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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 31, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: attacks on nhs staff hit a five—year high in england, as the health secretary promises zero tolerance to violence. president trump pays his respects in pittsburgh, ignoring appeals to stay away days after a massacre at a synagogue. 11 people are killed as italy is struck by fierce storms. we'll be live in venice with the latest. penalising loyalty — car and home insurance firms that only offer the best deals to new customers face greater scrutiny. in sport, eddiejones swings the axe, as he drops mike brown, england's most capped full—back, for saturday's test against south africa. good morning from brompton cemetery, where it is a cold start to the day,
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there is widespread frost this morning, a lot of dry weather, but showers in the north and west. i will more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, october 31. our top story: a zero—tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff is being promised as figures show attacks in england have reached a five—year high. the government says offenders will face quicker prosecutions, and staff will receive better training to deal with violent situations. lauren moss reports. these are just some of the shocking incidents recorded against frontline nhs staff — kicking, hitting and sometimes worse. nurse shelley pearce was taken hostage when a patient became hostile, trying to leave the ward. she became quite distressed and broke an item in her room, which was, in hindsight, plastic. i knew it was plastic because a part of it ended up next to my neck as she frog—marched me out of the ward. shelley did escaped unharmed, but says no one noticed
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she was missing and, despite her reporting what happened, it wasn't logged properly. her account is by no means isolated. according to a recent staff survey, over 15% of nhs workers experienced violence in the last 12 months. that is the highest figure in five years. from next month, the maximum prison sentence for assaulting an emergency service worker will double, from six months to a year, in england and wales. the union, unison, is welcoming plans to zero tolerance to violence against staff. later, the health secretary will announce better training and support, a new monitoring system, and fast—tracked prosecution for offenders, to try to protect those who face violence like this every day. lauren moss, bbc news. we'll be talking about this story throughout the morning and we'd like to hear about your experiences. what do you think should be done as
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well? after 7am, we'll hearing from a mental health nurse who suffers from flashbacks after she was attacked at work two years ago. president trump has visited pittsburgh where 11 worshippers at a synagogue were killed by a gunman on saturday. some local politicians and religious leaders had urged mr trump to stay away, accusing him of stoking extremism and intolerance at campaign rallies. here's our north america editorjon sopel. awaiting donald trump's arrival, members of pittsburgh's jewish community gathered outside the tree of life synagogue. the president flew into pittsburgh accompanied by the first lady, but also his daughter, ivanka, who converted tojudaism when she married her orthodoxjewish partnerjared kushner. they first went to the synagogue were the ii worshipers were gunned down and, in the entrance, lit a candle for each of the 11 victims.
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next, they came outside to lay a small pebble from the white house grounds, and white roses at each of the stars for the victims. the rabbi of the synagogue welcomed the president. but not the group, bend the arc. he has victimised immigrants. he has victimised refugees, he has victimised mexicans, muslims, lgbt community, women, people with disabilities — the list goes on and on. we cannot stand idly by. police radio: shots fired, shots fired! there are terrible stories of tragedy from saturday's shooting, incredible stories of bravery and luck, too. judah samet survived because he arrived late and was parking his car when he heard the gunfire. the second narrow escape of his life. in 1945, as a small child, he was on a train heading to a nazi concentration camp when it was liberated by the allies. it never stops, at least for me and my family. it never stops, itjust keeps going. but we are survivors. you know, i'm 80 years old.
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i told my daughter that i am ready whenever. you know, i'm not afraid of death. today, the first funerals were held for three of the congregants who were gunned down on saturday, two brothers and a local doctor. families mourning loss, a city in grief and a country wondering where it is heading. jon sopel, bbc news, pittsburgh. the conservatives will not win the next election by trying to spend more than labour on public services, that's the verdict of the former chancellor, george osbourne. in a bbc interview, mr osborne also expressed regret about how david cameron's government handled the issues of immigration, and membership of the european union, in the run—up to the brexit referendum in 2016. first of all, we didn't spot the shift in politics. there are things we could have done i think to fix the banking system more quickly than we did. i think we were wrong to
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play into the debate that everything that brussels did was a challenge and a battle and was wrong. we were too late in the day trying to explain some of the benefits of european union membership. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in 1986 are to continue searching a garden in the west midlands. the house in sutton coldfield used to belong to the mother of a convicted murder, john cannan. he's suspected of killing ms lamplugh, but has never been charged. indonesian search and rescue workers have detected a large object insurance companies that penalise loyal customers are expected to face greater scrutiny later. victoria is here. what is being planned, victoria? just tell us a little bit about what's going on and what's being planned. good morning to you and good morning to you both. yes, the loyalty premium, lots of us, nine in ten of us, think if you are loyal to your provider, home insurance, car insurance, broadband, mortgages, you will get a better deal. in fact the opposite can be true. citizens
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advice launched a super complaint in september about this. lots of people complained about this, that only the good new customers are lured in get a better deals and if you've been around for a long time, a long—term customer, you are penalised, and as a result we've done some research, citizens advice has done some research into this and they think that households could actually be worse off to the tune of £877 per household per year. that's about four months worth of food for the average household. so what the financial regulator is doing is they are doing a market study into home insurance and car insurance specifically. they are going to publish the results of their report a little bit later on at 7am. where going to find out what they think. we are not going to get penalties, we won't get new rules just yet, that will come later —— we're. but i am speaking with the head of strategy and competition at6:115am to find out a little bit more about what's going on, what those
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recommendations might pick. but really interesting and hopefully a little bit of a win for consumers today. -- might be. very interesting, thank you very much, see you later. 11 people are now known to have died in italy as storms batter the country, leaving roads blocked and thousands without power. in venice, officials say 70% of the city has been flooded. the water level in central st mark's square peaked at more than 1.5 metres for only the fifth time on record. yes, extraordinary pictures of that storm. if the duke and duchess of sussex endeared australia and fiji and, to new zealand than prince happy has surely sealed the deal. at a gathering hosted by new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern he greeted the crowd in not one, but look at this, six different languages. applause. prime minister, honoured guests, ladies and
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gentlemen, (speaks foreign languages). cheering and applause. (speaks foreign languages). cheering and applause. this is definitely the first time i've spoken most of those languages, so i've spoken most of those languages, soi i've spoken most of those languages, so i apologise if my accent wasn't any good, but i had to give it ago. it went down a storm, didn't it? they really, really appreciated it, didn't they? excellent. you might have noticed, it is halloween today. we didn't ask anyone for pictures of pumpkin. these magnificent creations have been carved by andy sharp and his family in brentfleet. they've captured everything from star wars to the adams family! yes, look carefully, you can kind of
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workout which one is which extraordinary work! meanwhile, animals at drusillas park in east sussex have been eating pumpkins rather than carving them! this is giant anteater, diego enjoying a tasty treat! and paula harberfrom bury st edmunds sent in this photo of her nephew and his friend sat on a pumpkin, which paula bought one halloween. she says, "it cost £10 pounds, weighed six stone and they could hardly move it! great memories!" so that was, i'm assuming, sometime ago. yes, look at it, you can tell, so ago. yes, look at it, you can tell, so sweet, isn't it? yes, thank you for those. we'd love to see your pumpkin carvings, halloween decorations orfancy dress. send your photos to bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or tweet us @bbcbreakfast. thank you. sally's here with the sport. good morning. yes, spooky goings on,
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and eddie jones, good morning. yes, spooky goings on, and eddiejones, we know he is ruthless, he is really showing it at the moment ahead of the autumn international. their most—capped full—back, mike brown, has been dropped for saturday's first test against south africa. it's the first time that he's been left out since jones stook over three years ago. meanwhile, leicester city's players say they'll do it for the boss when they will play their premier league game against cardiff this weekend. the club have confirmed they will fulfil the fixture following the death of owner vichai srivaddhanaprabha. while their efl cup match last night was postponed, other games did go ahead including victory for burton albion over nottingham forest. it's the first time burton have ever reached the quarterfinal. gymnast simone biles claimed her 11th world title as part —— gymnast simone biles claimed her 11th world title as part of the us team that triumphed in the world championships in doha. she'll now look to become the first woman in history to win five all—around titles later in the week. she is mesmerising. yes. absolutely
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mesmerising! she is fantastic, a real role model. we are going to look at the papers in the second. it is cold out and i am afraid that carol is out at brompton cemetery for us this morning. very good morning to you, carol. good morning, i have to say is the first time in 20 years breakfast i've been in a cemetery on halloween, but what a cemetery on halloween, but what a cemetery it is, it has just undergone a four—year restoration project. now, there are 35,000 monuments in this particular cemetery and when day breaks i'll be able to look at some of them. but it is also a cold start to the day as lou said, so good morning if you are just getting up. if you're heading out, there is widespread frost this morning, but the forecast for many of us this day is a dry one, it will be mild for many, but we are also looking at showery outbreaks of rain coming in from the west. and in between the showers, of course, we will see some dry and bright conditions. now, the reason for the
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showery outbreaks of rain is, as you can see on the pressure chart, we have to make weather fronts coming m, have to make weather fronts coming in, and eventually they will merge, but today they are separate entities, and out to the south and the east, well, it is a cold start, maybe patchy macro mist and fog to form, but it will be largely dry. —— patchy mist and fog. we will see sunshine in eastern and southern and central parts. for the uk, showers continuing to come from the west, and between those it will be dry and brighter. temperature—wise, though, there is no heat wave, single figures for scotland, northern ireland and england, and double figures for the rest of england and wales. now, as we had on through the evening and overnight, our two weather fronts merge, and evening and overnight, our two weatherfronts merge, and at evening and overnight, our two weather fronts merge, and at the same time we have rain coming from the southeast quarter of the country, so the whole lot is gradually moving east and northwards —— south—east. and in between, temperatures quite low once again, we're looking at single digits more oi’ we're looking at single digits more or less across—the—board we're looking at single digits more or less across—the—boa rd and we're looking at single digits more or less across—the—board and you can
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see these temperatures indicative of towns and cities. now, tomorrow, the two band of rain merging will push off to the north sea, some will be slow to clear and then in the west dry and bright with one or two showers across the north and west of scotland. temperature—wise we are looking at single figures, maybe scraping into double figures across scotland, northern ireland and northern england, but double figures as we push northern england, but double figures as we push across northern england, but double figures as we push across the west of england and wales. friday sees the calm before the storm. there will be a lot of dry weather around but increasingly through the course of the day we will see the cloud built in the west, the wind will strengthen and then we will see some rain coming in across northern ireland. this is coming our way overnight where we are likely to see stormy conditions across the north and the west in particular of the country, and that is the remnants of ex— hurricane oscar but more on that as we go through the morning. back to you. carol, thank you very much, thank you. now for the papers.
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the potential impact of brexit is the focus for the times today, as it leads on the rush for irish passports, reporting that the number of britons applying has nearly doubled since the eu referendum. it also carries a picture of venice tourists wading through floodwater after storms battered italy and parts of france. the guardian has a picture of people crossing a river on the mexico—guatemala border as they head towards the us to seek asylum. the paper reports that president trump is considering ending the right to citizenship for american—born children of non—citizens. the sun picks up on developments in the suzy lamplugh case as police continue to dig up a garden at a house in the west midlands. the paper claims prime suspect john cannon wasn't properly investigated at the time. and a spolier alert now, if you haven't watched the final of the great british
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bake off, look away now! the daily mirror leads with a photograph of winner rahul lifting the trophy alongside judges paul hollywood and prue leith. the paper also covers a backlash for chancellor philip hammond after announcing £400 million for schools in england which teachers argue doesn't cover long—term funding. we were talking to him about that yesterday. let's have a look inside the papers with victoria. with the retail, the high street is having a tough time of late. evans cycles is the latest law that looks like it's in trouble, but the same man seems to be swooping in. the founder of sports direct. he's got plans to buy evans cycles. he says to make them profitable, he's going to have to
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shut after stores. that's that story. a little story at the bottom here, wh smith, a business of two halves. not doing so well on the high street but its stores in train stations and the like are doing well. it's going abroad, acquiring a us presence in. if you're a regular on the london to new york route, you haven't woken up in the wrong city, there will be wh smiths in new york as well. interesting. albatrosses, this is cool, recruited to spy on illegal fishing by the this is cool, recruited to spy on illegalfishing by the french. i didn't know, there's the patagonian tooth fish, otherwise known as the chilean sea bass, prized for its buttery and sweet taste and smooth texture. sounds delicious. it does, but it's being illegally fished and asa but it's being illegally fished and as a result scientists have decided to transmit devices on 250 albatrosses that are going to look
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at the water instead and work out whether or not these fishing vessels are poaching these fish illegally. kind of interesting. the technology is amazing. a man quite interesting, busy at the moment, frank lampard, huge star at chelsea, derby manager now, derby due to play chelsea in the carabao cup, his wife hasjust had a baby, he's been doing night judy, feeding the baby with the bottle, while thinking how on earth are we going to feed the baby? you get good thoughts at that time of the morning. -- how are we going to beat chelsea. maybe you do, or maybe you go bonkers. we've all had this. can you see that at home? does it look like a raven to you? does it look like a raven to you? does it look like a bird or is it a cat? in fa ct, look like a bird or is it a cat? in fact, it is a cat if you look at it and turning round backwards looking
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at the camera. it hasn'tjust fooled us at the camera. it hasn'tjust fooled us this morning until we knew it was a cat, it fooled a certain search engine. it has the visual recognition. it is definitely a raven according to the engine but it has been shared by lots of people and it is a cat! let's have a look at this story. these kind of pictures, we become more become more familiar with them. this is in norfolk, a seal found with a plastic ring around its neck. it caused quite a deep cut. it was rescued. we have seen it before but every time you see them, you think it's terrible. what have you got, sally? the paul hayward columnist, about the rugby, is it a busted flush, eddie jones, or is he on course to
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win the biggest prize? there's talk about whether he can turn things around as england coach. he has brought in will carling from the old days. he is suggesting... ancient history! ye olden days. he is suggesting will carling will be a good leader, a good leadership coach, not everyone agreeing in the papers that will carling is the best person to teach leadership. interesting divide. maybe we will talk about that later on. good morning, you're watching breakfast. officials in indonesia believe they may have found the smashed fuselage of the indonesian jetliner that crashed on monday in the java sea. our correspondent, rebecca henschke, is injakarta for us this morning. rebecca, bring us up to date with the latest information you're getting. in the port area where this rescue operation is taking place, just a
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short drive from where i am now, divers are out at sea trying to retrieve the main body of the plane. they've said this morning they believe they have the right co—ordinates and they are getting very close to what they think is the main part of the plane. it has the black box recordings in it and that will give a clearer indication about what went wrong, what caused this almost new plane to crash in broad daylight and in good weather. they also believe if they find the main wreckage they will be able to retrieve most of the bodies of the passengers who were on that plane to be able to give them to grieving and desperate families here. and, of course, the immediate concern, as you say, is for those families but there will be wider and is for the aviation industry. there will indeed. this was an almost new plane —— wider questions.
