how good they were at waking up children. we found they weren‘t very good at waking up children. 0nly they weren‘t very good at waking up children. only about 20% of the children. only about 20% of the children that we tested were woken up children that we tested were woken up by children that we tested were woken up by the existing smoke alarms that are in each of our homes. so the follow—up study we did looked at combining a low—frequency noise, the one that you put on air, actually, where you have a sort of beeping noise, like the reversing of the truck and combining that with a voice and we used an actor‘s voice rather than the mother‘s voice. we found then that we had our young people between the ages of two white and 12 waking up about 80—90% of the time, so it reversed the success rate, if you like, almost completely. the american study backs that worked up. they looked at playing the mother‘s voice to the
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child in fact prove to be very successful also an waking up the children. professor, it is specifically the mother‘s voice, you couldn‘t just use anybody‘s specifically the mother‘s voice, you couldn‘tjust use anybody‘s voice? that‘s the interesting thing. for our research that we did at the university of dundee, we used an actor. for the american research, they used the mother‘s voice. 0ne actor. for the american research, they used the mother‘s voice. one of they used the mother‘s voice. one of the things they said they would follow on with is to see what happens when they changed that voice to something else. i think there is work to be done around that. we chose specifically to use the voice ofan chose specifically to use the voice of an actor that was pre—recorded, because of course if you send out or manufacture smoke alarms where you ask people to record a message on them, you are putting that responsibility on to the people buying them alarms, so we wanted to remove that step and see if an actor‘s voice would work and it worked very effectively in the study that we carried out. quite interesting that the age of the child seems to have an impact here. you found a marked change between
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those aged ten and 12, for example. yes, very interesting and we don‘t know why it happens. certainly, for younger children, up until about the age, between about 10—12, the conventional smoke alarm doesn‘t seem conventional smoke alarm doesn‘t seem to have a particularly good effect at waking them up at all. but around the age of ten, 11, 12, that sta rts around the age of ten, 11, 12, that starts to change and we see the conventional smoke alarms, the ones we‘re all familiar with, becoming more effective. still not as effective as the sound we used, that intermittent beep and the voice, but becoming more effective. we don‘t know why that is the case. again, there needs to be further researched and into the sound is why they are having these different effects. this research in the long term could save lives? absolutely, and that is com pletely lives? absolutely, and that is completely our motivation for doing this. when we started our research study, we put out a call to arms through the bbc, actually, that
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brought us nearly 700 young people to the study. so the difference between the work we did on the work our american colleagues have done is that we conducted our study on people‘s homes. it was a large scale citizens science project, where we compared conventional smoke alarms in your own home with the alarm sound we sent to our participants, that they could download and play over their mobile phone. the american study has done their work ina american study has done their work in a laboratory. so the work we wa nted in a laboratory. so the work we wanted to do and the motivation behind it for us is to make devices or to at least find a sound that could be integrated into the new devices, such that we can save lives, that sole motivation we had. fascinating. professor, thank you for your time. professor niamh nic daeid, thank you. my pleasure. you‘re watching afternoon live. there‘s a special poignancy to this year‘s poppy appeal, which has launched today.
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it‘s a century since the end of the first world war in 1918. over the coming weeks, volunteers will be selling poppies as the nation remembers the victims of not just that war, but all conflicts — as our correspondent lauren moss reports. the poppy, a symbol of hope, woven into the fabric of today. as this year‘s appeal begins, we are asked to remember across the generations those who gave so much.” to remember across the generations those who gave so much. i think it's good and it represents what the warriors did for us. barbara is 92 and a world war ii veteran. her pa rents and a world war ii veteran. her parents served at net in the first world war. she says the poppy still means so world war. she says the poppy still means so much. it's quite inspiring, really, because it could have faded away over the years but i'm amazed and very pleased to see so many young people taking an interest now. i helped run a stall in york a few weeks ago for the british legion, and they the number of young people
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coming along and contributing and they were putting 50p pieces in that temperament and £20 notes into our bucket. we did quite well. former by bucket. we did quite well. former rugby union captain lewis moody is supporting the campaign, honouring his relatives who fought.” supporting the campaign, honouring his relatives who fought. i think it‘s so important to remember the sacrifices. the centenary. to remember people like my grandfather who went and gave up so much so we can enjoy the privileges we do today, the freedom of speech and choice and the life we have. it's a hundred years since the end of the first world war, when more than a million british and commonwealth soldiers lost their lives. this installation is one of 15 across the uk, each of these spreads carries a message connected to those who served. 0ther installations at football stadiums in northern ireland and preston, a former mining town in wales, parks and beaches