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the first crash of the boeing 78 is the max eight, a new more efficient plane that was brought out. boeing is helping the indonesian government —— boeing 737 max 8. there will be on the occasions in terms of what is found out. rebecca, for the moment, thank you very much. the number of electric cars on our roads has dramatically increased in recent years, but how far can a fully—charged one go on the open road? it is one of the big questions motorists have, given the government has pledged petrol and diesel cars will off the road injust 20 years. our transport correspondent, tom burridge, has been round a test track to find out more. my my first ever drive in an electric. there is, thankfully, a chill mode
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that does reduce power somewhat, which i'm very keen to turn on, as they're quite potent. you want me to drive in chill mode? instinctively, i would like to buy an electric car. but i'm waiting for the right moment. when is the right moment? if you're driving up and down the motorway every day, long trips, it's probably a bit too early but for the vast majority of people nowadays, there is an electric car that suits them. so will and his colleagues are on a mission to answer an important question. manufacturers publish official ranges for all electric cars, but just like fuel economy figures for petrol and diesel, these are typically very optimistic. what we're trying to do is give electric car buyers, or potential electric
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car buyers, or potential electric car buyers, or potential electric car buyers, a realistic figure they can achieve, real—world driving. car buyers, a realistic figure they can achieve, real-world driving. the same conditions are applied to each vehicle. this is a high frequency piece of... it insures the cars are driven on exactly the same route at identical speeds with the same tyre pressure, the ad concept at the same temperature, you name it. and the results... well, the range was on average in real conditions. the range of electric cars needs to improve. some affordable ones can do 250 miles, that's a big leap, and it will encourage more people to go electric but you've got the charging infrastructure. if you've got charging infrastructure at home and you've got off street parking, that's one thing, but if you live in london and you park on the street, where are you going to park your car? but a new solution could be coming soon to a lamppost near you.
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in southwark in london charging points use the electricity inside. there are 700,000 lampposts in london and 7 million across the uk, lots of which are right near where ca i’s lots of which are right near where cars are. so the perfect situation to be able to install a charge point without needing to dig up the road. the government gives you £3500 towards an electric car, and subsidises councils in installing charging points, including faster ones for those longer journeys charging points, including faster ones for those longerjourneys and. in the uk, we currently have around 900 rapid charges, these are charges that will charge a car in 20 or 30 odd minutes. the uk as a whole will need many more over the next few yea rs. it's cheaper and greener, but the transition to electric will take time. tom burridge, bbc news. still to come: i only see you in this role, i
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a lwa ys i only see you in this role, i always know that it's all downhill from there. academy award winner viola davis talks to us about some of the more obscure film roles she's been offered, as well as her latest powerhouse performance in director steve mcqueen's thriller widows. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a former haringey councillor has apologised and resigned after being found guilty of possessing class a drugs with the intent to supply. ishmael osamor was elected in may as a labour councillor, but pleaded guilty on friday to having £2,500 worth of drugs at last year's bestival event in dorset. he's the son of shadow cabinet member kate osamor. four families of disabled children will be going to the high court this morning over cuts to some services in hackney. they claim reducing special educational needs provision in schools is unlawful on the grounds children won't get
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the necessary help required. the government has effectively frozen funding since 2011, although the number of young people in need of help has increased. it's a really bleak future if these cuts go ahead. what could happen, we hope? i don't know. is she going to fall through the cracks? i don't know. then one of the reasons i'm involved is to stop it falling through the cracks. a dog breeder has offered a £50,000 reward to help him find 11 puppies which were stolen from his home in essex at knifepoint. mark orley said thieves made off with four daschunds and seven french bulldogs. he warned four of the dogs could die if not returned within 2a hours as they were not old enough to be weaned. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there are severe delays
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on the circle and hammersmith and city lines and the metropolitan line is part suspended. on the trains, great northern trains are suspended between moorgate and finsbury park following a points failure. onto the roads, at euston, hamstead road is closed to the north of the euston road for emergency waterworks in the drummond street. you can see it on the camera. westbound traffic on the 813 is building from dagenham into barking. -- a13. now the weather with lucy martin. a cold and frosty start today with temperatures just below or around freezing. you could wake up to a touch of frost but a bright start with plenty of sunny spells to come through the day. there is the small chance of the odd isolated shower creeping up from the south through the morning, but into the afternoon, a good deal of dry weather, plenty of sunshine. temperatures a little milder than they have been so far
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this week, a maximum of 13 celsius with a south—easterly breeze. moving through this evening, however, we will see the cloud increasing from the south so outbreaks of rain spreading in. through the night, heavy bursts with the rain becoming more persistent. temperatures overnight not falling far at all, overnight not falling far at all, overnight lows of 7—9. tomorrow we're looking at a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain will spread east. could be a bit of mist and murk around first thing as well. temperatures still in double figures, a maximum of around 12. frau date, however, brings us some dry, bright and fine weather. —— friday, however. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to chralie and louise. bye for now. and louise minchin. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. ahead of some medicinal cannabis products being legally prescribed to patients, we'll speak to one woman who has campaigned on the issue after they helped her son control his seizures.
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we'll hear about the gangs of extreme fly—tippers who are taking over private land to create illegal waste dumps on a massive scale, as the bbc‘s flagship consumer series watchdog returns to our screens. and we'll be joined on the sofa by the author of the book thief. he'll tell us how its international success left him full of self doubt and why his new novel took a decade to write. not easy for an author when they have had big success. and the new book. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the government says it's adopting a zero—tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff as figures show attacks in england have reached a five—year high. more than 15% of staff say they've been subjected to violence in the last year. new measures will see offenders sentenced quicker and staff receive better training to deal with violent situations. wherever there is a person, there is
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a propensity for violence, and actually we don't necessarily manage the risks very well, and there is a lot of lone working that goes on, evenif lot of lone working that goes on, even if you're in a building full of people that are professionals, every time you close a set of curtains in order to promote patient privacy, you are also creating a risk of working on your own. president trump has visited pittsburgh where 11 worshippers at a synagogue were killed by a gunman on saturday. some local politicians and religious leaders had urged mr trump to stay away, accusing him of stoking extremism and intolerance at campaign rallies. he made no public statement during the trip. the conservatives will not win the next election by trying to spend more than labour on public services, that's the verdict of the former chancellor, george osbourne. in a bbc interview, mr osborne also expressed regret about how david cameron's government handled the issues of immigration, and membership of the european union, in the run—up to the brexit referendum in 2016.
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first of all, we didn't spot the shift in politics. there are things we could have done i think to fix the banking system more quickly than we did. i think we were wrong to play into the debate that everything that brussels did was a challenge and a battle and was wrong. we were too late in the day trying to explain some of the benefits of european union membership. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in 1986 are to continue searching a garden in the west midlands. the house in sutton coldfield used to belong to the mother of a convicted murder, john cannan. he's suspected of killing ms lamplugh, but has never been charged. britain's business leaders are set to be recruited as ambassadors following brexit. in a speech tonight, the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt is expected to say the move is part of a strategy to reinvigorate british diplomacy after the country leaves the eu. but the fda union, which represents senior civil servants,
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says britain's interests are best served by a professional diplomatic service. insurance firms which only offer the best deals to new customers could face greater scrutiny from today. financial regulator the fca is expected to launch a study into the home and motor insurance market at 7am this morning. consumer groups say the renewals system too often penalises loyalty. we will have more details with victoria later on. so that's all the latest news for you. sally is here with news from the rugby world. yes, and talking about loyalty, is there a point about loyalty, is there a point about taking loyalty too far, and you have to make the brave decisions, perhaps this is what eddiejones has decisions, perhaps this is what eddie jones has done. decisions, perhaps this is what eddiejones has done. good morning, everyone. england head coach eddiejones ahead of a very big month
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has dropped england's most—capped fullback mike brown for the first test against south africa on saturday. new zealand, australia and japan to come of course. it's the first time that the 33—year—old has been dropped in the three years that jones has been in charge of england. they are all naughty boys, aren't they, those old ones? i said to chris ashton the other day, he's a lwa ys chris ashton the other day, he's always a common denominator, so... no, both those guys have come in. they make really good, you know. i think they appreciate that they have another opportunity now to play for england. they want to play for england. they want to play for england. they want to play for england. they are mentally both in a good spot, physically good, and they have just good spot, physically good, and they havejust added to good spot, physically good, and they have just added to the squad, mate. we will see if those changes pay off. leicester city's premier league match at cardiff on saturday will go ahead following the death of owner vichai srivaddhanaprabha in a helicopter crash outside their stadium on saturday. there will be a minute's silence before the game and players will wear black armbands. an investigation into the cause of the crash in which five people died is ongoing. two gains in the league cup did go
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ahead. the draw for the quarter finals of the competition will include the name burton albion for the first time ever. they beat nottingham forest from the division above 3—2 last night. they call it the nigel darby because he coached both teams. bournemouth beat norwich in the other efl cup tie. in tonight's league cup fixtures derby county boss frank lampard returns to stamford bridge for the first time as a manager. the former chelsea midfielder pulled off a shock in the last round beating manchester united and his former bossjose mourinho. the last time he came up against chelsea he disappointed their fans by scoring a late equaliser for manchester city. and he's relishing tonight's return. obviously to go to manchester united was one thing, but the opportunity to go here so soon, yeah, it is big for me, it is before the players, we have a lot of young players here and a lot of experienced players who are
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very driven in and want to play against premier league dreams, so they deserve the occasion to go up against games for what is a fantastic chelsea side, no matter who put they put up on the night. simone bilesjust get simone biles just get better and better in the world of gymnastics. she's claimed her 11th world title as part of the us team that comfortably took gold in the team event at the world gymnastics championships. biles will now turn her attention to becoming the first female to win five all—around titles. pretty amazing considering she was hospitalised on the eve of the competition with a kidney stone. it is very special, because i have trained really hard this hole in tyre year and then coming into worlds the whole team has worked really ha rd to worlds the whole team has worked really hard to get where we are, so we are really hard to get where we are, so we a re really really hard to get where we are, so we are really excited. ifeel like i'm mentally stronger, and physically stronger, as well, and i know what i'm capable of whenever i step on the mat. what would it mean to get a fifth world title? it's never been done by a woman at the world level. yes, i think it's really exciting, so we'll have to see what happens.
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she is amazing, isn't she? mesmerising. with everything else in her life that is unfolding. yes, so she is very brave and supremely talented. just won sports story from me. —— one. now have a look at this, novak djokovic was serving for victory at the paris masters when a spectator was taken ill in the crowd just behind him djokovic stopped playing as the fan was attended to, even providing him with a towel before he left his seat for treatment. the world number two was nearly broken when play resumed but served out for the match to win. that poor man. i do feel a a little bit of sympathy for the poor guy who, i think, bit of sympathy for the poor guy who, ithink, maybe he bit of sympathy for the poor guy who, i think, maybe he fainted. well, a sip of water. and at how from novak djokovic, it will be fine. that is nice, isn't it? yes! 11 people are now known to have died in italy as storms batter the country, leaving roads blocked and thousands without power. in venice, the water level in st mark's square peaked at more than 1.5 metres for only the fifth time on record. let's speak tojo—ann titmarsh,
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who is an english teacher at the university of venice. morning to you, thank you very much for joining morning to you, thank you very much forjoining us. just tell us about the scenes, we have seen the pictures, and it does look extreme. yes, what is really bad, on monday, it was very serious. i think that is the second time that i have seen it that high. how was everybody coping with it? we had a lot of warning in advance. we have very good forecasts for the high water. the schools were shut, the universities were closed, and shops and bars and so on, businesses, were sort of trying to get as prepared as they could. but, against that kind of water it is just really difficult. and we are seeing pictures of st mark's square,
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this is a water city, but this is not what you expect, is it? no, what you saw not what you expect, is it? no, what you saw on not what you expect, is it? no, what you saw on monday was a very extreme example of something that happens quite naturally throughout the year, but monday was really devastating. and tell us about from your personal point of view, have you been ok, has the water being in your house? the water, i am on the first floor, luckily, as most venetians are, there are not many venetians who live on the ground floor, and we just had water coming into our entranceway, but my next—door neighbour unfortunately is on the ground floor with no step to protect him and he was sloshing out water from his apartment. and you say it is something that they are kind of use to, the venetians, they are also trying, there has been a plan to build defences, but that's not happened, has it? no, that's been an ongoing saga that's taken about 15
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yea rs, ongoing saga that's taken about 15 years, and cost about 6 billion euros of european and italian taxpayers' money, and it has also had 35 people arrested for corruption, so it has not been very successful. well, listen, best of luck, and i hope everything goes ok with the cleanup operation. thank you very much for your time this morning, thank you. carol is at brompton cemetery for us on this halloween morning with a look at the weather. good morning to you. it is a rather dramatic location down there. sometimes cemeteries are. dramatic location down there. sometimes cemeteries arem dramatic location down there. sometimes cemeteries are. it is. they are indeed, charlie. there is many, they are indeed, charlie. there is any they are indeed, charlie. there is many, many gravestones here as well, in fact, if we have a quick look, there are 30 5000, 200 and 5000 burials, and 633 trees from around 60 different species —— 35,000, and
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250,000 burials. it had a leaking roof here which was replaced over a large four—year restoration project, and the chapel, the dome on it, is reminiscent of the one in the papillon in rome. and i will give you papillon in rome. and i will give you more papillon in rome. and i will give you more facts about brompton cemetery through the course of the morning. it is frosty this morning. —— pantheon. temperatures last night in north scotland fell to —6, or just lower than that, and it is the same in oxfordshire, south newington also fell to — six. so if you're stepping out, bear that in mind. now the forecast for us all today is dry to start with for many parts of the uk. it will be mild particularly in the south. but there are showers in the south. but there are showers in the forecast coming in from the west. and they are drifting east and north through the day. you can see why. we have two weather fronts moving on from the west through the course of the day. but for many of us course of the day. but for many of us it will remain dry after the frosty start and any patchy mist or
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fog will clear. this morning we also have some showers across the south—east from the english channel. they too are moving northwards. we could catch one, possibly, in london in the next hour, but they will clear and the showers from the west will be on and off through the day with the cloud building ahead, turning the sunshine hazy. temperature—wise nothing to write home about. single figures in the north, double figures as we move towards the south. now, heading on through the evening and overnight, two weather fronts eventually collide and produce some rain, again moving north—east, and at the same time we have another set coming across the south—east, bringing in some rain. in between, under clear skies, it will be a cool light, here and there we might see a touch of frost, but it will be breezy, so that will help the situation. so into tomorrow, eventually all of the front bump into each other and the whole lot will clear off into the north sea through the day. some taking longer than others, for example, taking longer to clearfrom
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parts of east anglia. in the west, through central areas, when the fronts through central areas, when the fro nts m ove through central areas, when the fronts move away we will have sunny spells with some showers across the north—west of scotland. and again, temperatures nothing to write home about, single figures in the north, double figures further south. by the time we get to friday, this is the day which is the calm before the storm, again it will be a cold start, there will be sunshine around, but increasingly we are looking at cloud and rain coming in from the west, and the wind also strengthening. and what is happening is we have a deep area of low pressure tangled up in that with x are atan pressure tangled up in that with x are at an oscar and that's going to project —— ex— hurricane oscar and that will produce wild weather over the north—west of the country overnight and also into saturday with gales, even severe gales, four is ample, in the outer hebrides, and some heavy rain. but into the weekend, charlie and lou, last weekend, charlie and lou, last weekend we had cold weather, this weekend we had cold weather, this weekend we had cold weather, this weekend we will southerly winds, so the temperatures will recover. well, thank you for that. you always try
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to end, i know, carol, with a little bit of good news for me, don't you, thank you very much. so we are going to do the business news now but it does have a different look about it. it has been a scary few weeks for the high street but halloweeen could be spook—tacular for retailers. you can't have missed the fact it is halloween. we have decorated the set and we're not the only ones. after christmas and easter, halloween is now the third most valuable celebration of the year. valuable to retailers, that is. in fact, forecasters are predicting that we will spend more than £350 million in the shops this year. that's about £13 per household. but some of you are prepared to really splash the cash. let's hear from some of you. we're looking for things to decorate the house, aren't we, for the trick—or—treaters? the house, aren't we, for the trick-or-treaters? yeah. what sort of things do you want? that spider. i think
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of things do you want? that spider. ithinka of things do you want? that spider. i think a lot of people do spend money on halloween and things like that, but it's enjoyable for the kids. it's more for the kids than the adults, but we enjoy it. just ta ke the adults, but we enjoy it. just take them out trick—or—treating, have a good time. that's basically it really. i think it's gone massive now, decorating the house, kids are going out more trick—or—treating, so yeah, think it's massive now definitely. catherine shuttleworth is from the marketing agency savvy marketing. you've been running through some of these numbers, pumpkins, £13 per household, what are we spending the money on? dressing up and this year make up sales have rocketed. younger people are spending money, families but 18 -- people are spending money, families but 18 ——13—year—old —— people are spending money, families but 18 ——13—year—old "18—34 —year—olds are spending lots of money on spirits. do we have america to blame? it's a big celebration over their. we've now got black friday, people here even celebrate
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thanksgiving as well —— over there. are the americans to blame for reaching into our pockets yet again? we borrowed a lot of halloween, certainly trick—or—treating from america, but we've done sppok nights and it's become a huge event —— spook. a huge event for retailers and a huge chance to sell stuff. why is easter so big? it has to bank holidays and we have family parties, it tends to be when we get together and we do the easter bonnet thing of having parties and eating food. halloween is about parties in and out of home. this time around we've got half term coinciding, we're probably going to be spending more on things like outfits? lots of the country as half term this week. some will have gone back to school. when it's in a half term, that's huge, but people will combine it with bonfire parties at the weekend and have a gathering at the house, a
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huge eating occasion, social occasion as well as trick—or—treating and knocking on doors for sweets. it's a lot of fun, whether you're going to a party or trick—or—treating with the kids tonight, but there's a serious side for retailers, how much of a lifeline could it provide for the high—street? lifeline could it provide for the high-street? it could be massive for the high—street retailers, everyone can take part. the supermarkets will benefit but also the pound shops, it is huge and they will be positive this week. i was in stores yesterday and they were heaving with people buying halloween stuff, because it's genuinely good fun. what happens if they get caught out? what do you do with the leftover stock? it isn't that easy to sell pumpkins in the middle of november. not easy to sell pumpkins after the first of november. the big skill for retailers is to get out with a clean pairof retailers is to get out with a clean pair of heels, selling all the stock, if you haven't got your stuff by today then get out by lunchtime
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because stock levels will be low. they haven't got the nasty markdowns where they give things away in november when we're thinking about christmas instead. we've got quite a big problem with the high—street, lots of the big retailers are struggling. house of fraser, for example, closing stores with lots of administrations. do you think this is the way forward when it comes to retailers ? is the way forward when it comes to retailers? try and work around big events like this and you can slide into christmas? that's when the spending happens. we're in the golden quarter, the 12 weeks leading up golden quarter, the 12 weeks leading up to christmas and for lots of non—food retailers, it will be make or break about whether they can survive into the new year. it's huge. they're looking for unique products, halloween is a good example, what kind pumpkins and broomsticks have you got? what they wa nt broomsticks have you got? what they want is for people to come in, like what they've got and stay after christmas, so halloween is a great lead—in for that. we wish them well because we want the high—street to remain positive, it's such a great place to work and a huge place for
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employment. catherine, thank you very much. everyone going out this evening with your trick—or—treating, have a good time and be safe and keep warm because i think it will be cold. catherine, that really suits you. 0h, thanks! i think i catherine, that really suits you. 0h, thanks! ithink i might catherine, that really suits you. 0h, thanks! i think i might wear it all day at work! i think you think you should, it looks great! victoria, you like dressing up as well, we've been provided with some evidence. 0h, well, we've been provided with some evidence. oh, no! that was halloween in new york i think around... a few yea rs in new york i think around... a few years ago, used to work in new york for the bbc‘s. facial beard and everything. —— for the bbc. for the bbc‘s. facial beard and everything. -- for the bbc. what's going on? that was my tribute to johnny depp. that was quite full on. that was a lot of fun. my poor husband, he probably has no idea he is on breakfast television! lovely to see you both on breakfast. thank you. thank you to everyone sending in pictures. we didn't ask for these
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but now we're asking because you're sending them in any way. these magnificent pumpkins, let's have a look, still a bit green here, charlie! looks a bit spooky in here, doesn't it? these have been carved by andy sharp and his family in brenchley. they are portraits, they've captured everything from star wars to the addams family. a lot of work. you need to go close on that one to do justice to them to ca ptu re that one to do justice to them to capture the individual faces. middle left! this is from east sussex. animals eating the pumpkins. rather than carving them. a giant ant eater, apparently his name is diego. paula from bury st edmunds sent in a photo of her nephew and his friend sat on a large pumpkin that she bought one halloween, i think it was quite a few years ago from the photo and what they are wearing. she said it cost £10 and it weighed sixst and they could hardly move it.|j
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it cost £10 and it weighed sixst and they could hardly move it. i get the feeling about what happens now is someone feeling about what happens now is someone will send in a bigger one... the bigger pumpkin and it will go on and on and on! delighted to get your pictures as ever, fancy dress, pumpkins, whatever! the 19805 drama widows has been given a hollywood facelift. the film director steve mcqueen has adapted lynda la plante's itv hit for the big screen. academy award winner, viola davis leads a group of women in an attempt to pull off a heist after they've been left in debt by their dead husbands criminal activities. our arts editor, will gompertz spoke to viola about the film, class and james bond. you're a fan of steve's work. you're a fan of steve's worklj you're a fan of steve's work. i am a fan of steve's work. and one of the things that really attracted me to this project is the fact he likes me, he sees me. why should i trust you anyway?
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because i'm the only one standing between you and a bullet in your head. what i've learned from him, your late husband and my father, is that you reap what you sow. let's hope so. is he the first director you felt has truly seen you, seen viola davis the actress, what you're capable of. yeah, i'll say that, because i think a lot of times people will see my talent, but they don't see my womanhood. i always say... whenever someone comes up to me and womanhood. i always say... whenever someone comes up to me and says, vile, i wrote this specifically for you, it's specifically for you, i only see you in this role, i always know that it's all downhill from there, always. 99.999% of the time it's all downhill from there. it just sort of seems cliche? it's not even cliched. cliche is bad, but that's a step above some of the
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other things that i've been offered, which isjust other things that i've been offered, which is just nebulous. other things that i've been offered, which isjust nebulous. changing at all? yeah. well, i'll tell you why it's changing, because people are rebelling against that. yeah. there are rebelling against that mindset that's been... that has been the norm and that's been accept the ball for so long, which is you are only a device. you're only an idea. we've got a problem. what's this? she's fast, she's smart and she can drive. we can't do this the three of us, we need a driver. this is not your place, please ask her to leave. i don't know you. you don't have to. we need a driver. widows explore something else, it explores class. yes. in an interesting not particularly obvious way.|j
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yes. in an interesting not particularly obvious way. i have grown up particularly obvious way. i have grown up poor. i can attest that when you do not have money, and... then you are nothing. it's not that you just don't have anything, you are nothing. and ifeel that people only acknowledge people who have clout. steve's talked a lot about loving bond, you knowjames bond, would you, if you were offered the role of james bond, would you, if you were offered the role ofjames bond, take it? would you, if you were offered the role of james bond, take it? well, of course. but i would only take james bond if they wrote her like a woman. i need to have that feminine energy. i don't feel like i have to, sort of, take my feminine energy and throw it in the wastepaper basket in order to kill 50 million people in the course of a movie. i want to keep my energy asjames the course of a movie. i want to keep my energy as james bond and see how that works. look forward to seeing you in the role, vi!|j
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how that works. look forward to seeing you in the role, vi! i look forward to seeing anyone offering me that role! great to see her! still to come: on the business news, when you're with an insurance company, it could be your mortgage, people who are new customers get a better deal than those who show loyalty, and that's being questioned today. a lot of us have been in the situation where you see a deal and you can't get it because you're not a new customer. that's being investigated and we look at the fca, they i invest it m, look at the fca, they i invest it in, we will hearfrom look at the fca, they i invest it in, we will hear from them later. look at the fca, they i invest it in, we will hear from them latenm could be costing us £800 a year. more on that later, as well as your halloween pictures. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will be back at 7am with the headlines. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a former haringey councillor has apologised and resigned
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after being found guilty of possessing class a drugs with intent to supply. ishmael osamor was elected in may as a labour councillor, but pleaded guilty on friday to having £2,500 worth of drugs at last year's bestival event in dorset. he's the son of shadow cabinet member kate osamor. four families of disabled children will be going to the high court this morning over cuts to some services in hackney. they claim reducing special educational needs provision in schools is unlawful, on the grounds children won't get the necessary help required. the government has effectively frozen funding since 2011, although the number of young people in need of help has increased. it's a really bleak future if these cuts go ahead. what could happen we hope? i don't know. is she going to fall through the cracks? i don't know.