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signify that the memories will not be washed away. the money raised during the poppy appeal, and this year we are trying to raise £50 million, goes to our armed forces community and that is both serving: vetera n community and that is both serving: veteran and their families. whereas an amazing thing is that the money will go towards. it is lifelong support, whether it be providing ca re support, whether it be providing care in old age, whether it is providing respite and breaks the service families who haven‘t seen each other for service families who haven‘t seen each otherfor nine service families who haven‘t seen each other for nine months whether it is through research at places like the imperial college london centre for blast injuries study. people have been coming all day to see the sculpture and read the messages. the installations are open until monday the 29th of october. the legacy is to never forget the sacrifices made in the past for the present. time for a look at the weather. here‘s tomasz. you have a remarkable picture. yes,
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this is a typhoon, and these are the mariana islands, we are talking about the pacific, it is a us territory. and that is the eye of the most powerful typhoon of this year. right over the island. and what is a probability? because this is something like 40 miles across, maybe less. and it literally went over the island so the island was in the eye of the storm through about one hour. it was completely calm. so, from wings roaring like a jet engine coming from one direction, then one arab silence, then a 180 degrees change in that wind, and they described it as being like a monster was loose, like a jet. pretty incredible. in global terms,
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we look at these storms and some of them head this way. we have one of them head this way. we have one of them crossing the united states. another that will be bringing some cold quite soon here. these storms quite frequently bring spells of warm weather. they disrupt the jet strea m warm weather. they disrupt the jet stream across warm weather. they disrupt the jet stream across our warm weather. they disrupt the jet stream across our part of the world. but over the next couple of days we are seeing a shot of cold air coming from the arctic and this is significant because it is going to be the coldest spell that we will have seen since around the beginning of april. and i suspect it is going to feel colder than that because if you think about it, in april, there was quite a bit of oomph to that sunshine. we‘re well into 0ctober now. the sun is low in the sky and any cold winds from the north will make it the already bitterly cold. it shows you what wonderful weather we have had. yes, a couple of weeks ago we were way above average. so
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now, shocked to the system. i think the peak of it is saturday into sunday. this is what we have got right now. it is the swing in the wind direction, from a westerly tour northerly. it is going all the way to greenland and the arctic, and thatis to greenland and the arctic, and that is losing down, cold air, almost like honey, oozing across the uk during the course of the night. all that cloud to the north, that is a cold front, and it is behind it that we are getting that cold air racing in. 13, 14 degrees, only eight in stornoway, and this process of the weather cooling down, turning colder, happens tonight as this weather front shift southwards. we will also see a shift in the wind direction. so the wind will be coming out of the north, bringing
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showers, some of them wintry across the hills. by tomorrow afternoon, that cold front is somewhere in france, so we‘re all in naturally air mass from the north. say if this was january, we air mass from the north. say if this wasjanuary, we seen air mass from the north. say if this was january, we seen these showers bring a widespread snow across the country but because it is october, this northerly biking wind is bringing showers and sleet may be only across the hills. so it is going to feel cold, this biting wind, so in edinburgh, hull, newcastle norwich, significant wind—chill, guts of 30 mph, so stick your head outside of the window, in the car, that is what it will feel like. and on top of that you will see one or two showers around. it will feel like it is three or 4 degrees. so this is saturday. sunday, a slight difference. rather than from the north, the winds are
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coming out of the north—east. slightly lighter. actually some quite warm water in the north sea. so some of these coastal temperatures will rise a little bit. 0ut temperatures will rise a little bit. out of the two, saturday is the cold day, sunday is the lesser of the cold days. the least cold day, if you like. monday and tuesday looks like the cold weather is going to remain. so wrapped up warmly. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. lord hain has used parliamentary privilege to name sir philip green as the businessman accused of supressing sexual harassment claims — at the heart of the daily telegraph‘s injunction story. i feel it‘s my duty under parliamentary privilege to name philip green as the individual in question, given the media have been subject to an injunction. debenhams announces the closure of up to 50 stores, after making an annual loss of almost £500 million.
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president trump is criticised for accusing the media of "endless hostility" after suspected explosives were posted to cnn and high—profile democrats including hillary clinton and barack 0bama. the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and often times false attacks and stories. sport now on afternoon live. here‘s an update from the bbc sports centre. those who do not know pep guardiola well, they need to listen to the radio later. yes, the manchester
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city boss has been telling us how co mforta ble city boss has been telling us how comfortable he is in england, also off the field. the interview covers his views on things like the refugee crisis. he speaks about the importance of innovation in humanity but he did take time to speak about his relationship with the manchester city fans. having managed the european giants barcelona and bayern munich there is a slightly different feel to his time in manchester but if the other big teams in england and were hoping he‘d one day coach them, it seems unlikely. i will be a mancunian for the rest of my life. it will not be possible to train another team in england like manchester city because i feel big love for the people here. i like to be... to do it better, to seduce them, to make a better club where they can believe we are strong enough. to do their thing. but it is what it is. it‘s an intriguing interview.