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then one of the reasons i'm involved is to stop it falling through the cracks. a dog breeder has offered a £50,000 reward to help him find 11 puppies which were stolen from his home in essex at knifepoint. mark orley said thieves made off with four daschunds and seven french bulldogs. he warned four of the dogs could die if not returned within 2a hours as they were not old enough to be weaned. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube the circle, district, hammersmith & city and metropolitan lines are all part suspended. on the trains, great northern are suspended between moorgate and finsbury park following a points failure, with some services diverted to kings cross. onto the roads, and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. you can see from the camera it's very slow this morning. westbound traffic on the a13 is building from dagenham into barking. now the weather with lucy martin.
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hello, good morning. a cold and frosty start today with temperatures just below or around about freezing. you could be waking up to a touch of frost, but it will be a bright start with plenty of sunny spells to come through the day. there is the small chance of the odd isolated shower creeping up from the south through the morning, but as we move into the afternoon, a good deal of dry weather, plenty of spells of sunshine. temperatures a little milder than they have been so far this week, a maximum of 13 degrees celsius with a south—easterly breeze. as we move through this evening, however, we will see the cloud increasing from the south, outbreaks of rain spreading in. through the night, heavy bursts with the rain becoming more persistent. temperatures overnight not falling far at all, overnight lows of 7—9 degrees celsius. tomorrow we're looking at a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain will spread east. could be a bit of mist and murk around first thing as well. temperatures still in double
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figures, a maximum of around 12. friday, however, brings us some dry, bright and fine weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: attacks on nhs staff hit a five—year high in england, as the health secretary promises zero tolerance to violence. president trump pays his respects in pittsburgh, ignoring appeals to stay away days after a massacre at a synagogue.
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11 people are killed as italy is struck by fierce storms. we'll be live in venice with the latest. penalising loyalty — car and home insurance firms that only offer the best deals to new customers face greater scrutiny. in sport, eddiejones swings the axe, as he drops mike brown, england's most capped full back, for saturday's test against south africa. good morning from brompton cemetery, where it is a cold and frosty start to the day. this morning there is a widespread frost, some places dropped to —6 overnight, but a lot of dry weather with showery outbreaks of rain coming in from the west. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, the 31st of october. our top story: a zero—tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff is being promised as figures show attacks in england have reached a five—year high. the government says offenders will face quicker prosecutions, and staff will receive better training to deal with violent situations. lauren moss reports. these are just some of the shocking
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incidents recorded against frontline nhs staff — kicking, hitting and sometimes worse. nurse shelley pearce was taken hostage when a patient became hostile, trying to leave the ward. she became quite distressed and broke an item in her room, which was, in hindsight, plastic. i knew it was plastic because a part of it ended up next to my neck as she frog—marched me out of the ward. shelley did escape unharmed, but says no one noticed she was missing and, despite her reporting what happened, it wasn't logged properly. her account is by no means isolated. according to a recent staff survey, over 15% of nhs workers experienced violence in the last 12 months. that's the highest figure in five years. from next month, the maximum prison sentence for assaulting an emergency
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service worker will double, from six months to a year, in england and wales, bringing them in line with scotland. the union, unison, is welcoming plans to zero tolerance to violence against staff. later, the health secretary will announce better training and support, a new monitoring system, and fast—tracked prosecution for offenders, to try and protect those who face violence like this every day. lauren moss, bbc news. president trump has visited pittsburgh where 11 worshippers at a synagogue were killed by a gunman on saturday. some local politicians and religious leaders had urged mr trump to stay away, accusing him of stoking extremism and intolerance at campaign rallies. here's our north america editorjon sopel. awaiting donald trump's arrival, members of pittsburgh's jewish community gathered outside the tree of life synagogue. the president flew into pittsburgh
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accompanied by the first lady, but also his daughter ivanka, who converted tojudaism when she married her orthodoxjewish partnerjared kushner. they first went to the synagogue were the 11 worshipers were gunned down and, in the entrance, lit a candle for each of the 11 victims. next, they came outside to lay a small pebble from the white house grounds, and white roses at each of the stars for the victims. the rabbi of the synagogue welcomed the president. as did many in the community. but not the group, bend the arc. he has victimised immigrants. he has victimised refugees, he has victimised mexicans, muslims, lgbt community, women, people with disabilities — the list goes on and on. we cannot stand idly by. police radio: shots fired, shots fired! there are terrible stories of tragedy from saturday's shooting, incredible stories of bravery and luck, too. judah samet survived
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because he arrived late and was parking his car when he heard the gunfire. the second narrow escape of his life. in 1945, as a small child, he was on a train heading to a nazi concentration camp when it was liberated by the allies. it never stops, at least for me and my family. it never stops, itjust keeps going. but we are survivors. you know, i'm 80 years old. i told my daughter that i am ready whenever. you know, i'm not afraid of death. today, the first funerals were held for three of the congregants who were gunned down on saturday, two brothers and a local doctor. families mourning loss, a city in grief and a country wondering where it is heading. jon sopel, bbc news, pittsburgh. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in 1986 are to continue searching a garden in the west midlands.
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the house in sutton coldfield used to belong to the mother of a convicted murder, john cannan. he's suspected of killing ms lamplugh, but has never been charged. our correspondentjon ironmonger is outside the house where the search continues. jon, good morning to you. what more can you tell us? that search paused yesterday at nightfall. there is still a police presence outside the semi—detached property, as you can see, and police are expected to resume their search in about one hour of‘s time. we were able to speak to the owner of the property yesterday. he told us they were particularly interested in finding out what's underneath the large metal arage in his back garden, that is being dismantled, and of course the irresistible inference is police suspect the body of suzy lamplugh could be buried underneath the concrete —— garage. some 25 years
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ago as concrete —— garage. some 25 years ago as we were concrete —— garage. some 25 years ago as we were saying the former owner of the property was the mother ofjohn cannan, the prime suspect in suzy lamplugh‘s disappearance. police have never brought against him, citing lack of evidence, he is in prison for the murder and abduction of shirley banks in bristol in 1989, but many would be aware of the suzy lamplugh case, one of the most notorious unsolved murders of the 20th century. she went missing in 1986 and she was last seen leaving her estate agent to meet a man she reported in her diary as mr kipper, the man has never been traced, there is been an extensive police search, suzy lamplugh was declared dead in 1994, presumed murdered, so fast forward to today, we don't know the details specifically of what's going on here, we presume the police are working on new information but it is a significant development, the biggest in some years, and many people would be eagerly waiting to see what police find here. jon, thank you, thank you very much.
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indonesian search and rescue workers have detected a large object underwater in the area where a passenger plane with 189 people on board crashed on monday. ground staff lost touch with the aircraft shortly after it took off from jakarta. officials said the navy was using sonar technology to verify whether that object was part of the missing plane. earlier our correspondent, rebecca henschka injakarta gave us an update on the investigation. well, in the port area where this rescue operation is taking place, just a short drive from where i am now, divers are out at sea trying to retrieve the main body of the plane. they've said this morning that they believe they have the right chord in its and they are getting very close to what they think is the main part of the plane —— co—ordinates. that of the plane —— co—ordinates. that of course has the black box recordings in it. britain's business leaders are said to be recruited as ambassadors for the country following brexit, in a
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speech tonightjeremy hunt is expected to say the move is part of a strategy to reinvigorate british diplomacy after the country leaves the eu. but the fda, the union which represents a senior civil servants, says britain's interest are best served by a professional diplomatic service. two boys have been arrested over a hit—and—run during a police pursuit which left a toddler fighting for his life. three—year—old leo durrington was knocked down by a van which had been reported stolen in leigh yesterday morning. the youngsters being questioned are 15 and 16 years old. leo is critically ill in hospital. he'd been given first aid by officers who stopped at the scene. now, a story we are talking about, insurers could be penalised and facing greater scrutiny. and victoria, you are reading the report from the financial conduct authority. it has come out in the last two minutes, the financial
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conduct authority, the financial regulator, deciding to get involved and doa regulator, deciding to get involved and do a general insurance, home and car insurance, market study, to see whether or not they need to do more and it turns out they do. they say this morning they have decided a package of measures is now necessary following their initial work into this. they are going to look at conduct by firms, they are going to be looking at another study on conduct practices, whether or not insurance pricing practices are fair, and also a bit of a discussion going on. i am sure this will end up in parliament, as to whether or not customers are being really messed over. i just actually spoken to one customer in the last ten minutes or so. customer in the last ten minutes or so. he said that he was able to get £1000 of his home in shorrocks by going to his original home insurer, —— home insurance. he pretended he was a new customer, put in the details, and got a better policy, £75,000 of insurance at a lower
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price, £400 for pretty much the same policy as he was spending reviews lee, £1400, he went to the company and said it was outrageous and they just shrug their shoulders —— spending previously. so the advice at the moment is, shop around, because there are better deals for new customers and you are almost a lwa ys new customers and you are almost always penalise for loyalty. a little frustrating, isn't there, though, if there is an issue to be addressed, meanwhile people pay over the odds, the fca say they will investigate further, but is it likely that companies will be proactive and try to do something before they are told that they have to? exactly, so what they have been trying to do is ward off a further study in this and trying to improve some of their practices, but it looks like, reading between the lines, the financial regulator said insurance firms are not doing enough in terms of advising us, what is going on with renewals, what the premium is at the moment, what it will be later on in the next contract, so it looks like those
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kind of practices will be improved and we are probably going to see a little bit more work in this area a little bit more work in this area a little bit more work in this area a little bit later on, but very annoying for customers at the moment. yes, thank you very much and we would love to hear similar stories like that, whatever their experience are. thank you. 11 people are now known to have died in italy as storms batter the country, leaving roads blocked and thousands without power. in venice, officials say 70% of the city has been flooded. the water level in central st mark's square peaked at more than 1.5 metres for only the fifth time on record. it is 7:11am, you're watching the brea kfast. it is 7:11am, you're watching the breakfast. —— you're watching the brea kfast. as we've just been hearing, police investigating the 1986 disappearance of estate agent, suzy lamplugh are searching a garden in the west midlands. her family say they hope the search of the house, connected to the main suspect, will give them closure. let's speak now to hamish brown, a former met detective inspector who knows suzy‘s family well.
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hejoins us from our london newsroom. thank you very much for your time this morning. i know you have had many dealings over the years with the charity, the suzy lamplugh trust, just, this must be such a difficult time for them? oh, absolutely for the family. i knew paul and diana very well. lovely people. fantastic organisation, which has been set up, the suzy lamplugh trust, and i commend the people who work for them. and, in deed, the work they have done for victims of stalking really is to be commended. yes, suzy lamplugh's pa rents commended. yes, suzy lamplugh's parents have died, but her three siblings are still alive, we heard from them. i guess in some ways they must get some comfort from the notion that it is still being investigated. well, ithink notion that it is still being investigated. well, i think what eve ryo ne investigated. well, i think what everyone wants is closure, draw a line under this, so hopefully this will bring some sort of result. it has been a tortuous programme for
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them and i wish the police well and i hope they do make progress. yes, so, let's talk a little about the investigation itself, we know that search is continuing. this is a cold case effectively. what are the particular problems attached to investigations that date back so far? well, of course, cold cases have been with us for a little bit of time now, and the fact it is cold, it is going to be an old case, so, you know, seems change, people's memory fades, so they have to battle those, but apparently, and i know nothing more than this, police are working on specific information, and with that information they will concentrate hopefully to find where suzy lamplugh is, so the aim must be to bring satisfaction to draw a line under it for the family and bring that closure. yes, you quite rightly pointed out, there is a limit to the information we have at this point but we do know the search is
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continuing at the property. now, we also know that property had been searched previously, but that is going back some 15 years or so. presumably, technology will have changed in that period of time, forensics will possibly be able to search in a different way now? yes, absolutely. we've got dna, better technology, and all sorts of things can be used. but when the house and the grounds were searched last time, we don't know specifically what that was. was it just we don't know specifically what that was. was itjust the house, was it a cursory look at the garden? we don't know. i understand there is a shed or garage which is of particular interest now. now we don't know if that came up before. that's what the police i understand will be looking at. yes, there have been advances with dna, all sorts of technology. and police are now in a far better position to revisit scenes. and there is no disgrace in this, to go back, if something has been missed, they have to accept that. i think have been some admissions by the police that there were errors in the
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first investigation. well, that happens, unfortunately. but at least they are big enough to say, look, we are going back, we have a cold case and we will do our very best. yes, it is an important issue in and i know the papers are talking about that today. the reality of course is as that today. the reality of course is as you make progress it takes questions about why things were not done previously. that, inevitably, comes along the progress that might or might not have been made. it's very easy in hindsight to look back 30 years. policing has change, technology's changed, dna's changed, it's a different ballgame in many respects. it's all well looking back critically but should look into the future. what have we got? the fact the cold case is up and running, enquiries that can lead to digging in the garden and that must be the right way forward. a practical and honest way forward, might i say. give us a sense, you were serving in the met at the time, it became such an important story for the family
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personally, but also for other people because it was so rare someone people because it was so rare someone in those circumstances could disappear, there could be no accounting for where someone was. very unusual in policing in some respects, and now possibly some a nswe i’s. respects, and now possibly some answers. yes, indeed. again, i commend the suzy lamplugh two trust for advancing violence in the workplace. people are given more protection now. there are laws but it's important for employers and employees to understand, look after yourself and one another and the suzy lamplugh trust have taken this important aspect first. so it's been an important thing there. hamish, thanks very much, former met detective. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: nhs staff are being promised a zero tolerance with
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violence with attacks reaching a five—year high. donald trump has visited pittsburgh, where 11 weren't super is at a synagogue workload by a gunman on saturday —— worshippers. it is cold out and about this morning. carol is at brompton cemetery for us on this halloween morning with a look at the weather. a very beautiful place, lots of very famous people were buried there? that's right, it is. it'sjust undergone a recent four—year restoration, 39 acres and a grade one listed garden cemetery. as you mention, some famous people have been laid to rest here. historical figures like emmeline pankhurst, who was very much involved with the suffragette movement. sir henry cole, founder of the victoria and albert museum. you might be able to see on some of the graves that it's also a frosty, notjust in london, but across many areas. last night the temperature fell to —6.3
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thinking brace in northern scotland, -6 thinking brace in northern scotland, —6 in south newington in oxfordshire so —6 in south newington in oxfordshire soa —6 in south newington in oxfordshire so a bracing start to the day. for many in the south, remaining dry and mild, bara for many in the south, remaining dry and mild, bar a few showers, for many in the south, remaining dry and mild, bara few showers, but showery outbreaks coming in across the west. on the pressure drug you can see why. you can see two weather fronts moving in from the west and they are drifting through the east through the day. first thing this morning, as well as the frost, mist and fog around in parts of the midlands, perth and kinross will lift. showers coming in from the english channel across the south—east as well. but the main showers will come in on the two weather fronts from the west. some of the showers could be heavy as they drift eastwards and northwards through the day. in between them, drier and brighter conditions, not eve ryo ne drier and brighter conditions, not everyone seeing drier and brighter conditions, not everyone seeing those showers and where it remains dry with sunshine, you will find through the day as the
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france approach, the cloud will build so the sunshine will turn hazier —— the fronts approach. single figures in scotland, northern ireland and northern england but for the rest of england and wales, scraping into double figures. a cool feel. through the evening and overnight, our two fronts merge and then we've got another coming in across the south—east. all of them will produce some rain. in between under clear skies, chilly with patchy mist and fog forming an some frost in northern ireland and south—west scotland. tomorrow we start off with all those fronts, which bump into each other, and then the whole lot clear into the north sea. behind them, especially in the west, brightening up nicely with sunny spells around, but equally in the north—west, a few showers and temperatures not too dissimilar to what we're looking at today. single figures in the north, double figures further south. by the time we get to friday, well, this is the calm
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before the storm. for many it will before the storm. for many it will bea dry before the storm. for many it will be a dry day, some sunshine around but increasingly in the west we will see increasing amounts of cloud and it will turn windier and then there will be heavy rain coming our way. this is because the remnants of ex—hurricane and oscar are going to get caught up in an area of low pressure and bring us some wild weather, especially across the north and west through friday night and into saturday. this weekend, something else you'll notice is it will be warmer and that's because last weekend we had a northerly wind, this weekend it is a southerly so wind, this weekend it is a southerly so temperatures above average for this time in november. thank you for the southerly news. thanks, carol! let's return to our top story. the government says it's adopting a zero tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff. sharon morris is a mental health nurse who was seriously assaulted at work. she joins us now from our london newsroom. sharon, thanks so much forjoining
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us. sharon, thanks so much forjoining us. tell us a little bit about what happened to you a couple of years ago. yes, it was september, 2016, louise. i was working on a medium secure unit as a mental health nurse with mentally disordered offenders. we work long—term with these people, i had known my assailant for about a year. we were having quite a good day i thought, and then we were on a garden break with some other patients who then went in, and i noticed the patient about to assault one of my colleagues. i called out to alert her, and then i made eye contact and said the patient‘s name, because that's what we're supposed to do, but unfortunately on this occasion he lept over and started hitting me about the head with full force punches six times until i passed out. sharon, shocking on so many levels. i think we've got a picture of your
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injuries. were you quite badly injured? i had concussion. i've also since found out i lost all but 17% of my sense of smell. probably the most important thing is the psychological affect. i was diagnosed with ptsd following that. i know you've talked a little bit about seeing your assaila nt‘s i know you've talked a little bit about seeing your assailant‘s face in other people, tell us what seemed to be going on? yes, you become very hyper vigilant. i became quite distrustful of people. i became quite reclusive for about three months. i had three months off work. the current trend of hipster bearded young men hasn't helped me very much because they remind me of my assailant, as does unfortunately my eldest son, who had to learn to cough and announce himself before he came into the room so i wouldn't be
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startled. that was quite unpleasant. deeply affecting. we know these kind of attacks on nhs staff are at a five—year high. matt hancock, health secretary, saying he's going to introduce new measures. what kind of thing do you think would make a difference? i think on the back of the assaults on emergency workers, offences bill, which is about to be enacted next month, we've campaigned with the royal college of nursing to extend that to a wider group of front—line workers. it's also important the nhs employers support the staff so i think matt hancock's strategies will help with that in england and i hope that will be followed in wales as well. there needs to be a clear process for being able to report offences. there needs to be ingrained support. or instance, i had to refer myself for
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counselling. i had to tell payroll i was off with a work—related injury and ohs were constantly asking me when i was returning to work. you are still smiling today, but how are you doing now and does it still affect you? i wasn't able to go back to my original workplace. we had discussions with my union steward and the managers but it wasn't possible. they couldn't guarantee to keep me safe. nobody should be assaulted at work regardless of where they are working. so i now work in the community in the substance misuse service with a really supportive team, who do protect me. i've had to do a lot of work myself on dealing with the issues i've had. i think i've come through now. sharon, honestly, you tell your story bravely. thank you very much indeed for your time on
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brea kfast. very much indeed for your time on breakfast. sharon morris, who was a mental health nurse. thank you very much indeed, really good to talk to you. very interesting hearing that personal account. those official figures showing attacks on nhs staff, those people working on the wards, we heard a graphic account on what happens there, attacks at a five—year high. thanks for everyone getting in touch. lee has said it wasn't unusualfor touch. lee has said it wasn't unusual for hospital security guards to attend at least five incidents on a12 to attend at least five incidents on a 12 hour shift. during his three yea rs a 12 hour shift. during his three years at a hospital there were several serious verbal threats and assaults, many going unreported. lucy says hospitals need to focus on people in control of their actions, not prosecuting people who lash out involuntarily. the nhs says stephen needs zero tolerance, anyone intoxicated and tries to injure an nhs employee should be put in a room and locked up until they are sober. people should have to pay for
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security and medical treatment because of self induced injuries. the aftermath is interesting, left on your own to try to make your own way with very little help. feels like a real problem and a zero tolerance approach is being put into place. we'll see if it works. thanks to sharon for talking to us as well stop to thanks to sharon for talking to us as well stop to still to come: last night, three cooks battled it out to be named britain's best amateur baker in the great british bake off. we'll find out whose showstopper rose to the occasion. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. do you know what we will do every time? we will make it really clear that we are going to be talking about it because we are going to talk about it through the morning. we've got the klaxon ready to go to warn you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a former haringey councillor has
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apologised and resigned after being found guilty of possessing class a drugs with intent to supply. ishmael osamor was elected in may as a labour councillor, but pleaded guilty on friday to having £2,500 worth of drugs at last year's bestival event in dorset. he's the son of shadow cabinet member kate osamor. four families of disabled children will be going to the high court this morning over cuts to some services in hackney. they claim reducing special educational needs provision in schools is unlawful, on the grounds children won't get the necessary help required. the government has effectively frozen funding since 2011, although the number of young people in need of help has increased. it's a really bleak future if these cuts go ahead. what could happen we hope? i don't know. is she going to fall through the cracks? i don't know. then one of the reasons i'm involved is to stop it falling through the cracks. a dog breeder has
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offered a £50,000 reward to help him find 11 puppies which were stolen from his home in essex at knifepoint. mark orley said thieves made off with four daschunds and seven french bulldogs. he warned four of the dogs could die if not returned within 24 hours as they were not old enough to be weaned. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the circle, district, hammersmith and city and metropolitan lines are all part suspended. on the trains, great northern are suspended between moorgate and finsbury park following a points failure, with some services diverted to kings cross. onto the roads and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in euston, hampstead road remains closed to the north of the euston road for emergency water work. and on the m25, there are clockwise delays from orpington towards godstone. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. a cold and frosty start today with temperatures just below or around about freezing.
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you could be waking up to a touch of frost, but it will be a bright start with plenty of sunny spells to come through the day. there is the small chance of the odd isolated shower creeping up from the south through the morning, but as we move into the afternoon, a good deal of dry weather, plenty of spells of sunshine. temperatures a little milder than they have been so far this week, a maximum of 13 degrees celsius with a south—easterly breeze. as we move through this evening, however, we will see the cloud increasing from the south, outbreaks of rain spreading in. through the night, heavy bursts with the rain becoming more persistent. temperatures overnight not falling far at all, overnight lows of 7—9 degrees celsius. tomorrow we're looking at a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain will spread east. could be a bit of mist and murk around first thing as well. temperatures still in double figures, a maximum of around 12. friday, however, brings us some dry, bright and fine weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. it's exactly 7:30am. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the government says it's adopting a zero—tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff as figures show attacks in england have reached a five—year high. more than 15% of staff say they've been subjected to violence in the last year. new measures will see offenders sentenced quicker and staff receive better training to deal with violent situations. president trump has visited pittsburgh where 11 worshippers at a synagogue were killed by a gunman on saturday. some local politicians and religious leaders had urged mr trump to stay away, accusing him of stoking extremism and intolerance at campaign rallies. he made no public statement during the trip. police investigating
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the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in 1986 are to continue searching a garden in the west midlands. the house in sutton coldfield used to belong to the mother of a convicted murder, john cannan. he's suspected of killing ms lamplugh, but has never been charged. indonesian search and rescue workers have detected a large object underwater in the area where a passenger plane with 189 people on board crashed on monday. ground staff lost touch with the aircraft shortly after it took off from jakarta. officials said the navy was using sonar technology to verify whether that object was part of the missing plane. earlier, our correspondent, rebecca henschka injakarta gave us an update on the investigation. well, in the port area where this rescue operation is taking place, just a short drive from where i am now, divers are out at sea trying to retrieve the main body of the plane. they've said this morning that they
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believe they have the right co—ordinates and they are getting very close to what they think is the main part of the plane that, of course, has the black box recordings in it. two boys have been arrested over a hit—and—run during a police pursuit which left a toddler fighting for his life. three—year—old leo durrington was knocked down by a van which had been reported stolen in greater manchester yesterday morning. the youngsters being questioned are 15 and 16 years old. leo is critically ill in hospital. he'd been given first aid by officers who stopped at the scene. insurance firms are going to come under greater scrutiny from the financial regulator, amid claims existing customers are getting worse deals than new ones. within the past half hour, the financial conduct authority has launched a study into the home and motor insurance market to find out the scale of the problem and if any actions are needed. it says it has already identified
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areas of consumer harm and possible rule breaks from some firms. we will have more on that with victoria a little later on. if the duke and duchess of sussex hadn't already endeared themselves to the people of australia, fiji, tonga and new zealand then prince harry has surely now sealed the deal. at a gathering hosted by new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, he greeted the crowd in not one but six different languages. prime minister, honoured guests, ladies and gentlemen, talofa lava, mal e lelei, bula vinaka, fakaalofa lahiatu, lahiatu, kia orana.