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you can download it from the bbc sport website or app or listen on bbc radio 5live from 7 o‘clock this evening. quite a pep talk! and can arsenal continue their winning streak? yes, another spaniard in charge. things are going far better than expected after arsene wenger stepped down after nearly 22 years in charge but so far new boss unai emery deserves praise. for the first time in 11 years arsenal have won 10 games in a row. in emery they have a boss who has won three europa league titles so could this year lead to a european title? they‘re in portugal to face sporting lisbon with whom they are fighting for top spot in their group. are mind is on this group and on continuing our way, thinking also how we can improve. nil tomorrow is
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a big match, important also, for our confidence and also to try working practically on things with the players. and with a lot of respect for them. tomorrow we want to win this against sporting lisbon. that game kicks off against 5:55pm. as do celtic against rb leipzig in germany. rangers take on spartak moscow later as well. former arsenal and manchester united striker robin van persie says he‘ll retire at the end of the season. the 35—year—old won an fa cup and a premier league during his time in england. he also scored 50 goals in 102 internationals for the netherlands including this memorable one against spain at the 2014 world cup. kyle edmund suffered an upset in his round of 16 match at the vienna 0pen by losing
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to fernando verdasco. edmund is now ranked 14th in the world after winning his first tour title last weekend. but he was edged out in three sets against the world number 30 in austria. elena svitolina is through to the semi—finals of the wta finals in singapore after a 3—sets win over caroline wozniacki. svitolina joins karolina pliskova in the last four. the 2019 tour de france is set to be the "highest in history" according to the organisers after they revealed the route for the race. it will include a record 30 mountain passes and five summit finishes. brussels hosts the grand depart on the 6th ofjuly but the riders face a gruelling final week with a finish at more than 2000 feet in the pyrenees, then two more at altitude in the alps, with the final ride into paris on the 28th. geraint thomas will be the defending champion after winning his first tour this year.
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that‘s all the sport for now. will perry has more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to carol malia in newcastle where gateshead council have warned about potentially dangerous, flammable halloween masks ahead of halloween. and rhiannon wilkins is in cardiff. she‘s had the privilege of watching rehearsals for a piece of music composed just after world war one. it‘s never been performed in the 100 years since its creation, something that will change this saturday. carroll, council officials worried about these masks. they often do tests in the run—up to halloween witches of host next wednesday. they
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have taken a sample of children‘s costu mes have taken a sample of children‘s costumes and masks from high—street stores, branded and supermarkets, and they have tested them with a quite simple test. they hold a naked flame to a children‘s mask for five seconds and see if it catches. and as you can see it doesn‘t take long for the flames to take hold. and in less tha n for the flames to take hold. and in less than a minute, absolutely terrifyingly, this is what could happen to the mask that there is a safety mark. it doesn‘t mean that it‘s absolutely inflammable. so you have to be careful. that is terrifying to me because my child had that in his hands in the supermarket recently. thankfully, we didn‘t buy that one, but you have to be very wary indeed of the labelling if it at this apply to children and not have them near any naked flames at all. common—sense stuff but trading standards watch the reissue the warning to parents this year
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just so that they know what to expect. every costume has the chance of being possibly flammable. that's the message we are trying to get across today. just because it has a safety rating doesn't mean that the costume is inflammable and the tests we have done today show that you need adult supervision and you need to make sure that your child is away from naked flames. it seems improbable that these are sold and they are flammable. they are sold as toys and are not sold to the same standard as children‘s clothing. some would say that it is time to change that. let's go to cardiff. rhiannon, you‘ve been spending some time with a local orchestra that have found a particularly remarkable way to mark the centenary of the first world war. tell us more. that‘s right. this morning ijoined rehearsals for a piece of music that has never been performed before. it
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was composed 100 years ago. the world premiere is on cardiff on saturday. let me tell you more about the music. the composer was charles believes stanford, his response to the first world war. that‘s why it has not been performed until now. in 1919 when it was written, the general publicjust 1919 when it was written, the general public just wanted 1919 when it was written, the general publicjust wanted to have something else to focus on, focus on the future, not remember the conflict and what had gone on and how the war had impacted their lives. it is a huge piece of music. about 45-50 lives. it is a huge piece of music. about 45—50 minutes long. it includes the orchestra, chorus and four soloists, there are ten themes, and conductor adrian partington can tell you a bit more about those themes and you can get the pace of themes and you can get the pace of the music as well. on one level it