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cheering and applause this is definitely the first time i've spoken most of those languages, so i apologise if my accent wasn't any good, but i had to give it ago. it is one of the golden rules, isn't it? he did really well. if you speak the language, it works. you're not listening. i was trying to listen. kia ora, itjust means hello. it is 7:34am. 0h, kia ora, itjust means hello. it is 7:34am. oh, i kia ora, itjust means hello. it is 7:34am. 0h, iwas thinking kia ora, itjust means hello. it is 7:34am. oh, i was thinking of the little juice boxes, but 7:34am. oh, i was thinking of the littlejuice boxes, but anyway. eddiejones is thinking about his job, i‘d eddiejones is thinking about his job, i'd imagine. really significant call for him ahead of the autumn international coming up. he has dropped england's most capped fullback mike brown for the first
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test in south africa. it's the first time that the 33—year—old has been dropped in the three years that jones has been in charge of england. two men in the squad for the first time in a long time are chris ashton and manu tuilagi, both of whom have had their fair share of disciplinary problems in the past. they're all naughty boys, aren't they, those old ones? we've got ‘em under lock and key, mate. i said to chris ashton the other day, he's always a common denominator, so... no, both those guys have come in. they're really good, you know. i think they appreciate that they have another opportunity now to play for england. they want to play for england. they're mentally both in a good spot, physically good, leicester city's players say they'll do it for the boss, as the club confirms they will play their premier league match against cardiff this weekend. their carabao cup match scheduled for last night was postponed following the death of owner vichai srivaddhanaprabha, the players instead laying wreaths at the king power stadium. an investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing. two games in the league cup did go ahead, and the draw for the quarter
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finals will include the name burton albion for the first time ever. the league one side beat local rivals nottingham forest of the championship 3—2, in a match dubbed the nigel clough derby because burton's manager has been in charge of both clubs, and his dad brian won two european cups at forest. bournemouth beat norwich in the other tie. in tonight's league cup fixtures derby county boss frank lampard returns to stamford bridge for the first time as a manager. his side beat manchester united and his former bossjose mourinho in the previous round. and the last time he came up against chelsea he scored a late equaliser for manchester city. he says he's relishing tonight's return. obviously, to go to manchester united was one thing, but the opportunity to go here so soon, yeah, it's big for me, it's big for the players. we have a lot of young players here, and a lot of experienced players, who are very driven and want to play against premier league teams, so they deserve the occasion to go up against what is a fantastic chelsea side, no matter
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who they put up on the night. simone bilesjust gets better and better on her return to the world of gymnastics. after 18 months out of the sport, she's now claimed her 11th world title as part of the us team that comfortably took gold in the team event at the world gymnastics championships. she'll now turn her attention to becoming the first woman to win five all—around titles. pretty amazing considering she was hospitalised on the eve of the competition with a kidney stone. it is very special, because i have trained really hard this hole entire year, and then, coming into worlds, the whole team has worked really hard to get where we are, so we are really excited. ifeel like i'm mentally stronger, and physically stronger, as well, and i know what i'm capable of whenever i step on the mat. reporter: what would it mean to get a fifth world title? it's never been done by a woman at the world level. yes, i think it's really exciting, so we'll have to see what happens. now, there was lots of chat at the
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weekend, i don't know if you saw, did you see paul pogba runner—up for the penalty? well, he's shown that he's quite happy to poke fun at himself by re—creating the run up, shuffling from his front door to his car before heading off to training. look, look. that is basically how he took the penalty. is that what he normally does? it is what he does. hejust kind of normally does? it is what he does. he just kind of shuffles up for the penalty i think it is to spook the goalie. to be fair i think that is what my running looks like. that is what my running looks like. that is what my running looks like. that is what my walking looks like, terrible. now, time for me to say something i don't say very often, the b word, brexit, what it might mean for sport. horse racing is a pretty good place to start. it attracts around six million of us to the racetrack each year, and it's big business too, employing more than 17,000 people. the sport relies on not only the free movement of horses but people too. our sports news correspondent richard conway is at newmarket horse auction to look at what impact brexit might have.
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richard, what type of impact might brexit have on the sport? good morning, sally. yes, here we are at tattersalls, we a re morning, sally. yes, here we are at tattersalls, we are going to be looking through the day at, as you say, the impact on racing in sport in general, so, yes, there are issues for racing industry, specifically with the movement of thoroughbreds throughout europe, horses move all the time, 26,000 between britain, ireland and france, primarily underpinned by european law, so the british horseracing authority hope that will continue post— brexit, post the implementation period because they wa nt to implementation period because they want to ensure that british racing maintains its position ahead of the pack. sunrise over newmarket, the home of british horseracing. and, like every morning, some of the sport's finest thoroughbreds are out at first light as thoroughbreds are out at first light as another day of training begins.
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in the town's stables, skilled staff are in short supply. linda, who came here from sweden to follow her passion three years ago, is part of an international workforce that racing relies upon. people from all over the world, it is all here. i mean, all the big trainers are here in newmarket, and, like in sweden, in poland and in czech, the racing is so small that if you want to be invested in it there is not much out there, they just don't invested in it there is not much out there, theyjust don't have the quality as they do here in england. linda said she would think twice about coming to england now with brexit looming, all of which causes a headache for trainers seeking the best possible staff. racing does have a staffing shortage for a multitude of reasons. now, brexit, you know, we're all a little uncertain as to the effect is gonna have. i would say it's just a feeling of, you know, we feel very
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unsure as feeling of, you know, we feel very unsure as to how its gonna affect our. it is race day at newmarket. thousands of horses move seamlessly between britain, france and ireland each year under a long—standing arrangement that prioritises the health and welfare of forces. officials negotiating with the government on post— brexit arrangement want to ensure that punters continue to see the best racing possible. is at stake here. we have evolved over centuries and have a close, high level of integration with the likes of ireland and france and france and the movement of forces across europe, there are over 25,000 movements in any given year under a system through the eu now, a tripartite agreement we call it that allows for the free movement of thoroughbreds, we want to see that continue in some fall, else we could have some complications. bookmakers, though, for whom uncertainty is part of business, are hedging brexit bats. we don't know what's going to come when we pull out, no one knows what will happen because people are
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scared of spending money anyway. the british economy will still be the economy, people will still watch racing, the leisure pound will be the leisure pound and we will get a slice of it, there isn't a lot to go around, there are different ways to spend money, but they will still come racing. with brexit looming there are concerns within horseracing that echo those in other industries, but there is also hoped the sport within britain can maintain its current pace and thoroughbred reputation. so, that's the position from the wider industry, here at tattersalls it is auctioned day, it is for two—year—old horses and upwards in training and i'm joined two—year—old horses and upwards in training and i'mjoined by two—year—old horses and upwards in training and i'm joined byjimmy george, marketing director, good morning. you are at the sharp end, you know where the money is going, what are buyers telling you in light of brexit, there seems to be optimism around, despite those concerns we have had from the wider industry? yes, so far in 2018, sales at tattersalls have been very robust and the market has held up very well
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with record—breaking yearling sales and the autumn horse training cell that we are in the middle of the moment is going very smoothly, so, yes, the market is decent at the moment, and it is hugely international, and that is the crucial bit, britain is an tattersalls in particular is the european hub of the bloodstock trade so european hub of the bloodstock trade so it's important people come here to buy horses, confident that they can move them freely all around europe and further afield once they purchase these horses. is the message from the industry that they want, like everyone, to know what's going to happen so that they can get on and do what they do best, which is breed and racehorses? yes, i think for all walks of life at the moment a degree of certainty would be preferable. we don't have that. but equally, on the positive side, all the parties involved in the free movement of forces between britain, ireland and france, the tripartite agreement, which predates the eu itself, all of those parties are
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keen to see that preserved, and if there is agreement on all sides i think that makes it far more likely that it will be a positive outcome. thank you very much for your time this morning. so the option will be getting under way in a little while and we will be back in one hour to see the horses on parade and we will talk more about the impact on sport and specifically horseracing for now. richard, we want to see you with a horse in an alice. on a horse! no, that is mean. -- in an hour. oh god. we will be back a little bit later. lovely light. carol is at brompton cemetery for us on this halloween morning with a look at the weather. absolutely stunning, isn't it? good morning. i didn't realise it was so big. good morning. iwas asking somebody not long ago about the old est somebody not long ago about the oldest grave at the cemetery, that dates back to 1840 of a lady who sadly died in childbirth. the other thing you might not realise about
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brompton cemetery is it is home to 200 species of moths, 630 trees from around 60 different species. some of them are covered in frost and this morning, because it's a cold start. notjust in london but across many parts of the uk. tempsford fell to -6.3 parts of the uk. tempsford fell to —6.3 in parts of northern scotland. -6 —6.3 in parts of northern scotland. —6 in parts of south oxfordshire —— kemps fell. if you're stepping out, bear that in kemps fell. if you're stepping out, bearthat in mind! kemps fell. if you're stepping out, bear that in mind! the forecast today across many across many areas is dry —— tempsford fell. showers coming in from the west and they're going to be moving east and some not through the day. you can see why on the pressure charts, we've got two weather fronts, they are producing showers but we also have a few showers in the south—east coming from the english channel, they are heading north and they will clear. the other thing to watch out for, patchy mist and fog around the midlands and
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perth and kinross, but that will clear. through the morning, sunny spells developing. that's largely going to be in central and eastern areas, because coming in from the north—west we have two weather fronts. not everyone will catch showery outbreaks of rain from those weather fronts, in showery outbreaks of rain from those weatherfronts, in between we showery outbreaks of rain from those weather fronts, in between we will have brighter conditions, but no heat wave. in scotland, northern ireland and northern england, temperatures remaining in single figures. for the rest of england and wales, some will have temperatures into double figures. through the evening and overnight, our two fronts coming from the western bump into each other and another comes in across the south—east, all of them will produce rain. in between, we'll see mist and fog patches forming and it's going to be cold enough across parts of northern ireland and south—west scotland to some frost. word that's how we start tomorrow, with our two sets of rain. again they will merge and they will head off into the north sea, taking the rain with them as they do so. the rest of us, a dry day with
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sunshine and a few showers in the north—west of scotland. into friday, the calm before the storm literally because for many, it's going to be dry, there will be sunny spells. however, through the day in the west, the cloud is going to thicken, the wind will pick up and we'll start to see some rain. what's happening is we have a geek area of low pressure in the atlantic and embedded in that is ex—hurricane oscar —— the area. through friday night and into saturday, bringing heavy rain and gay is across the uk —— deep area. last weekend we had northerly winds, this weekend we have southerlies —— gales across the uk. temperatures about where they should be at this stage in november. thanks very much, carol. interesting story in the business news today. the infuriating thing that may have happened to you,
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you're an existing customer, you get the sense, maybe you have proof, if you were a new customer you would get a better deal. your new mortgage, car insurance, that kind of thing. nine in ten believe we would be rewarded for loyalty. quite the opposite can be true, as charlie mentioned. a lot of consumer groups have been calling for the regulators to look at this. citizens advice things we could be spending £877 extra per household by staying loyal. that's about the same as staying loyal. that's about the same as the average food bill for four months for a family. today the financial conduct authority says it has identified areas of potential consumer harm and will investigate further. that's in the insurance market. we can speak to chris woolard, director of strategy and competition at the fca. good morning. i've read the study
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and it makes for disappointing reading. you've identified potential non—compliance with the rules on transparency when it comes to people renewing their insurance policies, why are you commissioning a study and discussion paper on this? why aren't you going further? the work we've published this morning looks at two really important markets which matter an awful lot. almost every adult in the company is a customer of home insurers or car insurance, and it's worth over £78 billion a year in terms of premiums, so billion a year in terms of premiums, soa billion a year in terms of premiums, so a really big market. this morning we've published the results of preliminary work we did earlier this year where we said we were interested in the affect pricing has on the home insurance market. what we found is firms in the sample aren't necessarily paying enough attention to the controls they have around pricing, how they think about the treatment of customers and that. taking immediate steps obviously with those firms. but what we are also saying is we need to
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fundamentally look at how these two important markets work —— we're taking immediate steps. many know if you shop around you can get a good deal, and many do get a good deal in parts of these markets, but in particular, if you're more vulnerable, perhaps if you're an older person, maybe if you don't have internet access, actually getting to a good deal is really quite hard. in particular, if you repeatedly re—endure with the same insurer, you end up paying significantly more —— re—ensure. customers know this is happening, they are complaining, and in most insta nces they are complaining, and in most instances the company can't do anything about it or they're not willing to. if you know there's consumer harm and market abuse as the regulator, shouldn't you be moving to step in before it happens, not afterwards ? moving to step in before it happens, not afterwards? we're identifying best possible harm here, we're not saying there's market abuse. what we
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need to do is step back and take a fundamental look at how these markets are working —— there's possible harm. it's not simple. people are getting good deals at the moment, and we don't want to penalise those people shopping around actively. we're also asking the question, how hard should it be for consumers to get a good deal? how frankly do firms treat consumers when they come to renewal? when we look, for example, and someone who, say, has spent five years with the same company, we can see on average there paying around 70% more than a new customer. 70% more, that is clearly a big number. 70% more afterfive 70% more, that is clearly a big number. 70% more after five years, shouldn't you be doing more, shouldn't you be doing more, shouldn't you be fining these insurance companies and make the rules clearer when it comes to renewal is? we've already taken some action. for example, if you look at the car insurance when you get a renewal, you are being told the price you paid last year. —— renewals? most
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people don't find out and don't check and they renew because they don't look at that pricing. that we know that's an effective prompt. what we're saying is we need to do more “— what we're saying is we need to do more —— we know that's an effective prompt. we need to look at the rules but the right way to do that is to step back, look at the evidence, and that's the work we are launching today. chris, we're going to leave it there, director of strategy and competition at the financial conduct authority. that 70% is really staggering, victoria, when you hear that, you might be paying that much more. the advice is always shop around if you can, doesn't matter what it is, broadband, a fixed rate mortgage, a savings account, your insurer... sometimes there are quirks in the system, if you re—register as a new user you can get better deals even if you enter the same personal details. this presupposes you got the time to do that. exactly. lots
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of people don't, can't or they forget and they ended end up getting rolled over onto new contracts. thanks. the 19805 drama widows has been given a hollywood facelift. the film director steve mcqueen has adapted lynda la plante's itv hit for the big screen. academy award winner, viola davis leads a group of women in an attempt to pull off a heist after they've been left in debt by their dead husbands criminal activities. our arts editor, will gompertz spoke to viola about the film, class and james bond. you're a fan of steve's work. i am a fan of steve's work. and one of the things that really attracted me to this project is the fact he likes me, he sees me. my husband left me the plans for his nextjob. all i need is a crew to pull it off. why should i trust you anyway? because i'm the only one standing between you and a bullet in your head. what i've learned from them, like your late husband, and my father, is that you reap what you sow. let's hope so. is he the first director you've
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felt has truly seen you, seen viola davis the actress, what you're capable of. yeah, i'll say that, because i think a lot of times people will see my talent, but they don't see my womanhood. i always say, whenever someone comes up to me and says, "viola, i wrote this role specifically for you. it's specifically for you. i only see you in this role." i always know that it's all downhill from there, always. 99.999% of the time it's all downhill from there. itjust seems sort cliche? it's not even cliche. cliche is bad, but that's a step above some of the other things that i've been offered, which is just nebulous. changing at all? errm, yeah. well, i'll tell you why it's changing, because people are rebelling against that. yeah.