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isa the music as well. on one level it is a remembrance of those who died, but it is called the via victorix, the wales victory. it is actually quite triumphant. there's lots of fanfares. lots quite triumphant. there's lots of fa nfa res. lots of quite triumphant. there's lots of fanfares. lots of marches. it remembers the first world war in those two ways, look at it, boys, we won it, but we won it at an enormous cost. perform this weekend so the composer never got to hear his own music performed. how disappointing. it must have been disappointing. he was quite elderly when he wrote it. 0ne was quite elderly when he wrote it. one of the last pieces that he wrote. it wasn‘t a commission which means it wasn‘t guaranteed a performance which is why when century later we are seeing the first performance. he would not have got money for it because it was not a commission. and it would have been a commission. and it would have been a huge amount of work because of the nature of it, 45—50 minutes in
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length involving the orchestra, chorus and soloists. it would have taken him about one year to perfect it. a huge piece of work. one thing is for certain, everyone involved with it here in cardiff at the national orchestra and chorus of wales are national orchestra and chorus of wales a re really national orchestra and chorus of wales are really excited. and the rehearsals are full swing before the big event on saturday.” rehearsals are full swing before the big event on saturday. i can see how excited you are, it must have had some effect. thank you very much. carroll, there is one way to avoid trouble at halloween, you stay in, turn the lights off and do not a nswer turn the lights off and do not answer the door. do you know, it is my birthday on halloween! i'm not going to say a thing. best not. thank you both. you can see more on those stories
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through the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide every afternoon at 4:40pm on afternoon live. let‘s bring you the headlines. lord hain has used parliamentary privilege to name sir philip green as the businessman accused of supressing sexual harassment claims — at the heart of the daily telegraph‘s injunction story. debenhams has posted record annual losses and said it will close up to 50 stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk. president trump has called on the us media "to stop the endless hostility" — after suspected explosives were posted to high—profile democrats and to cnn. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. a £500,000 fine for facebook for what the data protection watchdog calles "a serious breach of the law". the fine, for the company‘s role
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in the cambridge analytica scandal, is the maximum allowed under the old data protection law. fancy a new pair ofjeans with your bread rolls? sainsbury‘s is opening 0asis clothes outlets in its supermarkets, the latest move to diversify the way its store space is used. the mid—market fashion chain will open before christmas in sainsbury‘s in sydenham, south london, and in its selly oak store in birmingham. twitter shares are up 13% ahead of the official open on the us stockmarket. most people were expecting its results would show a fall in the number of users because it‘s closing down accounts it considers "spammy and suspicious". that‘s true, but it‘s picked up business covering major league baseball games and other sports events. war you going to say something about the... ?i
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war you going to say something about the... ? i was wondering war you going to say something about the... ? iwas wondering how long it took you to think up the thing about having genes with your bread rolls! we think about everything! debenhams is having a rough time. one of these legacy stories, legacy brands, legacy stories, legacy brands, legacy companies, having to reinvent themselves going forward. 0nline is a big challenge for them because it‘s never had a proper sort of impact on the online retail world. but it‘s thinking now it is going to be closing 50 stores. it was originally going to be just ten. so 4000 people could be losing their jobs. the new head is mark butcher a former amazon executive so he has got the experience. the shares are up got the experience. the shares are up sharply today. something like 10%. but down 80% over the last year so 10%. but down 80% over the last year so still a long way to go. another
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company having difficulties is wpp. the lycra yes, an advertising company from the 80s. it was taken on and changed by rowan sorrell, and became a leviathan of the advertising world. it has competition from google and facebook. it is struggling to continue in the way that it did. it hasn‘t got to grips completely with the digital world, it has to an extent but not in a way that it can continue the sort of growth that shareholders have seen over the past few years. that‘s why its shares are down 10—12% today. few years. that‘s why its shares are down 10-12% today. andy dow index has risen again today after falling sharply yesterday. yes, the most volatile month on the stock market
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in 118 years. but it is still very volatile. percentage—wise, the swings up and down. in many respects, if you have a very volatile market, it is quite alarming for investors, because they simply don‘t know which way it is going to go, basically, but also people who watch the patterns of the markets say that increased volatility is a very dangerous sign. we could have a more professional look at this. jeremy thomson—cook, chief economist at world first. what does this say to you? demarcus love digesting some important news items and working out how much of an economic effect they are going to have, italy, for example, the higher tariff between the us and china.
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whether the us central bank continues to raise interest rates, also brexit, there's lots of headlines and the risk out there. a headlines and the risk out there. a headline that will come out and it will change in the near term the sentiment around how investors discern risk and assets on that day and over the course of months. we've had a decent run high over the course of the past six or seven years. running up to levels which seemed that the economy supporting these equities and vice versa have run so these equities and vice versa have run so farand these equities and vice versa have run so far and so fast, how much more can we actually squeeze out of these companies moving forward? so, a little bit of a stop coming in. people just taking a pause, taking a breath, and making sure that they are able to continue to run higher and that is what we have seen in october. talking about wpp and
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debenhams, both legacy companies. wpp is only 30—40 years old, not as old as debenhams, but they are both slightly old companies nowadays. yes, this is the problem. regardless of which ended the —— industry you're in, retail oradvertising, the way that you take the company into the digital world, we always say that digital marketing and e—commerce is like water. it will find the cracks in your business plan and exploit them. we are seeing that it wpp. the fact that they have been somewhat slow to transition into the digital economy and somewhat slow to bring in their flights to it, and as you alluded, people like facebook and google and alphabet, the google parent company, they used to use wpp as a middleman, and now they say, just use our platform directly, we have got
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creatives in our teams, we will give you great ideas and save you some money. wpp is left on the sidelines thinking, how do we make ourselves releva nt thinking, how do we make ourselves relevant and keep the relationship is going. anyone from ford for cars, tojohnson &johnson by is going. anyone from ford for cars, to johnson & johnson by household goods. let's have a look at the markets. the ftse has got up to just about back—up to where it started. the pump prices have not gone down. you will have the weight and little bit for that. they will want to see some profit first! and this is a spot price, the price today, they have oil in their tanks which they are paid for, some time ago. but it isa are paid for, some time ago. but it is a symptom of this worry about the
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slowing of the global economy, one of the reasons why the oil prices coming down. and the pound looking quite weak, down below $1.29. there‘s a special poignancy to this year‘s poppy appeal, which is launched today. it‘s a century since the end of the first world war in 1918. over the coming weeks, volunteers will be selling poppies as the nation remembers the victims of not just that war, but all conflicts. earlier i spoke to liam young, who‘s the third generation in his family to serve in military. he told me about the particular significance when i was six i was wanting to join the army and i was collecting for the army and i was collecting for the poppy appeal on the streets with my dad and my grandad and everyone else. when i read hospital after coming back from afghanistan, i thought, how much worry have i put my family through and years later my
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mum told me how much she worried about me and how she never wanted me tojoin the army about me and how she never wanted me to join the army in the first place. to those who say that it is a century since the end of the first world war, it is maybe time we all moved on, why is it so important that on the 11th of the 11th, we do all remember. it is more important now than 100 years ago. when the p°ppy now than 100 years ago. when the poppy was first conceived it was a niche thing, to help servicemen and theirfamilies after the niche thing, to help servicemen and their families after the first world war. now it is different, we have things like mental health, ptsd. 100 yea rs things like mental health, ptsd. 100 years ago it was mysterious, now we can understand it a little bit better. we will try to put that full interview on our twitter account a little bit earlier on. next up, then use at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here‘s tomasz. we will have to dig out the thick
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coats, hats and gloves. we have got the coldest weather since april of this year on the way. temperatures expected to be widely into single figures. there will be a wind chill as well. today, still relatively warm. temperatures between 13 and 15 degrees. that cold air is reaching scotla nd degrees. that cold air is reaching scotland tonight. some of the showers across the hills will be wintry with some sleet and snow falling. and here is a cold front. behind it, northerly winds coming all the way from the arctic. temperatures will be dropping rapidly. through the course of tomorrow, sunshine, showers, strong winds as well. we can see those winged arrows coming from the north. not the coldest day. by saturday we will be talking around 5—8 degrees. those sorts of values. today at 5pm: billionaire sir philip green is named in parliament as the man facing newspaper allegations of sexual harassment. lord hain said it was his duty
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to name sir philip in parliament given the "serious and repeated" nature of the allegations. i feel it is my duty under parliamentary privilege to name philip green as the individual in question, given that the media have been subject to an injunction preventing publication of the full details of the story. the injunction was brought against the daily telegraph. we‘ll be talking to the paper‘s associate editor shortly. the bbc has approached sir philip for comment but he hasn‘t yet responded. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: debenhams becomes the latest retailer to announce the closure of some of its high street stores, putting 4,000 jobs at risk.
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