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they're rebelling against that mindset that's been... that has been the norm and has been acceptable for so long, which is you are only a device. you're only an idea. solved our problem. what's this? this is belle. she's fast, she's smart and she can drive. come on, we can't do this the three of us. we need a driver. this is not your place, please ask her to leave. i'm standing here, you could talk to me. i don't know you. you don't have to. i'm happy to leave right now. we need a driver. widows explores something else, doesn't it? it explores class. yes. in an interesting, not particularly obvious way. i have grown up poor. i can attest that when you do not have money, and... then you are nothing. it's not that you just don't have anything, you are nothing. and i feel that people only acknowledge people who have clout. steve's talked a lot about loving
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bond, you knowjames bond, would you, if you were offered the role ofjames bond, take it? well, of course. but i would only take james bond if they wrote her like a woman. i need to have that feminine energy. i don't feel like i have to, sort of, take my feminine energy and throw it in the wastepaper basket in order to kill 50 million people in the course of a movie. i want to keep my energy as james bond and see how that works. look forward to seeing you in the role, viola! i look forward to seeing anyone offering me that role! she's got a great attitude. love that! absolutely, what a wonderful actor and how brilliant to hear from
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her! it's going to be a gay end, we'll have the headlines then. -- it's going to be 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. police have released an image of a man they suspect of carrying out a series of sexual assaults in the blackwall area. nine women have been attacked over a five—week period around blackwall way. police say the suspect, approaches lone women on his bike police say the suspect approaches lone women on his bike and touches them over their clothing. extra patrols are continuing in the area. a former haringey councillor has apologised and resigned after being found guilty of possessing class a drugs with intent to supply. ishmael osamor was elected in may as a labour councillor, but pleaded guilty on friday to having £2,500 worth of drugs at last year's bestival event in dorset. four families of disabled children will be going to the high court this morning over cuts to some services in hackney.
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they claim reducing special educational needs provision in schools is unlawful, on the grounds children won't get the necessary help required. the government has effectively frozen funding since 2011, although the number of young people in need of help has increased. it's a really bleak future if these cuts go ahead. what could happen we hope? i don't know. is she going to fall through the cracks? i don't know. then one of the reasons i'm involved is to stop it falling through the cracks. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the circle, and hammersmith & city lines have severe delays and the district and metropolitan lines are part suspended. on the trains, greater anglia and stansted express services via roydon are disrupted following an earlier trespass incident, with delays of up to 15 minutes. onto the roads, and traffic on the a13 remains slow westbound from rainham into barking. in euston, hampstead road remains closed to the north of the euston road for emergency water work.
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and in shoreditch, eastbound traffic on the city road is slow towards the roadworks approaching the old street roundabout, with delays back towards angel. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. a cold and frosty start today with temperatures just below or around about freezing. you could be waking up to a touch of frost, but it will be a bright start with plenty of sunny spells to come through the day. there is the small chance of the odd isolated shower creeping up from the south through the morning, but as we move into the afternoon, a good deal of dry weather, plenty of spells of sunshine. temperatures a little milder than they have been so far this week, a maximum of 13 degrees celsius with a south—easterly breeze. as we move through this evening, however, we will see the cloud increasing from the south, outbreaks of rain spreading in. through the night, heavy bursts with the rain becoming more persistent. temperatures overnight not falling far at all, overnight lows of 7—9 degrees celsius. tomorrow we're looking
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at a fairly cloudy day, outbreaks of rain will spread east. could be a bit of mist and murk around first thing as well. temperatures still in double figures, a maximum of around 12. friday, however, brings us some dry, bright and fine weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: attacks on nhs staff hit a five—year high in england as the health secretary promises zero tolerance to violence. president trump pays his respects in pittsburgh, ignoring appeals to stay away, days after a massacre at a synagogue. 11 people are killed as italy is struck by fierce storms. we'll be live in venice with the latest. from hundreds of seizures a month,
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to a life transformed — as medical cannabis comes to the uk, the mother of alfie dingley will tell us how her family fought for change. no reward for loyalty. the financial regulator tells us that car and home insurance firms are making thousands of customers pay well over the odds. in sport, eddiejones swings the axe as he drops mike brown — england's most capped full back — for saturday's test against south africa. good morning from brompton cemetery, a cold start to the day, frost this morning, but for many, it will be dry, but showers coming in from the north and the west. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, 31st october. our top story... a zero—tolerance approach to violence against nhs staff is being promised as figures show attacks in england have reached a five—year high. the government says offenders
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will face quicker prosecutions and staff will receive better training to deal with violent situations. lauren moss reports. these are just some of the shocking incidents recorded against frontline nhs staff — kicking, hitting and sometimes worse. nurse shelley pearce was taken hostage when a patient became hostile, trying to leave the ward. she became quite distressed and broke an item in her room, which was, in hindsight, plastic. i knew it was plastic because a part of it ended up next to my neck as she frog—marched me out of the ward. shelley did escape unharmed but says no one noticed she was missing and despite her reporting what happened, it wasn't logged properly. her account is by no means isolated. according to a recent staff survey, over 15% of nhs workers experienced violence in the last 12 months. that's the highest figure in five years. from next month, the maximum prison
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sentence for assaulting an emergency service worker will double from six months to a year, in england and wales, bringing them in line with scotland. the union unison is welcoming plans for a zero—tolerance approach to violence against staff. later, the health secretary will announce better training and support, a new monitoring system, and fast—tracked prosecution for offenders, to try and protect those who face violence and agression like this every day. lauren moss, bbc news. president trump has visited pittsburgh where 11 worshippers at a synagogue were killed by a gunman on saturday. some local politicians and religious leaders had urged mr trump to stay away, accusing him of stoking extremism and intolerance at campaign rallies. here's our north america editor, jon sopel. awaiting donald trump's arrival, members of pittsburgh's jewish
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community gathered outside the tree of life synagogue. the president flew into pittsburgh accompanied by the first lady, but also his daughter, ivanka, who converted tojudaism when she married her orthodoxjewish partnerjared kushner. they first went to the synagogue where the 11 worshippers were gunned down and in the entrance, lit a candle for each of the 11 victims. next, they came outside to lay a small pebble from the white house grounds and white roses at each of the stars for the victims. the rabbi of the synagogue welcomed the president. as did many in the community. but not the group bend the arc. he has victimised immigrants. he has victimised refugees, he has victimised mexicans, muslims, lgbt community, women, people with disabilities — the list goes on and on. we cannot stand idly by. police radio: shots fired, shots fired! there are terrible stories of tragedy from saturday's shooting, incredible stories of bravery
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and luck, too. judah samet survived because he arrived late and was parking his car when he heard the gunfire. the second narrow escape of his life. in 1945, as a small child, he was on a train heading to a nazi concentration camp when it was liberated by the allies. it never stops, at least for me and my family. it never stops, itjust keeps going. but we are survivors. you know, i'm 80 years old. i told my daughter that i am ready, whenever. you know, i'm not afraid of death. today, the first funerals were held for three of the congregants who were gunned down on saturday — two brothers and a local doctor. families mourning loss, a city in grief and a country wondering where it is heading. jon sopel, bbc news, pittsburgh. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in 1986 are to continue searching a garden in the west midlands.
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the house in sutton coldfield used to belong to the mother of a convicted murderer, john cannan. he's suspected of killing ms lamplugh but has never been charged. our correspondent, jon ironmonger, is outside the house where the search is set to continue. good morning. yes, the police search tea m good morning. yes, the police search team has just arrived good morning. yes, the police search team hasjust arrived in good morning. yes, the police search team has just arrived in the good morning. yes, the police search team hasjust arrived in the past few moments and has driven along the path. you may be able to see at the back of the property, peeping over the fence, a blue forensics tent and thatis the fence, a blue forensics tent and that is where the vast majority of the work is being carried out. police are searching the rear garden. they searched it 15 years ago but that owner told us yesterday police are here now and particularly interested in what is underneath a large metal garage. we understand that has been dismantled and workers being carried out to excavate the concrete floor of the garage, the
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inference is that police suspect suzy lamplugh could be buried underneath the floor of the garage. the previous owner of the property, going back 25 years, the mother of john cannan. john cannan is considered to be the prime suspect in suzy lamplugh's disappearance, he has always denied any involvement and is currently serving a jail sentence for the murder of another woman in 1986, her body has never been found. 32 years later, a significant development we seem to be seen here and many people will be eagerly waiting to find out what police can find on the back garden of the property. john, in sutton coldfield, thank you for the update. in the last hour, indonesia's transport minister has ordered the dismissal of lion air's
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technical director after one of their planes crashed on monday. meanwhile, search and rescue workers have detected a large object underwater where the passenger plane with 189 people on board came down. ground staff lost touch with the aircraft shortly after it took off from jakarta. earlier, our correspondent, rebecca henschka, injakarta gave us an update on the investigation. well, in the port area where this rescue operation is taking place, just a short drive from where i am now, divers are out at sea trying to retrieve the main body of the plane. they've said this morning that they believe they have the right co—ordinates and they are getting very close to what they think is the main part of the plane that, of course, has the black box recordings in it. the financial regulator tells us that car and home insurance firms are making thousands of loyal customers pay well over the odds. and rewarding those who take out new
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policies. what are they going to do? we are talking about this loyalty premium, whether or not people are being penalised by staying loyal to firms. citizens advice believe this was going on, the financial regulator has confirmed it is happening. they said earlier on that we could be paying up to 70% more for insurance premiums if we have been with the same insurer for five yea rs. been with the same insurer for five years. the fca says they already working in this area. if you are taking out, renewing car insurance, you get a prompt telling you how much you paid last year and how much you much you paid last year and how much y°u pay much you paid last year and how much you pay when you are new, but they did admit more needs to be done. we need to do more. we do think we need to take a look at whether the rules around this part of the market are right, for the right way to do that is to step back and look at the evidence and that is the work we are launching today. he was refusing to be drawn on the finds, he did not
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say they would go that far, he needs to do more work, discussion paper launched and a big market study —— fnes. that will be disappointing to lots of customers who feel they are being ripped off on this. and other people are getting better deals. he was quick to defend it and said, if we intervene in the market too quickly, we could end up penalising the very people we are trying to get more of, the switchers. the advice from consumer groups is, have a look, switch if you can, but sometimes it is not that easy. look, switch if you can, but sometimes it is not that easym look, switch if you can, but sometimes it is not that easy. it is one thing to say the responsibilities of individuals to phone around, the very people least likely to that are possibly older people, people who have not got access to the internet, and it begins to be a question about whether they are profiteering. there isa whether they are profiteering. there is a cost, they know what the cost is, but they are adding one more money to what you are paying.
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exactly. a similar thing happened in the gas and electric market and they decided to intervene and much clearer rules and regulations now around tariffs, standard variable tariffs, so will we see a similar thing happened in the insurance market and other things that the fca has to look into, things like fixed rate mortgages as well, savings accounts? could we see more rules around renewables, making it more transparent? you are right, it is the most vulnerable customers who end up being screwed over by this. thank you, victoria. something we will continue to follow on breakfast as will continue to follow on breakfast as well. the rest of the day's news now. . . two boys have been arrested over a hit—and—run during a police pursuit which left a toddler fighting for his life. three—year—old leo durrington was knocked down by a van which had been reported stolen, in greater manchester yesterday morning. the youngsters being questioned are 15 and 16 years old. leo is critically ill in hospital. he'd been given first aid by officers who stopped at the scene.
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11 people are now known to have died in italy as storms batter the country, leaving roads blocked and thousands without power. in venice, officials say 70% of the city has been flooded. the water level in central st mark's square peaked at more than 1.5m for only the fifth time on record. those are the main stories. we will have the sport and the weather coming up shortly. returning to a story we have talked about over the last few months on breakfast. from tomorrow, doctors in the uk will for the first time be allowed to legally prescribe medicinal cannabis oil for some patients. the change in the law came about following a number of high profile cases of children who had benefitted from its use. one of them was seven—year—old alfie dingley, and his mum hannah's fight has been instrumental in the change to the law. this is their story. where are you going today? are you going to school?
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alfie is seven and has been suffering from severe epileptic seizures since he was eight months old. at his worst, he was having up to 150 a month. you just hope and hope and hope that it will stop, but it doesn't. itjust comes and it reminds you that it won't stop. so, anyway... but we have to keep hoping, i suppose, and keep fighting. but i do feel really like i've had enough. in 2017, alfie went to the netherlands so he could take part in a cannabis oil trial. it's frightening. it's, you know... everyone speaks english and everyone's really nice, but it's still a massive thing for us to do. when alfie's in hospital or ill at home, we are used to having a lot of support and we haven't got that, so that's. .. you know, it's difficult. but we will get there. sorry. we will get there. his seizures went down to just one a month, but after coming home, he quickly became unwell again. now, after a long campaign by his family, from the 1st of november,
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doctors will be legally allowed to prescribe cannabis oil to patients. we are just over the moon. absolutely over the moon for alfie and over the moon that there's going to be many, many other people in this country benefiting from the fact that this licence has been issued. # hello, hello # how are you? what a great way to end that! hannah deaconjoins us now, along with professor mike barnes, who helped hannah with her campaign. we last saw you in july. just watching that back brought tears to your eyes. incredibly emotional. that is real. i am sorry. it is ok. i watch those films back sometimes to remind myself how bad it was and it was really bad and that is what. .. my work as
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it was really bad and that is what... my work as an ambassador, i am supporting families going through the same thing. i'm so passionate about it because this is real, this suffering for us and for many families across the country is real and it is so hard to watch your child suffer like that. it is an amazing thing that has been achieved. can you bring us right up to date now? how are things now? he is amazingly well. he is a cheeky seven—year—old little boy. he has some issues of course. he has been very seriously ill for many years, lots of medication given to him that did not work that may have damaged him, possibly. lots of seizures. we have our issues. but in the main, he has a wonderfully normal life, he goes to school everyday, learning to ride a bike, learning to ride a horse, called henry, he loves it. to have that change in his life, it is
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so have that change in his life, it is so amazing. so amazing. that is why iamso so amazing. so amazing. that is why i am so passionate about it because there are many, many people up and down this country with children who are seriously ill, with refractory epilepsy, who should have access to this medicine from thursday but u nfortu nately, we this medicine from thursday but unfortunately, we are getting lots of feedback to say doctors are not going to be prescribing this medication from thursday which is why i am still sat here campaigning. let us pick up on that thought. doctor mike barnes, why would it be, hannah is saying already do people saying doctors are reluctant, even though things in theory have changed? though things in theory have changed ? what though things in theory have changed? what is the problem? the problem is doctors have not been taught about cannabis or the brain's cannabis system so understandably they are reluctant to prescribe it, they are reluctant to prescribe it, they do not know what to prescribe, what dose. the priority now is educating doctors and on monday we are launching a medical cannabis
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society for doctors and a training programme for doctors call the academy of medical cannabis and we hope slowly but surely doctors will be able to feel more confident about prescribing cannabis. i am afraid it will not happen on thursday. there will not happen on thursday. there will be quite a long process of getting doctors more confident to help all the many thousands of people who will come to them asking the cannabis in the coming weeks.|j know you have been working with hannah and family for many years on this. give us a sense how much difference you seem medicinal —— you seem difference you seem medicinal —— you seem medicinal cannabis making?‘ lot of conditions can be helped by cannabis, particularly chronic pain, but for children with epilepsy, from several hundred seizures a month to some of them no seizures, and improvement in behaviour and ability to learn. for some children, the change is really astonishing. in virtually all children, there is a
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very positive change, particularly when you stop the other anti—convulsa nts that have when you stop the other anti—convulsants that have so many side—effects. it can be quite remarkable. as you will know from your personal experience, hannah, i am trying to picture the scene, and other parent possibly in the situation you were in, going to the gp, the reluctance possibly... but is going to be hugely frustrating, even though you know it can be done. i get quite upset about it. gps will not be allowed, only specialist doctors. i have a family who i am supporting who have been in london forfour supporting who have been in london for four weeks with their daughter seizing in hospital, the doctors are very good and very supportive, but i feel at the moment there are doctors that want to do this but the trusts are not allowing them because the education and guidance has not been released by the department of health. i speak to these mothers every day and they are desperate to
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help their children and i know some doctors are desperate to help but without the guidance and adjudication from the department of health, they are stuck. there are a big group of doctors who do not want to do it —— guidance and education. the department of health must take this and carry through the home secretary's vision. one of the issues, the government is insisting you will don't pave the way the recreational use of cannabis. what do you say to those who say it could bea do you say to those who say it could be a factor? it is medicinal cannabis, not recreational cannabis. recreational cannabis is a social and political issue and it is a debate we should have in the coming years perhaps, but we should not mix the two up. recreational cannabis generally be slightly higher in the psychoactive part of cannabis, thc, thatis psychoactive part of cannabis, thc, that is the part that causes and some people mental health issues. medicinal cannabis generally we are not talking about those sorts of issues, it is a different compound,
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they say the compound and one that should be used for the benefit of many tens of thousands of people. we should not mix the two together. looking at the risk benefits of anti—epileptic and steroids might son was on, they did not work for him, nearly 30 doses of intravenous steroids and month, it dendrologist said, if you carry on, he will die. i had to do something, i had to save his life —— the neurologist said. there was a risk benefit to every medication you give. i would rather my son be on a very small dose of thc and cbd and have the life he has now. some of the other drugs, they might be license, but they did not help him, they damaged him. our work is alfie of everything? he is not aware of anything. —— how aware is alfie of everything? i said last
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night, money is going to work, i never went to work before, i was a full—time carer, i tell my daughter, she is for, i talk to her about alfie's epilepsy, she does not really understand, but i tell him, i'm going to talk about you and the medicine that helped save your life. 0k, medicine that helped save your life. ok, mummy. have a nice time. he does not really get it. i feel so proud of the part we have played in all of this, just amazing. i want to thank all the people in the political world who have supported us and help to get the legislation through and let us hope in the coming months that people will really be benefiting from this. lovely to see. july we last saw you. things were so different. thank you for coming back. thank you your time as well. carol is at brompton cemetery for us. rather beautiful. it is indeed. it
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is beautiful here in brompton cemetery. some very interesting things, behind me, these gates, various symbols on the gates, the two i want to pick out, the lanterns upside down in the middle, that symbolises life being extinguished. underneath, the circle close to the bottom of the gates, the serpent eating its own tail, one of the symbols for everlasting life. if we come up, you can symbols for everlasting life. if we come up, you can see symbols for everlasting life. if we come up, you can see the pillars, arches, and underneath, the catacombs. 500 of the plots have been used but there was the potential for a 2000—3000 and they go away —— go around the cemetery. vc holder single—handedly took down the zeppelin in world war i is buried here. he sadly perished in an
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airshow in paris. buried here. he sadly perished in an air show in paris. lots of trees and wildlife as well, 200 different species of months. it has been a cold start to the date, notjust in london but across many parts of the uk. a widespread frost as temperatures in some areas fell to -6, temperatures in some areas fell to —6, quite bracing. today for many it will be very dry and in the south mild, but in the north and west, showery outbreaks of rain. you can see why on the pressure chart, a couple of fronts moving in from the nest meat west, heading east and north. for the rest of the country, quite quiet —— from the west. from the english channel, drifting north, they will clear, and a fair bit of sunshine for most of the uk. the sunshine for most of the uk. the sunshine will turn hazy as the weather fronts approach. as they move from the west to the east, the showers will go with them. showers so showers will go with them. showers so not all of us will see them. no heat wave, eight in the north, 13 in
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the south. as we move through this evening and overnight, the funds coming in colour light and form —— the fronts coming in combine. and they form one. we could see mist and fog patches and frost in northern ireland and south—west scotland in particular. tomorrow we start off with the two distinctive weather fronts but they collide and move off collectively into the north sea taking the rain with them, leaving behind a largely dry date with sunshine but a peppering of showers in the north and west. temperatures again nothing to write home about, single figures in scotland and northern ireland in northern england and double figures for the rest of england and wales. friday, starting off on england and wales. friday, starting offona england and wales. friday, starting off on a cold note once again. a lot off on a cold note once again. a lot of dry weather around, the calm before the storm. that cloud will increase in the west, the wind will
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pick up and the rain will arrive. this is down to an area of low pressure, deep low pressure in the atlantic, and embedded in this, the re m na nts of atlantic, and embedded in this, the remnants of ex—hurricane oscar. overnight into saturday, the north—west of the uk in particular will have scales, even severe gales, heavy rain. the wind is southerly so temperatures will rise to above average “— temperatures will rise to above average —— the north—west of the uk in particular will have gales. in the last hour, indonesia's transport minister has ordered the dismissal of lion air's technical director after one of the firm's planes crashed shortly after take off on monday. search and rescue workers have detected a large object underwater where the passenger plane with 189 people on board came down. our correspondent, rebecca henschka, is is injakarta for us this morning. rebecca henschka, is is injakarta quite rebecca henschka, is is injakarta a few developml wa nt quite a few developments. do you wa nt to quite a few developments. do you want to pick up first on the announcement from the transport
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minister, this addresses wider issues about air safety? many questions being asked. that is right. there are many questions on this move was an order by the transport ministry after meeting with lion air. they have ordered the grounding of all lion air flights and a full inspection of the type of plane that crashed, the boeing 737, a new plane, very new plane that crashed, they have ordered a full inspection of all of the lion air planes and the state airline. they have also said a fuller investigation is taking place now. but for now, that is the sanctions they have handed out. and just on they have handed out. and just on the investigation itself, what is the investigation itself, what is the latest? the cruise out in the port from where i am —— the crews.
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they are still searching for the main part of the plane, getting closer, they have detected an object they think is the main part of the plane holding the black box recordings that will give them more detail about exactly what went wrong. the plane crashed in daylight and in good weather. for the moment, thank you very much. you are watching bbc breakfast. we will be talking about the great british bake off in the next half an hour. early warning. spoiler alert. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. rain heavy for northern and western
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areas of wales. lots of it sitting out towards the irish sea. for a good deal of us, it will be dry and fairly bright with the temperatures getting up to 13. tonight, rain across the west and another batch of rain spreading into south—eastern areas into thursday morning. the other rain band moves and merges together. clear spells in the west but not as cold as last night. temperatures staying foremost above freezing. what started thursday in eastern areas, rain clearing the way and lots of dry and bright weather, sunshine developing on thursday. especially towards the north and the west. temperatures again eight, 12, 13. the ridge of high pressure set in
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for friday. it will be quite cold and quite chilly start for the day with frost around. but plenty of sunshine. light rain, but fairly pleasant. temperatures down a bit on friday despite that sunshine. about 10-12d. into friday despite that sunshine. about 10—12d. into the week that rain moves in and so it is quite a wet and windy weekend for many of us, particularly on saturday. temperatures about 14 or 15. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and maryam moshiri.
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facebook reveals disappointing user numbers and ad sales but mark zuckerberg says new growth is around the corner. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 31st october mark zuckerberg has attempted to shrug off facebook‘s underwhelming results — saying ad sales will catch up with changes in user behaviour. we'll look at his strategy to get growth back on track. also in the programme... australia ratifies the massive trans—pacific partnership deal, paving the way for it to come into force in december.

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